Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 17, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

9:00 am
hello, it's tuesday, it's 9 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. this programme can reveal that a number of councils in england are buying one—way train tickets for homeless people out of their area. it made me feel sick, because i have lived here all my life. i think what they want to do is get all the homeless people out of bournemouth because all the new people coming into the area are seeing all these homeless people sitting there. in bournemouth, the number of homeless people has trebled since 2010 — we'll try and find out why. also this morning — people in the music industry have been speaking out after this programme heard claims that abuse and harassment there were as bad if not worse than in hollywood. i have been in situations with men more senior to me who tried to use that position of power in order to garner some kind of sexualfavour with me. we want to hear your experience, wherever you work, this morning. get in touch in the usual
9:01 am
way and if you are happy to speak on air, start your message with the words "call me". and — he's gone from this to this. the first strong evidence there is the supermassive black hole at the centre of the milky way came from a 10—year study. and he's here to answer your questions on all things science. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11. throughout the morning the latest breaking news and developing stories — at around half past nine this morning we're expecting the latest hate crime figures. we'll bring them to you as soon as we get themm, and a little later we'll hear how house prices in large parts
9:02 am
of england and wales have fallen over the last ten years. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged. theresa may and the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, have agreed to accelerate the brexit negotiations. in a statement issued after a working dinner in brussels last night, the two leaders said their meeting had taken place in a constructive atmosphere. but there was no sign of any movement on the key issues — including how much the uk would be expected to pay to leave the eu. our europe correspondent, kevin connolly, is in brussels. what happens now? i think the answer is simply more of the same. there have been lots of talks and round after round of brexit negotiations, building up to the european union sion bennett at the end of this week where they will —— the european union summit to start talking about trade relationships and it does not
9:03 am
look like that will happen. the next european summit, all this against the background of the clock ticking on the brexit process. we will be out by march 2019. it is urgent to start talking about trade. it does not look like the europeans will move until the uk offers more money, to put it bluntly. it comes down to a simple proposition is that, politically difficult for theresa may at home. that is what she will have to do in brussels to get things moving and the statement last night was one of the most non—communicative pieces of communication when it talks about agreeing to accelerate the process. you could interpret that as meaning things are going well so we might as well make them go faster, or it could be that things have not been going fast enough and need to go faster. i think it is more of the latter, that it has been too slow
9:04 am
and that more needs to be done to get things moving towards trade talks. on britain's liabilities, is there not a clear list we promise to put into, to fund, that have a clear amount that we can add up and say, this is what we owe you?” amount that we can add up and say, this is what we owe you? i often find myself asking the same question and unfortunately i think the answer is producing national accounts is an art form. is producing national accounts is an artform. in is producing national accounts is an art form. in terms of the brexit bill, you are talking notjust about farm subsidies that britain has signed up to, you are talking about pensions for people who work for the european commission. somebody at 21 working for the european commission might drawa working for the european commission might draw a pension in 80 years, should britain be on the hook for that? should it make a one—off payment to get rid of the liability? should it be responsible for loan
9:05 am
guarantees the eu made to portugal and ukraine in the past? those guarantees might not be called in as long as the ukrainians for example pay their debt, but they lose are theissues pay their debt, but they lose are the issues that complicate matters and the eu wants as much as possible out of the uk, which has been a net payer into the budget. the uk is trying to get away with paying as little as possible and i suppose theresa may is trying to get away with not looking to her own backbenchers as though she is writing an enormous cheque to get out of the eu when no one can now remember during the brexit referendum anybody talking about the idea that it would cost a fortune to get out of the eu, just as it would have cost a lot of money to remain in. thank you. ben is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. an investigation by this programme has found that several councils in england are regularly buying one—way train tickets to transfer homeless people out of their area.
9:06 am
more than £1,000 a year was spent by some councils on one—way "reconnection" tickets. the strategy can be used to reconnect rough sleepers with family, but one man has said he was offered a ticket to a city he had never been to before. the charity homeless link called the scale of the problem "worrying" — but the government said it is investing £550 million to tackle homelessness. the football association's inquiry into historic sexual abuse is taking longer than expected because of the amount of documentary evidence collected, this programme has found. hundreds of people were identified as victims by police after a number of football players came forward to say they had been sexually abused as children during the 70s, 80s and 905. in almost a year since the inquiry was announced, the fa's team has spoken to 15 survivors and is yet to speak to another 20—30 people as part of the process. the inquiry is now not expected to be finished until next
9:07 am
april at the earliest. the authorities in the republic of ireland say it could be days before they restore power to hundreds of thousands of properties, following the damage caused by storm 0phelia — which killed three people. people in scotland and north east england are being warned of more problems this morning, with winds of up to 70 miles per hour expected during the rush hour. scottish power say there are currently 4,000 homes without power across north wales. the met office yellow weather warning for wind covering northern ireland, much of scotland and parts of england and wales remains until midday, with flood warnings also in place. house prices in large parts of england and wales are lower now than they were 10 years ago, according to research carried out by the bbc. the figures show that if you adjust for inflation, average values in northern areas have dropped by more than 10 per cent. sean bodmer reports. "for sale" signs are a familiar sign in the north—east.
9:08 am
here, average house prices have dropped in almost 95% of council wards in real terms. lee purchased his home in 2008 for £112,000. almost one decade on it is now worth between £80,000 and £85,000. if you could sell the house tomorrow, how much would you lose? £30,000. we could lose more than that. that is just what it would go on the market for. in the north—east, average prices in real terms have gone down in 9a.7% of all council wards. yorkshire and the humber saw a drop of 92.5%. it is a similar story in wales in 90% of wards. in london, 99% of wards have seen prices rise in the same period. in part, it is about a two—speed economy. so the economic catalyst has been much greater in london and the south—east of the country and that feeds into population
9:09 am
pressure, which is much greater in london and the south and means the lack of house building comes to the fore, driving prices in a way that simply has not happened in the north of england. millions of homeowners in yorkshire, wales and the north—east may be surprised to discover their property has lost value in real terms over the last ten years. but the data demonstrates what many have long suspected — a growing disconnect between the capital, the south—east and the rest of the country. a deal has been struck which it's hoped will help safeguard 4,000 jobs at the bombardier aircraft factory in northern ireland. the european manufacturer, airbus, has taken a stake in bombardier‘s c—series jet, which has wings built in belfast. the deal would allow some of the planes to be assembled at an airbus plant in alabama avoiding large import duties the us authorities have threatened to impose on the c—series. more than 1,000 people have taken
9:10 am
part in a vigil in malta for a journalist murdered yesterday by a powerful car bomb. daphne ca ruana galizia highlighted alleged corruption by senior politicians, including malta's prime minister, who has denied any wrongdoing and condemned her murder. a 20—year—old man has died and two others have been injured in a stabbing outside parsons green tube station in london. police were called atjust after 7.30 last night to reports of an incident outside the london underground station, where 30 people were injured in a terror attack last month. police say the stabbing is not terrorism—related. after 33 years, the bbc has confirmed it's going to drop the night—time version of crimewatch. instead it says it will increase the number of episodes it makes of the crimewatch roadshow, which will be broadcast during the day. the show was relaunched last
9:11 am
september withjeremy the show was relaunched last september with jeremy vine as the host. 0nline tv streaming service netflix is performing better than expected — with shares in the company reaching a record high. the service — known for shows like house of cards, narcos and stranger things — has gained 5.3 million more worldwide subscribers in the third quarter — with 56,000 new subscribers each day. social media giant facebook has bought an app aimed at making teenagers be nice to each other. the app, called tbh — or to be honest — is just nine weeks old, but has already been downloaded 5 million times. it works by posing questions like "who is best to bring to a party?" and asking users to choose from their contacts. facebook said it was impressed with the way the app brings people closer together. more from me at 9:30am. thank you for your comments about our
9:12 am
exclusive story. we will bring you a film in the next few minutes where various councils are buying one—way train tickets for homeless people. paul said pushed the homeless to another city is social cleansing. erica said just to get rid of a group of people the government put there in the first place is disgraceful. another said it is not the first time it has happened and will not be the last. the film is in the next few minutes. let's get some sport. 0lly foster is here. what has warren gatland been said about coaching the lions? he was bruised about the encounter. always intense the lions tours. he is a kiwi and was going back to his homeland with the lions and it was intense with mudslinging at the time. he is back in wales colours getting ready for autumn internationals but he was asked about the experience and said frankly, i am done. about the experience and said frankly, iam done. i hated about the experience and said frankly, i am done. i hated the tour. i hated the press, the
9:13 am
negativity in new zealand. he did ta ke negativity in new zealand. he did take a lot of flak at the time and we can show you headlines at the time, this one tipping him over the edge. that was before the second test, which the lions won to level the series and they drew the incredible final test, the drawn series against the all blacks. after that final test, he had a pot back at the press by walking into his news c0 nfe re nce at the press by walking into his news conference wearing a red nose. all fun and games at the time, but clearly, it hurt him and the home press having a go at him and he was asked whether he would put his name in the hat for the next tour, south africa in 2021. he said he would not subject himself to that. he beat australia because he was in charge of the last tour. the one against the all blacks and he has to go down
9:14 am
as one of the most successful coachesin as one of the most successful coaches in the history of the lions. but though more. he was upset about sniping within the camp. he said this really hurt him. sean 0'brien, not one of the players who makes up the numbers. he played a massive part in warren gatland's success. he had a real go at the coaches, saying if it was not for them, they would have won the series 3—0, which warren gatlin said hurt him, took the gloss off the tour and was disrespectful of new zealand, because it was a very special thing, warren gatland says, what the lionesses. he says to the next people in charge they have to have the proper preparation time to meld the four home unions together and putting them into a world beating site. in boxing, a setback
9:15 am
for anthonyjoshua. beating site. in boxing, a setback for anthony joshua. 11 days before his next world title fight, selling 70,000 tickets at the principality stadium. the roof was going to be in cardiff, it was going to be a fantastic night but the bulgarian has pulled out with a dodgy shoulder. another boxer has stepped up shoulder. another boxer has stepped up at short notice. apparently he was in training as stand—by for the next mandatory challenger. tricky forjoshua, who had prepared for a big punching guy, a lot taller than the opponent now, so that will be a tricky fight them perhaps he anticipated. next year we can expect, if he comes through that, a week on saturday in cardiff, possibly a las vegas fight against young tae wilder. mark your card for something football wise we are looking forward to. a big draw for
9:16 am
northern ireland, world cup play—offs, they will find out who they face to get to russia. they have to avoid italy, and some enormous champions league matches tonight including spurs at real madrid. an investigation by this programme has found a number of councils in england are regularly buying homeless people one—way train tickets out of their areas. the strategy can be used to reconnect rough sleepers with their family, but one charity has called the policy a form of "social cleansing". an area which regularly uses it is bournemouth, where the number of rough sleepers has trebled since 2010. 0ur reporter anna collinson has been investigating why so many vulnerable people are being drawn to this seaside town. people come to bournemouth because of the beach. sitting down by the beach when you're homeless is a comfortable, calming place. the uk is in the midst of a homeless crisis. but it appears to be affecting some
9:17 am
areas more than others. you can see people begging in the streets and it's an annoyance for the people who come here. but as bournemouth tries to cope with a growing number of rough sleepers, its council is coming under attack for the way it's dealing with the problem. we have people from lancaster. we have people from ireland. we have people from leeds, everywhere, from north down to south. they come to bournemouth. some fear that without drastic change lives will be lost this winter. except that we are people, who have feelings, you know. we're good people. a park in bournemouth on a windy afternoon.
