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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 17, 2017 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two: inflation hits a five—year high — it's costing us more to travel and to eat. and it's still going up. we expect that inflation will peak in the october— november figures, we expect that inflation will peak in the october— novemberfigures, so peaking potentially above 3%. an international think tank suggests britain would benefit from a 2nd brexit referendum. the chancellor says that's not going to happen. the government is clear that we're leaving the european union, and that we wa nt leaving the european union, and that we want a deep and special partnership with the european union, maintaining close economic ties. hate crime on the rise in england and wales, with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum, and terror attacks. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. the play—off draw for the world cup
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next summer has been made. northern ireland have avoided italy but have a tricky tie against switzerland. thanks olly. and chris has all the weather. the remnants of one storm, and you've already got your eyes on the next. the next autumn could be on its way through friday night. more on that coming up. with food and travel costs going up, how would you could? also coming up: we're not going to need a bigger boat. we've got a drone. the new way to tackle australia's shark problem. —— how will you cope? hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. chances are many of you've already noticed — the cost of living has gone up again. inflation has reached its highest level in more than five years — up to 3 % — with travelling and eating costing us more.
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but this is good news for pensioners — who will now get a 3% pension increase from next april. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. what's this got to do with the cost of living? the price of fish was one of the fastest rising goods in the year to september, up by 13.6%. and if you're thinking of cooking it in this, oils and fats are up by 14.9%. while other prices like airfares were down, the 3% average price rise was higher than it has been since april 2012. cars, food and clothing. everything is on the way up. food prices. especially the cost of heating, lighting, gas, electricity. those consumer products, there's other things that have increased the most. the entire shop, really, has gone up even in the last five years, it's probably gone up from £100 per week to £130 per week. the bank of england expects inflation to get a little higher before it drops back.
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we expect that inflation will peak in around the october figure, october, november figures and so peaking potentially above the 3% level. september's inflation number is used to set basic state pension so they should rise by 3% next april. that compares with wages. right now they are going up by 2.1% and if you are receiving working age benefits they will not go at all next april, so you are getting a real—terms cut. a policy of freezing benefits for people of working age is one of the biggest austerity measures. it saves the government money but removes it from bedford recipients. —— benefit recipients. the 3% inflation represents one of the biggest real terms wheezes on benefits we have seen for decades. it is set to save the government £1.9 billion per year in 2018, i9, but that means losses
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for many families. if we take a working family with two children they are set to leave the girl lose £1005 per year. , set to leave the girl lose £1500 per year. the chancellor was urged to address the key reason why wages are not keeping up with prices or pensions. the amount each worker can produce, productivity, has not been growing like it used to. why is it so important? because productivity is the key to the future growth of the economy and productivity, higher productivity, is the key to better wages. no wonder we have low wages! we have very low productivity! we need to increase productivity in order to get the wages up. shops and other firms face one more rising cost. business rates, which are set to go up by the old—fashioned retail prices index for september, 3.9%. in the city comedies also now seen as highly likely that next month, for the first time in more than a decade, interest rates will have rise.
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don't forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. the former chancellor, george osborne, has been tweeting. there it is. his cartoon shows theresa may jean—claude juncker both saying, is. his cartoon shows theresa may jean—claudejuncker both saying, we must accelerate, but both at opposite ends of the car. let's go to westminster and vicky young. that cartoon highlights an issue which is causing real concern. this statement is that they put out of their —— after their dinner last night is
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that they have to accelerate but it's not clear who has to push the accelerator. britain is saying, we have moved, it is up to you to give something back. the eu is saying, it is all about how you must pay and we're not there yet on other issues. david davis is still speaking in the commons now, updating mps, and he went through the sticking points. he was at pains to point out how much progress has been made on things like eu citizens, though he admitted there were still outstanding issues. he feels the uk has moved on all the bad. on northern ireland and ireland, the border between the two, he feels there has been progress. on monday, he is absolutely sticking to the same point the british government has made: that we have already said, yes, we will pay what we owe in this budget cycle up to 2020, but beyond that, we need to
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move on to look at our future relationship. this is what he said to mps. i've made no secret of the fact that to fully provide that certainty, we must be able to talk about the future. we all have to recognise that we are reaching the limits of what we can achieve without consideration of the future relationship. the prime minister's speech in florence set up the scale of the ambition of a new partnership with the eu, and she also laid out the case for a simple, clear and time—limited period of the main station on current terms. in the eu council this week, i have the 27 members will recognise and approve this, and provide michel barnier momentum. doing so will allow us to achieve ourjoint objectives and achieve ourjoint objectives and achieve a deal that works for the uk and the eu. there has been much discussion of what constitutes sufficient process. let me be clear
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that sufficient progress and the sequence that sufficient progress and the sequence of negotiation has always been the eu construct not the uk one. negotiations require both parties notjust to one. negotiations require both parties not just to engage constructively, but to develop their positions advance. the uk has been clear it will be conducting these negotiations in a constructive and responsible way. the substantial progress we have made over recent months proves we have done just that, and we're ready to move these big oceans on. interesting to listen to the radio this morning and hear someone close to angela merkel saying boris johnson is not helping. boris johnson is not helping. boris johnson is not helping. boris johnson is taking a hard line on the money. people should not be confused. there is the money we will pay to honour our commitments in this budget cycle, then there is the separate lots of money that the eu would like to see from us, which is about future programmes. boris
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johnson's point, and that of others in the conservative party, is that we are not just in the conservative party, is that we are notjust going to hand over a blank cheque and not know what we're going to get in return. david davis said there were no plans to get up and walk away from the stalk. he also said at one point, though, the eu are using time pressure to get more money out of us. that's what's going on, because we are in a negotiation. when it comes the labour, kia starmer, their spokesman, he accused some in the government of talking up a no deal scenario. nobody should underestimate the seriousness of the situation that we find ourselves in. at the first hurdle, the government has failed to hit a very important target. that leaves eu citizens in the uk and uk citizens in europe in a continued state of uncertainty. it means insufficient progress in relation to
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northern ireland, and it appears the deadlock on the financial settlement is such that both sides are barely talking. the secretary of state in his statement says that he is confident that we are now on the right track. i can't fault him for his confidence in his own negotiating ambitions. the problem is, most of those ambitions have failed to materialise. one of them was that the secrecy of talks would be the row —— the sequencing of talks would be the row of the summer and he would not agree. he did so by copy time on day one. the suggestion that sequencing and sufficient progress are eu can't ducks leave out of account the fact that he agreed to them and signed up to them. all eyes will turn to that eu summit at the end of the week, downing street and brussels confirming that theresa may will get the chance to speak directly to the other 27 eu
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leaders and try to persuade them that now is the time to move on and talk about the future relationship. vicky, thank you very much. a huge clear—up operation is taking place across ireland following the damage caused by storm ophelia, which killed three people. thousands are still without electricity after winds of around a hundred miles per hour brought down power lines and trees. ben ando reports. trees down. power down. clearing up. across the island of ireland workers, homeowners, engineers, restoring electricity and transport links damaged under the onslaught of storm ophelia. the damage was worse in the south, where around a quarter million people are still without power. some are being warned they might be left in the dark for several days. though engineers are working round the clock to reconnect everyone. the counties of cork and kerry bore the brunt of ophelia's 100 mph—plus winds. ireland's national emergency coordination group is meeting
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in dublin, but hospitals and roads managed reopen today. in northern ireland around 50,000 homes had power restored overnight. during the morning workers continued and now the number still without electricity is around 3000. during the night, ophelia continued north in scotland powered cuts affected around 1100 homes and in north wales 4000 lost electricity. compared to the south, northern ireland got off relatively lightly. schools in both north and south remain closed for a second day. the decision to close schools here yesterday taken very late on sunday evening was criticised. the decision to keep them closed today, meaning parents are having to find things to do with the youngsters, is also raising eyebrows. and while there were tragically three deaths and much damage to power lines and buildings, many will feel the wrath of storm ophelia could have been
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significantly worse. ben ando, bbc news, belfast. a deal has been struck which could help safeguard jobs at the bombardier aircraft factory in northern ireland. the european manufacturer airbus has taken a stake in bombardier‘s c—series jet, which has wings built in belfast. the deal would allow some of the planes to be assembled at an airbus plant in alabama, avoiding import duties us authorities have threatened to impose. a man has been found guilty of murdering a kurdish refugee, just hours after he'd been released from a secure hospital. jeffrey barry, who lived in the same supported housing as kamil ahmad, stabbed him more than 25 times in what was described as a ‘sustained and savage' attack. jon kay reports. 1am, and jeffrey barry head from his flat to kamil ahmad's bedsit. in his waistband, a large kitchen knife. he knocks on kamil‘s door, and inside stabs the kurdish
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refugee more than 25 times, before mutilating his body. that's like a black cloud in my life, you know... kamil‘s brother believes the attack could and should have been prevented, in a country they came to for protection. he came here to be safe. to just lead a normal life. but why, how come he got this? why did this happen, and how did it happen? jeffrey barry had a long history of severe psychiatric problems, including episodes of paranoid schizophrenia. this is the supported living accommodation in bristol where the two men were living, and six weeks before the attack jeffrey barry told the staff here that he wanted to kill someone, that he wanted to be notorious, and he said kamilahmad was top of his list. he'd left notes, saying he was planning to kill kamil, along with everybody else on the street. in the weeks before the attack barry was sectioned,
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but he was released from this hospital by a mental health tribunal, against the advice of a psychiatrist. he returned to the house, and within hours had killed the refugee. he called 999, and said he'd warned mental health professionals. that was his defence in court, flanked by staff from broadmoor high security hospital. but barry has been convicted unanimously of murder. kamil‘s family believe the 48—year—old would still be alive if he had been warned in advance
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that barry was returning that night, and if staff in the house had been given time to come up with a plan. i am very angry... his brother told me all the agencies involved must reflect on this case. i hope they learn, you know, what has happened to my brother, so it doesn't happen to anybody else again, because only i know how i feel, you know? only we know how i feel, to have lost a loving brother, you know. and they could have done something about it beforehand. a review will be published next year. the headlines: inflation hit a five—year high because of high food and transport prices. the oecd says that british economic output would increase significantly if brexit were reversed.
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there has been a large rise in the number of hate crimes after brexit and terrorist attacks. northern ireland will face switzerland in the world cup play—offs next month. the first leg will be in belfast. this was only lost one match in qualifying and we re lost one match in qualifying and were seeded in the draw. it is the return of the champions league tonight. tottenham are in spain facing real madrid. liverpool and manchester city are also in action. chris froome says that retaining his tour de france title will be a mass in —— massive challenge. the route for next year does not play to his strengths. let's return to our main story. inflation has reached its highest level in more than five years — driven up by increases in transport and food prices. the rate of inflation, as measured by the consumer prices index, increased to 3% last month,
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up from 2.9 % in august. with me is pauljohnson, director at the institute for fiscal studies. we've heard from mark carney. sorry, i should say, nice to see you. mark carney thinks it is going to be higher than 3%. who is this hating particularly hard? higher than 3%. who is this hating particularly hard ? it higher than 3%. who is this hating particularly hard? it affect anyone with a job and anyone on benefits, doesn't it was magellan like those of us who are just about old enough to remember the 1970s will think that 3% is not anything to worry about. then, it was in the teens and heading towards 20%. wages are not going up by that rate per year, so people in work are being made worse off on average because earnings are going up by less than 2%, inflation is at 3%, so by the end of the year, you can buy less than you were able to at the start. people who rely on benefits other than pensions are
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seeing no increase at all in their benefits over a four—year period, so the consequences that they will be 396 the consequences that they will be 3% worse off at the end of the year. if we're talking about transport and food costs, that affects all of us. yes, and of course, food as a proportion of the amount that people spend, food is a bigger chunk of the budget of poorer people than it is of richer people. inflation through food prices will hit people on lower incomes significantly higher than those on higher incomes. we will all see the impact, though. people with tracker mortgages are thinking, the last thing i need is an interest rate hike, but that looks more likely, doesn't it? people who had mortgages back before 2009 have had a pretty nice seven or eight years, in the sense that they have had the lowest ever interest rates. if you had your mortgage before the crisis,
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then you are sitting reasonably pretty, on average. certainly, for people who have taken out a mortgage since then, probably stretching themselves quite a long way, given what has happened to house prices. any increase in interest rates will be difficult to deal with, though i don't expect any increase to be big. when people hear the words economic forecast, they can be forgiven for glazing over a bit, but this one from the oecd, suggesting that britain needs a second referendum and to rethink what they clearly think is a decision, but they have got things wrong in the past, so do we ta ke got things wrong in the past, so do we take this with a pinch of salt? forecast get things wrong most of the time. —— forecasts get things wrong the time. but if you make
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trade with your nearest partner, in our case, the european union, we will end up making ourselves less well off than we otherwise would have been. there are lots of other reasons for moving out of the eu, to do with sovereignty and so on, but on the economic front, it is bad for us. on the economic front, it is bad for us. we just don't know where we are with the negotiations, and that uncertainty is causing problems. uncertainty causes a lot of problems for businesses when they are thinking about investment, and even ignoring the brexit book, we have had a terrible seven or eight years for business investment, partly once —— partly because of uncertainty about growth in general. now the additional uncertainty about what will happen in 2019—20 makes people less keen to put big money into big investments, and it is those big investments, and it is those big investments that people are holding off on, i think, until they know quite what is going to happen. we
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have the chancellor saying, we have voted out, we are going out, but do you think there is a growing sense that a call for a second referendum might have traction?|j that a call for a second referendum might have traction? i really couldn't comment on whether there is any chance of a second referendum. but among those you talk to, what is the mood music? you can see poll is changing very slightly, but the strong presumption is that we will leave the eu. the uncertainty is not really about whether we will leave, it is about what terms we will leave on. we need to focus on getting good terms, and that means as good a trade agreement as we can get with the rest of the eu. as i said, they are our biggest, richest, nearest trading partner, and if we crash out without any kind of trade agreement, that really will are grim consequences, whereas if we get a good deal, the consequences will be much more lucid. thank you for
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joining us. the number of hate crimes recorded by police increased by 29 % in the last year — the largest annual rise since records began in 2011. the home office says the biggest spikes coincided with the eu referendum, and terror attacks. most of the offences were racially motivated — but the biggest rise was in disability hate crimes, which went up by more than 50 %. june kelly reports. westminster in march. the first of this year's terror attacks in the uk. five people, including pc keith palmer, died, after the killer, khalid masood, went on his murderous rampage, first with a car and then with a knife. in the days that followed there was an increase in hate crime. just one of the reasons why it's gone up in the last year. there were 80,393 hate crimes recorded by the police in england and wales. this was a rise of 29% on the previous 12 months, and there was an increase in all categories of hate crime. john gillespie was a victim of hate crime, targeted because he has a learning disability.
