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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 13, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. american actress rose mcgowan becomes the fourth woman to publicly accuse holywood producer harvey weinstein of rape. but oscar—winning director, oliver stone warns against a trial against a trial by media. are i believe a man should not be condemned by a vigilante system. it's not easy what he is going through, on the other hand. "the end of modern medicine" — england's chief medical officer urges global leaders to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. we will risk losing antibiotics and they underpin modern medicine. not just when we have infections but also cancer treatment, transplantation... the trump administration unveils a new strategy against iran,
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aimed at confronting what it calls tehran‘s aggression and preventing it from acquiring nuclear weapons. her uber launches its appeal against london transport‘s decision can keep using the app for now — also this hour: more than 30 people have died and hundreds more are missing as wildfires sweep through parts of northern california. windy conditions hamper the work of thousands of firefighters as officials warn conditions could worsen this evening. and booker‘s best — we'll speak to short listed author ali smith on her novel autumn, partly set around last year's eu referendum. my world change when the eu referendum happened. so i went with it and the book, to some extent, is about the surface reaction. good morning, it's friday 13th october.
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i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. more public figures have spoken out against hollywood producer harvey weinstein in a sexual allegation scandal that's dominating hollwood. actress rose mcgowan has become the fourth person to allege she was raped by the hollywood mogul. in a series of tweets, mcgowan also accused amazon's studio chief of having ignored her when she made the allegation to him. yesterday she tweeted the head of amazon jeff bezos. .. amazon said in a statement... a spokeswoman for
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harvey weinstein said... any allegations of nonconsensual sex are unequivocally denied by mr weinstein. the oscar—winning director, oliver stone, has accused the film industry and the public of prematurelyjudging mr weinstein. i'm a believer in, you wait for this link to get to a trial, if he broke the law, it will come out, there will be a trial and believe a man should not be condemned by vigilante system. so it's not easy what he's going through. here friends of the tv personality myleene klass say she was sexually harassed by mr weinstein and last night actress kate beckinsale said he propositioned her when she wasjust i7. scotland yard say they are investigating a claim of sexual assault by the producer on an actress in london back in the 1980s.
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meanwhile british film—maker stephen woolley said "everyone should have joined the dots up" over the hollywood producer's actions. there is a certain amount of shame attached to this. as i said, we should join the dots, we didn't realise that what was happening to that person, we had laughed it off, was also happening to another person and another person and another person. what is shocking, in the last week or so, what is truly shocking, is the amount of people coming forward. i'm afraid to say that this has been prevalent in our industry. actress emma thompson says it is endemic in hollywood. industry. actress emma thompson says it is endemic in hollywoodlj industry. actress emma thompson says it is endemic in hollywood. i didn't know about these things but they don't surprise me at all and are endemic to the system anyway. what a find sort of extraordinary is, this man is at the top of a very particular iceberg. i don't think
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you can described him as a sex addict, he is a predator. he is at the top, at the ladder of a system of harassment, and belittling, and bullying and interference and what my mother would have referred to as the olden days as pestering. is he pestering you? the olden days as pestering. is he pestering you 7 that's the olden days as pestering. is he pestering you? that's the word were used in the old days as you recall. this is an part of women's world since time immemorial. what we need to start talking about is the crisis in masculinity, the crisis in extreme masculinity which is this sort of behaviour, where it is not sort of behaviour, where it is not sort of behaviour, where it is not sort of ok but it is also represented by the most powerful man in the world at the moment. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba joins me now. so many allegations, a growing number each day. let's talk about
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the allegations made by rose mcgowan, the actress, she said she was ignored by amazon studios and they put the head of studios on leave of absence immediately, talk to us about the implications of that. this is rory price, the head of studios, he rose mcgowan said on social media ignored her when she said harvey weinstein had raped her, he separately is facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behaviour from a female producer who worked on an amazon show, the man in the high castle. amazon is becoming a big player in the film and tv world, if you remember the grand tour, jeremy clarkson at owl went to work for them when they left the bbc, last year but i could just actor casey affleck, they are moving into the big world of tv and broadcast. this
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isa big world of tv and broadcast. this is a difficult time for them as they hope to expand into the hollywood arena and accept that roy price is ona arena and accept that roy price is on a leave of absence while a investigation is carried out. we assume. an interesting intervention by oliver stone who moves in the same circles, he is talking about things like trial by media but if it hadn't been for the media, these allegations may not have come to light. it's a tricky situation. i assume the point he is trying to make is let's actually wait and see how all this pans out rather than leaping immediately to conclusions. but i think many people believe the situation is hollywood —— in hollywood and harvey weinstein in particular was such an open secret that actually it is not an over reaction for many to be talking the way they are at the moment. look at what is happening, he has been suspended by baxter, the british academy, the oscars —— bafta, the
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oscars are holding an emergency meeting over the weekend. it's a tricky time for them because for some people, they do not have a great track record in this area. for instance, bill cosby who has had accusations of sexual impropriety, roman polanski who pled guilty to child rape many years ago, they are both still members of the academy in hollywood. it is harvey weinstein is kicked out of the academy also standard, people will say is this double standard ? are standard, people will say is this double standard? are the academy reacting to public pressure rather than doing what is right? do we know more about the police investigations? harvey weinstein himself is said to be in therapy in arizona? that i investigations on both sides of the atlantic. in new york where allegations have been
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made earlier this week, merseyside police the an allegation that has been made by an individual to them to the metropolitan police, the allegation took place in london in the 1980s, for investigation. those investigations are under way, presumably weinstein will be questioned about this but there is a long way to go. breaking news coming from the court of appeal wherejudges breaking news coming from the court of appeal where judges have breaking news coming from the court of appeal wherejudges have ruled an islamic faith schools policy of segregating boys and girls is unlawful sex discrimination. this relates to a school in birmingham and a high courtjudge ruled last november that ofsted inspectors were wrong to penalise the school on the basis of what the judge called an erroneous view that segregation amounted to unlawful discrimination that ofsted appealed that decision and today the court of appealjudges
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have ruled that an islamic faith schools policy of separating boys and girls is unlawful sex determination. the court is backing ofsted's view, the case is seen as raising fundamental questions over pupils being taught british values. thejudgment coming pupils being taught british values. the judgment coming into pupils being taught british values. thejudgment coming into us, more detail on that very soon. england's chief medical officer has urged global leaders to address the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. professor dame sally davies has warned that in the future routine operations could become incredibly "risky" and transplant medicine would be a "thing of the past." our correspondent adina campbell has this report. with infectious diseases becoming increasingly difficult to treat, the fight against bacteria is essential. for decades, we've relied on antibiotics to prevent and treat infection. a bedrock of modern medicine. but now there's a new warning that the drugs we often turn
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to to protect us could become less effective due to drug—resista nt infections. it is estimated 700,000 people around the world die every year from tried resistant infection such as tuberculosis, hiv and malaria. it's estimated 700,000 people around the world die every year from drug—resistant infections such as tuberculosis, hiv, and malaria. without antibiotics, it's feared common medical procedures such as cesarean sections, cancer treatments, and hip replacements would become too risky. the uk government and the wellcome trust, a global charity that supports scientists and researchers, have now organised a meeting for health experts around the world. it's as a new project is announced to map the spread and disease caused by superbugs. if no action is taken, it is estimated the drug resistant infections will kill 10 million people every year by 2050.
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the taxi app, uber has filed an appeal at westminster magistrates' court to overturn a decision by london's transport regulator, which stripped its operating licence in one of its most important foreign markets. rory, you mentioned the last meeting between tefl and hooper was last week. hooper has been saying that they perhaps wanted to reassess its approach after the band but it's pretty inevitable wasn't it, that this would get to lima could not get sorted out before going to court. we've been waiting for this. it was inevitable. they were pushing their legal case together, they were never likely in one meeting to come to some deal with tefl. both sides
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thought that would be too quick. the new chief executive came over from the united states, had a meeting with transport for london, and both sides describe that as constructive. it was never going to happen in a big hurry. i'm just it was never going to happen in a big hurry. i'mjust printing something off the printer behind me, with just had this statement from newburgh, perhaps you could take that from us. —— statement from uber. it they said they want to have constructive talks with transport for london, and want to make things right. that is an indicator of a different tone. the original founder of uber was a hard—charging, belligerent kind of executive, he went round the world really not worrying too much if he offended regulators, and taxi drivers. the new man has come in very much trying
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to change the image of the company. he said we are sorry, we need to get things right. changing the image and the tone, thinking about the public facing aspect of birth. —— public facing aspect of birth. —— public facing aspect of uber. in terms of the change of transport for london wa nt to the change of transport for london want to see, are we seeing signs those will happen? it all depends on the kind of mechanics of the process of registering drivers and making sure the safety checks are done. uber has flying back at transport for london saying they are responsible for those checks and we are doing our best to get there. transport for london and a great deal of pressure politically from the london taxi drivers who saw this asa the london taxi drivers who saw this as a great victory and are telling transport for london and the mayor sadiq khan, this. the headlines on bbc newsroom live.