9:18 am
for most it's a place to relax or to play. but for a time this was mhairi hopkins's home. right now i'm taking you through the park to the place where i used to stay every single night that i was on the streets. mhairi developed post—natal depression after giving birth a few years ago. while her parents took care of her son the 22—year—old's mental health deteriorated. this is where i stayed for four weeks. eventually she ran out of places to stay and felt too ashamed to ask for help. so one dark night she bundled up a duvet and a sleeping bag and tried to sleep here. you don't know who's watching you, you don't if you're going to get up in the morning safe. this is a very dodgy area. this park is so secluded, it's absolutely mad. anything can happen. just was watching you now, as you talk about it, you are looking around.
9:19 am
i can't really help it. it is a bit, hold on, who's going to jump out? i was doing this every single night. i'd wake up at least four or five times a night and look around at what was going on, try and calm myself down. it didn't work. you've got such a broken sleep pattern, i didn't actually sleep. did you ever cry? yeah, of course i did. i was on my own, i was in a dark, scary, scary place. if i said i didn't cry i would be lying right now because i did. it's not somewhere you want to be. because when i was out here i felt so alone, and you didn't really want to turn to anyone because you didn't want to feel like a charity case. i would never beg, so i wouldn't do it. but you can see why people do do it because you have nothing. one night every autumn local authorities in england count how many people are sleeping rough. last year there were more than 4,000, a 130% rise in six years. some charities are sceptical about how the data is collected because councils can choose to enter an estimate if they prefer.
9:20 am
in 2016, large cities featured prominently in the 20 areas with the worst problem. but not too far behind was a seaside town, with a population of 180,000, where homelessness has trebled since 2010. when we told people in bournemouth the town had 39 rough sleepers they laughed, and said it was at least 100, if not more. well, this is where it happened. it might not look much, but for 70 or 80 people this is a lifeline, that they get four nights a week. claire matthews has been running the soup kitchen hope for food for four years. a lot of the people they help would be classed as hidden homeless because they sofa—surf or live in hostels or temporary housing, so don't count in official figures. it really upsets me when we have families and children coming to the soup kitchen.
9:21 am
there's a lot of ex—military guys that have served our country that are sleeping on the streets. all of the food has been made by volunteers or donated by supermarkets and claire and her team all work for free. she claims their existence is proof bournemouth council is ignoring its growing homeless problem and that without their help people would starve. i do this seven days a week, 2a hours a day, along with my full—time job and until the council help, i'lljust keep doing it. a lot of people do not want to say, "i need help". and going there for the first time, it's actually admitting that you do need help. james bearn became homeless after his mum died. he now has a temporary roof over his head, can't afford to feed himself. it made me suicidal. because you start to think no one cares. the council, the government, the people with the real power, they don't care.
9:22 am
currently a council is not required to provide emergency accommodation to a homeless person if they're not what is called a priority need. i was told, you're a single man, you're young, you are not vulnerable. i said but i'm homeless, i'm on the street. you're not a pregnant woman, you're not a priority, you're not vulnerable. and then i was on the streets for years, and gradually became more became more and more vulnerable. what would you say to people who think it's down to just drink or drugs? you can't just label everybody together, and say all the homeless, it's their own fault because they're drug addicts. because i ended up homeless, i wasn't a drug addict, my mum died and then i was on the street. i was living with all the alcoholics and drug addicts on the streets. i'd say that's an ignorant way of looking at it. bournemouth council repeatedly refused to be interviewed, but told
9:23 am
us reduced government funding will inevitably impact its homeless services. they say the reason for the rise is varied and complex but evictions from private rented accommodation is the most common situation. there's a lot of wealth in this area. only a short drive away is sandbanks, britain's richest seaside town. but charities say if you look closer many are sinking. a recent report by the national audit office says rising rents combined with benefits being cut is the reason homelessness has increased significantly in england in the last six years. like many places, bournemouth‘s resources are stretched and it's experiencing a major housing shortage but still the vulnerable come. they say it is warmer, there are lots of generous tourists and if all else fails there's the beach. when the sun is shining there is no
9:24 am
better place than bournemouth. there are also many within the town who are concerned the growing homeless problem is damaging bournemouth‘s reputation as a holiday destination. and you can see people begging in the streets, and it's an annoyance for people who come here on holiday. they don't want to be stopped and bothered when they are on holiday. in ten years it's definitely got worse. it's got to the state where the police are called, they are moving them on and moving them on and moving them on and theyjust come back. and so i'm afraid at the bottom end of the scale, where people haven't got money, they haven't got an address they can put their name down to get a flat or get in somewhere, that they're going to sleep rough. and i think you're going to see a lot more of it. so how are bournemouth council
9:25 am
dealing with a problem which is affecting an entire town? its most controversial methods can be linked back to its train station. this is a really popular place for homeless people to hang out, particularly at night, but in 2015 the council started playing loud music like bagpipes and alvin and the chipmunks. they said it was to stop anti—social behaviour. it used to be played all night and then in other certain places they have this high—pitched sound, beep, beep, beep, all night. there's another car park down in the town centre, and all they do all night is play bagpipe music. then it emerged the council were buying homeless people train tickets, but there was a condition. they were one—way. the idea being that could send people back to where they came from. bournemouth council say they only offer the so—called reconnection policy to rough sleepers who aren't local to the area. but gareth glendall—pickton claims
9:26 am
he was still offered a one—way ticket to manchester. it made me feel sick because i've lived here all my life, you know. so what they want to try and do is get all the homeless people out of bournemouth because all the new people coming into the area are seeing all these homeless people sitting there. and i think they see it as it's making bournemouth a bad place or whatever. we found bournemouth council has bought more than 140 rough sleepers one—way train tickets in just under three and a half years. you don't even want, you know, it's hard for me to stand here speaking to you on camera, you know. i don't want my face published, you know, so you can probably understand it is soul destroying for me. it is really soul destroying. and you came up to us today, you wanted to talk to us. can you tell me why? because it needs to be made public.
9:27 am
there are so many people, and they are good people, you know. mhairi now lives in a hostel but if she gets a job she will have to move out, which could potentially lead to her sleeping rough again. the government claims the new homeless reduction act will help people like mhairi. the bill will place greater legal responsibility on councils to stop all people from becoming homeless, notjust ones with a priority need. this place isn't really like home. it's a roof over my head. it's somewhere to stay, but it's not my home. everyone thinks it's as simple as walking into somewhere getting a job and you're sorted out but when jobs find out you live in a hostel they don't want to take you because it's not worth the risk to them. they'd rather have someone with a permanent roof over their head who they believe they can trust more, who wasn't ever made homeless or whatever. the homelessness reduction act is due to become active in april. but that's not much comfort for thousands, this winter.
9:28 am
as for mhairi, she wants a home to call her own, like the one she had when she grew up. to this day i call this my home. and why? because it's where everything was, it's where we were happy. do you still have a relationship with your mum and dad? yeah, we still talk a little bit because obviously they are the ones who help to look after my little boy. without them right now i don't know where i would be still, to be honest. i've got no idea. ijust want us to go back to how we used to be, but i don't know if it's too late. you can read more about our story on the bbc news site. your experience of this really welcome. after 10am, we'll talk to one of the councils which buys one—way train tickets for rough sleepers.