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he had a necklace stolen, picked on because the thief knew he was vulnerable. it made me feel so sick, that somebody could have... that somebody could do that to someone like me. the period after the brexit vote saw a spike in race hate crimes. this family were victims. the majority of hate crime is race related. today's annual figures only go up to the end of march this year, so they don't cover the weeks following the terror attacks in manchester, and at london bridge and finsbury park mosque, but police data is showing a rise in hate crime after all of them. and these were the offences that were reported — many victims never go to the police. june kelly, bbc news. assistant chief constable mark hamilton is the lead for hate crime at the national police chiefs council.
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hejoins me from our belfast newsroom. ijust want i just want to pick up ijust want to pick up onjune's last point, is it the case that this is down in some small part to more and more people feeling able to report crimes in the first place? yes, we think that is part of the answer. our national strategy for many years has been to encourage victims of hate crime to report more crimes to us, because we believe it is hugely underreported. so, the appearance of hate crime in our communities over the last year, the knowledge of, i think, has encouraged more people to come forward and report what is happening to them. i am happy that the figures have gone up in all the category areas, although we have seen larger rises than we actually anticipated. happy ‘ rises than we actually anticipated. happy — an interesting rises than we actually anticipated. happy - an interesting word. rises than we actually anticipated. happy — an interesting word. why?m was a hidden crime that was not often reported. many victims did not have confidence to engage with the
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criminal justice system, have confidence to engage with the criminaljustice system, so we have been appealing to people for years, and we continue to do so, to come forward and tell us. it is a key pa rt forward and tell us. it is a key part of our strategy to drive these figures are, not down. the england and wales crime survey of two years ago showed that there were 220,000 hate crimes in our communities, and yet the police are only recording 60,000 -80,000, yet the police are only recording 60,000 - 80,000, so yet the police are only recording 60,000 — 80,000, so there is a big disparity between what we are told is happening and what we actually believe is happening in communities. therefore, a high reported break the ice means that some of our strategy is working. it is a depressing picture, isn't it? particularly an increase in attacks involving transgender people, increase in attacks involving tra nsgender people, people increase in attacks involving transgender people, people with disability issues. if people ask you, what sort of world are we living in, how do you answer them? it addresses things that have been going on in many communities around the world for many years. we have an
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expansive and all—encompassing definition of hate crime that is the envy of many communities around the world. we report it more than any other country in the world. in some respects, this shows the more forward—looking aspect of our society, but equally, it shows that for some people there is an underlying level of intolerance that are acceptably translates itself into crime against those who are most vulnerable. can i pick you up on that? is there an underlying link in terms of the perpetrators? who are the sorts of people who commit these offences? well, there is a range of these people. some of these people commit all sorts of other crimes, and this isjust another crimes, and this isjust another crime type for them. after the referendum period, we saw other people getting involved in what we would describe as casual racism, making comments to people on buses
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and trains to people. the understanding of offender data is quite limited in this area, and we're working with colleagues in the academic arena to understand this a bit. mark hamilton, thank for your time —— thank you for your time this afternoon. let's have a look at the weather, which has been making the news in the last 2a hours with a failure. we got another one? that was ophelia when it was at its most powerful. it is the most powerful hurricane there has been that far east in the atlantic. very unusual, and there are still thousands of people left without power across northern ireland, scotland and wales, where we had strong gusts of wind. and it is still blowing up north? yes. ophelia came across spain and
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portugal as a category one hurricane. then it weakened as it approached the british isles. the strongest gusts were 97 mph. now, it is moving into the norwegian sea. the strong winds are dying down, but we still have significant problems with trees that have fallen. this sea remains pretty high and rough. this is the scene in cumbria. looking like a shaving accident with all the sea foam being blown in. through the rest of the day, it will stay pretty blowing across the north. gusts around a0 mph. cloudy with showers. across the south west, we will see a band of rain moving in. it could affect parts of sussex as well. that leaves a swathe of central uk that will be dry and bright. tonight, outbreaks of rain become more expansive, and there will be low cloud forming, mist and fog patches on the hills of southern
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england. still some showers across northern ireland and scotland. the far north of scotland gets cooler air, temperatures close to freezing in the countryside. for most of us, a relatively quiet start to the day. a lot of cloud first thing, some fog on the hills, and outbreaks of rain across parts of england and perhaps wales. there could be heavier bursar at times. the largely dry day for scotla nd at times. the largely dry day for scotland and northern ireland, with bright and sunny spells. where we see the sunshine, that is where the coolest air is, temperatures of 12-13dc. the coolest air is, temperatures of 12—13dc. the rain moved to the north overnight into thursday. bright for a time before we see more damp weather pushing into central england. the next atlantic front makes its presence felt, with heavy rain getting into northern ireland and winds up to gale force again, the same in south—west england. on friday, is this low pressure will bring us all some rain. brighter
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weather will working behind the main band of rain, which will still linger across scotland and north east england even into the afternoon. temperatures of 1a—16dc. and the next, friday night, coming into the uk, severe gales developing across england. there is a bit of uncertainty about the exact track of this low. strong winds could affect other parts of the uk as we head into saturday morning. certainly a storm to watch. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. inflation has reached 3%, its highest level in more than five years, largely due to rising food and transport prices. the oecd warns that economic growth in the uk will slow next year but suggests that reversing the brexit vote would have a positive impact. there's been a 29% rise in hate crimes recorded by police in the uk — with incidents increasing after the brexit vote and terror attacks. sport now on afternoon live,
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olly is with us again at the bbc sport centre, olly, busier day than yesterday! its early years, we are getting excited about the champions league matches to mike —— it certainly is. we will see if manchester city have still got their shooting boots on after scoring seven goals in the premier league. liverpool have really got to win tonight, and totte n ha m really got to win tonight, and tottenham will take anything they can get from their trip to real madrid. chris froome has found out just how tough it is going to be as well in the tour de france next year as he goes for a fifth title. we will have details of the route in just a minute. will have details of the route in justa minute. studio: you were talking about the fifa world rankings yesterday and how that might be bad news for northern ireland in the play—off draw. liverpool yes, we were speculating, but now we know how it has affected them. northern ireland dropped into
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them. northern ireland dropped into the pot of unseeded teams for the play—off draw, but they have avoided italy. they will have to beat switzerland to reach the world cup in russia. the play—off draw has taken place this afternoon and michael o'neill‘s men will face the swiss over two legs next month. they are still working out the x act dates. —— exact. the swiss were strong in qualifying, nine wins out of nine until their final defeat to portugal that saw them finish second on goal difference. the first leg is at windsor park before they travel to switzerland to decide their world cup fate. we knew it was going to be a tough game and whoever we got, and switzerland have done very well, but this gives us an opportunity to get to russia and we have got to do well in the first game at belfast, before
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coming to switch them for the second leg. we know we have got to be at our best to qualify but we believe we are capable of doing that. the republic of ireland have denmark, and the right way around, away in copenhagen first. it's croatia v greece and a huge game with sweden v italy. sweden finished second in their group which saw holland missing out on the world cup. italy were the ones everyone wanted to avoid. the games will take place on a home and away basis, with the first legs between 9th and 11 november and the second legs between 12 and 1a november. first of all we are pleased to be in the draw, we had to win our last couple of matches to get here, and being one of the unseeded teams it was going to be a difficult time for us, but we are delighted to be in it. i know denmark and i know the
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manager, we used to play together. so it will be an interesting confrontation. the champions league is back, manchester city are at home to napoli, liverpool have to beat maribor away in slovenia, but what a night coming up in madrid, tottenham hotspur up against the 12—times winners and reigning champions, real. spurs lost to them home and away in the quarterfinals six years ago. there's not one surviving member of that spurs team. luka modric and gareth bale are now madrid players. bale might not be involved. he still has a dodgy calf. the real manager zinedine zidane has hailed spurs' harry kane as a complete player — he scored 15 for club and country last month — but even with kane on form, it could be a difficult night for spurs. i think it is always special to play here.
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it is always special. they are the club with the most victories in the competition. i feel that when you play here, when you come here, you will start to feel the reality of football. everyone is excited. chris froome says he faces a "massive challenge" to win a fifth tour de france title, after the route for next year's race was announced. the race will start on 7thjuly on the island of noirmoutier off the vendee coast and will take place almost entirely in france, with only 15 kilometres in the spanish pyrenees. it will cover the shortest route of the 21st century — and there'll be no long, flat individual time trial, where froome normally excels. there are six mountain stages with a punishing finish before they hit the champs elysees on 29th. froome says the route "tests every aspect of cycling". conspiracy theory that the organisers have designed it so he
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can't win, perhaps. it will be very tough for him. studio: thanks for joining us. we have this coming from buckingham palace, the duke and duchess of cambridge are delighted to confirm they are inspecting a baby in april. they announced that she was pregnant in september and it was thought she was around three months pregnant, i'm not sure how much news this really is, but clear your diaries and get the time but daft, that news coming in from kensington palace —— get the time booked off. they're called ‘reconnection' tickets — one way train tickets bought for homeless people by a number of local councils in england. more than £1,000 a year has been spent on the scheme to put rough sleepers back in touch with theirfamilies. but one man says he was offered a ticket to a city he had never been to before.
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anna collinson from the bbc victoria derbyshire programme reports. i'm taking you through the park to the place where i used to stay every single night on the streets. mhairi hopkins developed post—natal depression after giving birth a few years ago. while her parents took care of her son, the 22—year—old's mental health deteriorated. eventually she ran out of places to stay. you don't know who's watching you, you don't if you're going to get up in the morning safe. i was doing this every single night, i'd wake up at least four, five times a night and look around at what was going on, try and calm myself down. you've got such a broken sleep pattern. you didn't actually sleep. one night every autumn local authorities in england count how many people are sleeping rough. last year there were more than a,000, a 130% rise in six years. some charities are sceptical about how the data is collected because councils can choose to enter an estimate if they prefer. in 2016 large cities featured prominently in the 20 areas with the worst problem. but not too far behind was a seaside
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town, with a population of 180,000, where homelessness has trebled since 2010. this is a really popular place for homeless people to hang out, particularly at night but in 2015 the council started playing loud music like bagpipes and alvin and the chipmunks. 55; $5555; ti; éiééiii;ifé;sazr . ~~ ~ — man was so what they want to try and do is get all the homeless people out
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of bournemouth because they see it as it as making bournemouth a bad place. while mhairi is no longer sleeping rough, thousands of others are this winter. the government says it's investing £550 million to tackle the problem as well as implementing the homelessness reduction act which goes active in april. anna collinson, bbc news. a woman whose partner 20—year—old kevin nunes was shot dead 15 years ago in what was believed to be a gangland killing — says she's been let down by police. in her first broadcast interview, leanne williams says officers should have been held to account for the mistakes made by staffordshire police during the investigation. the police watchdog found that while the force was guilty of collective failings, individuals weren't to blame. phil mackie reports. how is it that nobody, not one person, has been disciplined? nobody. and it's just shocking to me.
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it's just absolutely shocking and ijust think it's really, really, really bad. in september 2002, leanne williams was pregnant with kevin nunes‘ son when his bullet—ridden body was found near a farm in south staffordshire. five men were jailed for his murder, but their convictions quashed after it emerged that staffordshire police failed to disclose an internal report that would have raised questions about a witness' reliability. when the men were cleared, the appeal court said it had been a shocking episode which may have amounted to a serious perversion of the course ofjustice. initially the ipcc recommended that four senior officers should face misconduct hearings. adrian lee, who held the topjob at northamptonshire. suzette davenport, who became chief constable in gloucestershire. and marcus beale, the assistant chief constable in the west midlands. a five—year investigation ruled there were collective — but not individual — failings.
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the fact that... there's wrongdoings all around. people got released. failures. this, that. and nobody‘s in trouble for it. i can't comprehend it, i'm just not understanding to what level that nobody feels that they have to even get a slap on the wrist. 15 years since kevin nunes‘ body was dumped at this remote farm, his killers still haven't been caught. staffordshire police say that the investigation is still open and regularly reviewed. leanne williams hopes that someone will come forward with the information that will finally bring kevin's killers to justice. phil mackie, bbc news, staffordshire. and there's more on that story on file on four on bbc radio a at 8pm tonight. the european commission has
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expressed its horror at the killing of a maltese journalist in a car bombing and called for those responsible to be brought tojustice. daphne caruana galizia was described as a thorn in the side of the establishment and the criminal underworld. she'd highlighted alleged corruption by senior politicians, including malta's prime minister, who has denied any wrongdoing. andrew plant reports the wreckage of a car in the distance, daphne caruana galizia was driving near her home on monday afternoon, when the bomb went off. in the foreground here, the site of the extension, powerful enough to blow her car off the road. it ended up in the field beyond. daphne ca ruana galizia was a thorn in the side of malta's establishment, described as a one—woman wikileaks, the most recent revelations pointing a finger at malta's prime minister, joseph muscat, and claims of corruption leaked to the panama
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papers a claim he has denied. no one has claimed responsibility for the attack. investigators are quoted in local media saying the bomb appears to have been outside the car. it is known she had claimed she had received death threats and her website was targeted by hackers. hundreds gathered for a vigil on monday evening, paying their respects to the popular journalist, wife and mother of three, walking to a local bay and lighting candles. as a maltese citizen, i think daphne was not only a journalist and an absolutely fearless human being, and today's heinous crime was not only against a human being and journalist, but against a pillar of everyone's democracy. malta is the eu's smallest member.