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american actress rose mcgowan becomes the fourth woman to publicly accuse holywood producer harvey weinstein. "the end of modern medicine" — england's chief medical officer urges global leaders to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. the trump administration unveils a new strategy against iran, aimed at confronting what it calls tehran's aggression and preventing it from acquiring nuclear weapons. in sport, new plans for test cricket to make it more appealing for fans. the icc has given the green light to a one—day international league. glasgow women claim agonisingly close to a comeback in the champions league. manchester city also join chelsea with a 6—0 lead. and a plea
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for manchester united's wind the matter. they are hoping to donate i% of the money to, and discussing what that would do for those who need it. the president of the european commission jean—claude juncker has said that the brexit process is taking longer than expected. said the brexit process will take "longer than initially thought", blaming delays on britain's failure to settle its financial obligations. he went onto say that ‘britain has to pay‘ and because that has not been resolved the eu could not recommend moving onto the next stage in negotiations. we saw the issue of the divorce bill was one of the thorniest. these comments to listen jean—claude juncker talking to students, he is
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showing his frustration with this? the president of the commission which is the bit of the eu institution which is running the brexit talks on a day to day basis, he is laying out the main thing is frustrating the eu side in the brexit process. the first being citizens' rights. he said there were still wrangling over rights of eu citizens in brexit and they said this should be sorted out in an easy way, writes joe acquired over living in the eu. he likes analogies and he said it was likes analogies and he said it was like being in a barand buying 28 beers, then colleagues disappearing without paying. your colleague has to pay, in other words, the uk has
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the pay. i don't think you are stressing theresa may comes with a suitcase of money and that unlocks the trade talks, he talks about the british recognising the financial obligations that they entered into when they were members of the eu, and whether those obligations can extend beyond the membership of the eu. theresa may has said the uk government recognises their obligations that the eu wants britain to write down, make commitments on paper about what they are willing to pay for. that is thought to help unlock the talks, getting off divorce issues and on to phase two, about trade and the future of the relationship. the trump administration has unveiled a new strategy against iran, aimed at confronting what it calls tehran's aggression and preventing it from acquiring nuclear weapons. the move to decertify will not withdraw the us from the accord; but it will give congress 60 days to decide whether to do so by re—imposing economic sanctions. joining me now is our diplomatic correspondent jonathan marcus.
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donald trump likes to talk about deals. he has called this accord the worst deal that iran isn't living up to the spirit of the agreement. so what could these actions from the us mean? essentially, it's going to be a two fold policy, one is to double down on the deal, to enforce it is more strictly, and we will have kuwait see precisely how the us to do that. —— have and see. the other pa rt do that. —— have and see. the other part as you say is to get tough on iran more generally because of what the americans see as bad behaviour in the region. its supporting the assad regime in syria and rebels in yemen, destabilising the gulf region as americans were generally, hostility to israel and more. it is
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not clear what they are going to do, providing ballistic missile defences to their allies, talking about more sanctions to the iranian revolutionary guard corps, and with all the discussion about sanctions, thatis all the discussion about sanctions, that is about nuclear related sanctions, that i whole host of other sanctions on terrorism related matters the most human right matters, those have always been in force. it's not entirely clear how far new sanctions under those headings will bring additional pressure to bear on iran. we have had a response from iran. the iranians are not happy, but it will be interesting because the great danger here is that the americans by lighting a fuse under the nuclear agreement, we don't know if that bomb will eventually explode or the fuse all just spot bomb will eventually explode or the fuse alljust spot on, there are leaving iranians with the moral high ground. iranians are likely to stick with the deal and trump came to
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office, the iranians have stuck to the letter of the agreement insisting that they do not want to be the ones to bulldoze it away. briefly, donald trump has not had much success with getting his plans through congress. this plan to decertify the accord would give congress 60 days to decide whether or not to impose economic sanctions. do you think you would get ' backing? we don't yet know if the administration wants to actively encourage congress to reimpose the nuclear related sanctions that were waived under the agreement. it's going to be interesting. the balance on capitol hill is probably to see the agreement continue in existence at least for now. it isn't the
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decertification and that brings america out of the treaty in effect, his act is the reimposition of the nuclear related sanctions. congress has 60 days to look at it again, a lot will depend on what the president asked for, what he advises congress to do. there are some indications that he may not actually wa nt to indications that he may not actually want to see the sanctions reimpose for now, hejust want to see the sanctions reimpose for now, he just wants to see the agreement enforced possibly as he sees it, and measures to constrain iran's regional. we've had some reaction from the prime minister to those comments from the head of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, with our reporter in brussels. let me remind you what he said in a speech to students. this was in relation to britain's divorce bill for brexit. he said they have to pay, not in an impossible way, i'm
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not ina pay, not in an impossible way, i'm not in a revenge movie, not hating the british but now they have to pgy- the british but now they have to pay- "— the british but now they have to pay. —— not in a prevent mood. a spokesperson for theresa may says she has made her position on the brexit financial settlement clare in her florence speech, that is from theresa may's spokeswoman. another line coming from the spokesperson for the prime minister who is making it now she has full confidence in the chancellor philip hammond. that is after a number of people calling for philip hammond to be sacked in relation to his comments saying there will be extra money for planning for no deal. on brexit. some other breaking news just coming in relating to the partially exploded device at parsons green underground station, the teenager accused of placing the bomb will stand trial next year. in a brief
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hearing at the old bailey, ahmed hassan who was 18, is told his trial would begin in march. attempted murder and attempted cause injury. that trial will begin in early march next year. the number of dead from the wildfires still raging through the wine country of northern california has risen to 31. fire officials say hundreds of people are missing in what is now the worst fire in the state's history. the winds hampering firefighters' efforts have now died down, but there's concern they may pick up again at the weekend. dave lee reports from california. more than four days on and still, it burns. there are 8,000 firefighters battling to contain more than 20 huge fires. even prison inmates here have been called upon to help. but efforts remain at the mercy of the winds, predicted to get worse
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as the weekend comes around. this is what remains of coffey park, a community in the city of santa rosa which was particularly badly hit. it's been several days now since fires rolled through here but there is a thick smell of ash in the air and there are still some small fires burning. the only people who pass through right now are fire crews and the odd police car on the lookout for looters who, unbelievably, think they can find something of value in this mess. now, the investigation has begun into how and why this fire caused so much damage. and their responsibility is, you know, to begin trying to assess potential cause and how the fire evolved, spread, so that's ongoing as we speak. residents have been supportive of the response from the emergency services. at a community meeting, each official was applauded. they're doing a greatjob.
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you know, it's difficult to, you know, realise the encompass — you know, how big the fire is. i felt really safe here, right on the first street — i could hear every siren that came by. officials have begun releasing some details about the victims. so far, the average age of the dead is 70. and so, amidst the appreciation of the emergency response, there are some pressing questions. why was an emergency text alert system not used to warn people of the danger? and could a weak power line falling over have been the spark that set off this tragedy? investigators told us they're looking at that theory very closely. dave lee, bbc news in northern california. more on the breaking story coming to us more on the breaking story coming to us from the court of appeal. it has ruled that an islamic faith schools policy of segregating boys and girls
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is unlawful sex discrimination. the school had previously been penalised for there. clive, take us through thejudgment. for there. clive, take us through the judgment. this is a significant judgment because this is an appeal by the chief inspector of ofsted, we will talk to her in a moment, against a ruling by a will talk to her in a moment, againsta ruling bya high will talk to her in a moment, against a ruling by a high court judge originally, ofsted had come to the view that the policy of this school in birmingham has, it admits children from 4—16, from year five when they are around ten years old. they are completely segregated for everything, classes, after—school clu bs, everything, classes, after—school clubs, school trips and so forth. ofsted concluded that that amounts to an unlawful discrimination. a high courtjudge to an unlawful discrimination. a high court judge found to an unlawful discrimination. a high courtjudge found against and
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ofsted appealed to the court of appeal and unanimously, this morning the court of appeal found this policy amounts to unlawful discrimination, contrary to the equality act. they found the policy discriminated against both boys and girls. the court by a majority, rejected and often argument that it disadvantages girls more than boys. but the court eventually scull effectively said that parliament never intended schools with boys and girls to have segregation. this is a significant ruling because ofsted will now take this ruling and have do look at schools across the country. i'm joined by caroline joanna trip joanna who country. i'm joined by caroline joanna who is the chief, you must be happy you want? this is a good day for girls happy you want? this is a good day forgirls and
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happy you want? this is a good day for girls and boys. the court found this school, that any school that this school, that any school the school was at pains to say it was a religious motive, but whatever the motive is, it is unlawful. the argument was that separate but equal treatment could not about to dissemination, against either sex, we have established very clearly that it does. that neither discrimination against either sex. the of—— of —— discrimination against either sex. the practice amounts to discrimination. what is the harm caused by having a policy like this in school? girls and boys are not learning in this school to socialise with each other, to work with the opposite sex in later stages of education or adult life, and are not properly prepared for life in modern
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britain. you indicated during the hearing itself but if you were successful, this would be applied across the country. just give a sense of the number of schools you have to look at, and what you will do? we think the number of schools is in the low 205. the copy ap5ley i5 is in the low 205. the copy ap5ley is certain because 5chool5 open and close, and we haven't checked every 5chool. close, and we haven't checked every school. we will discuss with the department of education to register 5chool5, giving 5chool5 timed to regulari5e their arrangements, we have to make sure as the different point5 have to make sure as the different points out, to be fair to schools and we will be, but nevertheless we wa nt and we will be, but nevertheless we want to see this important principle i5 want to see this important principle is reflected promptly. this is a very, very clear signal from the court of appeal that in a co educational school any policy that segregates girls from boys is unlawful and it is unlawful discrimination and it won't be
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allowed. clive, thank you very much. an angler in bournemouth has had a lucky escape, afterjoking around with a dover sole he caught. the man had put the five—and—a—half inch fish over his mouth, but it managed to wriggle free and jump down his throat. a paramedic, who removed the fish using forceps, said he'd never attended a more bizarre incident, and didn't think he ever would again. it took four or five attempts to get the fish to pull away and pull it forward and i pulled it out of the mouth. but i was very concerned that ifi mouth. but i was very concerned that if i broke part of the fin or part of the end of the tail, at the time i saw one centimetre of tail fin and i realised if i pulled too hard, thenit i realised if i pulled too hard, then it is likely that the fish would have went further down into the trachea and ijust couldn't have done anything about that.