9:29 am
so and couple of comments. this is on twitter. "the bournemouth homeless shelter closed years ago. i was left in the street with cancer: " sean says, "an extremely disturbing piece on the homelessness crisis. magnificent from your team." thank you. your experiences are welcome as i said. still to come: and professor brian cox will be here to talk about all things science. will be here to talk when will be here to talk is a strawberry dead? they will be when is a strawberry dead? they will be talking to gcse students as well. time for the latest news, here's ben. the main headlines on bbc news. theresa may and the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, have agreed to accelerate the brexit the two leaders said they had had a "broad, constructive exchange on current european and global challenges", including preserving
9:30 am
the iran nuclear deal, strengthening security in europe to battle terrorism, and article 50 negotiations. however, there was no sign of movement on key issues, such as how much the uk would be expected to pay to leave the eu. an investigation by this programme has found that several councils in england are regularly buying one—way train tickets to transfer homeless people out of their area. more than £1,000 a year was spent by some councils on one way "reconnection" tickets, as they're called. the strategy can be used to reconnect rough sleepers with family, but one man has said he was offered a ticket to a city he had never been to before. the charity homeless link has called the scale of the problem worrying, but the government says it is investing £550 million to tackle homelessness. the authorities in the republic of ireland say it could be days before they restore power to hundreds of thousands
9:31 am
of properties, following the damage caused by storm 0phelia — which killed three people. people in scotland and north east england are being warned of more problems this morning, with winds of up to 70 miles per hour expected during the rush hour. scottish power say there are currently 4,000 homes without power across north wales. the met office yellow weather warning for wind covering northern ireland, much of scotland and parts of england and wales remains until midday, with flood warnings also in place. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. and now the latest sport. the headlines, warren gatlin says he will not coach the lions again. he oversaw the series win against australia and the drawn series against the all blacks, but said he hated negativity from the press and would not subject himself to it. anthonyjoshua's next opponent has
9:32 am
pulled out 11 days before their heavyweight world title fight. the cameroonian carlos tack and will replace him. and equaliser against west bromwich albion last night for leicester. a massive night of champions league football ahead with totte n ha m champions league football ahead with tottenham facing real madrid at the birnbaum. i will be back with an update after 10am. the latest inflation figures have just come out. ben bland is here to explain them for us. the figure is 3%, which means the average prices for goods have gone up average prices for goods have gone up in september compared with august. they have gone up faster between the two months compared to the year before. inflation is a measure of a typical basket of goods and services which we typically spend money on and they compare how
9:33 am
much they cost now with how much they cost a year ago. prices have gone up they cost a year ago. prices have gone up on average they cost a year ago. prices have gone up on average 3% compared to september last year and a lot of factors play into this, partly the wea k factors play into this, partly the weak pound which means importing raw materials and goods is expensive which is passed on in terms of higher prices. the reason it is significant is because the bank of england looks at the figure when it sets interest rates and if inflation is high, it pushes them to move closer to putting interest rates up to try to control inflation. that might bring average prices under control and help with the cost of living squeeze, but it puts up borrowing costs which means higher mortgages to pay and it could squeeze from the other side and the danger is it chokes off economic growth. also, the septemberfigure is important because the government uses this inflation figure two sets
9:34 am
next yea r‘s uses this inflation figure two sets next year's pensions and benefits increases. thank you. people in the music industry have been speaking out after this programme heard claims yesterday that abuse and harassment there is as bad if not worse than in hollywood. i think it's pretty prevalent. i mean, the industry as a whole, there is a culture ofjust everyday sexism. and everyday bullying in regards to women. but i think there are, you know, i would say there are figures in the industry that are, you know, similar, in terms of how they, i don't know what the word is... treat women? treat women, to someone like weinstein. i've been in situations with men that would be more senior to me who tried to use that position of power in order to garner some kind of sexualfavour with me. so if it's like... the most obvious one i can think of was, i was at a festival and somebody who is a promoter came up to me
9:35 am
and took me back to a caravan and basically exposed himself to me. at the time i was... i'm the sort of person who would have laughed it off and thought it was disgusting but i know that he did the same thing to other women on that same day. and he's still working in the industry today. if people recognise what i'm saying, then it's an excuse for people to stand up and make their stories known, because i think it's only by people coming out and saying this happened, this is unacceptable, i know i'm only a pa at a company but i'm witnessing this, this and this happening and i think it's terrible, that's how you're going to kind of shift people's perception of what's wrong and right. so many people got in touch with us after that interview to tell their stories of sexual harassment in the music industry. clare scivier used to work as an a&r representative
9:36 am
in the music industry — and experienced sexual harassment. jordannah elizabeth is a freelance musicjournalist, and a soul and folk musician, who says she was raped in her early 20s when trying to get a record deal. erin sharoni is a dj, former tv presenter and deputy editor of dj magazine. she says she has been sexually assaulted. rachel grace almeida is a music journalist who was sexually assaulted by someone in the industry. she has since investigated assaults and harassment of women across the music business. and in bristol is sarah ginn, a photographer who says her career suffered after she rejected an artist's advances. they have all waived their right to anonymity to talk to us this morning. what have you experienced? i started in the record business in the late 19805 and within the first
9:37 am
week i was working for the company, my boss attacked me and physically grabbed me and threatened me and because he wanted me to drive him home and i realised ifelt 5cared and had the guts to say, absolutely not. i have found the entire bu5ine55 not. i have found the entire business is pretty morally bankrupt. i went into behavioural psychology 15 years ago and now i coach and mentor a lot of artists and writers and it is still going on. how widespread i5 and it is still going on. how widespread is it? vary. -- it is very. tell us what happened to you in your twenties? in my early 205 i was an artist and musician travelling around. i received enough clout to go to los angeles and pursue a re cord go to los angeles and pursue a record deal. there were a number of
9:38 am
instances of being told i was overweight. i was a size four and being told i had to lose 15 pounds in six weeks. i was told i would have to have sex with whoever i was told to have sex with by certain managers and anrs. told to have sex with by certain managers and anrsi told to have sex with by certain managers and anrs. i am sorry to interrupt. you were told to have sex with certain men? straightout. that is what i was going to say, sexual favours are currency in the music industry and also in hollywood. these men consider a sexual favour to bea these men consider a sexual favour to be a part of the gig, if you are a young woman, particularly working to bea a young woman, particularly working to be a pop star, and expecting to make millions of dollars. drugs and sex are expected and you are
9:39 am
expected to do what you are told by men you do not know. you have worked in wall street, in television and now in dance music as a dj, and journalists. is it possible to say which sector is worse? unfortunately, the behaviour is endemic and as you have seen from getting e—mails and responses on social media from women across the world, really, it is not specific to those industries in which it is stereotypically where women are objectified and discriminated against. as you mentioned i experienced sexual assault and have experienced sexual assault and have experienced varying degrees of harassment across all three industries. it is equally tolerated in all of them as my fellow american guest will agree with. it is normalised and you have to look no
9:40 am
further than our country's presidency for a glaring example of that. although you say it has gone on the decades before donald trump took over as president? it is a glaring example of the normalisation. rachel, thank you for talking to us. what happened to you as you started out as a music journalist. i was 21 years old and i went to the show with a senior person i was working with and we got a taxi back home together. becau5e we lived near each other and he attacked me in the back of a taxi. that is pretty much what happened. how did you respond? i could have dealt with it by not really dealing with it but i saw this person getting more advanced in their career and kind of walking all over me in career and kind of walking all over meina career and kind of walking all over me in a certain way and i decided to come out about it and get examples
9:41 am
from other women in the industry. sarah, you spent ten years as a photographer in the music industry but you have quit because of the harassment and abuse you have experience. give the audience and in5ight. experience. give the audience and insight. what i find is that if you are a female in the industry and have any kind of issue with a man in the industry, they tend to blackball you out of the industry and harass you. in my case, i was chased out of a festival, out of the photo pits by someone i had an issue with a year and a half previously. the problem being is that people tend to close ranks where there are issues between people but it only really tends to happen to women more than anything. after hearing my friends' stories, i decided it was not a place i could
9:42 am
carry on any more. right. that is a real indictment about the state of the industry? like you were saying, it is notjust the music industry, it is notjust the music industry, it happens in all industries. this i5 it happens in all industries. this is what we are discovering. claire 5aid is what we are discovering. claire said it was prevalent in the music industry and we have heard your exa m ple5 industry and we have heard your examples from different sectors. what has to happen to change attitudes? i thinkjust talking about it. we have seen everything changing in america with what has gone on in hollywood and people feeling able to speak out and that i5 feeling able to speak out and that is what we need to do more of this i5a is what we need to do more of this is a start. what about you ? is a start. what about you? the conversation absolutely has to be broached. it took me a decade to write about my account in la weekly. i have noticed there has been more inclusiveness in
9:43 am
there has been more inclusiveness in the media and as women grow in the ranks, asjournalists the media and as women grow in the ranks, as journalists and the media and as women grow in the ranks, asjournalists and producers and executive producers. after a time, i believe a couple of my colleagues and i realised particularly after a story dropped about r kelly and other people, we realised it was our responsibility and getting to a point in our careers where things cannot be taken away from us. it is a responsibility on our part as women to understand that the world is changing. we can control our narrative. this is really about saving lives and the future of women and keeping women from being hurt and raped and that is what i try to keep in mind when i do these shows. it is not about me, it is about protecting bodies and lives. what would you say? i would like to
9:44 am
say especially to the people i know will have a response that is, say, -2 will have a response that is, say, —2 women standing up and coming out, wondering why we did not do it before, did we invite this sort of action perpetrated against is? i would like to say remaining silent does not diminish a victims credibility. to open up a wound, it is their choice. it is not a hard cast moral obligation and it does not relinquish a perpetrator's responsibility. 0h, not relinquish a perpetrator's responsibility. oh, if she said something sooner, he would not have done it to the next woman. he should not have done it to the first woman or everand it is not have done it to the first woman or ever and it is important for people to keep that in mind, it is the perpetrator's shame and their responsibility not to do these things. it is not her responsibility to stop him. it from happening in
9:45 am
the future. another important thing, because we are talking about the entertainment industry, to keep in mind, is that our office space is not a cubicle, you should be. 0ur offices are places in which parties are taking place and most of the time, people may be intoxicated so there is already a seed of doubt. wash intoxicated, dressed provocatively? did she invite it, as if the egregious act is excusable or even worse acceptable because of the environment in which they took place and that is something people have not touched on and it is important to consider in the harvey weinstein case, how he brought within in. and at festivals, or happen to me at a show, and these are vulnerable situations in which intrinsically there are blurred boundaries. it is not a corporate office and people are not dressed in suits, but that
9:46 am
does not excuse the behaviour. zoe says, "these women on your programme are so strong. we need to speak about the 5exi5m and abuse in the music industry. there is so much we don't see." a criticism from steve who says, "despite what eve ryo ne steve who says, "despite what everyone knows about the music industry your programme only has women on the show today to talk about abu5e women on the show today to talk about abuse in the record industry which." it is a really fair point and we are aware it happens to men and we are aware it happens to men and gay men and that's something we are pursuing. so, watch this space. thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for your time. thank you. sexual harassment happens in all walks of life. this morning on the programme we want to hear from you, if you've been sexually harassed in your workplace do get in touch in all the usual way5. if you're happy to speak on air start your e—mail, or tweet or text with the words "call me".