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the 53—year—old had been driving in the night close to her home. her son is said to have heard the explosion and rushed outside to find the wreckage. malta's prime minister has condemned the killing, calling it a barbaric attack. meanwhile, malta's president has said a team from the fbi is on its way to the island, to help investigate the murder. andrew plant, bbc news. a us backed militia in syria says it's taken control of raqqa after months of fighting with islamic state militants. the success of the syrian democratic forces is being seen as another heavy blow to is as raqqa was their self proclaimed capital. it is thought the group now controls just a handful of towns along the euphrates valley. we have more on inflation injust a moment. but now the headlines. inflation hits a five—year high — it's costing us more to travel — and to eat. and it's still going up.
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an international think tank suggests britain would benefit from a second brexit referendum. hate crime on the rise in england and wales — with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum — and terror attacks. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. inflation has reached its highest point in more than five years. the governor of the bank of england has been explaining when he thinks price rises will peak. european plane—maker airbus is to take a majority stake in bombardier‘s c—series jet project. the move could help the plane escape import taxes of 300% imposed by the us. bombardier is northern ireland's biggest private sector employer. online fashion retailer asos has
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seen profits rise by 1a5%. that was boosted by strong sales overseas — as the firm cut prices to meet strong competition. we will talk about inflation, but i wa nt to we will talk about inflation, but i want to talk about the oecd, it's a claim about brexit, but what do they say about the economy on a broader basis? they think the economy will grow by about 1% next year, at the moment it is going by 1.5%, so they are anticipating a slowdown in the performance of the economy. they are expressing worries about productivity and about the way that certain jobs productivity and about the way that certainjobs like productivity and about the way that certain jobs like those jobs in the gig economy are actually being regulated. it is a scary picture they are painting. i want to stay with this, they have done forecasts before which have been very wrong, they said it would be great to join they said it would be great to join the irm, for example, so we need a pinch of salt? with all of these forecasts they are subject to events, as they say, events, dear
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boy, events. what people will look at, when they look at this report, what is the factual basis, and at the moment we are seeing growth of about1.5%, the moment we are seeing growth of about 1.5%, but many forecasters are saying as the impact of the uncertainty of brexit really feeds through, we can expect some diminution of growth in the uk. through, we can expect some diminution of growth in the ukw is the inflation, that is what he achieved in the pocket. this is very painful. -- that is what hits you in the pocket. as you alluded to, prices are going up and wages are not keeping pace, and there are a few reasons for this, travel costs have increased, but it feeds back to brexit because the uncertainty of brexit, when it first happened, caused the pound to go down and that
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has fired up prices when it comes to buying anything from overseas. the governor of the bank of england mark carney has been speaking about this. we expect that inflation will peak in around the october figure, october, november figures, peaking above the 3% level. october, november figures, peaking above the 396 level. that was mark carney giving his views on when inflation will peak. alix stewart from schrodersjoins me now. what do you think about that assessment, inflation will peak in october? that is probably correct. we are seeing the effects of the fall in sterling and the currency has been fairly similar at its level for a while, and these base fx should stop and then inflation will fall off. it is understandable when people see the figures of the
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highest level for five years, but they are online, but should we be freaking out? —— and they are alarmed. yes, wages have not kept up with inflation, but this should make it easy on the pocket, but we have had a tough for a while. what about the possibility of a rise in interest rates later this year? the bank of england have been quite clearly flagging that if things continue along the path they saw, they would probably raise rates in november, so it looks quite likely that they will. but going forward, as inflation falls back if we don't see a big pick—up in wages, then any pressure on further rate rises is going to be more muted. going back to the oecd, i was interested in what they were saying about productivity in the uk, we are not really being as productive as we might be, what is that about? this
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is all part of it, one of the reasons why is all part of it, one of the reasons why wages is all part of it, one of the reasons why wages have been lower than you might expect for this level of unemployment. it is indeed the jobs we are producing in the lower productivity sectors, so we are not producing the kind ofjobs where you can get big benefits in terms of growth for each extra person you employ. thanks forjoining us. it is all a bit... it employ. thanks forjoining us. it is alla bit... it is employ. thanks forjoining us. it is all a bit... it is up employ. thanks forjoining us. it is alla bit... it is up in employ. thanks forjoining us. it is all a bit... it is up in the air, thatis all a bit... it is up in the air, that is the bottom line, that is eve ryo ne that is the bottom line, that is everyone in the city and everyone forecasting, they say the same, but the markets don't seem to be reacting in the way we might predict. the thing about the ftse, i would say... we are all feeling a bit squeezed. yes, i thought that might have been my glasses, but that is the way it looks. we are seeing the ftse powering away, because so
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many of the companies that operate on the ftse are focused overseas and many of them make most of their money from overseas which is why we have seen it powering away. merlin, the entertainment company which owns things like the london eye and madame tussauds, their prices are coming under pressure, squeezed, because of growth in sales, which is flat. their way house—builders, they are picking up because of the continued impact of the government's help to buy scheme —— beltway. brent crude is being supported by global tensions around the middle east. thanks forjoining us. there were more than a dozen unprovoked shark attacks off the coast of australia last year alone. now drone technology is being tested out to try to protect more swimmers
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and surfers by spotting sharks as they get close to the shore. hywel griffith has been to see them in action. a shadow in the sea or something more sinister? from the beach it's hard to tell, but from the skies, the drone has a clearer view. it feeds into deep—learning software which it's claimed has a 92% success rate in spotting sharks, as well as less—threatening species. every time it sees a dolphin, whale or a swimmer in distress, it learns their shape. launched along the beaches of new south wales, the drones can patrol for a0 minutes. daniel was one of the first to train as a life—saver pilot. i can't physically run out and grab a board and paddle out and save someone, but sitting on the beach, we've got eyes in the sky and we are just another layer of protection, really. the drones don't only observe, they can react, too — dropping an inflatable device
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to help people in the sea. they won't replace the use of controversial shark nets and drum lines, however, which some claim do more harm than good. last year around australia there were 17 unprovoked shark attacks. the number isn't that high compared to how many people actually go in these waters, but it leaves a national preoccupation to the question of how to share the beaches between the human beings and the sea life. when this great white washed onto sydney's shores recently, it was welcomed and christened fluffy. not everyone wants to get so close, even if the chances of an attack are minimal. it's that humanlike fear of being attacked by a wild animal. but the risk to people that are entering the water rates so low on the scale as opposed to other threats going about your daily life — i mean traffic and cars and bee stings and all those statistics. and for regulars in these waters, it's all part of the experience.
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i was actually swimming here once. i was six months pregnant and there was a shark alert. i did freak out a bit! if i'm going to die i'd prefer to be taken by a shark than have a stroke and end up in a nursing home. the drones won't be on every beach every day, but they should give everyone a better understanding of what is down below. hywel griffith, bbc news, sydney. fluffy the great white shark! time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. ophelia continues to move away, but over the weekend it was a major atla ntic over the weekend it was a major atlantic hurricane, it turned into a normal area of low pressure, which brought the damaging winds two parts of the british isles, and today ophelia is going out to the norwegian sea. today we'll continue to have fairly brisk winds across
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scotla nd to have fairly brisk winds across scotland and northern ireland, bringing showers, and brighter weather across england and wales, but turning cloudy across southern england with outbreaks of rain getting into parts of the south west. a range of temperatures, from ten to 17 in london, but where ever you are, it feels fresh air. overnight, the rain is expected to become more expensive across the southern counties of england and there will also be low cloud and mist and fog patches. a few showers and fairly cloudy weather in scotland, but as the skies clear temperatures in the countryside could get low enough to give a touch of ground frost. a chilly start the somme on wednesday, and for england and wales, cloudy and grey note —— a chilly start for some. patchy rain around which could be heavy at times, if you burst of heavy rain to big spectre, further north and west,
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—— eight fewer heavy bursts of rain expected. through wednesday night, the area of rain expanding north, working into scotland, thursday we're looking at the next weather system moving from the next weather system moving from the atlantic bringing further outbreaks of rain across northern ireland, winds picking up in the south west, may be reaching gale force, and a fair bit of cloud and rain elsewhere. 19, though, not too bad in london. into friday, the area of low pressure moving north and east, the ridge of high pressure follows, so some brighter weather working in for time, temperatures reaching 1a—16, average for the time of year. friday night, the next potential stormy spell, deep area of low pressure could bring severe gales to the south—west of england, but there is uncertainty. strong winds could affect other parts of the uk as well. hello.
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you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at three: inflation hits a five—year high — it's costing us more to travel and to eat. and it's still going up. we expect that inflation will peak in the october november figures, so peaking above the 3 percent level. an international think tank suggests britain would benefit from a second brexit referendum. the chancellor says that's not going to happen. the government is clear, we are leaving the european union, and that we want a deep and special partnership with the european union, maintaining close economic ties. hate crime on the rise in england and wales, with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum and terror attacks. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. there's a lot going on, just not
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there! but we do have the weather. storm ophelia moving out of the way, the wind is coming down, but the next storm will be on its way through friday night. more on that coming up. thanks, chris. tweet us on those inflation figures — and with food and travel costs going up, how will you cope? also coming up: we're not going to need a bigger boat — we've got a drone. the new way to tackle australia's shark problem. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. chances are, many of you've already noticed — the cost of living has gone up again. inflation has reached its highest level in more than five years — up to 3 % — with travelling and eating costing us more.
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but this is good news for pensioners, who will now get a 3% pension increase from next april. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. what's this got to do with the cost of living? the price of fish was one of the fastest rising goods in the year to september, up by 13.6%. and if you're thinking of cooking it in this, oils and fats are up by 1a.9%. while other prices like airfares were down, the 3% average price rise was higher than it has been since april 2012. cars, food and clothing. everything is on the way up. food prices. especially the cost of heating, lighting, gas, electricity. those consumer products, there's other things that have increased the most. the entire shop, really, has gone up even in the last five years, it's probably gone up from £100 per week to £130 per week. the bank of england expects inflation to get a little higher before it drops back. we expect that inflation will peak
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in around the october figure, october—november figures and so peaking potentially above the 3% level. september's inflation number is used to set basic state pension is so they should rise by 3% next april. that compares with wages. right now they are going up by 2.1% and if you are receiving working age benefits they will not go at all next april, so you are getting a real cut. the policy of freezing benefits for people of working age is one of the biggest austerity measures. it saves the government money but removes it from benefit recipients. the inflation represents one of the biggest real terms wheezes on benefits we have seen for decades. it is set to save the government £1.9 billion per year in 2018,19, but that means losses for many families. if we take a working family with two children they are set to leave the girl
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lose £1005 per year. , set to lose £1500 per year. —— set to lose £1500 per year. the chancellor was urged to address the key reason why wages are not keeping up with prices or pensions. the amount each worker can produce, productivity, has not been growing like it used to. why is it so important? because productivity is the key to the future growth of the economy and productivity, higher productivity, is the key to better wages. no wonder we have low wages! we have very low productivity! we need to increase productivity in order to get the wages up. shops and other firms face one more rising cost. business rates, which are set to go up by the old—fashioned retail prices index for september, 3.9%. in the city comedies also now seen as in the city, it's also now seen as
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highly likely that next month, for the first time in more than a decade, interest rates will have rise. don't forget, you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us, on screen right now. the oecd — an international economic body — says that reversing brexit would boost the british economy. it's a provocative claim — from an organisation that once said we would receive "great benefits" from joining the erm. but with or without a pinch of salt, it's clear there are increasing concerns over brexit negotiations. last night, over dinner, theresa may and eu commission presidentjean—claude juncker agreed to "accelerate" negotiations. we can speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young, who is at westminster for us. they couldn't go any slower. that's true, though david davis was at pains to data point out where progress has been made. i think the government is conscious they need to say a bit more about that, because
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the thought out there is that things have stalled, nothing is really happening, not progressing to the next stage, and he was saying, on eu citizens, progress has been made, on theissue citizens, progress has been made, on the issue of the border between ireland and northern ireland, some progress there. the sticking point is still money, and he said at one point that the eu was using time pressure, because obviously the clock is ticking, to get more money out of the uk, as you would expect, he said, because this is a negotiation. ouraim remains to our aim remains to give as much certainty as possible to businesses and citizens on both sides. i've made no secret of the fact that to fully provide that certainty, we must be able to talk about the future. we all have to recognise that we are reaching the limits of what we can achieve without consideration of the future relationship. the prime minister's speech in florence set up the scale of the ambition of a new partnership with the eu, and she also laid out the case for a simple, clear and time—limited period of the main
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station on current terms. in the eu council this week, i have the 27 members will recognise and approve this, and provide michel barnier momentum. doing so will allow us to achieve ourjoint objectives and achieve a deal that works for the uk and the eu. there has been much discussion of what constitutes sufficient process. let me be clear that sufficient progress and the sequence of negotiation has always been the eu construct not the uk one. negotiations require both parties not just to engage constructively, but to develop their positions advance. the uk has been clear it will be conducting these negotiations in a constructive and responsible way. the substantial progress we have made over recent months proves we have done just that, and we're ready to move these negotiations on.