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that must rank as matt's most unusual case. it is time for the weather forecast and simon unusual case. it is time for the weatherforecast and simon king has the latest. we have got a wet day across scotla nd we have got a wet day across scotland and northern ireland. we will continue to see the rain through the course of the afternoon. it will be heavy at times as well, but away from these areas, we will see that rain clearing away from the far north of scotland and clearing away from northern ireland down towards the south and the east. one or two showers. a few breaks developing to give us sin shine. breezy, but warm really. temperatures despite the cloud and the rain about 17 to 19 celsius. through tonight, it will continue to be quite damp and drizzly across wales and northern parts of england. cloudy skies and it will be exceptionally mild. temperatures for some, not going below 16 or 17 celsius and that warm weather will
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continue throughout saturday, still outbreaks of rain across wales and northern parts of england, but sunny spells before rain moves in here. elsewhere, there is brighter skies into the afternoon and feeling warm. those temperatures up into the low 20s. those temperatures up into the low 205. i those temperatures up into the low 20s. i will see you later. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the actress, rose mcgowan, has become the fourth woman to publicly accuse harvey weinstein of rape. ms mcgowan, had previously said the hollywood producer had sexually harassed her. england's chief medical officer has called for a worldwide attempt to limit use of antibiotics. dame sally davies warned that many more people would die if the drugs lost their effectiveness. donald trump has unveiled a new strategy against iran, aimed at confronting what it calls tehran's aggression and preventing it from acquiring nuclear weapons. uber has filed an appeal against the decision by london authorities to deny it a licence
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to operate in london. tfl said it took the decision last month on the grounds of "public safety and security implications". it's time for the sports. the sport. holly has the latest. there's to be a major revamp of test cricket, in plans aimed at making it more appealing to fans who are increasingly turning towards the shorter form of the game. england will take part in a test world championship after the sport's governing body, the icc, gave the go—ahead for a nine—team, two—year series to begin in 2019. there will also be a 13—team one—day international league, which will lead to direct qualification to the world cup. and there'll be a trial of four—day test matches. speculation is already mounting over who will takeover as scotland manager, even a former england boss is being touted as one of the favourites. gordon strachan left the post yesterday, four days after the team failed to qualify for the world cup.
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david moyes and malky mckay have been tipped for the post, but sam allardyce has also been mentioned as a possible candidate. whoever it is won't have an easy task, the last boss to take the scotland to a world cup was craig brown back in 1998. how many times in sport, you climb to the top of the mountain, butjust as you think you're there, you fall at the final hurdle. glasgow women had done the hard bit in, just about pulling off one of the greatest comebacks in champions league history, scoring four goals, to turn their tie around and draw level against kazygort of kazakhstan. they then needed to score a penalty to reach the last 16, but it struck the post, and by a whisker they were out. elsewhere though, manchester city joined chelsea in the last 16, with an easy win against austrian side saint polten. world number one rafael nadal is through to the semi—finals of the shanghai masters after his 15th consecutive win. he beat grigor dimitrov in straight sets
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as chases his seventh title this season. he'll face marin cilic in the last four. meanwhile, jamie murray and brazil's bruno soares reached the doubles semi—finals with a win victory over raven klaasen and rajeev ram. there's a big weekend ahead for rugby union fans as the european competitions get going. the champions cup starts tonight, but the second tier challenge cup began yesterday and it didn't go too well for gloucester. they got to the final of this competition last season, but french pau were well ahead at the break. gloucester did recover to earn a losing bonus point but pau finished up 27—21winners. so with only four races to go, ferrari's sebastian vettel is 59 points behind lewis hamilton, but according to one former world champion, he won't be giving up on the champions title just yet. nico rosberg says vettel will need a miracle though but his fellow german is a fighter. it's so difficult for sebastian now with where it is in the championship. lewis is such a
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momentum. everything is going, you know, his direction. winning one race after another. yeah, i mean, it really needs a miracle for sebastian to come back, but he is a fighter and the farary team always come back strong and it will remain interesting. let's see how far he can take it. manchester united'sjuan mata is calling on his fellow players to follow his lead and donate 1% of their earnings to charity. the midfielder spent some time in slums in mumbai before inviting some of the children back to old trafford for a guided tour of the stadium. his charity common goal launched last month and is aimed at changing people's lives around the world through football related projects. in the beginning it's voluntary. so people who want to join, join. the goal is in the future maybe it can be embedded within football. that would be helpful to reach even more
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people if we all do it together. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. holly, thank you very much. an nhs mental health trust has become the first in england to be put in special measures for a second time amid concerns over patient safety. inspectors said services at the trust covering norfolk and suffolk were unsafe due to staff shortages and that it had failed to learn from patient deaths. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. pippa is struggling to come to terms with her son's death last year. 21—year—old henry was detained by police under the mental health act after he was found peering over a bridge. he was taken to hospital at the norfolk and suffolk mental health trust but discharged the next day when he said he was feeling better. five days later henry hanged himself. pippa says the hospital should have realised he was at risk. i feel i've been completely robbed of the future i had
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planned with my son. i will never attend his graduation from university. i will never attend a wedding or see him have grandchildren. the trust said it's saddened when things go wrong and there will be an inquest. hospital inspectors said they were concerned the trust was still not focused on learning from patient deaths. the number of serious incidents was higher. staff shortages meant services were unsafe and some staff had caseloads of 60 to 70 patients. some patients struggle to access crisis care. last year when the trust was taken out of special measures, many patients and families warned it hadn't improved. today questions are being asked about whether inspectors acted too hastily. we took the decision a year ago based on what we found at the time. what we saw then was a service that was improving and our anticipation and hope
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at that time was that it would continue to improve, so we are disappointed. in september, the trust's chief executive announced his retirement. the trust says it has now begun urgent work to address inspectors' concerns. a couple kidnapped by the taliban in afghanistan have been released, after spending five years imprisoned. canadian joshua boyle and his american wife caitlan coleman were freed by pakistani security forces, along with their three young children who were all born in captivity. aleem maqbool reports. over five long years the families of joshua boyle and caitlan coleman had only seen them in a series of videos released by their taliban captors. they really will not settle this until they get what they are demanding. the couple disappeared if
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afghanistan, but they and their three children were freed after being taken no pakistan, joshua finally able to call his mother. it's the first time in five years we got to hear his voice. it was amazing and he told us how much he looked forward to his children were looking forward to meeting their grandparents and that he would see me in grandparents and that he would see meina grandparents and that he would see me in a couple of days. so we are waiting for that. it is believed their hostage—takers waiting for that. it is believed their hostage—ta kers had waiting for that. it is believed their hostage—takers had been demanding the release of taliban prisoners, a demand that was a p pa re ntly prisoners, a demand that was apparently never met before pakistani security forces freed the family. i want to thank the pakistani government and i want to thank pakistan. they worked very ha rd thank pakistan. they worked very hard on this and i believe they are starting to respect the united states again. it's very important. i think a lot of countries are starting to respect the united states of america once again. and the pakistani army praised the way that american agencies worked with them. the success under scores the
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importance of timely intelligence sharing said a statement and pakistan's continued commitment towards fighting this menace. well, while both sides are unusually congratulating themselves on their co—operation, there will be lots of questions asked of the couple that's been freed, about their time in captivity and about what they were doing in afghanistan in the first place? austria is voting in a general election. the frontrunner is from the conservative people's party. the far—right freedom party which is battling the social democrats for second place has its best chance in more than 12 years ofjoining the next coalition government. bethany bell reports. this man is hoping to be austria's next leader. sebastian kurz of the conservative people's party is just 31 years old. he became foreign minister at 27 and now he's surging
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ahead in the polls. i think he's a very good, charismatic politician. i like sebastian kurz because he's really honest and he always says the things that attract the people in my opinion. sebastian kurz has been called the wonder hotshot. his party has been in the doldrums for years, but now there's a new sense of energy, partly because of his carefully cultivated image and partly because of his hard—line against migrants. during the migrant crisis in 2015, austria took in tens of thousands of asylum seekers. at first, sebastian kurz welcomed them, but he soon cracked down, pushing to close the balkan route. not everyone is convinced by him. this election video by the far—right freedom party mocks austrians who believe that sebastian kurz represents a change.