9:47 am
we'll try and speak to as many of you as possible after 10.30am this morning. breaking news. it is the latest hate crime statistics. there has been an increa5e crime statistics. there has been an increase in hate crime statistics according to the 0ns. an increase of 2996 in according to the 0ns. an increase of 29% in 2016/2017, there were over 80,000 offences recorded by the police in which one or more hate crime 5trand5 wa5 police in which one or more hate crime 5trand5 was deemed to be a motivating factor. and the increase over the last year is thought to reflect a genuine ri5e over the last year is thought to reflect a genuine rise in hate crime around the time of the eu referendum, but due to on going improvements in crime recorded by the police. more on that after 10am. how do you build a universe from scratch? can extraterrestrials exist? what are the fundamental building blocks of reality? when is a simple strawberry actually dead? some of the questions professor brian cox and comedian
9:48 am
robin ince are answering in a new book out this thursday. they have been making 5cience accessible to everyone for yea r5 through their hit radio programme the infinite monkey cage. and they are here. hello. also with us are some gcse science students from rui5lip high school in west london. suak5hi, robert, adam, ula, reem and tariq who are here to ask them questions. hello and welcome to the programme. cani hello and welcome to the programme. can i introduce to brian cox and robin ince. i will be answering fewer of the questions. i will be interrupting when people are going, "what's brian cox talking about now?" how is it going? well, i hope. there has been a change in the last ten years and you know, it's not all
9:49 am
down to us and the bbc. the government recognised it a while ago that we have a shortage of scientists and engineers. so there has been a big push, i think, scientists and engineers. so there has been a big push, ithink, to address that need. why are you interested in science? what is it about science that you find exciting? it explains so many things about the world that you may not otherwise understand which i think is very important for the younger generation. it makes you look at things differently because you get to see how things work and like how it works. so you can understand it better. there are like so many different theories and there is like so different theories and there is like so many different ways of explaining each one and ijust find it really interesting. does it blow your mind sometimes? yeah. it's hard to comprehend really. that's really important. that's the whole thing which i think for a lot of people who, you know, are older than you and who have left school and they go, "i can't approach this. or this
9:50 am
is too hard." you may never end up with a deep understanding of the nature of the universe, but the journey of finding out different ideasis journey of finding out different ideas is a delight in itself. the journey, that bit where you look up at the stars and you start, the first time i heard there were 200 billion stars approximately, in our galaxy, you just go, "hang on a minute. " you have galaxy, you just go, "hang on a minute." you have that moment where you almost stop, you almost freeze. it's an incredible number and you almost stop, you almost freeze. it's an incredible numberand it you almost stop, you almost freeze. it's an incredible number and it is an incredible potential of life beyond our own planet. all of those things, those moments of being able to look up at the stars and the story of the collision of neutron stars and the understanding of gravitational waves and how that helps, these stories, just the little details and you go, "wow, that's beautiful" who has got the question about gravitational waves. go for it? i was wondering with the observe vation of the two stars, why i5
9:51 am
observe vation of the two stars, why is the understanding of gaffe tational waves important? so these are tational waves important? so these a re two stars, tational waves important? so these are two stars, they are a bit more massive than our sun, but each is squashed into something about ten miles in diameter. we saw two orbiting around themselves and colliding into each other and they shake the fabric of the universe. it isa shake the fabric of the universe. it is a violent event that space and time is stretched and squashed. the man who got the nobel prize for the idea a couple of weeks ago, called ita idea a couple of weeks ago, called it a storm in time. at one level, it's interesting because einstein predicted this 100 years ago, it is the way the fabric of the universe changes. we saw it not only in the fabric of the universe changing, but in light, visible light and x—rays and that's confirmed one thing which is if you look at, have you got a piece ofjewellery, a wedding ring, it's made of gold. it has been one of the big mysteries. that's not
9:52 am
made of gold. i don't think it is gold. one of the big questions is where does gold come from? where is it made? it's not made in the hearts of normal stars and one of the theories it was made in the cold is of exotic objects many billions of years ago, in the case of the gold in your ring and that turns out to be true so we saw gold being produced in this collision which i think is a remarkable thing. do you ee, think is a remarkable thing. do you agree, robin i think, i have want to find out what lesser stars made this ring. you said it's not gold! i rememberthe ring. you said it's not gold! i remember the first time we were lucky, we were at jodrell bank and we we re lucky, we were at jodrell bank and we were standing in the middle of the lovell telescope and when brian started explaining and saying the things about the first detection is two black holes merging and the power output is 500 times greater than all the stars in the known universe, that hooks you and when we we re universe, that hooks you and when we were touring, very often we get questions where people will go, this is probably a stupid question,
9:53 am
because people are worried, they we re never because people are worried, they were never stupid questions. even something simple, we think as simple, why is the sky blue? that takes you on a beautiful adventure of the sky. let's get some more que5tion5 because this is why you're here. i was wondering do you think there is a possibility that someone could live two lives, one in a real world and one in virtual reality? it's a good question. so we think about the human brain and it is made of the same stuff as this table and the stars and planets in the sky. so, it obeys the laws of nature. so that means we can in principle simulate it in the same way we can simulate it in the same way we can simulate the weather for example. so, there is no reason i can see where in the future we couldn't get to the point where we can simulate human brains and there is a project, a big european project to do that, which isjust beginning now. so, that's that sort of suggests that you could in principle, essentially copy your brain. and put it into a computer. so, i don't see any reason
9:54 am
why not except that the technology is way beyond us at the moment. so, i don't think, i doubt in our lifetime, i really do... in our lifetime, i really do... in our lifetime or their lifetime? well, certainly theirs. we will be 60, but you might be around by then. as old guys, you might be around by then. as old guys, we are a little bit kind of uncertain and sceptical about simulation theory. any of you think we are living in a simulation?” simulation theory. any of you think we are living in a simulation? i was going to ask, do you think that we, this hole world could be a virtual reality and that another life form could control us? we do in the book. it's actual lay possibility, a strong possibility, elon musk made news saying he thinks we live in a simulation. we went through the argument in the book because on the radio show we had an enormous argument about it because i think when you go through the argument it's quite possible that we are living in a — it sounds like science
9:55 am
fiction. the thing with the arguments is you have got to find a bit that you disagree with when you go logically through it and i couldn't when i read one of the papers on it. i couldn't find the bit with which i disagreed and science is about this, science is about thinking carefully and no matter how outlandish the conclusion you get to, you can'tjust dismiss it. the question about do we live in a simulation? could we tell? probably not. secondly, do we care? does it matter? does it matter? would it matter to you? no. it wouldn't matter to me. who is controlling us? well, it's a good question. the whether the programmer intervenes in the simulation. we don't see that because we live in a world that's governed by laws of physics and laws of nature and we don't tend to see things that violate the laws and we don't see people disappear or don't get transported back ten years in the past or things like that. so, if we
9:56 am
are ina past or things like that. so, if we are in a simulation and then it doesn't look as though the programmer intervenes. the strawberry doesn't float off. the law of gravity doesn't get turned off. rattle through your answers. he never rattles through them.|j off. rattle through your answers. he never rattles through them. i know. i really want everybody to get their opportunity. how do you think the world is going end? what's your favourite theory? so the sun is going to run out of fuel in five billion years, we know that, before that, it will get too hot on earth, but the universe is continuing to expand, expanding faster and faster so we think the stars will burn out and we will live in a dark and cold universe. if the universe is always expanding, what does it expand into? a great question. the idea is i mentioned the fabric of the universe earlier with the gravitational waves. it's stretching. you can imagine that something can be infinitely big and still stretch and that may well be what's happening so
9:57 am
it doesn't expand into anything, it just stretches and stretches and stretches. i'm going for a clash of galaxies in three billion years' time. there is that. adam, you asked one, i'm sorry. how are poorer people expected to learn a living if robots can do theirjob? that's a really good question. i was and a conference last week and there was a point made which is the point of science, the purpose of science, is to generatejobs, new science, the purpose of science, is to generate jobs, new knowledge and therefore, jobs, faster than it destroys jobs and if you do that, you live in a better world in the future than we did in the past. so the challenge is yes, we know how to build machines to do some jobs and the challenge is to invest so we can generate new knowledge and build new industries so that there are more interesting jobs that will replace the old jobs, taken over by the robots and that's a big challenge for us, it means we have to invest in education so people like you can go into the newjobs or invent the newjobs. go into the newjobs or invent the new jobs. we need to go into the newjobs or invent the newjobs. we need to think more about the idea rather than profit.
9:58 am
profit can usurp that. it's up to us asa human profit can usurp that. it's up to us as a human being to make those decisions to think about the human relationships. robert? which field of science do you think has the best opportunities for young people? oh, it's a good question. you didn't mention money there? many of them do. we have a shortage across all areas, but i think the big advances at the moment, biosciences is really rattling forward at the moment. the advancesin rattling forward at the moment. the advances in medical technology are remarkable, but space flight, one of our biggest growth industries in the uk is spacecraft building and i think the british government announcement about that, trying to build a space port in cornwall and maybe in scotland. it is growth all the way from aerospace through to bio sciences. the reason there is a bowl of strawberries, you discussed it on your radio programme, you talk about in your book, it is like an
9:59 am
annual, you use strawberries to talk about life and death? it was one of those flippant moments that sop often leads to a very lengthy discussion. there was a moment on the radio show where one of the scientist was saying, "well, what they took was a dead strawberry?" and bri—arne went, "so when is a strawberry dead? " and bri—arne went, "so when is a strawberry dead?" is that meant to be his accent? it is this beautiful kind of moment where from that point onwards we went when is a strawberry dead? it has been worked out, and it is specific, but it's a journey. seeds live a long time. there is a seed vault where we keep seeds and some can live for 100 years or more, but there will come a point when they can't germnate and they're dead. this isn't a seed. the pips are the ovaries and strawberries are complicated things. they are not a berry and the little things you think are seeds, they are not seeds.