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david davis said that the country needs to be ready and that negotiations will progress. this is what amber rudd said to the home affairs select committee. there has been discussion on speculation about whether there might be no deal at all of any form. if there were no deal of any form, do you believe that britain would continue to be as safe and secure as we are now?|j think safe and secure as we are now?” think it is unthinkable that there would be no deal. it is so much in their interest as well as ours, in their interest as well as ours, in their communities, families and tourists' interests to have something in place. we will make sure there is something between them and us to maintain our security. let's discuss this and the wider economic news today. i am joined by a member of the treasure —— a former
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member of the treasury select commodity. —— committee. this member of the treasury select commodity. -- committee. this the treasury select committee, the governor of the bank of england in front of us today, saying... everybody recognise it is in our mutual interest to have an agreement andl mutual interest to have an agreement and i think that is what will happen. what about those who say the economic impractical beg —— impact of brexit, the fact that inflation is so high is because the pound has slumped, that this isjust is so high is because the pound has slumped, that this is just the beginning of how things are going at it is adding are —— the beginning of how things are going and it is having a negative impact. those organisations that are forecasting gloom and doom, the oecd today, these are the same organisations that we learn from bitter experience before the referendum got it so very wrong. the oecd in particular
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hmmfi wrong. the oecd in particular forecast that a plague of frogs would descend from the sky and we would descend from the sky and we would break out in boils ahead of the referendum and they have been busy upgrading their forecasts! businesses and politicians are keen for us to talk about everything, including a future relationship. the oecd, their report is gloomy, saying that staying in the eu, if we could reverse the referendum result, that would boost the uk economy. a no deal scenario, investment would seize up and the uk's credit rating would be cut. it is hard to forecast the performance of an economy from the performance of an economy from the outside. they forecast what would happen after the referendum and then busily scrambled to revise their forecast upwards in the face of strong figures from the economy after the referendum. three quarters
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of economic is psychology. these organisations failed to appreciate the psychology of the british people. most people are optimistic about leaving after having voted for it. investment is ok, employment is very high and we are a resilient and ingenious country, and we know generally in ourselves that we will find a way to thrive in the future, whatever happens. what do you think should happen now in the negotiations? does britain need to put more money on the table? no, i think we have a fundamental problem, which is they want to know what we are going to pay and we want to know what we are buying. the eu said at the start that nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, and yet they won't talk about everything. how will they move forward? come christmas, i expect to see greater political pressure from those elected politicians in europe who will have to live with the consequences of no deal, to come and
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talk about a future trade deal. there is action going on in geneva, where the wto is based. we have already started to agree tariff free quotas, so i am hopeful that by the time we get to the turn of the year, sense will prevail and it will start to come together. thank you very much. all eyes now towards the end of the week will be on the eu summit where theresa may and the british government will be hoping for some sign from eu leaders that they are willing to start talking about a transition period, maybe even that trade deal. i think we'll be talking about this on friday, when we? thank you very much. a huge clear—up operation is taking place across ireland following the damage caused by storm ophelia, which killed three people. thousands are still without electricity after winds of around a hundred miles per hour brought down power lines and trees. ben ando reports. trees down. power down. clearing up. across the island of ireland workers, homeowners, engineers, restoring electricity and transport links damaged under
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the onslaught of storm ophelia. the damage was worse in the south, where around a quarter million people are still without power. some are being warned they might be left in the dark for several days. though engineers are working round the clock to reconnect everyone. the counties of cork and kerry bore the brunt of ophelia's 100—mph—plus winds. ireland's national emergency coordination group is meeting in dublin, but hospitals and roads managed reopen today. in northern ireland around 50,000 homes had power restored overnight. during the morning workers continued and now the number still without electricity is around 3000. during the night, ophelia continued north in scotland. power cuts affected around 1100 homes
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and in north wales a000 lost electricity. compared to the south, northern ireland got off relatively lightly. schools in both north and south remain closed for a second day. the decision to close schools here yesterday, taken very late on sunday evening, was criticised. the decision to keep them closed today, meaning parents are having to find things to do with the youngsters, is also raising eyebrows. and while there were tragically three deaths and much damage to power lines and buildings, many will feel the wrath of storm ophelia could have been significantly worse. ben ando, bbc news, belfast. the number of hate crimes recorded by police increased by 29 % in the last year, the largest annual rise since records began in 2011. the home office says the biggest spikes coincided with the eu referendum, and terror attacks. most of the offences were racially motivated — but the biggest rise was in disability hate crimes, which went up by more than 50 %.
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june kelly reports. westminster in march. the first of this year's terror attacks in the uk. five people, including pc keith palmer, died, after the killer, khalid masood, went on his murderous rampage, first with a car and then with a knife. in the days that followed, there was an increase in hate crime. just one of the reasons why it's gone up in the last year. there were 80,393 hate crimes recorded by the police in england and wales. this was a rise of 29% on the previous 12 months, and there was an increase in all categories of hate crime. john gillespie was a victim of hate crime, targeted because he has a learning disability. he had a necklace stolen, picked on because the thief knew he was vulnerable. it made me feel so sick, that somebody could have... that somebody could do
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that to someone like me. the period after the brexit vote saw a spike in race hate crimes. this family were victims. the majority of hate crime is race related. today's annual figures only go up to the end of march this year, so they don't cover the weeks following the terror attacks in manchester, and at london bridge and finsbury park mosque, but police data is showing a rise in hate crime after all of them. and these were the offences that were reported — many victims never go to the police. june kelly, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: inflation hits a five—year high at 3%, mostly because of higher food and travel costs. reversing the brexit process would boost the uk economy, according to the international body the oecd. hate crime on the rise in england and wales, with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum and terror attacks.
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in a moment: a number of councils in england are regularly buying one—way train tickets for homeless people to take them out of their area. in sport, northern ireland will face switzerland in the world cup play—offs next month. the first leg will be in belfast. this was only lost one match in qualifying and are one of the seeded teams in today's draw. the winner will face denmark. top neymar in spain facing real madrid. chris froome says that retaining his tour de france title will be a massive challenge. next year's route, with six mountain stages, that has been revealed today, does not play to his strengths as he seeks a sixth title. more now on the inflation rate rising to its highest in five years, driven up by increase in transport
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and food prices. the rate of inflation, as measured by the consumer prices index, increased to 3% last month, up from 2.9 % in august. the rise in inflation will have a further squeeze on families who rely on benefits who have seen them frozen by the government over recent years. with me is imran hussain, director of policy and research at the children's charity child action poverty group. the thing about an increase in food, it isa the thing about an increase in food, it is a much larger proportion of the budget of someone who is less well off, isn't it? the headline figure is 3%, but as you say, for families on low incomes, the basics form a much bigger part of their spending basket than for other families, so it really hits those families, so it really hits those families hard. the figure of 3% is a five—year high, but this issue has been a bread—and—butter issue for families on low incomes for some time now, and in particular, when you think about it, it hits working families in three ways: they are already squeezed by low wage growth,
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and if they have children, the children's benefits have been stuck for a number of years, children's benefits have been stuck fora number of years, so children's benefits have been stuck for a number of years, so they are falling in value, and there in — what benefits have been cut as well, so those things add up together and dojust about so those things add up together and do just about managing families the prime minister talked about our hit really ha rd. prime minister talked about our hit really hard. these families have had low inflation for a long time. they arejust figures for a low inflation for a long time. they are just figures for a lot of people, aren't they? but when you see 3%, it really does make a difference. when you are living on almost next to nothing, these small percentages make a huge difference to families about their decisions about what they do. we do research every year where we ask families, the public, about what they think the public, about what they think the minimum things are that all family should have and we cost that up. benefits are way below the level the public regard as needed to meet
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basic needs. there is a real issue about the benefits system. at the moment, what we've had for a number of years, is cut after cut after cut. that can't continue. at some point, some future government will have to step in and say, hang on, this doesn't make sense, because if we are having families at the bread line like this, then we will see extra costs to local authorities in terms of problems such as homelessness and health, for the nhs. if we have more children in poverty, we will see worse outcomes for children, which will feed through to the nhs. we can't carry on kicking the can down the road than pretending that we can carry on cutting benefits and it having no consequence. mark carney said things are still going to get higher, that rate will get higher. he's also hinting atan rate will get higher. he's also hinting at an interest rate rise. what reaction do you get from people when you suggest that is coming as
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well? people arejust when you suggest that is coming as well? people are just very worried about their finances. particularly those on low incomes. they have very little at the moment, and what they keep thinking about is paying the bills, the problems in front of them, and that has been getting harder and harderfor a them, and that has been getting harder and harder for a number of yea rs harder and harder for a number of years now. if interest rates do rise, some of that will be fed through and will affect families. that will be another issue for them to deal with. we're hoping that the government gets a grip on the issue in the november budget and increases some of these benefits in line with prices, particularly children's benefits. children have twice the poverty rate of pensioners, and it is only right that their benefits get the same kind of protection that we give to the basic state pension for pensioners. imran hussain, thank you forjoining us. a deal has been struck which could help safeguard jobs
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at the bombardier aircraft factory in northern ireland. the european manufacturer, airbus, has taken a stake in bombardier‘s c—series jet, which has wings built in belfast. the deal would allow some of the planes to be assembled at an airbus plant in alabama, avoiding big import duties us authorities have threatened to impose. a man has been found guilty of murdering a kurdish refugee, just hours after he'd been released from a secure hospital. jeffrey barry, who lived in the same supported housing as kamil ahmad, stabbed him more than 25 times in what was described as a ‘sustained and savage' attack. jon kay reports. 1am, and jeffrey barry head from his flat to kamil ahmad's bedsit. in his waistband, a large kitchen knife. he knocks on kamil‘s door, and inside stabs the kurdish refugee more than 25 times, before mutilating his body. that's like a black cloud in my life, you know... kamil‘s brother believes the attack could and should have been prevented, in a country they came
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to for protection. he came here to be safe. to just lead a normal life. but why, how come he got this? why did this happen, and how did it happen? jeffrey barry had a long history of severe psychiatric problems, including episodes of paranoid schizophrenia. this is the supported living accommodation in bristol where the two men were living, and six weeks before the attack jeffrey barry told the staff here that he wanted to kill someone, that he wanted to be notorious, and he said kamilahmad was top of his list. he'd left notes saying he was planning to kill kamil, along with everybody else on the street. in the weeks before the attack barry was sectioned, but he was released from this hospital by a mental health tribunal, against the advice of a psychiatrist. he returned to the house, and within hours had killed the refugee.
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he called 999, and said he'd warned mental health professionals. that was his defence in court, flanked by staff from broadmoor high security hospital. but barry has been convicted unanimously of murder. kamil‘s family believe the a8—year—old would still be alive if he had been warned in advance that barry was returning that night, and if staff in the house had been given time to come up with a plan. i am very angry... his brother told me all the agencies involved must reflect on this case. i hope they learn, you know,
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what has happened to my brother, so it doesn't happen to anybody else again, because only i know how i feel, you know? only we know how i feel, to have lost a loving brother, you know. and they could have done something about it beforehand. a review will be published next year. they're called ‘reconnection' tickets — one way train tickets bought for homeless people by a number of local councils in england. more than a thousand pounds a year has been spent on the scheme to put rough sleepers back in touch with theirfamilies. but one man says he was offered a ticket to a city he had never been to before. anna collinson from the bbc victoria derbyshire programme reports. i'm taking you through the park to the place where i used to stay every single night on the streets. mhairi hopkins developed post—natal depression after giving birth a few years ago. while her parents took care
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of her son, the 22—year—old's mental health deteriorated. eventually she ran out of places to stay. you don't know who's watching you, you don't if you're going to get up in the morning safe. i was doing this every single night, i'd wake up at least four, five times a night and look around at what was going on, try and calm myself down. you've got such a broken sleep pattern. you didn't actually sleep. one night every autumn local authorities in england count how many people are sleeping rough. last year there were more than a000, a 130% rise in six years. some charities are sceptical about how the data is collected because councils can choose to enter an estimate if they prefer. in 2016 large cities featured prominently in the 20 areas with the worst problem. but not too far behind was a seaside town, with a population of 180,000, where homelessness has trebled since 2010. this is a really popular place
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for homeless people to hang out, particularly at night, but in 2015 the council started playing loud music like bagpipes and alvin and the chipmunks. they said it was to stop anti—social behaviour. then it emerged the council were buying homeless people train tickets. but there was a condition: they were one—way. the idea being they could send people back to where they came from. bournemouth council didn't want to be interviewed, but said it only offered one—way train tickets to homeless people who were not from the area. and "where it can be proven that the service user can be safely reconnected back to the area of locality". it made me feel sick, because i've lived here all my life, you know. so what they want to try and do is get all the homeless people out of bournemouth because they see it as it is making bournemouth a bad place.
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while mhairi is no longer sleeping rough, thousands of others are this winter. the government says investing £550 million to tackle the problem as well as implementing the homelessness reduction act which goes active in april. anna collinson, bbc news. time for the weather with chris fawkes. hello. gusty winds will move across the southern half of the uk as ophelia heads out into the norwegian sea. it will be gusty through the rest of the afternoon, with cloud and showers following into northern ireland and scotland. rain moving into south—west england as well, clouding over in the south—east. a swathe of brighter weather across central england. there will be low
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cloud, and missed and hill fog patches forming across southern england overnight. still a few showers for central scotland, but clearing skies across northern scotla nd clearing skies across northern scotland could get countryside temperatures down close to freezing. a lot of cloud hosting on wednesday. outbreaks of rain across england and wales, with some heavy bursts from time to time. the best of the sunny spells will be across northern and western areas of scotland, but these areas will see the lowest temperatures. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: inflation has reached 3% — its highest level in more than five years — largely due to rising food and transport prices. the oecd warns that economic growth in the uk will slow next year, but suggests that reversing the brexit vote would have a positive impact. there has been a 29% rise in hate crimes recorded by police in the uk with incidents increasing after the brexit vote and terror attacks. sport now on afternoon live, olly foster is with us again olly foster is with us again
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at the bbc sport centre. a busy day. yes, a much busier day. we're all building up to tonight's champions league matches. see how many manchester city can score against napoli, liverpool really have to win in slovenia and tottenham have a toughy at real madrid. chris froome has found outjust how tough it's going to be at the tour de france next year. we've just had an update on the middlesex appeal against their cricket county championship relegation and it's all to do with that cross—bow bolt that was fired into the oval. i will have details in a minute. ok, we will wait for that. a tease, yeah.
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in terms of northern ireland, and all eyes on russia and some better news for them. it could have been worse for northern ireland, dropping in to that pot of unseeded teams. they will have to beat switzerland to reach the world cup in russia next summer. the play—off draw took place in zurich this afternoon. they didn't drag this out as they sometimes do, only eight teams in the hat and michael o'neill‘s men will face switzerland over two legs next month. the swiss were strong in qualifying, nine wins out of nine until their final defeat to portugal that saw them finish second on goal difference. the first leg is at windsor park before they travel to switzerland to decide their world cup fate. switzerland had a great qualifying campaign. asl switzerland had a great qualifying campaign. as i say, i think it gives us an opportunity to go to russia.