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the freedom party says mr kurz has stolen far—right policies especially on migration, but an alliance between the two parties is possible. mr kurz could choose to form a coalition with the far—right after the election. the social democrats are finding it hard to compete with the shift to the right. the trigger for this movement is definitely migration which is a big concern in our country and it dominates our social issues. people accept more easily the answers which are given by the right when we are working on the subject and our intention is to get the trust of the people and we're still very optimistic. the social democrats are also embroiled in political smear scandal. some say that makes an alliance between mr kurz and the far—right even more likely. let's get more now on one
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of our main stories. england's chief medical officer has renewed her warning about what she's described as a "post—antibiotic apocalypse" saying there has be to a global effort to tackle the crisis. professor dame sally davies said that if antibiotics lost their effectiveness, it would spell "the end of modern medicine". mark enright is a professor of medical microbiology at manchester metropolitan university. thank you forjoining us. when dame sally uses that sort of language, she is not being dramatic, is she? no, ithink she is not being dramatic, is she? no, i think this story has been on the boilfor a no, i think this story has been on the boil for a couple no, i think this story has been on the boilfor a couple years now since we've really found out what a huge problem antibiotics is. we are talking 700,000 unnecessary deaths every year with untreatable infections. so, i was every year with untreatable infections. so, iwas going every year with untreatable infections. so, i was going to ask tu how long until it's too late and commonly treated problems become impossible to treat, but you are saying it is already happening? yes, it is already happening with sub
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types of infections, even something usually easily treatable like gonorrhoea has developed resistance to all antibiotics that we have and there are some types of pneumonia and some types of tb which are untreatable even with the newest antibiotics which are getting a bit old by now. and what are the treatments we take for granted? well, it's not just treatments we take for granted? well, it's notjust bacterial infections, there is viral infections, there is viral infections as well, but antibiotics make things like abdominal surgery, ca esa rea n make things like abdominal surgery, caesarean sections and even cancer chemotherapy, you need antibiotics to fight off possible infections and if you're developing the resistance to everything that we have in terms of therapeutics, it's going to endanger those people. we've heard
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that big pharmaceutical companies aren't really taking the ball and running with this in terms of being quick to look at developing new antibiotics, but are there any governments anywhere who are funding specific programmes toe develop the next generation of antibiotics? specific programmes toe develop the next generation of antibiotic5?|j next generation of antibiotics?” think the pharmaceutical companies, there is some action there and we do need different levrss to push them towards new developments. it is just that antibiotic development is not relatively speaking, it's not worth as much as developing news anti—cancer drugs for example and there is a fear if we did develop new antibiotics that they won't be used, they will be used sparingly so the return won't be so much. we do need new economic levrs there. do you fear that despite the warnings that a lot of people are going to wa ke that a lot of people are going to wake up to this simply too late? yes, i think that is the case. i mean, it's basically creeping
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towards kind of routine things, could be in endangering people's lives when there is no need for it. this is a global problem, we are doing well in the uk in cutting the amount of antibiotics getting into the population, but other countries don't have that type of balance and restriction on antibiotic use. thank you very much. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: further allegations against harvey weinstein. the end of modern medicine — england's chief medical officer urges global leaders to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. uber launches its appeal against london transport‘s decision to strip them of their licence in the capital, meaning londoners can keep using the
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app for now. hello. i'm susannah streeter. in the business news: the eu is to begin preparing for its post—brexit trade negotiations with the uk, while refusing to discuss the matter with the british government. an internal draft document seen by the bbc suggests the 27 european union countries should discuss trade among themselves while officials in brussels prepare the details. it comes as the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, said there was "deadlock" over the uk's brexit bill. the uk economy grew at a muted rate in the third quarter of 2017 despite progress in the manufacturing sector and an improvement in export sales and orders. the british chambers of commerce said services and domestic sales and orders remained static and many uk businesses faced worsening recruitment difficulties. more on this in a moment. low—income tenants are now spending an average of 28% of their wages on rent, up from 21% in the mid—1990s, according to the
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institute for fiscal studies. over the same period, the proportion of people renting homes privately has increased from 8% to 19% — whilst average private rents have gone up 33%. the ifs says renters have been hit by substantial cuts to housing benefit, with government support expected to fall further behind the cost of housing. there quarters of manufacturers experienced difficulty in hiring. recruitment problems rose to the highest level in 18 months. the survey shows that although orders are growing in the manufacturing and the services sector, domestic sales remain static. it says much of westminster is
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distracted by brexit. joining us now is suren thiru, the head of economics at the british chambers of commerce. what kind of action on the home front are you talking about here? well, you're right when you summarised our survey. it does show that the uk economy is losing momentum. what we want to see, given that it momentum. what we want to see, given thatitis momentum. what we want to see, given that it is a month until the autumn budget is that brexit can't be the only show in town over the next couple of years. there is long—standing issues around skills and infrastructure and the cost of doing business in the uk that need to be addressed now to get the uk ready for a post brexit world. when you say a shortage of skills, is that way many manufacturers are experiencing the recruitment difficulties? absolutely. our survey shows the majority of firms in manufacturing as well as services have been experiencing significant recruitment difficulties. the key concern for business is that as we move towards leaving the eu the
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situation could get worse. all eyes are on what the immigration system could look like post brexit. you say that the uk economy has been growing ata that the uk economy has been growing at a muted rate. the manufacturing sector has been robust. why is that not filtering through? is it to do with the strength of the services sector? yes. you're right for the manufacturing sector, they enjoyed a solid quarter. activity picked up, which was encourage, the uk economy is dominated by the service sector which accounts for around three—quarters of output overall and activity in the services sector has been muted. a lot of that has been in sumer focussed industries. 0k. thank you very much for talking to us. let's talk about hip hop star akon now. he's best known for his number one records, more than ten
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of them platinum selling as well as many tv and film appearances. but he has recently been branching out into the energy business in africa. he spoke to our africa business correspondent lerato mbele about how he got the idea. i was doing concerts and every time i would do concerts, the lights would go out. laughter i was like, wait, something has got to be done about this. we could never have a full concert without the electricity going black. then i realised it was a bigger problem. this isn't just realised it was a bigger problem. this isn'tjust a concert, this is people's lives and livelihoods and that prompted me to say i want to be able to do something in africa. your focus is on energy and electricity, but what are you doing? are you building the hard infrastructure or are you a venture building the hard infrastructure or are you a venture capitalist? no we are you a venture capitalist? no we are actually building the hard infrastructure. we have an academy thatis infrastructure. we have an academy that is doing very well and it is expanding. we are going into an
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assembly plant but we realised that the biggest issue in africa's infrastructure was energy. you can't start about doing anything without energy. that became the main focus for us. time to check-in with the final markets. the ftse 100 for us. time to check-in with the final markets. the ftse100 has fallen. way down by the engineering group. the pound has lifted somewhat on reports that britain might be offered a two year brexit transition and that the other 27 eu countries maybe discussing a trade deal. gentleman pa an's nikkei hit a 21 year high despite more problems for kobe steel. it admitted that a scandal surrounding the quality of its products extends further than it thought. kobe steel's announcement
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knocked 9% off its share price. they said there had been false labelling and that's been widened to include its core steel business as well. 500 companies across the world could be affected. back to you, anita. thank you very much. prince harry was speaking at magazine awards where princess diana was honoureded with the legacy award. award. a british satellite has been blasted into earth today to monitor air quality around the world. it will make daily maps of global air pollution and help predict natural weather disasters. it is part of a project run by the european commission and uk ministers hope this type of collaboration and
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research will continue after brexit. now, how many panda cubs have you seen together? two ? three? how about 36? these cubs born in south west china are making their first public appearance. so far, 42 giant panda cubs have been born this year, the highest recorded amount of births since the breeding program began. among them, there are 15 pairs of twins. wonderful. definite wlins the award for the cutest images today. the headlines are coming up. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. we have got a lot going on in the weather. it will turn very warm and then as we go into next week, some stormy weather on the way. but for this afternoon, it is going to be warm for most of us despite cloudy skies and this weather front towards the north—west which is bringing outbreaks of rain across scotland,
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northern ireland, north—west england and wales. that weather front will move southwards. so things improving in the far north of scotland later on this afternoon. elsewhere, further south, there is quite a bit of cloud. we could see the odd shower. but still a few holes in the cloud developing and despite the cloud developing and despite the cloud and any showers, it will feel warm. temperatures up to 18 or 19 celsius. still some rain across wales and through north—west england particularly over the higher ground, southern scotland and into northern ireland, but for northern scotland, things improving here this afternoon. there will be sunshine and feeling fresher with highs of 13 or 1a. tonight, we will keep a lot of cloud and still there will be outbreaks of rain across northern england and across wales, but with all that cloud and some very mild airover us, all that cloud and some very mild air over us, temperatures no lower than 16 or 17 celsius in some parts. you can ditch the winter duvet, a mild night for england and wales. now, throughout saturday, it will be cloudy and there will be a little