10:00 am
the seeds are inside the little pips. our show has been about creating the complexity ofjam. pips. our show has been about creating the complexity of jam. we love it. we love it. thank you so much. you are all doing triple science. is it this year or the year after? for us, thits year. for them, they are doing it next year. best of luck. thank you both of you. how to build a universe by brian cox and robin ince is available to buy this thursday. pa rt part one. part one? yes. it is very much a starter pack. thank you. and it is available to buy this thursday. are not dressed in suits, but that does not excuse the behaviour. wand hand we have the remnants of former hurricane 0phelia pushing eastwards. —— we have. and we have heavy rain. the strongest winds
10:01 am
across and still are across south—east scotland and north east england. we are looking at gusts of wind about 50, 60 mph and up to 70 mph at times. if you look at the cluster of isobars, it still is pretty windy with coastal gales. as the remnants pull away, it will drag the remnants pull away, it will drag the isobars with it and behind it, it will not be as windy. this morning in south—east scotland and north east england, strong wind. the risk of disruption to travel. we also have rain in the north of scotland, some of it heavy, and the wind they feature, but not as strong as through central lowlands. and down to the south pennines. and coastal gales off the coast of north—west england and wales. in and south, a fine start. some seeing
10:02 am
sunshine. if you do not have the sunshine, bright with cloud slowly starting to build from the south across parts of cornwall and devon. as we head through the course of the day the cloud will continue to build, producing rain. it will still be blustery and across scotland and northern ireland and northern england is looking at showers, some of which will be heavy. between them, sunshine. compared to yesterday, when it was 24 celsius in one part of kent, it will feel cooler today. 0vernight, rain drifting north—eastwards and some of that will be heavy. likely to see patchy fog form over northern ireland and under clear skies in scotland, a touch of frost. no such problems further south with an overnight low of 10—12. tomorrow we pick up the rain and we are looking at it push off in the direction of
10:03 am
the north sea and behind is a lot of cloud that will produce showers. the brightest skies behind that. sunshine at times in south—west england, northern ireland and scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland and looking at temperatures between ten and 17. from thursday into friday we have an area of low pressure coming our way. you can tell from the isobars it will be windy. another follows from tell from the isobars it will be windy. anotherfollows from friday into saturday. this one looks more potent. something we are keeping a close eye on and i will keep you updated this week. hello, it's tuesday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. we can exclusively reveal a number of councils in england regularly buy one—way train tickets for homeless people out of their area. it made me feel sick, because i have lived here all my life. i think what they want to do is get all the homeless people out of bournemouth,
10:04 am
because all the new people coming into the area are seeing all these homeless people sitting there. in the next hour, we'll hear from a tv presenter who slept rough on a park bench and a council which says it has helped eight homeless people reconnect — that's their word — with their original home area. and music insiders tell us about the level of abuse in their profession. sexual favours our currency in the music industry and also in hollywood. this morning on the programme we want to hear from you — if you've been sexually harassed in your workplace, do get in touch. we will talk to you after 10:30am. ben is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. inflation has risen to its highest level in more than five years. the rate of consumer price index inflation rose to three
10:05 am
inflation rose to 3% last month — up from 2.9 per cent in august. it's believed the rise is driven largely by the pounds fall since last year's brexit vote. theresa may and the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, have agreed to accelerate the brexit negotiations following talks held over a working dinner on monday. the two leaders said they had had a "broad, constructive exchange on current european and global challenges", including preserving the iran nuclear deal, strengthening security in europe to battle terrorism, and article 50 negotiations. however, there was no sign of movement on key issues, such as how much the uk would be expected to pay to leave the eu. an investigation by this programme has found that several councils in england are regularly buying one—way train tickets to transfer homeless people out of their area. more than £1,000 a year was spent by some councils on one way
10:06 am
"reconnection" tickets, as they're called. the strategy can be used to reconnect rough sleepers with family, but one man has said he was offered a ticket to a city he had never been to before. the charity homeless link has called the scale of the problem worrying, but the government says it is investing £550 million to tackle homelessness. more people in the music industry have been speaking out after hearing claims on this programme yesterday that harassment in the industry is as bad if not worse than in hollywood. some said the wrong questions are still being asked when victims come forward. 0ur questions are still being asked when victims come forward. our offices are places in which parties take place and most of the time people may be intoxicated, so there is a seed of doubt sown, wash intoxicated, what she dressed
10:07 am
provocatively? as if the egregious act is somehow excusable, or even worse acceptable, because of the environment in which they took place and that is something people have not touched on very much and it is important. more from me at 10:30am. here's some sport now with 0lly. just trying to find my place. warren gatland says he won't coach the lions again. he led them to a series win against australia and this summer a drawn series against new zealand but he says, i hated the tour, and all the negativity from the press and personal criticsm and he won't put himslef through it again. he also said he was really hurt by the comments made by sean 0'brien, one of his key players. the irish forward says the coaching wasn't up to scratch and they should have won the series 3—0. anthonyjoshua has a new opponent for his heavyweight title fight in cardiff a week on saturday.
10:08 am
the bulgarian kubrat pulev has pulled out after hurting his shoulder in training. over 70,000 tickets have been sold for the fight under the roof at the principlaity stadium. cameroonian born carlos takam, who is based in france, will now cahllenge for the ibf and wba belts. it'll be joshua's first fight since april when he stopped wladimir klitschko at wembley. riyad mahrez was recalled last night for leicester and scored his first goal of the season as they drew 1—1 against west bromwich albion. they remain in the relegation zone, though. what a night what a night in madrid. totte n ha m what a night what a night in madrid. tottenham playing real madrid. both
10:09 am
teams have won two out of two in their group. zinedine zidane, the manager, hailed harry kane a com plete manager, hailed harry kane a complete player. scoring 15 for club and country last month but even with harry kane on form you would think it would be tricky for spurs. it is special to play here, real madrid, champions league, it is special. the club with most victories in that competition. you feel when you play here, you come here, you start to feel the reality about football. we are excited. sergio aguero could return to the manchester city starting line—up tonight, for their match at home to napoli. he damaged ribs in a car accident a couple of weeks ago. liverpool face a must—win game away to maribor, after drawing their opening two group matches. an important world cup play—off draw
10:10 am
at lunchtime with northern ireland finding out who they will face to try to make it to russia next summer. the man leading the independent investigation into historical child sex abuse in football has received counselling to deal with the traumatic evidence he has heard. the lawyer clive sheldon was asked by the football association to look into the scandal after a series of allegations from former players, many of them heard on this programme. 0ur reporterjim reed has been following the story for a year. where are we up to? this enquiry was announced almost a year ago. it came after dozens of former footballers came out, many on this programme, to talk about abuse they suffered as children and young players. after that, hundreds more came out to talk to police about similar abuse they alleged. the fa appointed clive
10:11 am
sheldon, a senior lawyer, to look into this and answer who knew what and when and could more have been done to protect young players. we understand he has been offered and accepted counselling to deal with some of these accounts, which he and the rest of his team have been hearing, which have been described as harrowing and serious at times. as for the enquiry, we understand it is making headway. so far they have spoken to 15 survivors of abuse and interviewed them, and they have carried out another 35 interviews, with witnesses, administrators, that kind of thing. they plan to speak to at least another 20—30 survivors, but that number, critics could say, is on the low side. the police are looking into more than 270 potential cases of abuse involving potentially more than 500 victims. it may be opens them up to criticism on that
10:12 am
side. the fa has spoken to former players, many of whom have spoken on our programme but one in particular. tony our programme but one in particular. to ny b rya nt our programme but one in particular. tony bryant came on our programme, a former player for chesterfield, hull and other clubs and he spoke about abuse he suffered at the hands of a coach, ted langford. they were very professional, i have to say that. they recorded the whole meeting. they were very respectful. does that mean that you have faith in that inquiry or not necessarily? i'd like to think that they'll do a good job. i would like to think that they will do a good job. and what would you like from that inquiry, what do you want it to achieve? the truth. his case is particularly interesting to this enquiry we understand because he is one of the few people,
10:13 am
they say they have encountered so far, he says he warned senior people in the game back then and that is what this enquiry is looking at. who knew what and whether more could have been done. what is the enquiry doing next? a big focuses on documentary evidence. there is a warehouse in east london with thousands of boxes of old documents that the fa has stored. so far they have reviewed 1266 boxes of evidence. we are talking about correspondence, letters from parents to the fa, internal correspondence, complaints. but they have to check another 2092 boxes they say could be potentially relevant, which is what we think is causing a delay, in terms of the timings. because they have so much to do. how long is it likely to take? we expect this report at the beginning of next year. now we think april at the
10:14 am
earliest it will be handed to the fa, perhaps later than that by the time it is published. another thing thatis time it is published. another thing that is interesting, it was meant to be looking at historical cases of abuse but it looks like now they are starting to widen that to look at the current state of child protection in football, whether the right protection is now in place. people watching this with children playing the game would be interested in that, i would have thought. still to come: for the first time, the royal college of psychiatrists has admitted "profound regret" impact that treatments such as "gay aversion therapy." we will speak to a young man of 18 who was given the therapy at 18. let's now talk more about a controversial tactic to deal with england's growing homeless problem. an investigation by this programme has found a number of local authorities are regularly buying
10:15 am
rough sleepers one—way train tickets out of their areas. councils say they only do it if it is the best way to get an individual off the streets. but one charity has likened the policy to "social cleansing". 0ur reporter anna collinson has been to bournemouth, which uses the reconnection strategy often. right now i'm taking you through the park to the place where i used to stay every single night on the streets. mhairi developed post—natal depression after giving birth a few years ago. while her parents took care of her son, the 22—year—old's mental health deteriorated. this is it. this is where i stayed for four weeks. eventually, she ran out of places to stay and felt too ashamed to ask for help. so, one dark night, she bundled up a duvet and a sleeping bag and tried to sleep here. you don't know who's watching you. you don't if you're going to get up in the morning safe. this is a very dodgy area.