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we have to make sure we're particularly in the first game being in belfast and then obviously to come to switzerland for the second leg, but we look ford to the game. we know we'll have to be at our best to qualify, but we believe we're capable of doing that. they are still thrashing out the dates. there is the draw. the republic of ireland have denmark away in copenhagen first. it's croatia v greece and a huge game with sweden v italy. the games will take place on a home and away basis, with the first legs between 9th and 11th november and the second legs between 12 and 1a november. the champions league is back, manchester city are at home to napoli, liverpool have to beat maribor away in slovenia but what a night coming up in madrid, tottenham hotspur up against the 12—times winners and reigning champions, real. spurs lost to them home and away in the quarterfinals six years ago. there's not one surviving
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member of that spurs team. but luka modric and gareth bale are now madrid players. bale might not be involved. the real manager zinedine zidane has hailed spurs' it is the club with most victories. you feel that when you play here, when you come here, you start to feel the reality of football. everyone are excited. middlesex‘s relegation from the county championship first division has been confirmed. that's after their appeal against a two point penalty was rejected. they were penalised for a slow over rate in the match against surrey at the oval that was abandoned for safety when a cross bow bolt was fired into the ground
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and landed on the pitch. middlesex were relegated by a single point. that's why they are so aggrieved at that penalty for slow overrate. that's it for them, they have gone down. chris froome says he faces a "massive challenge" to win a fifth tour de france title after the route for next year's race was announced. the race will start on 7thjuly on the island of noirmoutier off the vendee coast and will take place almost entirely in france, with only 15 kilometres in the spanish pyrenees. it will cover the shortest route of the 21st century and there'll be no long, flat individual time trial, where froome normally excels. frome says it will test every aspect of cycling. that's all for me. no more bulletins for me to miss. let's see howjohn watson gets on in the next hour. no
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individual time trial for chris froome which he's very, very good at. so it will be tough for him and his team sky team—mates. at. so it will be tough for him and his team sky team-mates. that's something you and i have done in the past i'm sure. see you soon, olly. more now on our main story and inflation rose to 3% in september — the biggest rise in six years. the figures are significant because state pension payments from april next year. a 3% rise in the state pension would be the biggest increase in six years which means people receiving the new weekly state pension would see it increase to £16a a week. however, this could be amended by the chancellor in next month's budget. with me is neil duncanjordan, national officer at the national pensioners convention. when i was writing the headlines i thought good news for pensioners and i had to stop myself. it is keeping ta bs i had to stop myself. it is keeping tabs with things? the point you made earlier is not technically correct.
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people who retired after april last year are on the higher state pension. many of our members have been pensioners for sometime. they retired, you know, a number of years ago. their state pension, even after this 3% increase, isjust ago. their state pension, even after this 3% increase, is just £126 a week. for many women who don't get a full state pension, their increase, this april coming, will be somewhere in the region of £2.20 extra. for people who argue that's good news for pensioners, when the extra you're getting is between £2.20 and £2.70 a week that's hard to swallow. hard to swallow and of course, the budget coming up. what do you want the chancellor to say? we all want more money, but are there any safeguards or anything that would help pensioners particularly? one of the big issues that the government needs to address which isn't linked to inflation, of course, is the crisis in social care. they have been kicking that one into the long grass for sometime. they really need to address what people are going to do with their money, their savings
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and so on when it comes to social care. are they going to have to sell their homes? are they going to have to use up their life savings just to be looked after? these are massive issues. in terms of pensions the triple—lock needs to stay. the triple—lock needs to stay. the triple—lock on pensions needs to stay. that was under threat. absolutely. until the stay. that was under threat. absolutely. untilthe last election? and the dup coming into the government in a sort of broad sense have kicked that into touch so that's safe for now. ironically, evenif that's safe for now. ironically, even if the conservatives had their way and did away with the 2.5% guarantee, which is what they were pledging at the election. it would have made no difference to today's announcement because it is 3% cpi and that would have been what the pension was linked to. so a lot of the arguments are sue per flewous really. a difficult time fob a pensioner? it is a difficult time if you are living on the basic state pension. we have 6.5 million pensioners who don't pay income tax,
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they have an income every year of less tha n they have an income every year of less than £11500. that's not a lot of money to live on. the figure of £160, that only applies to those since... april last year. right. and that's only if you have got 35 years of national insurance contributions and you never had a company pension. it's complicated. and that's not a huge amount when you are looking at food price going up, because for pensioners that's a major part of a budget? the other issue to bear in mind, isaw budget? the other issue to bear in mind, i saw you had somebody on from child poverty action group earlier." you still have to pay the council tax just like the other person. £2.70 doesn't increase the food, fuel and so on. when you talk to pensioners and they tend to say what they think. do they say this is the
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government's fault or brexit, why do they think we are going through this difficult time? well, the state pension has been historically low, ever since 1980 when the conservative government broke the link with earnings, we haven't caught up with what the state pension have been... what would it have been? £165. if you are £126 you are way off what it would have been and governments tried to do other things rather than address the state pension issue. so you get a bus pass. you get a free tv licence, you get a winter fuel payment. why? because our state pension is so conically low. so the triple—lock, i mean actually, is great in name only because the issueis is great in name only because the issue is underlying and will not stop you from struggling and you must hear stories of people struggling? my old boss jack jones used to say 3% of nothing is still nothing. when you are applying it to
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a low base, it's still meaningless. we have to address the fact that pensioner incomes are under real pressure in this country and i think future generations are going to need the state pension even more because their company pensions won't be there. the idea that everybody retires on a gold plated final salary pension scheme. those days are long gone. briefly, you must hear stories of pensioners who before the end of the week, the money has gone? we have people writing in and saying they only heat one room. they spend all day on the bus to keep warm, going to libraries so they don't have to be at home. all these store chris are real. it is not every single pensioner, we shouldn't give that impression, of course, but we have a problem of pensioner poverty in this country, 1.9 million pensioners living below the poverty line. neil, it is good of you to come in. thank you very much. a woman whose partner, 20—year—old kevin nunes,
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was shot dead 15 years ago in what was believed to be a gangland killing, says she's been let down by police. in her first broadcast interview, leanne williams says officers should have been held to account for mistakes made by staffordshire police during the investigation. the police watchdog found that while the force was guilty of collective failings, individuals weren't to blame. phil mackie reports. how is it that nobody, not one person, has been disciplined — nobody? and it's just shocking to me. it's just absolutely shocking and ijust think it's really, really, really bad. in september 2002, leanne williams was pregnant with kevin nunes‘ son when his bullet—ridden body was found near a farm in south staffordshire. five men were jailed for his murder, but their convictions quashed after it emerged that staffordshire police failed to disclose an internal report that would have raised questions about a witness' reliability. when the men were cleared, the appeal court said it had been
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a shocking episode which may have amounted to a serious perversion of the course ofjustice. initially the ipcc recommended that four senior officers should face misconduct hearings. jane sawyers, who retired this year as staffordshire's chief constable. adrian lee, who held the topjob at northamptonshire. suzette davenport, who became chief constable in gloucestershire. and marcus beale, the assistant chief constable in the west midlands. a five—year investigation ruled there were collective, but not individual, failings. the fact that... there's wrongdoings all around. people got released. failures. this, that. and nobody‘s in trouble for it. i can't comprehend it, i'm just not understanding to what level that nobody feels that they have to even get
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a slap on the wrist. 15 years since kevin nunes‘ body was dumped at this remote farm, his killers still haven't been caught. staffordshire police say that the investigation is still open and regularly reviewed. leanne williams hopes that someone will come forward with the information that will finally bring kevin's killers to justice. there's more on that story on file on four on bbc radio a at 8pm tonight. two ireland and northern ireland by two ireland and northern ireland rug by stars two ireland and northern ireland rugby stars are to stand on charges of rape. paddy jackson rugby stars are to stand on charges of rape. paddyjackson is 25 and stewart olding is 2a are to stand trial on charges of rape. that news just coming in. a us—backed militia in syria says it
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has taken control of raqqa after months of fighting with islamic state militants. the success of the syrian democratic forces is being seen as another heavy blow to is as raqqa was their self proclaimed capital. it's thought the group now controls just a handful of towns along the euphrates valley. portugal has begun a period of three days of national mourning for the 36 people killed in wildfires that have devastated parts of the country. firefighters continue to tackle a number of blazes in central and northern portugal, although rains have eased the situation in some areas. alison roberts reports from lisbon. with more than 660 separate blazes starting over two days, portugal's firefighters were stretched to the limit and beyond. in many areas, residents had to fend for themselves, and choose between protecting their property, or fleeing for their lives. even some of those who did flee ran into terrible trouble. with up to 6,000 firefighters on the ground during the day on monday, most of the blazes were gradually
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brought under control, even as the number of dead rose steadily. paying homage to the victims in this terrible year for fires, portugal's prime minister called for a cross—party consensus to ensure, in his words, nothing will stay the same. translation: we are aware that the country demands rapid results, after decades of forest disorganisation. we cannot deceive the portuguese by promising immediate results. but we do not fear the challenges, and we find in this national requirement a motivation to collectively overcome this battle. over the border in north—western spain, in galicia, deadly forest fires also raged. there, local officials blamed arsonists for the repeated outbreaks. in portugal, too, locals suspect arson in many cases. prosecutors have opened investigations in several areas. the country has begun three days of national mourning. meanwhile, the survivors are counting the cost,
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and wondering how they can rebuild their lives. egon is here. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: inflation hits a five—year high — mostly because of higher food and transport prices. an international economic body says britain's economic outlook would improve significantly if brexit was reversed. there's been a big jump in hate crime in england and wales with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum and terror attacks. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: as inflation reaches its highest point since 2012, we'll find out when the bank of england governor, mark carney, thinks it will hit its peak.
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online fashion retailer asos has seen profits rise by 1a5%. that was boosted by strong sales overseas as the firm cut prices to meet strong competition. european plane—maker airbus is to take a majority stake in bombardier‘s c—series jet project. the move could help the plane escape import taxes of 300% imposed by the us. bombardier is northern ireland's biggest private sector employer. we have been talking about the oecd report in term of brexit, but they have gun giving a forecast for the economy as a whole? they think we will see the economy grow by 1% next year. when you consider that at the moment we are growing at 1.5%. they are predicting something of a slowdown next year. they are also worried about productivity. they say that the sorts ofjobs that worried about productivity. they say that the sorts of jobs that we're producing really aren't the type
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that can be susceptible to increased productivity, so you know, if you put a guy on a bike, with a pizza, he's not going to deliver that many more pizzas. and what they are saying is that's really holding back both wage growth and the way we grow as an economy. ok. we have been talking about inflation and that has a role in all projections anyway? that's right. what we have seen todayis that's right. what we have seen today is news that inflation has gone up 3%, the highest figure since april 2012. the way people will feel this is because prices are going up about 3% and wages are going up nowhere near that and that's really producing a squeeze on people as they feel their household budget really feel the impact. earlier, i spoke to a senior economist, jane foley about this. the office of national statistics
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talk a lot about food prices. if we look more deeply, we have to look at the exchange rate. if we look at the words from the bank of england, from the bank of england governor, he said several times over the last year—and—a—half that the push up on inflation is universally because of the fall in sterling. that happened after the brexit referendum last june. now, if you considerthe after the brexit referendum last june. now, if you consider the value of sterling now, relative then, we are looking at an exchange rate is 396 are looking at an exchange rate is 3% or a% weaker than the euro and 9% weaker against the dollar and what weaker against the dollar and what we have in the economy is that impact last year, takes time to push through. the good news is that it will start to fall out of the index in the next few months. so by the ind of the year inflation should be a little bit lower than it is right now. the figures for asos are astonishing. profits have risen 14596
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over the last year. what it is finding is it is really doing well here in the uk. that's an under statement! it has seen growth here in the uk at 16%, but overseas, growth has been about 50% and they're saying that that is down to, that really strong performance overseas is down a lot to the fact that the pound has gone down recently and that's making it easier for them to sell stuff overseas. recently and that's making it easier for them to sell stuff overseasm can't all be down to that? no, it isn'tment you're right, they are really focussing on their core market of 20 something—year—olds, like us! who want to get... laughter they'll sue! laughter so millennials who are looking to get high street bar gains, quality products, at really bike bargain prices. and so they're saying that's really helping them in their performance as well. let's get the views now ofjohn stephenson who is
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a retail analyst at the peel hunt. let's dig down on what they're doing right. as you say, they are focussing on their core customer and the 20 something, it is notjust about the product on website, it's about the product on website, it's about the product on website, it's about the way they sell so they are very much mobile first, 70% of the traffic to the website comes from mobile rather than a laptop, a pc or ipad. if you look at the product, whether it is their own product or other people's brands and they try and make it as easy as possible, it is free delivery and they try to give people a refund as fast as possible. it is about getting the proposition right and when you look at the dwell time on website, they are streets ahead of the competition. people are sending so much more time on the asos app or website compared to competition. much more time on the asos app or website compared to competitionm does this mean people operating shops on the high street have got to
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put up their hands and say, "we're done." it is more than being online. we could look at other retailers who have online and high street. when you focus on the customer, you know, you focus on the customer, you know, you can deliver decent levels of growth if we look at businesses like joulles or ted baker. they are taking market sha re joulles or ted baker. they are taking market share organically and they are getting great volume growth and are able to off set the pressures so things like the national living wage or the effect such as import price inflation. if you have got 20% volume growth you can have a more interesting conversation with your suppliers in terms of who takes the pain. you are able to be more flexible to off set the costs. the head winds that the more mature retailers are feeling,
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are not getting, notjust the online retailers, but the growth retailers in general. so the fight is still on. a whiz through the markets. here they are. yes, as you can see the ftse is continuing to perform well because so many of the companies on the ftse are focussed overseas and the ftse are focussed overseas and the global market is doing well. merlin are the people who run attractions such as madam's tu sards and the london eye. they are under pressure because they said their sales are flat. house builders are doing well. bellway has seen profits go doing well. bellway has seen profits 9° up doing well. bellway has seen profits 9° up by doing well. bellway has seen profits go up by 12.5%. an uplift in their share price as well and brent crude doing well as a result of tensions elsewhere in the world. thank you very much. there were more than a dozen unprovoked shark attacks off the coast of australia
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last year alone. now drone technology is being tested out to try to protect more swimmers and surfers by spotting sharks as they get close to the shore. hywel griffith has been to see them in action. a shadow in the sea or something more sinister? from the beach it's hard to tell, but from the skies, the drone has a clearer view. it feeds into deep—learning software which it's claimed has a 92% success rate in spotting sharks, as well as less—threatening species. every time it sees a dolphin, whale or a swimmer in distress, it learns their shape. launched along the beaches of new south wales, the drones can patrol for a0 minutes. daniel was one of the first to train as a life—saver pilot. i mean i can't physically run out and grab a board and paddle out and save someone, but sitting on the beach, we've got eyes in the sky and we're just another layer of protection, really.