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bit of drizzle affecting north wales, northern parts of england later on rain spreads into northern ireland and scotland. here temperatures will be about the mid—teens, but elsewhere with brighter skies, sunshine developing, the temperatures 18 to 20 or 21 celsius. by sunday the temperatures could be higher across the south east. up to 23 celsius or 2a celsius. once again, quite cloudy with outbreaks of rain across the north north—west. you may have heard about a hurricane on the way to the uk. hurricane ophelia will weaken. it will lose its tropical identity and testimony become ex— ophelia as it moves towards ireland and the uk on monday. it is important to stress that it will no longer be a hurricane. there is still uncertainty on the exact track the storm will take, but it could be stormy as we go through monday and tuesday. while the stormiest of the weather is towards western parts,
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further east, it will be even warmer. that's it from me. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. american actress rose mcgowan becomes the fourth woman to publicly accuse hollywood producer harvey weinstein of rape. but oscar—winning director, oliver stone warns against a trial by media. i believe a man should not be condemned by a vigilante system. it's not easy work he's going through either. the court of appeal rules that an islamic faith school's policy of segregating boys from girls from the age of ten is unlawful sex discrimination. ofsted welcomes the judgment. girls and boys are not learning in this school to socialise with each other, to work with the opposite sex in later stages of education or aduu in later stages of education or adult life and then not being
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prepared for life in modern britain. uber launches its appeal against london transport‘s decision to strip them of their licence in the capital — meaning londoners can keep using the app for now. also: global leaders urged to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. england's chief medical officer warns it could mean "the end of modern medicine", as common medical procedures would become ‘too risky‘. the fish that fought back — one angler got a little more than he bargained for when the dover sole he caught jumped good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. more public figures
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have spoken out against hollywood producer harvey weinstein in a sexual allegation scandal that's dominating hollwood. actress rose mcgowan has become the fourth person to allege she was raped by the hollywood mogul. in a series of tweets, mcgowan also accused amazon's studio chief of having ignored her when she made the allegation to him. yesterday she tweeted the head of amazonjeff bezos saying "i told the head of your studio that hw raped me. over & over i said it. he said it hadn't been proven. i said i was the proof." amazon said in a statement: "roy price, that's their head of studio, is on leave of absence effective immediately. we are reviewing our options for the projects we have with the weinstein company". a spokeswoman for harvey weinstein said: "any allegations of non—consensual sex are unequivocally denied by mr. weinstein." he has also spoken publicly for the first time since the allegations came out. i'm not doing ok. i'm trying. i've
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got to get help, guys. you know what? we all make mistakes. second chance i hope, ok? at other prominent names in hollywood have spoken out. the oscar—winning director, oliver stone, has accused the film industry and the public of prematurelyjudging mr weinstein. ifhe if he broke the law, i believe a man should not be condemned by a vigilante system so it's not easy what he's going through. here, friends of the tv personality myleene klass say she was sexually harassed by mr weinstein and last night actress kate beckinsale said he propositioned her when she wasjust 17. scotland yard say they are investigating a claim of sexual assault by the producer on an actress in london back in the 80s. meanwhile british film—maker stephen woolley said "everyone should have joined the dots up" over the hollywood producer's actions. there is a certain amount of shame
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attached to this. as i said, we did notjoin up the dots. we didn't realise that what was happening to that person who had laughed it off, was also happening to another person and another person and another person. what is shocking, in the last week or so, what has been truly shocking, is the amount of people coming forward, and i'm afraid to say that this probably has been prevalent in our industry. actress emma thompson said it was a problem that's endemic with hollywood. in his first public comments since the allegations were published what he is at the top of, the ladder
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of, is it a system of harassment and belittling and bullying, and interference and what my mother would have referred to in the olden days as pestering. is he pestering you? that's the word we use in the olden days as he recalled. this is pa rt olden days as he recalled. this is part of women's world it since time immemorial. what we need to start talking about is the crisis in masculinity, the crisis of extreme masculinity, the crisis of extreme masculinity which is this behaviour, and the fact it is not only ok but it also is represented by the most powerful man in the world at the moment. earlier, our correspondence explained a significant of amazon's present. this is roy price,
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the head of studios, he rose mcgowan said on social media ignored her when she said harvey weinstein had raped her, he separately is facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behaviour from a female producer who worked on an amazon show, the man in the high castle. amazon is becoming a big player in the film and tv world, if you remember. the grand tour, jeremy clarkson et al went to work for them when they left the bbc, last year's best actor winner casey affleck, they are moving into the big world of tv and broadcast. this is a difficult time for them as they hope to expand into the hollywood arena and accept that roy price is on a leave of absence while a kind of investigation is presumably being carried out. an interesting intervention by oliver stone who moves in the same circles as harvey weinstein, he is talking about things like trial by media but if it
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hadn't been for the media, these allegations may not have come to light. it's a tricky situation. i assume the point he is trying to make is let's actually wait and see how all this pans out rather than leaping immediately to conclusions. but i think many people believe the situation is hollywood with harvey weinstein in particular was such an open secret that actually it is not an overreaction for many to be talking the way they are at the moment. look at what is happening, he has been suspended by bafta, the british academy, the oscars are holding an emergency meeting of their board of governers over the weekend. it's a tricky time for them because for some people, they do not have a great track record in this area. for instance, bill cosby who has had accusations of sexual impropriety, roman polanski who pled guilty to child rape many years ago, they are both still members
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of the academy in hollywood. if harvey weinstein is kicked out of the academy or suspended, people will say is this double standards? are the academy reacting to public pressure rather than doing what is actually right? a court has ruled that an islamic faith school's policy of segregating boys from girls is unlawful sex discrimination. the al—hijrah school in birmingham had previously been penalised by ofsted inspectors. shut this is a significantjudgment because this is a bit appeal by the chief inspector of ofsted. against a ruling by a high courtjudge. originally, ofsted had come to the view that the policy that this
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school in birmingham has, it admits children from the age of four to the age of 16, but from year five children from the age of four to the age of 16, but from yearfive in other words where they are ten years old, they are completely segregated. that is for everything, notjust simply poke classes in school, it's for after—school clubs, break times and school trips. after concluded that that amounted to discrimination. they announce that to the court of appeal and unanimously this modelling, the court of appeal found this policy amounts to unlawful discrimination contrary to the equality act. they found the policy discriminated against both boys and girls. the court by a majority rejected and often argument that it disadvantages girls more than boys. what the court effectively said was that parliament had never intended in coeducational schools, in other words schools with boys and girls, for there to be
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segregation. so this is a significant ruling because ofsted will now take this ruling and have do look at schools across the country. i am do look at schools across the country. iam by do look at schools across the country. i am by amanda spielman, the chief inspector for spread. you must be pleased you've won? —— chief inspector. ofsted. girls and boys are not learning in this school to socialise this is a good day for girls and boys. the court found this school, that any school that the school was at pains to say that whatever the it was a religious motive, but whatever
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the motive is, it is unlawful. the argument was that 5epa rate but equal treatment could not about to dissemination, against either sex, we have established very clearly that it does. that neither discrimination against either sex. the of —— discrimination against either sex. the practice amounts to discrimination. what is the harm caused by having a policy like this in school? girls and boys are not learning in this school to socialise with each other, to work with the opposite sex in later stages of education or adult life, and are not properly prepared for life in modern britain. you indicated during the hearing itself but if you were successful, this would be applied across the country. just give a sense of the number of schools you have to look at, and what you will do? we think the number of schools is in the low 205. we can't be absolutely certain because schools open and close. we will discuss with the department of education to register schools, giving schools time to regularise their arrangements, we have to make sure as the judgment
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points out, to be fair to schools and we will be, but nevertheless we want to see this important principle is reflected promptly. asi as i say guide this is a clear signalfrom the as i say guide this is a clear signal from the court this morning that in a coeducational school, any policy that separate girls and boys is unlawful discrimination and will not be allowed. england's chief medical officer has urged global leaders to address the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. professor dame sally davies has warned that in the future routine operations could become incredibly "risky" and transplant medicine would be a "thing of the past." our correspondent adina campbell has this report. with infectious diseases becoming increasingly difficult to treat, the fight against bacteria is essential. for decades, we've relied on antibiotics to prevent and treat infection. a bedrock of modern medicine.