10:16 am
this park is so secluded, it's absolutely mad. anything can happen. one night every autumn, local authorities in england count how many people are sleeping rough. last year, there were more than 4,000 — a 130% rise in six years. some charities are sceptical about how the data is collected because councils can choose to enter an estimate if they prefer. in 2016, large cities featured prominently in the 20 areas with the worst problem. but not too far behind was a seaside town, with a population of 180,000, where homelessness has trebled since 2010. when we told people in bournemouth the town had 39 rough sleepers, they laughed and said it was at least 100, if not more. this is a really popular place for homeless people to hang out, particularly at night. but in 2015, the council started playing loud music like bagpipes and alvin and the chipmunks.
10:17 am
they said it was to stop anti—social behaviour. it used to be played all night and then in other certain places, they have this high—pitched sound, beep, beep, beep, all night. then it emerged the council were buying homeless people train tickets. but there was a condition. they were one—way. the idea being they could send people back to where they came from. bournemouth council repeatedly refused to be interviewed but say they only offer the so—called reconnection policy to rough sleepers who aren't local to the area. but gareth glendall—pickton claims he was still offered a one—way ticket to manchester. it made me feel sick because i've lived here all my life, you know. so what they want to try and do is get all the homeless people out of bournemouth because they see it as it is making bournemouth a bad place. the homeless reduction act is due to become active in april. the government says it will place
10:18 am
greater legal responsibility on councils to stop all people from becoming homeless, notjust ones with a priority need. when jobs find out you live in a hostel, they don't want to take you because it's not worth the risk to them. they'd rather have someone with a permanent roof over their head who they believe they can trust more, who wasn't ever made homeless or whatever. we asked bournemouth borough council to talk to us this morning but they said no. they told us they only offer one—way tickets to homeless people who do not have a local connection to the area, "where it can be proven that the service user can be safety reconnected back to their area of locality, the bournemouth and poole rough sleeper team are to reconnect the client back to their home address as soon as is possible." the department for communities and local government told us the government is investing £550 million to tackle homelessness and rough sleeping.
10:19 am
we can talk now to tv presenter, gail porter, who slept rough on a park bench after major money problems. this is herfirst tv interview talking about it. welcome gail. we also have alison butler. who is the labour deputy leader of croydon council, which says in five years it has helped reconnect eight homeless people with their original home area. thank you for coming on the programme. gali, from the outside you had it all, presenting shows like top of the pops and fully booked and then you are sleeping on a park bench. how does that happen? everything caught up with me and the older, i've lost my hair, i don't know if you noticed. a lot of work dried up and then the kind of work i was doing i do a lot of charity work and you don't get paid and you have bills to pay and rent to pay and i have got a daughter and yeah, it was alljust have got a daughter and yeah, it was all just getting out have got a daughter and yeah, it was alljust getting out of control and i was, alljust getting out of control and iwas, i alljust getting out of control and i was, i didn't squand squander money ed anything, it was just thinking i'm doing a job for £100
10:20 am
this month and my rent is more than £100 and i need to, and yeah, it just got, itjust got to a stage where i couldn't keep up and i had no one to ask for help and i didn't know what to do and i was embarrassed so i couldn't pay the rent and then i had this big bag and loads of my friends were there and i would sleep on lots of sofas and stuff and it got towards christmas time and! stuff and it got towards christmas time and i couldn't afford to put money on the phone and everyone had gone away for christmas. where do i stay now? i couldn't call anyone. i thought i'm going to have to do the bench and i went to hampstead heath andi bench and i went to hampstead heath and i didn't get murdered which was great. thank goodness. you're saying all this in a really upbeat way with all this in a really upbeat way with a big smile on yourface, i'm guessing you were feeling low?|j cried a lot. ifelt guessing you were feeling low?|j cried a lot. i felt so useless and when you have got no base and trying it get a job, you must come across this alice, you have to have
10:21 am
somewhere to get a job and then if you don't have somewhere, you can't, it's like a catch 22. so yeah, it was pretty tricky, but you know, i got through it, positive thinking and just keeping, trying to work as much as possible and touch wood... i have got a roof over my head at the moment. that's brilliant to hear. lying on the bench and presumably putting stuff over you to keep you warm? yeah. most people watching will never have experienced that and hopefully never will. .. will never have experienced that and hopefully never will. . ij will never have experienced that and hopefully never will... i hope no one does. it's not nice, you just think, hopefully, a, you're cold for a start and then you just think, hopefully there is not a bad person around. ididn't hopefully there is not a bad person around. i didn't have anything for them to steal, but you never know, but i put the thing over my head so nobody knew whether it was a girl or a boy or whatever. so, yeah. iwas, yeah, i was left alone and it was not the nicest experience of my life, but i'm doing it again in two
10:22 am
weeks' time for a homeless charity, but yeah, still smiling. yeah, absolutely, you are. what do you think of this policy of come councils, when they say, they have evidence that there is no connection to their local area, but they can reconnect a homeless person with their original hometown or city or village, they buy them a one way train ticket? well, you're going to be the expert on talking about that, but personally, my daughter was staying with her dad and he is down in sussex way and my family are from scotland. so if they gave me a one way ticket up to scotland, where am i going to go? i don't have my mum any more and my dad was in spain at the time and my daughter is down there. it's kind of, i'm still going to have a problem, but theyjust wa nt to have a problem, but theyjust want me to be, it is almost like cleansing, you're not from here and you have to go off. it's a really odd policy. alison, is it social cleansing? i think it's an
10:23 am
incredibly difficult subject and gail... is it social cleansing? as you have said we've reconnected in the last five years eight people, the last five years eight people, the majority of those were actually back to other london boroughs. so, but we at croydon feel quite strongly, there is no point sending anybody anywhere else they want to be there because they willjust come back. i'm sure a lot of people moved away from the area because of maybe family problems and they want to go somewhere different. london is quite quite different because i think we, as local authorities, see our borders, but other people who live in london, don't recognise the board r borders, they maybe living in lambeth or croydon, so we would only reconnect somebody home if they wanted to go there and we have to put the services in place. so you have to make contact with the other local authority and you have to see that they have got somewhere to go to and you have to see they have got a way to sustain that and that's all the more difficult because some of
10:24 am
the more difficult because some of the things you've touched on in your report around the bend fit cuts, around the freezes on house approximating benefit, because there is no point sending someone somewhere where theyjust can't afford to stay. can you guarantee of the eight people thaw say you reconnected that there was somewhere for them to live when they got back to their old borough? we put in place provisions so that we knew where they were going and what they we re where they were going and what they were doing. so there is no question whatsoever, you give someone alticket and say goodbye. because that's simply not sustainable. it's not fairon them that's simply not sustainable. it's not fair on them and it's not fair on the local authority they're going to or croydon. in anna's report we saw a man who was offered a one—way ticket to a city he has never been to? i find that really puzzling if thatis to? i find that really puzzling if that is what happened. what is the point in that? and often if you do that, that as a local authority, you will find they will get on a train and come back to where they started.
10:25 am
some of the biggest things as a authority, we look at is preventing it happening in the first place. if you can prevent people becoming homeless, you can stop the cycle of homelessness. gail, you talked about the none problems and the spiral, what advice would you give them having experienced what you have experienced? well, i mean, iwould love to give great advice, but it's deusmt once you're in that situation and if you have not got people around and you don't have a phone, it's difficult. there is amazing charities that you can go, but they need to find where the charities are and if you're homeless and you don't have access to communication, it's really ha rd, have access to communication, it's really hard, but there are places out there to help them. before hopefully you get to that point, where you think i'm going to have to sleep on a park bench tonight, please contact citizens advice bureau because they can always help. also contact your local authority because if they can't help you, they
10:26 am
will know of all the things in place... i twopebt a hostel place andi place... i twopebt a hostel place and i had known about it when i used to live in soho and it closed down. i walked all the way there and then you need money to stay there as well. you need to, yeah... besides the council there is a lot of excellent charities out there, crisis and so on and we can put new touch and ensure that you don't fall into that spiral of homelessness. thank you. thank you alison buttler and gail. thank you for talking so openly. aversion therapy is the practice of using electric shocks or nausea—inducing drugs to try to "cure" people of their sexuality. it was used by psychiatrists in this country in the 19505, 19605 and even 19705, after homosexuality was decriminalised. now, for the first time, the royal college of pychiatrists has admitted "profound regret" for the lifelong impact that treatments such as aversion therapy
10:27 am