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the drones don't only observe, they can react, too, dropping an inflatable device to help people in the sea. they won't replace the use of controversial shark nets and drum lines, however, which some claim do more harm than good. last year around australia there were 17 unprovoked shark attacks. the number isn't that high compared to how many people actually go in these waters, but it leaves a national preoccupation to the question of how to share the beaches between the human beings and the sea life. when this great white washed onto sydney's shores recently, it was welcomed and christened fluffy. not everyone wants to get so close, even if the chances of an attack are minimal. it's that humanlike fear of being attacked by a wild animal. but the risk to people that are entering the water rates so low on the scale as opposed to all other threats going about your daily life — i mean traffic and cars and bee stings and all those statistics.
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and for regulars in these waters, it's all part of the experience. i was actually swimming here once. i was six months pregnant and there was a shark alarm. i did freak out a bit! if i'm going to die i'd prefer to be taken by a shark than have a stroke and end up in a nursing home. the drones won't be on every beach every day, but they should give everyone a better understanding of what is down below. breaking news. craig shakespeare has been sacked as manager of leicester city. he signed a three year deal just four months ago. the foxes are third from bottom in the premier league. they have not won any of their past six league matches. he is 53 years old and succeeded the title winner claudio ranieri in february ona winner claudio ranieri in february on a temporary basis, but he steered
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the foxes away from trouble to finish in 12th place and was given thejob in finish in 12th place and was given the job in june. finish in 12th place and was given the job injune. they finish in 12th place and was given thejob injune. they had a 1—1 draw with west bromwich on monday and that was the moment it was decided that was the moment it was decided that for craig shakespeare it has come to an end. more in the sports news coming up. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. storm ophelia heads out into the norwegian sea. it will be gusty through the rest of the afternoon with cloud and showers following into northern ireland and to scotland. a finger of rain moving into parts of south—west england as well through the afternoon, clouding overin well through the afternoon, clouding over in the south east, but there will be a swathe of brighter weather across the central slice of the uk. now, during tuesday evening and overnight the rain becomes expansive. further north, a fair bit of cloud. still showers for central scotland,
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but clearing skies across northern scotla nd but clearing skies across northern scotland could get temperatures in the countryside fairly close to freezing. so, for one or two, a chilly start to the day on wednesday, otherwise a lot of cloud first thing. outbreaks of rain with us across england and wales with heavier bursts freum. the best of any limited sunny spells will be across northern and western areas of scotland. here we will have the lowest temperatures. highs of 11 or 12 celsius in the north. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at a. inflation hits a five—year high — it's costing us more to travel, and to eat. and it's still going up. we expect that inflation will peak in and around the october— november figures, so picking potentially above the 3% level. an international think tank suggests britain would benefit from a 2nd brexit referendum.
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the chancellor says that's not going to happen. the government is clear that we are leaving the european union, and that we want a deep and special partnership with the european union, maintaining close economic ties. hate crime on the rise in england and wales — with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum — and terror attacks. coming up, all of the sport. john watson has that. we do indeed, news of another premier league sacking. of course with the announcement that has just of course with the announcement that hasjust come of course with the announcement that has just come through of the departure of craik shakespeare as the leicester city manager. he took over from the leicester city manager. he took overfrom claudio the leicester city manager. he took over from claudio ranieri. the leicester city manager. he took overfrom claudio ranieri. more on that. as we recover from one storm, another may be on its way. yes, the violent winds from ophelia working out, but another big storm coming our way through friday night. tweet
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us on those inflation figures, with food and travel costs going up, how will you be coping? and we will not need a bigger boat, we have a drone instead. the new way to tackle australia's shark problem. chances are many of you've already noticed the cost of living has gone up again. inflation has reached its highest level in more than five years — up to 3% — with travelling and eating costing us more. but this is better news for pensioners — who will now get a 3% pension increase from next april. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. what's this got to do with the cost of living?
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the price of fish was one of the fastest rising goods in the year to september, up by 13.6%. and if you're thinking of cooking it in this, oils and fats are up by 1a.9%. while other prices like airfares were down, the 3% average price rise was higher than it has been since april 2012. cars, food and clothing. everything is on the way up. food prices. especially the cost of heating, lighting, gas, electricity. those consumer products, there's other things that have increased the most. the entire shop, really, has gone up even in the last five years, it's probably gone up from £100 per week to £130 per week. the bank of england expects inflation to get a little higher before it drops back. we expect that inflation will peak in around october, november figures and so peaking potentially above the 3% level. september's inflation number is used to set basic state pensions
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so they should rise by 3% next april. that compares with wages. right now they are going up by 2.1%, and if you are receiving working age benefits they will not go at all next april, so you are getting a real—terms cut. a policy of freezing benefits for people of working age is one of the biggest austerity measures. it saves the government money but removes it from benefit recipients. many of them receiving already less and less each month. the inflation represents one of the biggest real terms squeeze on benefits we have seen for decades. it is set to save the government £1.9 billion per year in 2018—19, but that means losses for many families. if we take a working family with two children they are set to leave the girl lose £305 per year. the chancellor was urged to address the key reason why wages are not keeping up with prices or pensions. the amount each worker can produce, productivity, has not been growing like it used to.
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why is it so important? because productivity is the key to the future growth of the economy and productivity, higher productivity, is the key to better wages. no wonder we have low wages! we have very low productivity! we need to increase productivity in order to get the wages up. shops and other firms face one more rising cost. business rates, which are set to go up by the old—fashioned retail prices index for september, 3.9%. in the city, it's also now seen as highly likely that next month, for the first time in more than a decade, interest rates will have rise. rates will have to rise. don't forget — you can let us know what you think. most of you seem excited that the duke and duchess of cambridge are
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expecting a baby in april. it didn't come as news to a lot of us who suspected it was going to be around then anyway when they announced it. the oecd — an international economic body — says that reversing brexit would boost the british economy. it's a provocative claim — from an organisation that once said we would receive "great benefits" from joining the erm. but with, or without, a pinch of salt — it's clear there are increasing concerns over brexit negotiations. last night — over dinner — theresa may and eu commission presidentjean—claude juncker agreed to "accelerate" negotiations. we can speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young who is at westminster for us. accelerate, as long as you're going in the same direction? exactly, and who has got their foot on the pedal, i think. both sides saying it is time the other one got a move on so that we can move onto the age to talk about trade deals, a possible transition period. there was some concern that these talks may have stalled. everyone really looking for some kind of progress. now the international trade secretary, dr
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liam fox, has been talking today about what he thinks is likely to happen, he has been speaking to my colleaguejohn pienaar. clearly we don't want to leave with no deal but most of the world's trade is done on that basis. we have very strong fundamentals in this economy, last year was the highest amount of investment ever to come into the united kingdom in our history. we have seen a very strong performance in employment, and the economy is still growing very robustly. so no need to fear crashing out with no deal? in a nutshell? we don't have to fear it because it is the basis of most of our trade but it would be better if we left with a full agreement with the eu. his colleague david davis in the eu. his colleague david davis in the house of commons this afternoon speaking the mps also said that the uk had to be prepared for a no deal scenario. he said that was the best way of getting a good deal out of the european union. but in front of the european union. but in front of the home affairs select committee, amber rudd, the home secretary, was
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asked the same question by labour. there has obviously been discussion and speculation in the press about whether there might be no deal at all of any form. if there were no deal of any form, do you believe that britain would continue to be a safe and secure as we are now?” think it is unthinkable that there would be no deal. it is so much in their interest as well as in hours, in their communities, their families, their tourists's interest to have something in place. we will make sure that there is something between them and us to maintain our security. iamjoined by i am joined by wes streeting, labour member of the treasury select committee. you were speaking to mark carney the governor of the bank of england today particularly about inflation. he suggests we are reaching the peak point of that and actually things will improve, in the sense that prices might well start to come down. that was mark carney's view on inflation. there are a much broader set of issues around the
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economy at the moment, and i think the warning signs are there, in terms of the risks around brexit. we have seen the uk growth revised down. we were leading europe, now we are at risk of lagging behind. we have seen the fall in sterling predicted prior to the referendum, that is having an impact on the economy, and we saw the news in the telegraph yesterday about the plummeting foreign direct investment in the uk. so at this point in the negotiations to be talking about a no deal scenario is a huge risk to our economy. there should be the moment at which we we re should be the moment at which we were signing those crucial transitional agreements because there are lots of businesses where there are lots of businesses where there are lots of businesses where there are manufacturing businesses with supply chains european union or financial services, who have got to make intentionally irreversible decisions about where jobs and economic activity is located. those sorts of businesses are looking to make those by christmas or into the new year, so if it looks like we are contemplating a no deal scenario, rather than a transitional deal with the european union, i think it is
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just kind of fantasy economics, and politicians, i'm afraid, behind me in the conservative party are playing games with people'sjobs in the conservative party are playing games with people's jobs and livelihoods, and for us to be at this stage, and this state at this stage in an oche —— the negotiations is something that should worry us all. but most cabinet ministers say what they do want is a deal. they are pushing for a deal. labour has said they will vote against a no deal scenario but aren't you risking not getting the bastille? if you are willing to walk away from the table surely that means the eu might give us something better? one of the most worrying thing is we have seen in the last week grown—ups around the cabinet table, philip hammond, or amber rudd, giving evidence to the home affairs select committee today, they have been absolutely trashed in they have been absolutely trashed in the pages of newspapers, not by labour mps like the pages of newspapers, not by labourmps like me the pages of newspapers, not by labour mps like me orjeremy corbyn orjohn mcdonald but by their own side, and! orjohn mcdonald but by their own side, and i think one of the challenges we have got, in terms of the future arrangements of the
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european union is trent to get consensus between our government and 27 eu member states. it seems we can't even get agreement there. one thing i would say because people remember those george osborne predictions and prophecies of doom if people voted to leave. let's just rememberthe if people voted to leave. let's just remember the moral of the story of the boy who cried wolf is that in the boy who cried wolf is that in the end there was a wharf. while we might not have seen the big economic shock people were expecting, we haven't left european union, but on growth, inward investment, on decisions that businesses are taking now and potentially into the new year about the future of our economy beyond brexit, all of the warning signs are there and i think too many people in the building behind me in the conservative party are indifferent to the risk to our economy to the point of irresponsibility. but the eu have said we have not agreed on the divorce settlement. how much would labour be willing to pay, if you we re labour be willing to pay, if you were in power? and it is still possible that a deal is done, a
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transitional arrangement, the things you up evictee might not happen.” hope we can get to a deal and of course there is a responsibility on both sides of the channel to make the necessary compromises to reach a deal. i think one of the things we forget is that many of the drivers behind our decision to leave the european union went about the economy. many voters decided that other issues, sovereignty or immigration, was more important than leaving the eu. politics has trumped economics. now the eu are prioritising other interests. the risk in all of that is that whether we are talking about british taxpayers and customers or european taxpayers and customers or european taxpayers and customers within the eu, there arejobs taxpayers and customers within the eu, there are jobs and livelihoods at stake on both sides of the channel, and i think politicians on both sides of the channel have responsibility to their citizens to promote the economy from being a second order issued to the most important issue at the centre of these discussions. ok, wes streeting, thank you much indeed, the messages to put the politics
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aside. i'm not entirely sure that will happen. a huge clear—up operation is taking place across ireland following the damage caused by storm ophelia, which killed three people. thousands are still without electricity after winds of around 100mph brought down power lines and trees. ben ando reports. trees down. power down. clearing up. across the island of ireland workers, homeowners, engineers, restoring electricity and transport links damaged under the onslaught of storm ophelia. the damage was worse in the south, where around a quarter million people are still without power. some are being warned they might be left in the dark for several days. though engineers are working round the clock to reconnect everyone. the counties of cork and kerry bore the brunt of ophelia's 100 mph plus winds. ireland's national emergency coordination group is meeting in dublin, but hospitals and roads managed reopen today. in northern ireland around 50,000
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homes had power restored overnight. during the morning workers continued and now the number still without electricity is around 3000. is around 3,000. during the night, ophelia continued north in scotland powered cuts affected around 1,100 homes and in north wales a,000 lost electricity. compared to the south, northern ireland got off relatively lightly. schools in both north and south remain closed for a second day. the decision to close schools here yesterday taken very late on sunday evening was criticised. the decision to keep them closed today, meaning parents are having to find things to do with the youngsters, is also raising eyebrows. and while there were tragically three deaths and much damage to power lines and buildings, many will feel the wrath of storm ophelia could have been significantly worse. ben ando, bbc news, belfast. you're watching afternoon live,
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these are our headlines: inflation hits a five—year high at 3% — mostly because of higher food and travel costs. reversing the brexit process would boost the uk economy, according to the international body the oecd. hate crime on the rise in england and wales — with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum — and terror attacks. in a moment... a number of councils in england are regularly buying one—way train tickets for homeless people to take them out of their area. in the sport, in afternoon live, the second sacking of the premier league season with news of craig shakespeare cosmic departure from leicester city. despite leading the clu b to leicester city. despite leading the club to safety last season and the quarterfinals of the champions league following the departure of claudio ranieri, one win in eight matches of this campaign has prompted a sacking. northern ireland will face switzerland of the world cup play—offs next month, the swiss
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only lost one match in qualifying, the first leg will be at windsor park. it is the return of the champions league tonight. tottenham are in spain to face the champions real madrid at the bernabeu, liverpool and manchester city also in action. back with more on all of these stories at half—past. the number of hate crimes recorded by police increased by 29% in the last year — the largest annual rise since records began in 2011. the home office says the biggest spikes coincided with the eu referendum, and terror attacks. most of the offences were racially motivated — but the biggest rise was in disability hate crimes, which went up by more than 50%. june kelly reports. westminster in march. the first of this year's terror attacks in the uk. five people, including pc keith palmer, died, after the killer, khalid masood, went on his murderous rampage, first with a car and then with a knife. in the days that followed,
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there was an increase in hate crime. just one of the reasons why it's gone up in the last year. there were 80,393 hate crimes recorded by the police in england and wales. this was a rise of 29% on the previous 12 months, and there was an increase in all categories of hate crime. john gillespie was a victim of hate crime, targeted because he has a learning disability. he had a necklace stolen, picked on because the thief knew he was vulnerable. it made me feel so sick, that somebody could have... that somebody could do that to someone like me. the period after the brexit vote saw a spike in race hate crimes. this family were victims. the majority of hate crime is race related. today's annual figures only go up to the end of march this year, so they don't cover the weeks following the terror attacks in manchester, and at london bridge
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and finsbury park mosque, but police data is showing a rise in hate crime after all of them. and these were the offences that were reported — many victims never go to the police. june kelly, bbc news. they're called ‘reconnection' tickets — one way train tickets bought for homeless people by a number of local councils in england. the scheme is aimed at putting refs sleepers back in touch with their families. but one man says he was offered a ticket to a city he had never been to before. anna collinson from the bbc victoria derbyshire programme reports. i'm taking you through the park to the place where i used to stay every single night on the streets. mhairi hopkins developed post—natal depression after giving birth a few years ago. while her parents took care of her son, the 22—year—old's mental health deteriorated. eventually she ran out of places to stay. you don't know who's watching you, you don't if you're going to get up in the morning safe.