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but now there's a new warning that the drugs we often turn to to protect us could become less effective due to drug—resista nt infections. it is estimated 700,000 people around the world die every year from tried resistant infection such as tuberculosis, hiv and malaria. it's estimated 700,000 people around the world die every year from drug—resistant infections such as tuberculosis, hiv, and malaria. without antibiotics, it's feared common medical procedures such as cesarean sections, cancer treatments, and hip replacements would become too risky. the uk government and the wellcome trust, a global charity that supports scientists and researchers, have now organised a meeting for health experts around the world. it's as a new project is announced to map the spread of death and disease caused by superbugs. if no action is taken, it is estimated the drug resistant infections will kill 10 million people every year by 2050. the taxi app, uber,
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has filed an appeal at westminster magistrates' court to overturn a decision by london's transport regulator, which stripped its operating licence in one of its most important foreign markets. our technology correspondent explains. this is the last day they could put their appointment together, they could never came to a deal with tfl, both sides would felt this would be too quick. we have seen a change in approach, the new chief executive came overfrom approach, the new chief executive came over from the united states, had a meeting with transport for london, and both sides described that as constructive. but it was
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never going to happen in a big hurry. and as printing something off the printable mind me, we had this statement from uber, but taps you can take me through that. they say we hope to continue having constructive discussions with transport for london is an ceo has said, we are determined to make things right. that is an indicator ofa things right. that is an indicator of a different tone. the original founder of uber, was a very hard—charging, belligerent kind of executive, went around the world not worrying too much frankly, if he offended regulators and taxi drivers. the new man has come in, very much trying to change the image of the company, he actually said we are sorry. we need to get things right. changing the image, changing the tone, thinking about the public facing aspect of uber, but in terms
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of changes for transport for london, that they would like to see, are we seeing any signs they made happen? —— might happen? seeing any signs they made happen? -- might happen? it depends on the mechanics of the processes of registering drivers and making sure safety checks are done. uber has flung it back at transport for london saying they are responsible for those jerks and we are doing get there. but transport for london —— those checks, taxi happy. taxi drivers are saying to the deep and that they would like change. we have had news about the harvey weinstein case and the growing number of women accusing him of
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sexual assault and harassment and rape. in that split, oliver stone who is at a film festival, was cautioning against trial by media as he put it. but in this new statement on facebook users i've been travelling for the last couple of days and wasn't aware of all the women who came out to support the original story in the new york times. you can see this now on your screens. . . this is a series that oliver stone was working on with which the weinstein company was involved as well. so, a change of position from the director, oliver stone, from that clip that we've been playing
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for you today. now he says he was not aware of all who came out to support the original story of accusations against harvey weinstein in the new york times. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. american actress rose mcgowan becomes the fourth woman to publicly accuse hollywood producer harvey weinstein of rape. the court of appeal rules that an islamic faith school's policy of segregating boys and girls from the age of ten is unlawful sex discrimination. ofsted welcomed the judgement. uber launches its appeal against london transport‘s decision to strip them of their licence in the capital — meaning londoners meaning londoners can keep using the app for now. more sport now and back to holly. let's start with the news of a major reva m p of test let's start with the news of a major
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revamp of test cricket. plans to make it more appealing to fans who are increasingly turning towards the shorterform of are increasingly turning towards the shorter form of the game. are increasingly turning towards the shorterform of the game. england will take part in a short version after the icc gave the go—ahead to a new series in 2019. there will also bea odi new series in 2019. there will also be a odi league which will lead to direct qualification to the world cup and a trial of four—day test matches instead of five. speculation is mounting over who will take over as scotland manager, isn't a former england boss is touted as one of the favourites. gordon strachan left yesterday, four days after the team did not qualify for the world cup. sam alla rdyce has did not qualify for the world cup. sam allardyce has been mentioned as a possible candidate. whoever it is will not have an easy task of the last boss to take scotland to the world cup was craig brown in 1998. a big weekend and i rugby union fans as the european competition gets underway. after a testing start,
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wasps began there campaign tonight. they go to ulster having lost four of their opening games and suffering a rocky run of injuries labelling them without 15 players. we can recover. i believe if we don't have a good start in europe, it will be ha rd to a good start in europe, it will be hard to get out and win. we know that, we are looking forward to with its clean slate, and hopefully we can go there and do a job. the challenge cup began yesterday and it didn't go too well the glasgow who got pau finished 27—21winners. rafa nadal is through to the semifinals of the shanghai masters after his consecutive win. the beat grigor
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dimitrov after winning two crucial brea ks dimitrov after winning two crucial breaks for nearly two and a half hours. the spaniard is facing his seventh title and will be in the last four. that's all your sport for now, i will have more for you at 1:30pm after the lunchtime news. the president of the european commission jean—claude juncker has said the brexit process will take "longer than initially thought", blaming delays on britain's failure to settle its financial obligations. he went onto say that ‘britain has to pay‘ and because that has not been resolved the eu could not recommend moving onto the next stage in negotiations. downing street said mrs may has made clear in her florence speech that the uk would honour its financial commitment so let's speak to our brussels reporter. despite everything ijust said,
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clearly there is a problem about the payments or clarification about what is exactly the uk is prepared to page or the eu will accept? jean—claude juncker is the page or the eu will accept? jean—claudejuncker is the president of the european commission, the part of the european commission, the part of the european commission, the part of the eu that runs the brexit talks day—to—day, technically the boss of michel barnier the chief negotiator. he was giving a speech to students in luxembourg today, and said things are going more slowly than people envisaged at the start of the whole process. he said one of the big stumbling blocks was money and the uk to acknowledging its financial obligations it has to be eu as it leaves. he gave the analogy of somebody buying 28 beers to their collea g u es somebody buying 28 beers to their colleagues in the bar and then leaving without paying. you have to pay, said mrjean—claude juncker. here's what he said. we cannot have for the time being a compromise as far as the remaining
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financial commitment of the uk are concerned. a5 financial commitment of the uk are concerned. as we financial commitment of the uk are concerned. as we are financial commitment of the uk are concerned. as we are not able to do this. we will not be able to say to the european council in october, now we can move to the second phase of the negotiations. that means reshaping of the british— european future. things have to be done, things have to be delivered. he also talks about the right of eu nationals living in the uk after brexit and british people moving abroad to —— living abroad. he said it's nonsense that still rambling over such an important issue. diplomats will sit down this evening to consider a draft document put in front of eu leaders when they meet in brussels next friday to talk about brexit. the document has something for both sides of the argument. it says the uk still to make commitments about money and citizens' rights before the talks to move on to divorce related issues to talking about relationships and
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fermentation phase. but michel barnier, the chief negotiator and his officials, should start the internal work for preparing when those trade talks do start. thank you. the remains of moors murderer ian brady will be disposed of with no music and no ceremony that's the decision of a judge at the high court this morning. at an undisclosed location. the precise arrangements may not be reported, but but the chancellor of the high court, sir geoffrey vos said that playing music during brady's cremation would cause legitimate offence to the families of his victims. the trump administration has unveiled a new strategy against iran, aimed at confronting what it calls tehran's aggression and preventing it from acquiring nuclear weapons. the move to decertify will not withdraw the us from the accord; but it will give congress 60 days
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to decide whether to do so by re—imposing economic sanctions. earlier i spoke to our diplomatic correspondent jonathan marcus and asked him what the new strategy will mean for us foreign policy on iran. essentially it's going to be a twofold policy. one is to double down on the deal itself, to enforce it ever more strictly, and we will have the weight to see precisely how the us intends to do that. —— wait and see. the other part as you rightly say as to get tough on iran generally because of what emergency is bad behaviour in the region, supporting the assad regime in syria, supporting rebels in yemen and destabilising the gulf region, hostility towards israel and so on. it is not entirely clear what the americans will do, they talk about providing ballistic missile two defences providing ballistic missile two d efe nces to providing ballistic missile two defences to the allies and sanctions
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towards the iranian revolutionary guard corps, remember of course, guard corps, remember of the discussion about sanctions, that's about nuclear sanctions, that i whole host of other sanctions on terrorism related matters, human rights matters, they are in force, have always been in force and is not entirely clear how far new sanctions and those headings are really getting additional pressure to bear on iran. we have had a response from iran on this? the iranians are not happy clearly, but it will be interesting because the great danger here is the americans by lighting a fuse under the nuclear agreement, we do not know if that bomb will eventually explode or the fuse will plotter, they are in a sense leaving the iranians with the moral high ground. the iranians are likely to stick to the deal since mr trump came into office, the indications have stuck to the letter of the agreement were insisting they do not wa nt to
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agreement were insisting they do not want to be the ones to actually bulld oze want to be the ones to actually bulldoze it away. briefly, sorry, donald trump has not had much success with getting his plans through congress, so far, has the? this plan to decertify the acord would give him six days to —— 60 days to impose sanctions. do you think he would get congress' backing? it looks unlikely. we don't know yet if the administration wants to actively encourage congress to bring in, to reimpose the nuclear sanctions that were waived under the agreement, it will be interesting. the balance on capitol hill is probably to see the agreement continue in existence, at least for now. it is not the decertification that brings america out of the treaty, as you rightly suggest it is the reimposition of those nuclear
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related sanctions. congress has 60 days to look at it again, a lot will depend on what the president at advance joe murphy asks for depend on what the president at advancejoe murphy asks for and advisers. —— asks for and advisers. they may well want to see the sanctions, he wants to bring in a battery of other measures to constrain iran's regional influence. prince harry has asked people to recognise the treatment of aids and hiv. princess diana was honoured at the attitude awards with the legacy award, he collected her reward on her behalf. time to look at the weather. thank you. good afternoon.
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—— nota —— not a sparkler of a day so far, if it is dank and dreary you are not alone. small comfort. they weather from across the north of scotland, gradually easing its way across scotland, there are one or two gaps further south but working on the basis that there is a further amount of rain across the uplands and high ground of northern england, the high ground of northern england, the high ground of northern england, the high ground of wales and northern ireland, overnight, mild air is flooding into the south weather front. something slightly cooler to the north, as close as it was last night perhaps, 15—16d. saturday, if you are near the weather front, dank and really. increasingly bright after the dull start. quite warm as well, 20 degrees not out off the question. brighter, cooler skies over north, that weather front moves into the north on sunday. those
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temperatures could get into the low 20s. am. —— forsome. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines: the actress, rose mcgowan, has become the fourth woman to publicly accuse harvey weinstein of rape. ms mcgowan, had previously said the hollywood producer had sexually harassed her. the court of appeal has ruled that a muslim school in birmingham should not teach boys separately from girls. the three judges said schools inspectors were right to regard that as unlawful discrimination. the taxi—hailing company, uber, has begun its appeal against a decision by transport for london not to renew its licence to operate in the city. last month, tfl said the american firm was not fit and proper. the chief medical officer for england, dame sally davies, has called for governments around the world to put more effort into stopping the over—use of antibiotics, otherwise, she warned, modern medicine as we know it would come to an end.