had on gay men and women. it follows a story by buzzfeed news' lgbt editor, patrick strudwick. what have they said patrick? good morning. what well, what they have said is rather remarkable. this is an historic moment in the history of lg bt rights because an historic moment in the history of lgbt rights because the main body for psychiatrists in this country, has said we hold our hands up and they have issued a very detailed humble, heartfelt statement to both the victims of aversion therapy, the wider lgbt community and indeed the wider lgbt community and indeed the wider community at large and the president of the college, professor wendy burn opened her statement saying there are no words that can repair the damage done to anyone who has ever been deemed mentally unwell simply for loving a person of the
10:28 am
same—sex. for those who are then treated using non evidence based procedures by mental health professionals the trauma of such experiences can never be erased. she says, "it is with profound regret that we hear of the life long impact that we hear of the life long impact that treatments such as aversion therapy had on jeremy that treatments such as aversion therapy had onjeremy gavins and others. it is with openness, kindness and humility that we hold our hands up, open our doors and fight to provide ethical, mental health treatment that all of us deserve. an extraordinary statement. huven was this therapy used?m deserve. an extraordinary statement. huven was this therapy used? it was routine. for some people, they were pushed into this treatment by their families, by the church, by schools, by the community at large, by their gp. by the armed services, we know that it was being used from probably the late 19405 right up until the
10:29 am
19805 in fact. people think that it stopped in the 1907s, which was when the psychiatric profession as a whole worldwide agreed that homosexuality was not a disorder, but i know that it carried on in this country. i have had people write to me who said that they were offered it in the 19805 as a teenagerment one guy said that he ran away rather than accept the treatment. jeremy gavins was given electric shock aversion therapy as a treatment for being gay when he was 18. tell us what impact this aversion therapy had on you? oh, where do i start? it's not ruined my life because i've managed to get to here and i'm still alive, but all through
10:30 am
my life i have had an underlying depression that sort ofjust under the surface at all times and i could just drop into it and out of it if i was stressed in anyway. i've got post—traumatic stress disorder due to it because i have got the all flashbacks which are quite painful when i received the shocks. and i have a lot of body memories which are as a result of the electric shocks. my body experienced the pain, but what i tried to do with my mind was to get away from it, if you know what i mean? could you describe what the electric shock therapy involved, were you seated, what was placed on you, and
10:31 am
the pain, when the current went through you? when i arrived at the mental hospitalfor a session, had to go when i arrived at the mental hospital for a session, had to go to changing rooms and take all my clothes off. anyway, i had to put a dressing gown on and slippers and wander along the corridor to a room. when i went in the room, i was asked to sit on a chair. sometimes i had to sit on a chair. sometimes i had to ta ke to sit on a chair. sometimes i had to take the dressing gown off and sometimes i did not. i think it depended on whoever was pushing the buttons, so to speak. and then i would sit there. they would strap my left and right hands to the handles of the chair. i'm sorry... it still affects me now. it is all right, jeremy, please take your time. and
10:32 am
then they would fascinate a blue strap around my right for arm. they gave me a little switch for my left hand which i will tell you about in a second. but then, the guy turning the electric, whatever you want to call it, knob one, would turn it on and say after giving me an electric shock, does that hurt? i would say yes. i have tried to explain, it is ha rd to yes. i have tried to explain, it is hard to explain the pain. you know when you get... you hurt your elbow ofa when you get... you hurt your elbow of a rock and you get a funny shape up of a rock and you get a funny shape up and down your arm. it is like that, 50,000 times worse, and it goes right into your neck and that happens every half minute, every three minutes, depending on what mood today are in. —— mood they are
10:33 am
in. the little switch for the left hand, they told me, turned off the electric shock. so it did not work. so you've got the shock pretty much every time? yes. can i ask how you react to this in—depth statement from the royal college of psychiatrists, expressing profound regret for the lifelong impact that treatment such as aversion therapy had on gay men and women.” treatment such as aversion therapy had on gay men and women. i think it is brilliant. up to a month ago, nobody had heard of me. i met patrick and i said an apology would be nice. they have come out with it. that is as near to an apology i am going to get and i feel good about
10:34 am
it and for all the people who suffered like me, hopefully, it will make them feel better. how do you reflect on what happened to you as an 18—year—old now? reflect on what happened to you as an 18-year-old now? oh, well, it was all wrong. i was a very naive 18—year—old. i was in love. i was subjected to all sorts of horrible thoughts, even before i entered the mental hospital, from the school i went to and i was more or less blackmailed to go for the aversion therapy. in that your school said you will have to leave and not be able to do your a—levels, or you go through aversion therapy? yes, basically. so i volunteered. but i
10:35 am
don't think i did, really. i don't know. well, i am gratefulfor don't think i did, really. i don't know. well, i am grateful for you talking about this on television, having spoken to patrick earlier, but thank you so much for your time, jeremy. you have to mention my book. the only reason i am sitting here talking to you is because i wrote a book about my life which is about aversion therapy and how i have recovered from it. thank you. jeremy gavins and patrick from buzzfeed news, thank you. normal title still to come: sexual harassment happens in all walks of life. title still to come: sexual harassment happens in all walks of life. this morning on the programme we want to hear from you, title still to come:
10:36 am
if you've been sexually harassed in your workplace do get in touch in all the usual ways. if you're happy to speak on air start your email, or tweet or text with the words "call me". the numbers of hate crimes have surged by 29% in 2016 and 2017. let's talk to june kelly. a big increase. this is the period between the end of march 2016 and end of march 2017 and the rise is attributed to two main thing is, first and increase post—brexit in hate crime and also better recording by the police. what is hate crime, what is the definition when it comes to the police recording these?m what is the definition when it comes to the police recording these? it is when someone is targeted because of their race. they form the biggest numbers, race crime. race, religion,
10:37 am
sexual orientation, if somebody is transgender, disability. a range of offences. and in terms of the increases, we saw a spike post the first terror attack of this year on the 22nd of march, the attack at westminster, when a police officer died. the other attacks, there have been increases after those attacks, but at that period, it is not covered in these figures. thank you. house prices in large parts of england and wales are lower than they were ten years ago. tell us more. we concentrated on some of the worst affected parts of the uk following this exercise by the uk following this exercise by the open data institute of the bbc and visited locations in the north—east, yorkshire and wales,
10:38 am
that have seen nine in every ten council wards have a decrease in house prices. we visited the home owner in the north—east in one of the worst affected areas with the fourth cheapest prices in the uk who bought a house in 2007 for £113,000. todayit bought a house in 2007 for £113,000. today it is worth between 80000 and £85,000 and is sitting potentially ona £85,000 and is sitting potentially on a £30,000 loss and is angry there isa on a £30,000 loss and is angry there is a disparity between the north—east yorkshire compared with london and the south—east that have seen prices in 99% of wards go in the opposite direction, going up. we spoke to a young family in bradford in yorkshire and they bought a house in 2008 for 86,000 500. today it is on the market for £11,000 lower than they bought it for ten years ago and they bought it for ten years ago and they recently had an offer of
10:39 am
£70,000. it illustrates the problems people are facing in parts of the country where house prices have declined over the last decade. some of the reasons behind that decline? largely because of what is called a two speed economy where population pressure on london and the south—east has driven house prices. not enough being built in london and the south—east which causes an u pwa rd the south—east which causes an upward trend on house prices. the odi upward trend on house prices. the 0d! and upward trend on house prices. the odi and bbc upward trend on house prices. the 0d! and bbc number crunched 8 million property transactions, excluding buy to lets between 2007 and july this year and they worked out in orderfor your and july this year and they worked out in order for your house to make a profit, if you bought it for £100,000 in 2007, it would need to be worth 126,020 17. clearly, in vast parts of the country it has not happened and in real terms house prices are lower than they were a
10:40 am
decade ago. —— £126,000 in 2017. prices are lower than they were a decade ago. -- £126,000 in 2017. we are looking at central london, so you would expect house prices to be massive. this is the west end, when i put those coding, it tells me that the average house price in 2017 is 1.7 billion and that is up 97% since 2007. it chimes with the most expensive ward, kensington and belgravia. the average price there isa belgravia. the average price there is a breathtaking £2.9 million. that is a breathtaking £2.9 million. that is about 80 times the value of a home in the cheapest place, near middlesbrough. you can see the massive disconnect between parts of the north of england and the
10:41 am
south—east and london in particular. really interesting. this website goes on to say, for the average price of a house in your ward, which i have said is the west end or westminster, you can buy 49 houses in that location in middlesbrough. you can put in your own postcode and see what the average cost of a house is in yourarea see what the average cost of a house is in your area and how much it has gone up or down in the last ten yea rs. gone up or down in the last ten years. you have been painting a picture this morning of sexual harassment in your workplace. we heard from teachers, nurses, engineers and so on. the revelations about sexual harassment in hollywood and the music industry have empowered women — and some men — from all walks of life to speak out about their own experience. and for the rest of the programme we're handing over to you to share your stories and to try and paint a picture of how prevalent this is.