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i was doing this every single night, i'd wake up at least four, five times a night and look around at what was going on, try and calm myself down. it didn't work. you've got such a broken sleep pattern. you didn't actually sleep. one night every autumn, local authorities in england count how many people are sleeping rough. last year there were more than a,000, a 130% rise in six years. some charities are sceptical about how the data is collected, because councils can choose to enter an estimate, if they prefer. in 2016, large cities featured prominently in the 20 areas with the worst problem. but not too far behind was a seaside town, with a population of 180,000, where homelessness has trebled since 2010. this is a really popular place for homeless people to hang out, particularly at night, but in 2015 the council started playing loud music, like bagpipes, and alvin and the chipmunks. they said it was to stop
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anti—social behaviour. then it emerged the council were buying homeless people train tickets. but there was a condition. they were one—way. the idea being they could send people back to where they came from. bournemouth council didn't want to be interviewed, but said it only offered one—way train tickets to homeless people who were not from the area. and "where it can be proven that the service user can be safely reconnected back to their area of locality". but this man claims he was still offered a one—way ticket to manchester. it made me feel sick, because i've lived here all my life, you know. so what they want to try and do is get all the homeless people out of bournemouth because they see it as it as making bournemouth a bad place. while mhairi is no longer sleeping rough, thousands of others are this winter. the government says it's investing £550 million to tackle the problem as well as implementing the homelessness reduction act which goes active in april.
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anna collinson, bbc news. with me is hannah gousy, policy and public affairs manager at the homeless charity, crisis. thank you for coming in. this is something you are aware of already. is it something you are aware of already. isita something you are aware of already. is it a good idea? this is something we have already published research ona we have already published research on a couple of years ago, and what we found is that in a number of situations assessments were being made, and people were being reconnected back to areas where they didn't have a particularly strong connection. so the support services weren't there, they weren't being connected back to places where they had family and friends there. we also found instances of people being reconnected the places where there was potentially a threat of violent as well, so that is obviously a very dangerous and difficult situation to put someone in. what we so found that was very worrying was that in situations where people refused this reconnection offer, they were then
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denied any other services from the council to help resolve their rough sleeping. the difficulty for the homeless who are perhaps saying any money is going to be welcome, they are not necessarily going to tell a council actually i face violence if igo council actually i face violence if i go home, or the difficulties that journey may create for them because frankly they just want to get out of the position they are in. indeed. most people will want to be connected to strong support services. they will want to be going back to places where they do have friends and families there to support them and that will be their top priority. what we found was that quite often local authorities were reconnecting people back to where they have their last settled home, but that might not necessarily be where they have those really important support services that can help move them on from homelessness, and that's what really vital. in this situation, what we need is for local authorities be to doing very full and robust assessments, listening to their views and needs to make sure we can ultimately get people off the streets as quickly as possible. a difficult question for
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you to answer, because nobody can guess at how councils operate, but is there a suspicion that a council just says here is the money, away? we are definitely seeing a situation with some councils where they are potentially deflecting cases and moving people around the country, but i think this all has to be seen within the context of cuts to local authority services, which have had a huge impact on the services they are able to deliver the homeless people. so what we really need to see is better resource inc within local authority areas, in all areas of the country, to reduce this issue. because for the homeless people themselves, moving is i suspect most of the time not the answer. not always. sometimes the support services are exactly where you are an local authorities have to take that into account, look at where somebody is likely to receive the support that will move them on from homelessness as quick as possible, whether that be somewhere they have an easily identifiable local
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connection or not. that is also important to point out that often if you have been sleeping rough you have lost all the documentation that might prove your connection to a local area as well. so local authorities have to show some discretion in the situation, it can't be simply about tracking you back somewhere where you had a local connection three or five years ago. just looking at what is coming up, we will be talking about house prices. when we go nationwide, we will be hearing from keeley donovan, from bbc look north in leeds. she has been looking at the disparity in prices. she has tweeted to say she is coming up at a:30pm, to look at that disparity and how houses have declined in real terms in price in the last decade. a man has been found guilty of murdering a kurdish refugee, just hours after he'd been released from a secure hospital. jeffrey barry, who lived in the same
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supported housing as kamil ahmad, stabbed him more than 25 times in what was described as a ‘sustained and savage‘ attack. jon kay reports. 1am, and jeffrey barry heads from his flat to kamil ahmad‘s bedsit. in his waistband, a large kitchen knife. he knocks on kamil‘s door, and inside stabs the kurdish refugee more than 25 times, before mutilating his body. that‘s like a black cloud in my life, you know... kamil‘s brother believes the attack could and should have been prevented, in a country they came to for protection. he came here to be safe. to just lead a normal life. but why, how come he got this? why did this happen, and how did it happen? jeffrey barry had a long history of severe psychiatric problems, including episodes of paranoid schizophrenia. this is the supported living accommodation in bristol where the two men were living, and six weeks before the attack
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jeffrey barry told the staff here that he wanted to kill someone, that he wanted to be notorious, and he said kamilahmad was top of his list. he‘d left notes, saying he was planning to kill kamil, along with everybody else on the street. in the weeks before the attack, barry was sectioned, but he was released from this hospital by a mental health tribunal, against the advice of a psychiatrist. he returned to the house, and within hours had killed the refugee. he called 999, and said he‘d warned mental health professionals. that was his defence in court, flanked by staff from broadmoor
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high security hospital. but today barry has been convicted unanimously of murder. kamil‘s family believe the a8—year—old would still be alive if he had been warned barry was returning that night, and if staff in the house had been given time to come up with a plan. i am very angry... his brother told me all the agencies must reflect on this case. i hope they learn, you know, what has happened to my brother, so it doesn‘t happen to anybody else again, because only i know how i feel, you know? only we know how i feel, to have lost a loving brother, you know. and they could have done something about it beforehand. a review will be published next year. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. hundreds of students were forced to
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flee a high—rise accommodation flat after a fire broke out last night in manchester. the accommodation block is run by unite students. they are investigating claims that some of the alarms failed to work. a deal has been struck, which could help safeguard jobs at the bombardier aircraft factory in northern ireland. the european manufacturer, airbus, has taken a stake in bombardier‘s c—series jet, which has wings built in belfast. the deal would allow some of the planes to be assembled at an airbus plant in alabama, avoiding big import duties us authorities have threatened to impose. the duke and duchess of cambridge have announced today that their third child is expected in april 2018. the couple announced last month that kate was pregnant — the baby will be fifth—in—line to the british throne. yesterday, the royal couple attended a charity event at london‘s paddington rail station. time for a look at the weather with
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chris fawkes with a familiar image from yesterday. the orange sky and son. i was reflecting on how weird the set of circumstances that led up to this, not only the saharan dust and the wildfire smoke blowing in the cross this part of the world, but also it was tied in with the cold front. if you think about it, if a cold front had produced rain, all of that dust or smoke would have been washed out of the earth cosmic atmosphere, so all of those circumstances coming together made those beautiful images. is that what you do upstairs, is that your schedule for the day?” you do upstairs, is that your schedule for the day? i am going to get on with the weather. while we are looking at yesterday cosmic weather, this is another picture from yesterday, a big storm blowing m, from yesterday, a big storm blowing in, this was ophelia, the waves crashing in around the harbours around porthcawl. massive wage
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there. and remember this was a major hurricane that spying our way —— swung way. it brought a swathe of damage to the north and west of the uk, downing power lines and trees we re uk, downing power lines and trees were felled. we had some pretty big disruption. ophelia is now working out into the norwegian sea, but still left over from that system if you few showers affecting northern ireland and scotland, the wind still gusting 30 to a0 mph, and this finger of rain across southern counties of england, so a few spots the framework in their way in, and then overnight the rain gets a bit more expensive, at the same time some low cloud, mist and hill fog patches forming as well. still a few showers for scotland and northern ireland, so not entirely dry. the far north of scotland, clouds will break up and with those clearer skies could turn out much chillier. temperatures getting them close enough to give us a touch of ground frost. the next few days, unsettled weather, rain at times becoming
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increasingly windy. looking at wednesday‘s forecast, cloud and rain to start the day. some of it will come with patches of heavy rain at times, potentially affecting parts of wales. for the most part a dry and bright day with some sunny spells. whether sunshine is out it is quite cool, 11 or 12 degrees competitive 17 in those grey and cloudy skies in london. wednesday night, the rain turning a bit heavier as it pushes across northern england into scotland as well. the breeze picking up as well, quite murky over the hills, mist and fog patches, and thursday, more rain in the forecast. the majority of the rain will be working in across northern ireland and south—west england, where it will turn increasingly windy with gales returning. through thursday night and into friday, low pressure swings across the uk, bringing some wet and windy weather overnight, still there for the first part of friday and there will be a dryer slice of whether through the south and west working in, temperatures 1a to 16
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degrees. then the next storm that simon was talking about is due to come in on friday night and the first part of saturday. this one potentially bringing severe gales to the south—west of the uk, so again some disruption here, a bit of uncertainty about how —— how far north or south the pressure will be, so strong winds could affect other parts of the uk as well. that is your weather. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: inflation has reached 3% — its highest level in more than five years, largely due to rising food and transport prices. the oecd warns that economic growth in the uk will slow next year, but suggests that reversing
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the brexit vote would have a positive impact. there‘s been a 29% rise in hate crimes recorded by police in the uk with incidents increasing after the brexit vote and terror attacks. sport now on afternoon live. john watsonjoins us from the bbc sport centre. yes second premier league sacking of the season, craig shakespeare from leicester with the club currently in the relegation zone after a poor start to the season. you‘ll remember the surprise when claudio raneieri was sacked last season having guided leicester to that increible pl title. but he left when the club looked at risk of relegation the season after that title triumph. shakesperare who was assistant to raneiri during his time there, was appointed as caretaker manager in february following his departure,
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and duly guided the club to pl safety and the qf‘s of the champions league. so not to be for shakespeare. you see what i did there? we have been doing them in the office. what else have you come up with? shake gets the sphere. that's why you haven't said it will until now! the draw for the world cup play—offs has been made today. champions league football as well tonight, but northern ireland have been drawn against switzerland for a place at the world cup and considering they have could have been drawn against italy, it is a draw they will take. the two legs will be played next month. the first between the 9th and 11th. the draw was made in zurich.