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more now on the strategy towards iran announced by the white house today, aimed at confronting what it calls tehran's aggression and preventing the country from acquiring nuclear weapons. joining me now via webcam is trita parsi who is the president of the national iranian american council and author of losing an enemy — obama, iran and the triumph of diplomacy. thank you very much forjoining us on the bbc news channel today. iam thinking on the bbc news channel today. i am thinking from what i have seen of your thoughts on this, you believe this latest strategy is anything, but a triumph of diplomacy? it is turning what is a functioning agreement. an agraosmt that's delivering, an agreement that the iranians are abiding to, it is
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turning that into a crisis. a com pletely turning that into a crisis. a completely unnecessary crisis. so when president trump says that iran isn't living up to the spirit of the deal, what do you think he means? well, as you mentioned, i read ina means? well, as you mentioned, i read in a book about the negotiation, i interviewed the negotiators. i never came across anything about the spirit of the deal. i'm not really sure what trump is referring to there. if he's referring to activities that iran is engaged outside of the nuclear field, when those things were not pa rt field, when those things were not part of the negotiations, just as much the iranians were incorrect in criticising it the deal on the us's position on israel or saudi arabia. so you think he is talking about operating outside the terms of reference ? operating outside the terms of reference? he is. he is against the deal. he cannot claim that the iranians are violating the deal because they're not and the iae has certified that eight times now. instead he's arguing about the spirit of the deal which he then is
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ina spirit of the deal which he then is in a position to define in anyway way, shape or form. in a position to define in anyway way, shape orform. the bottom line is donald trump is trying to kill the deal. what would the logical consequences of that be in your mind? well, the deal achieved two things, it represented a war between the united states and iran and prevented iran having access to a path to a nuclear weapon. if you destroy the deal, those two bad scenarios come back on to the table and that's the danger here. do you think that donald trump is escalating the situation without giving himself any opportunities to deescalate it or to move away from the position that he is currently taking? and are there any sources the us right now, whether it be in the us right now, whether it be in the us right now, whether it be in the us government or outside the government that might yet urge him to deescalate this? well, i think
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what you're pointing to is exactly what you're pointing to is exactly what are the concerns of the pentagon. that's why the announcement that will come today appears to be less belligerent than already intended and that's because of the fact that in the absence of a dialogue with iran the united states doesn't have very effective deescalatetry mechanisms. it is easy to escalate and you need to find an exit ramp and if you don't have a dialogue, deescalate and that's the danger that can bring the united states into war even if donald trump... amongst the iranian american community, you are the president of the national iranian council. what are fire they'res and concerns there at this point? there is tremendous disappointment in what he's doing and a tremendous amount of anxiety as well because this deal was seen as something very
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important, not only to prevent war, but also to give the prodemocracy movement in iran a chance to be able to move the country slowly, but surely in a more open and democratic direction. if tensions between the united states and iran once again go up united states and iran once again go up as seems to be the case now, one of the first victims will be those inside of iraq or on the ground and are trying to move the country in a democratic direction. thank you very much for your time today. thank you for having me. the number of dead from the wildfires still raging through northern california has risen to 31. fire officials say hundreds of people are missing in what is now the worst fire in the state's history. the winds hampering firefighters' efforts have now died down, but there's concern they may pick up again at the weekend. dave lee reports from california. more than four days on and still it
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burns. there are 8,000 firefighters battling to contain more than 20 huge fires. even prison inmates have been called upon to help. but effo rts been called upon to help. but efforts remain at the mercy of the winds. predicted to get worse as the weekend comes round. this is what remains of coffee park, a community which was badly hit. it has been several days now since fires rolled through here, but there is a thick smell of ash in the air and there are still some small fires burning. the only people who pass through right now are fire crews and the odd police car on the look—out for looters who unbelievably think they can find something of value in this mess. now, the investigation has begun, into how and why this fire caused so much damage? the responsibility is to begin trying to assess potential cause and how the fire evolved, spread, that's
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ongoing as we speak. residents have been supportive of the response from the emergency services. at a community meeting, each official was applauded. they're doing a great job. it's really difficult to you know realise how big the fire is.” felt really safe here, right on the first street, i could hear every siren that went by. officials have begun releasing some details about the victims. so far, the average age of the dead is 70. so amidst the appreciation of the emergency response there are some pressing questions. why was an emergency text alert system not used to warn people of the danger? could a weak power line falling over have been the spark that debt off this tragedy? investigators told us they are looking at that theory very closely. the white house's new strategy
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towards iran and potentially pulling out of the nuclear deal with iran. we have had a statement from a kremlin spokesman saying that if the usa quits the iran deal, it will damage the atmosphere of predictability, security, stability and non proliferation around the world. let me repeat that line from a kremlin spokesman saying if the usa pulls out it will damage the atmosphere of predictability and security and non proliferation around the world, the spokesman saying if the usa quits the deal, it will have extremely negative consequences and saying that the kremlin already knows iran will pull out if the usa with draws. so that is the response from moscow to developments in washington. let's get more now on one of our main stories. england's chief medical officer has renewed her warning about what she's
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described as a "post—antibiotic apocalypse" saying there has be to a global effort to tackle the crisis. professor dame sally davies said that if antibiotics lost their effectiveness, it would spell "the end of modern medicine". with me now is professor rosanna peeling, director of the international diagnostics centre at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. thank you for coming along to talk to us. i have spoken to professor dame sally on a number of occasions in the last 18 months or so about this. she has been issuing equally dire warnings about antibiotic resistance. do you think that people aren't listening or are theyjust not listening perhaps closely enough? i think it's a bit of both. i think that people do listen and they are scared at the prospect of this. but i think the other thing that we need to do is to make sure governments around the world have the tools to actually know what is the tools to actually know what is the situation in their country. for
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example. is the uk doing well on this? yes. yes. certainly in most developed countries, you know, we have labs with tests that could detect a resistance so we know the extent, where is it happening? is it hospitals? is it in the community, etcetera ? hospitals? is it in the community, etcetera? in many countries around the world, where laboratory infrastructure is not very good or they cannot afford or have the expertise to use these tests to know what the situation in their country is, then how can they make rational strategies to contain it as well as if they institute any infer ventions how would they know the impact of those interventions? so, the role of diagnostics is extremely important and that's something that we like to help other countries do. so with the connectivity... yes. of world populations... if every country
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isn't trying it's utmost to deal with this, does that reduce the effectiveness of the campaigns, the strategies in countries which are trying to deal with it? that's right. i think that you hear these horror stories about people who had acquired resistance in countries that they visited and brought back to their home country and there, if they go into hospital or if their resista nce they go into hospital or if their resistance tax root in that country then, so we have seen a lot of the spread of very resistant superbugs around the world. we have talked a lot today about the impact on people and routine operations, no longer becoming routine. but we need to also consider the agricultural industry, don't we and the part that it has to play in this because antibiotics that are given to animals will end up orfish antibiotics that are given to animals will end up or fish farming
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for example will end up, because we eat those products, will end up in our bodies. is the agricultural industry doing enough?” our bodies. is the agricultural industry doing enough? i think they're trying and there is actually civil society that puts pressure on the industry such as you see in restau ra nts the industry such as you see in restaurants now, they start to advertise that they would not use meats that have antibiotics in them, etcetera. so i think everybody is trying, but we need to really make sure that people have the tools to do what they need to do. finally, a sobering statistic. you have worked out that the moment one person dice of antibiotic resistance every 45 seconds. that's from the report. this report says if nothing is one by 2050, that's will be one person every three seconds. dying from something that should have been preventible? we need to get the
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tools into the people who have the rights to control such as physicians. if we have a simple rapid test that could allow the physicians to know whether it is a bacterial infection or viral infection they could reduce substantially the inappropriate use of antibiotics. 0k. of antibiotics. ok. thank you very much for your expertise and for coming along to talk to us. police searching for a 79—year—old woman in australia say they believe she may have been the victim of a crocodile attack. she has been missing from a nursing home in queensland since tuesday. it is believed the 79 suffers from dementia and had wandered from the centre before. police officers say they cannot rule out that she was they cannot rule out that she was the victim of a fatal attack. if confirmed it will be the third in australia this year. children who have dyspraxia are being mislabelled at school as "lazy or naughty",
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a charity says. dyspraxia is a condition which is thought to affect about 5% of the population and yet it receives a fraction of the publicity of disorders such as dyslexia or autism. it's a lifelong neurological condition, causing difficulty with coordination and movement, but also with processing information. the dyspraxia foundation believes that tens of thousands of children and adults are unaware they have it. earlier, the victoria derbyshire programme spoke to two families who are affected by dyspraxia and a trustee of the dyspraxia foundation, sally payne, who explained more about the disorder. dyspraxia is a condition that affects large body movements such as balance, posture, the ability to catch and kick a ball and also the fine motor movements so the way that we use our hands to grip, manipulate, and handle tools and equipment. it can also affect speech