10:42 am
if you want to talk on air — do get in touch in the usual ways — put call me at the beginning of your message. georgina calvert—lee is with us for the rest of the programme. she's a barrister specialising in discrimination and harassment. we can talk to claire, a pharmacist. linda, not her real name, who works in the music industry and jane, not her real name, who is a taxi driver. and michelle, who is an engineer who works on building sites with men who regularly demean women, she says. actually, michelle hasjust dropped out, we will come back to her in a moment. georgina, let me start with you and your experiences.” specialise in sexual harassment and
10:43 am
discrimination cases and we have been approached over the years by people from all walks of life, whether it is in the boardroom, the dinner room, it does not matter what your status is in the company, the conditions are ripe for harassment. if there is disparity in power between you and perhaps your immediate boss or anyone else you are working with. michelle, can you hear me? hello. hello. thank you for talking to us. tell us about your experience. i have worked in the construction industry over ten years worked for a lot of different firms. i have not experienced any sexual, physical harassment, but i have on the verbal side of things and i have said it dished out to other women. what kind of things, bearing in mind
10:44 am
the time of day? comments towards body image. be specific about that. what, your breasts, you're back? what, your breasts, you're back? what specifically? specifically on one job i was told perhaps i should not wear tight jeans because one job i was told perhaps i should not wear tightjeans because it would put the guy is off doing their work. how did you respond? at the timel work. how did you respond? at the time i was quite young and i laughed it off. afterwards, i realised it was massively inappropriate to make such a comment and was quite upsetting. why do you think men felt able to say things like that and worse? sometimes i feel because, if lam worse? sometimes i feel because, if i am working with guys and for a lengthy period of time, they get used to me being there and being the only female on site i am sometimes classed as one of the lads and baby
10:45 am
the comments are not well thought through. but yes, i think there is not a lot of thought behind —— may be the comments are not well thought through. what would your advice be to somebody like michelle? that does amount to harassment. anything that degrades you or humiliates you. the problem with these comments, any individual one, we have been conditioned to shrug off and treat as the norm, if you don't laugh along, you are the problem for not smiling along and not having a sense of humour and being too prickly generally, but it mounts up. conditioning people to accept that as the norm is what allows worse discrimination to take place down the line and it's not right that people should exposed to
10:46 am
that conduct. that would be harassment in itself, but most people don't realise that. most people, even if they do realise it is, don't action it, because it will get in the way of their working lives, it will be a load of hassle? we need a societal shift and the big uproar this week is an amazing sometime, societal statement, that we're ready to confront what has been happening for generations, but there comes a point when you have to put your foot down and it is interesting that virtually any woman i know can put up their hand and say, "of course, this happened to me. i didn't consider this harassment." why would i make a complaint because then i wouldn't progress in my career. michelle, thank you. good to talk to you. let's bring in linda. linda worked in the music industry. tell us about your experiences. ok, when i started
10:47 am
initially in the job i was in my mid—205 and it was just a general thing day—to—day, are you going to be the next one to sleep with your boss and that is how it started... sorry, who would say that?” boss and that is how it started... sorry, who would say that? i was in a department that was solely men. right. it would be a general topic of conversation. he sleeps with women in the company. are you going to be next? if i ever socialised with them, there would be so many questions, did you sleep with him? that's how it began. i had incidents where other bosses within the company one put his hand up his skirt one day and said, "i would love to have sex with you." when i fed the information to my boss he said, "i'm not surprised." that's how it began and it came to a head when i was pregnant. if i had an opinion within the department, all the men would laugh and say like, oh
10:48 am
you're just being snippy because you're just being snippy because you're not getting action because you're not getting action because you're pregnant. oh my gosh. i'm getting upset. it wasjust, you know, the one time they said, i always tried to fit in within the department. 0ne always tried to fit in within the department. one said, "i don't know why you're dressing up and making an effort, no one fancies fat pregnant women." there effort, no one fancies fat pregnant women. " there was effort, no one fancies fat pregnant women." there was another occasion where they said, "i heard that pregnant women can't jump. " where they said, "i heard that pregnant women can'tjump." sol where they said, "i heard that pregnant women can'tjump." so i got off my chair and ijumped and they we re off my chair and ijumped and they were like, oh, we were onlyjoking. we wanted to see if your boobs wobbled. i went through this for a prolonged period of time and i went to the managing director because i felt i would get her support and she sent me home for a week to think seriously about what i had said and then told me that i have to take the peeks with the troughs because this is the radio industry. and how did you react to that? i never went
10:49 am
back. i haven't been back since. so, you know, i had been there for a numberof you know, i had been there for a number of years you know, i had been there for a numberof years and you know, i had been there for a number of years and that was that. wow. lin darks thank you so much. i really appreciate you sharing that. georgina, so there is a woman who did go to the boss, it was a female boss, but the boss advised her to ta ke boss, but the boss advised her to take the pea ks boss, but the boss advised her to take the peaks with the troughs. that was shocking if i had not hear that before, but it is shocking. you wouldn't expect that from any boss, but it is traditionally been the way that if you're caught in this situation, if you're victimised by someone, you are the problem. you clearly haven't handled yourself properly. just the way you were describing playing bullying, getting you tojump off a chair. i could hear you were almost taking on the
10:50 am
board for that, you were feeling i hadn't realised it was just a joke. it shouldn't happen. this is how it's treated, routinely across industries and the victim is made to feel like they are the problem and the only choice they have is really to get out to preserve their sanity or put up with it for longer and usually in then they're made redundant anyway so it doesn't help in that culture, women or the victims of harassment are not going to get to the top anyway. jane, is a taxi driver. it's not her real name. hi,jane. taxi driver. it's not her real name. hi, jane. hi. thank you for talking to us. tell us about your own experience. to be honest, my sexual harassment experiences started very young, from say 16 years old, when i worked with a guy who, when his wife wasn't around, he used to talk about having sex all the time and he was making crude comments. i thought oh
10:51 am
god, i really don't want this. he had daughters not much older than me. and then ten years later, i was ina differentjob me. and then ten years later, i was in a differentjob and a guy invited me out for lunch to discuss his job offer and then me out for lunch to discuss his job offerand then said, me out for lunch to discuss his job offer and then said, "we had to go home to his house to get uniform. once we got inside his house, he dived on me. he just pinned me to the sofa and his hands were all over me. he was kissing my neck and he yanked my earrings out and somehow i managed to struggle and get him off and say, " look, managed to struggle and get him off and say, "look, i'm going to tell your wife. " i and say, "look, i'm going to tell yourwife." i remember and say, "look, i'm going to tell your wife. " i remember telling and say, "look, i'm going to tell yourwife." i remembertelling a friend and she kind of looked at me with a little bit of disbelief. but he was kind of, he was a very typical medallion man and thought he was wonderful and thought he could do what he wanted. carte blanche, but it wasn't a nice experience. i
10:52 am
ama but it wasn't a nice experience. i am a taxi driver now and i'm some years older, the sexual harassment is unbelievable and it is always from older men. is that colleagues or passengers? a particular colleague does make some very lewd comments which i kind of ignore. but from passengers mainly. as i say, mainly older men. i don't want to be too graphic. fair enough. we get the picture and it's pretty horrific. jane, thank you. thank you very much. thank you. jennifer, used to work in a bar. hi jennifer. we've changed her name to protect her identity. are you there, jennifer? obviously, she is not there. let's talk to clare. hello. how are you? i'm fine. how are you? very well, thank you. thank you for talking to us. so tell us your own experience. well, i worked in a
10:53 am
pharmacy. i was a dispenser. when i started at the pharmacy, i wasn't, i mean, iwas started at the pharmacy, i wasn't, i mean, i was a bit shocked because, people messed about and joked about it, and! people messed about and joked about it, and i was taken off guard maybe the pharmacy manager wasn't bad and it wasn't long after that i was subjected to a campaign of age and religious discrimination and mainly sexual harassment really at the hands of my pharmacy manager. so, i complained about it in the normal way, in the proper way and did a proper grievance procedure with my area manager, but ne failed to do a proper investigation and i mean, i don't know how they failed to do a proper investigation really because it was kind of common knowledge that he did this to so many people, but i felt like i was the only one that spoke out about it and i made them aware that they had, they should have a lot of information about his
10:54 am
previous grievance procedures. i gave to other people. and they said they did find evidence of this, but then they, then obviously they looked into the investigation so poorly that they later got back to me and said they hadn't found any evidence of what it what ever and they didn't know what i was talking about and i felt victimised by my own employer for doing a really bad investigation and not taking on board what i was saying. did you carry on working there?” board what i was saying. did you carry on working there? i did for as long as i could, but i felt, i was giving everything to my employer and felt i was doing everything i possibly could and they weren't helping me. iwas possibly could and they weren't helping me. i was put on shifts with him and things like that. they did suspend him for a while and they we re suspend him for a while and they were talking about bringing him back and said, "we're going to have to move you. " and said, "we're going to have to move you." i said, "why am i being
10:55 am
victimised? told to move from a job i love and nothing else is going to ut my hours. " i love and nothing else is going to ut my hours." i had those hours for my little girl and they didn't really care and it was like almost ina way really care and it was like almost in a way they sided with him and i felt like they had almost taken his word instead of mine despite having like a weight of evidence, of him doing it to so many people in the past and i felt that people were scared of him because he was a high up scared of him because he was a high up managerand scared of him because he was a high up manager and they didn't want to rock the boat or make things difficult for themselves. clare, thank you very much. georgina, would you describe that as an abuse of power by that pharmacy manager? clear cut. the thing worth saying is some of the conduct described by these very brave people who are speaking out now is criminal. you could go to the police about that. it doesn't need to be
10:56 am
a lwa ys about that. it doesn't need to be always called sexual harassment, it is not only degrading, it is sexual assault, any touching or any threat of being assault. the guy pushed the woman on the sofa, that's attempted rape is it not? yes. it is worth going to the police if you felt you could. alicia, hello. hello. we haven't got long before the end of the programme. tell us your experience. i joined the programme. tell us your experience. ijoined a major insurance company and i was put on a training programme for graduates and i found that i was not progressing very much within the company and i knew i was doing discriminated against. later, iwas posted knew i was doing discriminated against. later, i was posted to a different team and the manager who interviewed me invited me to dinner, a team management team and i met the re st of a team management team and i met the rest of the team and all that and when we were having dinner at the dinnertable when we were having dinner at the dinner table surrounded by many
10:57 am
people including at least three other managers, two of whom were women, he basically sexually prom circumstanced me and he told me that the team regularly met after work at a hotel for drinks and all that and the next time that we went to the hotel for drinks he was going to re nt hotel for drinks he was going to rent and room and i should wear a leather skirt and he was going to bring a leather whip and i should join him in the room. did you say he told you should wear a leather skirt and wee bring a leather whip to the room? yes. that's exactly what he said. we've got so little time left. briefly, briefly, briefly tell us the outcome of that horrific comments from that boss. well, i mean it was really horrible for me because, mean it was really horrible for me because , eve ryone mean it was really horrible for me because, everyone was laughing including the managers. when i got upset i went to the ladies room and one of the female managers came in and asked me what my problem was? i
10:58 am
said that the comments were inappropriate and said i wanted to report them, she discouraged me and saying i would be back listed.” know you took the case to a tribunal forunfair know you took the case to a tribunal for unfair dismissal, but was advised to drop t thank you very much and thank you georgina. we're back tomorrow at 9am. have a very good day. good morning. storm ophelia yesterday gave a trail of damage and destruction. tha nkfully of damage and destruction. thankfully today it's moving out into the north sea. while we have got breezy conditions across the northern half of the uk, things will gradually improve throughout the afternoon so still gusty conditions across noention, south—east scotland in particular, but those winds will ease away. for many of us, it's a dry day with sunshine. just a bit of rain across scotland. perhaps northern ireland and later on in the
10:59 am
far south—west of england. one thing, all of us will notice is how much cooler it is today compared to yesterday. temperatures down to 13 to 17 celsius. now, through into this evening, rain will continue to spread its way further northwards and that will be around for many parts of england and wales actually during wednesday. wet at times. the best of the weather will be the further north and north—west you are. so for scotland, here we will have sunny spells and lighter winds here. maximum temperatures about 12 or 13 celsius. down towards the south, temperatures up down towards the south, temperatures up to about 17 celsius. i will see you later. bye—bye. honourable lady
11:00 am
this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11: inflation hits 3% — its highest level in more than five years, driven partly by the fall in the pound. the number of hate crimes recorded in the past year in england and wales has risen by 29% in the past year. storm ophelia sweeps across scotland and northern england with winds up to 70 miles an hour. european aerospace firm airbus partners with bombardier‘s c—series aircraft programme, boosting belfast job prospects. also: a one—way ticket to ride — the councils spending thousands on train tickets to send homeless people out of their area. and drones have become the latest hi—tech tool to protect swimmers and surfers from shark attacks in australia.

35 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on