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eight teams in the hat. the swiss we re eight teams in the hat. the swiss were particularly strong in qualifying. nine wins out of nine until they slipped to defeat against portugal in theirfinal until they slipped to defeat against portugal in their final group game which means that they went into the draw for the play—offs. the first leg will be played at windsor park before they travel to swits listened and that will determine whether or not they will indeed get a place at the world cup in russia next year. we knew whatever team we got was going to be a very difficult game, but switzerland have had a great qualifying campaign, nine victories and one defeat. it gives us an opportunity to go to russia. we have to make sure particularly with the first game being in belfast and then to come to switzerland for the second leg. we look forward to the game. we know we have to be at our best to qualify, but we believe we're capable of doing that the republic of ireland reached the play—offs. they will face denmark away in copenhagen first and croatia
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ta ke away in copenhagen first and croatia take on greece and then there is sweden against italy. the champions league back tonight. manchester city are home to napoli. what a night as well to come in madrid. tottenham are up against the 12 times winners and reigning champions real madrid. spurs lost to them in the quarterfinals six years ago. there is not one surviving member of that squad. . bale plays for real madrid. he is struggling within an injury. har yan scored 15 for club and country last month. even with kane on form, it could be a difficult night ahead for tottenham in spain. i think it is special to play here, it is always special. the club is most big in that competition. you feel that when you play here, when
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you come here, you start to feel the reality of football. everyone is excited. middlesex's relegation from the county championship has been confirmed after their appeal against a two point penalty was rejected. they were penalised for a slow over rate. that was abandoned for safety reasons when a crossbow was fired into the ground. middlesex were relegated by a point. and hence their protests at against that relegation. thris frome says he faces a massive challenge to win a fifth tour de france title after the route for next year‘s race was announced. it will start on 7thjuly and will take place entirely in france with only 15 kilometres in the spanish pyrenees. it will cover the spanish pyrenees. it will cover the shortest route of the 21st century. there will be no long, flat, individual time trial where frome normally excels, but he‘s good
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in the mountains as well. six mountain stages with what is a punishing finish lfr they hit the champs elysees on 29th. frome says that that the route will test every aspect of cycling. he has had such success in that race, you wouldn‘t bet against him this time round. that‘s all the sport for now, i will be back with more at 5.30pm. john, thank you very much. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide, and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. we‘ve been talking about house prices after a bbc investigation into how the value of homes have struggled to rise over the past ten years. the north of england and wales are the worst affected, keeley donovan from bbc look north in leeds is there and will tell us more in a minute. i‘m joined by carol malia the presenter of bbc look north, further north in newcastle, who has a property story that‘s a bit different kind to bring us, as well as the latest on the damage
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done in cumbria by storm ophelia. to keeley in leeds first. how are people reacting to the disparity? words they are using are words like trapped and frustrated. if we needed any more evidence of a north—south disconnect this. is it. we have learned that average prices in london have risen in 99% of council wards and they have gone up in more than 80% of wards in the south east, but here in yorkshire, they‘re down. in nine in every ten wards and that‘s in real terms. now, of course, the north—east and wales as you can imagine are similarly affected. we‘ve talked to one home—buyer whose haus in bradford cost him £86,000 in 2007. it‘s now on the market forjust short of £76,000. he saw a bid of £70,000 fall through. we've got a choice of kind of either being really frut straighted and stuck and feeling like we have
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nowhere to go or we can choose to be positive about it and take that hit and just go for it and know that we're going to have to make exceptions to get through. but yeah, there have been times when myself and my wife have kind of been talking through and felt stuck. in any region, there are different reasons and you don‘t have to travel very far and you find prices are quite different? well, the residential property experts that we‘ve talked to said that one of the principle reasons for the stark regional differences is economic. what we have is evidence of a two—speed economy. much more weighted in london and the south, leaving a lot of the north behind. and this tends to me that there is greater population pressure in south and asa greater population pressure in south and as a result, you have more shortage of house building which pushes prices up in a way that it hasn‘t happened here in the north and that disparity means home own nears northern england haven‘t seen significant growth in property
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prices. keeli, thank you very much. middlesbrough? imagine how you would feel if somebody said about your hometown it‘s the worst place to live in the country. well, that‘s what the channel a programme location location location said ten yea rs location location location said ten years ago about middlesbrough. they posedit years ago about middlesbrough. they posed it for as a question, but it more than ruffled feathers in middlesbrough and house prices would have been affected. the town mayor came out fighting and said it was offensive and outrageous and insulting and pointed to the institute of modern art, the transporter bridge, new housing, new couege transporter bridge, new housing, new college development, but one thing that people in middlesbrough do have, back then, and of course, today, is humour as home bred comedian rory chubby brown demonstrates. we love getting up
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into the morning and hearing the beds coughing and sometimes on a clear day you can see the washing line. we have houses round in this area, 100 houses worth £1 million plus so it can't be that much of a dump. you only have to come out of the town centre and you see the parks and the flowers. this time yesterday, a lot of concerns about what storm ophelia was doing and it‘s the clean up today and parts of cumbria suffered, didn‘t they? today and parts of cumbria suffered, didn't they? yes, last night, we we re didn't they? yes, last night, we were braced for the worst particularly as you say in cumbria on the west coast. the storm spun off to the north, thankfully, but nevertheless cumbria was affected. at one point we had 18,000 homes without power. it is down to 2,000 engineers working on that trying to rectify that by the end of today. of course, the scenes, were amazing from last night onwards, the seas we re from last night onwards, the seas were high off the coast, north cumbria was taking a battering from
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the waves and in the streets, debris came down from roofs, various litter lying about the place, three schools are still closed today. and on the m6 in cumbria, at shap a lorry was overturned. that‘s an exposed motorway, a bleak, but beautiful pa rt motorway, a bleak, but beautiful part of the country and we are reporting live from there tonight. carol, thank you. pleasure. good to see you. that‘s nationwide for today. portugal has begun a period of three days of national mourning for the thirty—six people killed in wildfires that have devastated parts of the country. firefighters continue to tackle a number of blazes in central and northern portugal, although rains have eased the situation in some areas. alison roberts reports from lisbon. with more than 660 separate blazes starting over two days, portugal‘s firefighters were stretched to the limit and beyond. in many areas, residents had to fend for themselves, and choose between protecting their property,
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or fleeing for their lives. even some of those who did flee ran into terrible trouble. with up to 6,000 firefighters on the ground during the day on monday, most of the blazes were gradually brought under control, even as the number of dead rose steadily. paying homage to the victims in this terrible year for fires, portugal‘s prime minister called for a cross—party consensus to ensure, in his words, nothing will stay the same. translation: we are aware that the country demands rapid results, after decades of forest disorganisation. we cannot deceive the portuguese by promising immediate results. but we do not fear the challenges, and we find in this national requirement a motivation to collectively overcome this battle. over the border in north—western spain, in galicia, deadly forest fires also raged. there, local officials blamed arsonists for the repeated outbreaks.
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in portugal, too, locals suspect arson in many cases. prosecutors have opened investigations in several areas. the country has begun three days of national mourning. meanwhile, the survivors are counting the cost, and wondering how they can rebuild their lives. a us—backed militia in syria says it‘s taken control of raqqa after months of fighting with islamic state militants. the success of the syrian democratic forces is being seen as another heavy blow to is as raqqa was their self—proclaimed capital. it‘s thought the group now controls just a handful of towns along the euphrates valley. a woman whose partner, 20—year—old kevin nunes, was shot dead 15 years ago in what was believed to be a gangland killing, says she‘s been let down by police. in her first broadcast interview, leanne williams says officers should have been held to account for mistakes made by staffordshire police during the investigation. the police watchdog found that while the force was guilty of collective failings,
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individuals weren‘t to blame. phil mackie reports. how is it that nobody, not one person, has been disciplined — nobody? and it‘s just shocking to me. it‘s just absolutely shocking and ijust think it‘s really, really, really bad. in september 2002, leanne williams was pregnant with kevin nunes‘ son when his bullet—ridden body was found near a farm in south staffordshire. five men were jailed for his murder, but their convictions quashed after it emerged that staffordshire police failed to disclose an internal report that would have raised questions about a witness‘ reliability. when the men were cleared, the appeal court said it had been a shocking episode which may have amounted to a serious perversion of the course ofjustice. initially the ipcc recommended that four senior officers should face misconduct hearings. jane sawyers, who retired this year
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as staffordshire‘s chief constable. adrian lee, who held the topjob at northamptonshire. suzette davenport, who became chief constable in gloucestershire. and marcus beale, the assistant chief constable in the west midlands. a five—year investigation ruled there were collective, but not individual, failings. the fact that... there‘s wrongdoings all around. people got released. failures. this, that. and nobody‘s in trouble for it. i can‘t comprehend it, i‘m just not understanding to what level that nobody feels that they have to even get a slap on the wrist. 15 years since kevin nunes‘ body was dumped at this remote farm, his killers still haven‘t been caught. staffordshire police say that the investigation is still open and regularly reviewed.
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leanne williams hopes that someone will come forward with the information that will finally bring kevin‘s killers to justice. there‘s more on that story on file on four on bbc radio a at 8pm tonight. egon is here. in a moment he will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. inflation hits a five—year high — mostly because of higher food and transport prices. an international economic body says britain‘s economic outlook would improve significantly if brexit was reversed. there‘s been a big jump in hate crime in england and wales with incidents increasing immediately after the eu referendum and terror attacks. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: as inflation hits its highest level in five years, the governor of the bank of england says
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he thinks it will hit its peak this month or next. european plane—maker airbus is to take a majority stake in bombardier‘s c—series jet project. the move could help the plane escape import taxes of 300% imposed by the us. bombardier is northern ireland‘s biggest private sector employer. online fashion retailer asos has seen profits rise by 1a5%. that was boosted by strong sales overseas as the firm cut prices to meet strong competition. we have been talking about the oecd and politics, but what do they have to say about economics? well, they have had some, not very encouraging news, let‘s say that, about the economy. they say that next year the economy. they say that next year the economy is going to grow by about 196. economy is going to grow by about 1%. now, if you think that at the moment we‘re growing about 1.5%, you can see that they are predicting a bit of a slowdown. they‘re
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expressing worries about how productive we are. they‘re saying we are not producing jobs at a sufficiently productive for the economy. and the feel-good factor is missing for a lot of people with news that inflation is going up?m isa news that inflation is going up?m is a feel bad factor because inflation going up to 3% which is the highest it has been since 2012 and wagesjust the highest it has been since 2012 and wages just aren‘t keeping up. the highest it has been since 2012 and wagesjust aren‘t keeping up. so people are really feeling the squeeze. well, let‘s talk more about this to chrisjustham. he is from seven investment mament and he joins me now from the city of london? mark carney says he thinks that the inflation rate will peak this month or next, do you agree with that?” think mark carney has talked up the prospects of an interest rate rise over the last month or sol prospects of an interest rate rise over the last month or so i think the expectation is over the next month or two there will be an interest rate rise and i think inflation is a key measure that they look at where this is concerned.
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inflation has been something that's been ticking up. you mentioned it is 396 in been ticking up. you mentioned it is 3% in september, 29% a month previously, but the domestic pressures if you like seem to be waning slightly and maybe as they slack, there tends to be a little bit left, therefore the prerveure won't be on and domestic pressures where inflation is concerned won't continue to push it through the 3% mark. what about the point that a lot of people think that the fall in the value of sterling has really helped push up inflation and that‘s what we‘re seeing now and that it‘s going to ease off, do you think there is any force to z to that argument inflation is looked at a rolling 12 month basis. they are comparing the figure to september 2016. as and when the number drop out, by that mean, on a rolling 12 month basis, over that period as the impacts of the fall in sterling, then fall—out of the rolling 12
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months as the months continue to go forward , months as the months continue to go forward, we should still see that ease off, but the domestic pressures which well continue to come through. let‘s talk about the bombardier deal. is that really going to get around the 300% tariffs that the americans have put on? i think they will be optimistic to think it would. it is being seen as trying to circumvent this issue. it will come under more scrutiny. they were talking about this for a number of months in the run—up, boeing and airbus are the titans that always tend to compete and bombardier is regarded for its efficiency and whether the us authorities buy that explanation or whether they want to look at that in more detail remains to be seen as they look at that adjudication. look at the markets. yes. and here they are. as we have seen throughout they are. as we have seen throughout the day, it has been... are you all
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right? you moved about three feet! i‘m on the slide as is the ftse. right? you moved about three feet! i'm on the slide as is the ftse. oh, very good. it was doing very well a lot of day. it has come off it highs though. merlin, that‘s the big entertainment company that runs the london eye and mad mcdam tussauds —— madam tussauds. nothing moving at the waxwork? frozen sales! we've done it! bellway has been bringing home the profit. it has seen profits rise 12.5%. brent crude, again we have seen that doing well during the day. it has come off its highs though, but it is being buoyed up by international pressures around the middle east which makes people think that there could be a possible supply problem. 0k, could be a possible supply problem. ok, thank you very much.
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you‘re watching afternoon live. there were more than a dozen unprovoked shark attacks off the coast of australia last year alone. now drone technology is being tested out to try to protect more swimmers and surfers by spotting sharks as they get close to the shore. hywel griffith has been to see them in action. a shadow in the sea or something more sinister? from the beach it‘s hard to tell, but from the skies, the drone has a clearer view. it feeds into deep—learning software which it‘s claimed has a 92% success rate in spotting sharks, as well as less—threatening species. every time it sees a dolphin, whale or a swimmer in distress, it learns their shape. launched along the beaches of new south wales, the drones can patrol for a0 minutes. daniel was one of the first to train as a life—saver pilot. i mean i can‘t physically run out and grab a board and paddle out and save someone, but sitting on the beach, we‘ve got eyes in the sky
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and we‘re just another layer of protection, really. the drones don‘t only observe, they can react, too, dropping an inflatable device to help people in the sea. they won‘t replace the use of controversial shark nets and drum lines, however, which some claim do more harm than good. last year around australia there were 17 unprovoked shark attacks. the number isn‘t that high compared to how many people actually go in these waters, but it leaves a national preoccupation to the question of how to share the beaches between the human beings and the sea life. when this great white washed onto sydney‘s shores recently, it was welcomed and christened fluffy. not everyone wants to get so close, even if the chances of an attack are minimal. it‘s that fear of being attacked by a wild animal. but the risk to people that are entering the water rates so low on the scale as opposed to all other threats going about your daily life — i mean traffic and cars and bee
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stings and all those statistics. and for regulars in these waters, it‘s all part of the experience. i was actually swimming here once. i was six months pregnant and there was a shark alarm. i did freak out a bit! if i'm going to die i'd prefer to be taken by a shark than have a stroke and end up in a nursing home. the drones won‘t be on every beach every day, but they should give everyone a better understanding of what is down below. time for a look at the weather. hi there. gusty winds will continue to ease across southern parts of the uk as storm ophelia continues to fade away. it turned into a normal area of low pressure that brought the damaging wind gusts to parts of the damaging wind gusts to parts of
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the british isles. today the remains of storm ophelia working out into the norwegian sea as a weakening area of low pressure. today, we will continue to have brisk winds across scotla nd continue to have brisk winds across scotland and northern ireland through the afternoon, bringing with itafairfew through the afternoon, bringing with it a fair few showers. a brighter slot of weather across england and wales, but turning cloudier across southern england with outbreaks of rain getting into parts of the south—west through the afternoon. quite a range of temperatures from around ten celsius in shetland to 17 celsius in london. but wherever you are, it feels fresher today. overnight, the rain is expected to become more expansive and as well as the rain, there will be low cloud and mistand the rain, there will be low cloud and mist and fog patches forming too. there will be cloudy weather across central and southern scotland, but as the skies clear across northern scotland, temperatures in the countryside could get low enough to give us a touch of ground frost. wednesday, for england and wales, dawning on a rather cloudy and grey note with mist and fog patches over the hills. there will be patchy outbreaks of rain around as well. some of the rain could be heavy at
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times. further north and west, still afairamount of times. further north and west, still a fair amount of cloud, but across western scotland, that‘s where the best of any bright or sunny spells will be, but cool air, temperatures around 11 or 128 celsius. through wednesday night, that area of rain expands northwards, working into scotland. for thursday, we are looking at the next weather system moving in off at the atlantic bringing rain across northern ireland, the winds picking up across the south—west, perhaps reaching gale force late in the day. a fair bit of cloud with patches of rain elsewhere across england and wales. 19 celsius, not too bad in london and through thursday night and on into friday, our area area of low pressure m oves into friday, our area area of low pressure moves northwards and eastwards, we will see brighter weather working in for a time on friday and the temperatures ranging between 1a and 16 celsius. friday night, we are looking at the next potential spell of stormy weather. there is uncertainty at the track of
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this low. those strong winds could affect other areas of the uk as well. today at 5:00, prices are rising at a faster rate, than at any time in the past five years, piling pressure on household budgets. higher transport and food costs have helped drive inflation up to 3%, and the bank of england says it‘s likely to go higher still. we expect that inflation will peak in and around the october and novemberfigures, in and around the october and november figures, peaking potentially above the 3% level. ina in a crucial week for brexit talks: the international the oecd, says reversing would have a ‘positive and significant‘ impact on the uk economy. we‘ll have reaction to both developments, in syria, us—backed militia say they‘ve taken control of raqqa,
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