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in some people and there are also difficulties with organisation, planning, attention, memory and these difficulties combined can make it really difficult for people to carry out the every day activities that the rest of us take for granted. it might be unhelpful but it has been described some as dyslexia for movement?” it has been described some as dyslexia for movement? i think there isa dyslexia for movement? i think there is a general understanding or awareness of dyslexia, but i think dyspraxia is very different in that it affects the planning and organisation. how dyspraxia affect rubben? rubben, do you want to answer that in it took me quite learn to learn to swim and ride a bike and everyone in my class could tie their shoelaces and it took me a lot longer to learn to tie my shoelaces and the teachers would get annoyed because they would have to do my shoelaces and i wouldn't be able to do them. and then, now i
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have been diagnosed with dyspraxia, they sort of understand more and they sort of understand more and they get it. they understand that i have a reason that i don't. that must have been pretty difficult not knowing why you can't do other things which to other people seem easy. how did you feel? it was embarrassing because everyone else could do it and i couldn't and it wasjust annoying could do it and i couldn't and it was just annoying and could do it and i couldn't and it wasjust annoying and embarrassing. when was reuben diagnosed? what dead to that? to be honest it was actually a school report. so, obviously i have got a daughter who isa obviously i have got a daughter who is a little bit older and just a year older and who had sort of flown through school and they had the same teacher. reuben moved into the same class and the teacher was astonished at the difference between the two children and reuben isjust my reuben and but when we had the school report back it said the word
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distracted" five or six times and i thought that was chipping away at his self esteem and i thought, well, he is trying really hard. and you are how old? ten. when did you get that report? i was eight. so a few yea rs that report? i was eight. so a few years ago. that's made a real difference, hasn't it? yes. and to your teacher as well. have you herd the term dyspraxia before that?” worked in health as an occupational therapist like sally so i had some inside knowledge about it. but i think it's still very different when it's your own child. you know managing all of those sorts of issues thinking is it because he is a boy, boys take longer? should he be trying harder? and it's trying to judge that balance all the time.” will come to you in a second, lucas, it does, well, you tell me, does it affect males more than females? yes,
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the research suggests about three boys to every one girl is affected andi boys to every one girl is affected and i think some research that the dyspraxia foundation carried out a couple of years ago suggested that girls were later when their difficulties were identified. lucas, how does dyspraxia affect you? difficulties were identified. lucas, how does dyspraxia affect you ?m doesn't really affect me. itjust took me longer to ride my bike and like tie my shoelaces and like, it just took me longer at other things than other people. like, ijust got like a bit bad at handwriting then everybody else. so like... and what was that like for you? was that difficult? yeah, it was quite confusing and embarrassing when i didn't know i had dyspraxia, but now i know it is not that big a deal because my teachers let me bring in special pencils to help my handwriting. can you tell me how you
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found out you had dyspraxia? so, a dyspraxia teacher came called ciara and she did a lesson with me and then she realised that i had dyspraxia because of the way which i was doing some stuff. and how did that make you feel? what's it been like for you since you found out? it's been like just normal, but like a bit different to other people because like, you have dyspraxia and most people don't. so like, i've just got bad at handwriting than everybody else. and what strategies have you come up with? have professionals come up with to help lucas? yes, so when lucas was diagnosed we all started learning what dyspraxia was and figuring out how to explain it. he has a little
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ca rd how to explain it. he has a little card saying what dyspraxia is. it helped him understand... card saying what dyspraxia is. it helped him understand. . ” card saying what dyspraxia is. it helped him understand... i don't know if we can have a look at that... he used to come home from school upset and having this card helped him understand what dyspraxia was and he could use it to explain to his friend, it is not because i'm silly or i'm worse than you or not as clever, it is because i have this condition and it makes things tricky, but i try my best. a man arrested on suspicion of pushing a woman into the path of a has been released without charge. police said he would face no further action. the boom in insurance claims made by british tourists because of alleged gastric illness is to be investigated by the government after
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an increase in 30,000 claims. travel industry bosses are asked to submit evidence on the holiday sickness claims culture which is costing the travel industry millions and risks pushing up the prices for law abiding holiday—makers. a couple kidnapped by the taliban in afghanistan have been released after spending five years imprisoned. canadian joshua boyle and his american wife caitlan coleman were freed by pakistani security forces, along with their three young children who were all born in captivity. aleem maqbool reports. over five long years the families ofjoshua boyle and caitlan coleman had only seen them in a series of videos released by their taliban captors. they really will not settle this until they get what they are demanding. the couple disappeared if afghanistan, but they and their three children were freed after being taken into pakistan, joshua finally able to call his mother.
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it's the first time in five years that we got to hear his voice. it was amazing and he told us how much he looked forward to — his children were looking forward to meeting their grandparents and that he would see me in a couple of days. so we're waiting for that. it's believed their hostage—takers had been demanding the release of taliban prisoners, a demand that was apparently never met before pakistani security forces freed the family. and i want to thank the pakistani government and i want to thank pakistan. they worked very hard on this and i believe they are starting to respect the united states again. it's very important. i think a lot of countries are starting to respect the united states of america once again. and the pakistani army praised the way that american agencies worked with them. the success underscores the importance of timely intelligence sharing said a statement and pakistan's continued commitment towards fighting this menace. well, while both sides are unusually congratulating themselves
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on their co—operation, there will be lots of questions asked of the couple that's been freed about their time in captivity and about what they were doing in afghanistan in the first place? the year's biggest literary prize, the man booker award, will be revealed next week. between now and then we'll be previewing the six shortlisted titles here on bbc news. our look at the would—be prize winners continues today with ali smith discussing her latest novel autumn. here's an old story so new that it's still in the mid—of happening. here's an old story so new that it's still in the middle of happening. when i started writing these books, i checked with my publisher if it might be possible to publish a book as close to it being
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finished as possible. as i'm writing it, our world changed. the eu referendum happened and so, i went with it and the book to some extent is about that surface reaction and to some extent it is about a dimensionalising that seems to be more and more important. all across the country people felt it was the wrong thing. it was the right thing. all across the country people felt they really lost. felt they had really won. all across the country people felt they'd done the right thing and other people had done the wrong thing. all across the country people looked up google "what is eu"? all across the country looked up google, "move to scotland". all across the country people looked up google "irish passport applications". the book is called autumn and it's about time and autumn and the movement of the year. the seasons remind us of the depth of our own experience in time and the way that we experience time differently. as i was thinking about autumn,
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i simply saw a picture by an artist i'd never heard of and i looked at the picture and i was like what is that? that's amazing. a female pop artist. how don't i know about this person and then i looked up her life and then i realise the story of pauline boty is of a life of such energy, such vibrancy that stops so soon that there was an immediate parallel with the very notion of the briefness of life that autumn just reminds us of every leaf fall, she pasted, she cut, she painted, she concentrated. in her dream she slapped the past in its face. telling her school friend beryll, they were both 16, "i'm going to be an artist". "women don't get to be that", beryll said. "i will. a serious artist. i want to be a painter".
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now, how many panda cubs have you seen together? two ? three? how about 36? these cubs born in south west china are making their first public appearance. so far, 42 giant panda cubs have been born this year, the highest recorded amount of births since the breeding program began. among them, there are 15 pairs of twins. the bbc news at one is coming up. now it's time for the weather with phil avery. thank you forjoining me. friday was never going to be much of a sparkler. the culprit, bear that satellite picture in mind. we will be coming back to it. underneath the cloud this is as grim as it gets it. press west wick and yet as that front press west wick and yet as that fro nt m oves press west wick and yet as that front moves just that little bit further south, probably not getting away from ayrshire, but interest the
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top half of scotland and northern ireland, there will be some late afternoon sunshine. if you are near that frontal system or just afternoon sunshine. if you are near that frontal system orjust exposed to the moisture ladened south—westerlies, low cloud all over these western areas. any brightness at all will be found further to the east, but it will not be a particularly cold afternoon and evening. and the rainfalljust on coming. the rainfall totals mounting up coming. the rainfall totals mounting up in cumbria, york shir and lancashire, coming down to the we shall mown tonnes. it won't be a particularly cold night. here we go on saturday. that frontal system making progress, can you believe it, just a little bit further back towards the north? if you are to the south of it, there will be a greater chance of seeing sunshine and the temperatures really responding. anywhere near the frontal system, we are in the cooler air to the north, 12, 13 are in the cooler air to the north, 12,13 or 14als. are in the cooler air to the north, 12, 13 or 14als. that same weather front is around perhaps providing another 80 millimetres of rain into the western hills of scotland as far
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ahead as sunday. many more of us still engaged in this southerly breeze, providing quite a bit of warmth if you get to see sunshine. here is the satellite picture again. we are on a hurricane hunt. i'm taking out into the atlantic and there is the much talked about hurricane. notice the strength of the gusts. in exposed coastal locations, 70mph, across many northern and western areas, as far ahead as tuesday there is the potential for disruptive, potentially destructive weather. we will keep a close eye on that and here is the rub — at the at the same time that that is going on across western parts, somewhere in the east on monday with sunshine could see 24 celsius. the harvey weinstein scandal deepens as he's publicly accused again of rape.
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the american actress rose mcgowan is the latest woman to come forward. here one of his office staff has spoken about the hollywood producer's reputation. i remember being frightened but i was also able to go "no", because i was also able to go "no", because i was prove warned that this sort of thing would happen. i think i was probably looking at how close it was to get to the door. as police investigations are launched in both the uk and the us — mr weinstein has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. also this lunchtime. a warning from the european commission president who says the uk "will have to pay" if it wants brexit negotiations to progress to a future trade deal. 8,000 firefighters struggle to control the deadliest fires in california's history — more than 31 people have died with hundreds of people missing.
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