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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  October 19, 2017 5:30am-5:46am BST

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this is bbc world news. the headlines: madrid has demanded catalonia's devolved government confirms whether or not it is declaring independence. the spanish government has insisted catalonia's leader retract a unilateral declaration of independence made last week, even though it was also suspended. ahead of britain's prime minister addressing european leaders, theresa may is offering more reassurance to eu citizens living in the uk about their rights after brexit. but trade looks like it's still off the agenda as the deadlock over cash continues. the us has said it holds myanmar‘s army accountable for the deepening rohingya refugee crisis in bangladesh. hundreds of thousands of people have fled myanmar, where they'd faced a military offensive. there are fears of food shortages in zimbabwe after it banned fruit and vegetable imports to help preserve its dwindling money reserves.
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most of the supply of groceries in the capital harare come from neighbouring south africa. now it's time for world business report. time tojoin now it's time for world business report. time to join sally. it's a $700 billion dollar relationship, but trade looks like it's still off the agenda in brexit talks as the deadlock over cash continues. plus, eyes on the prize! north american cities battle to host amazon's vast new headquarters. we're in a tough newjersey neighbourhood that is daring to dream. welcome to world business report. i'm sally bundock. as ever, it is a packed programme.
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also in the programme, rico will have the latest growth numbers from china as its leaders are gathered in beijing. but first. we start in brussels, where eu leaders are beginning a two—day summit. they are due to decide whether brexit talks with the uk have made enough progress to move on to the next phase, in particular, discussing their all important trading relationship once britain leaves. the answer's almost certain to be no, and it's all about money. here's why. back in march, european commission presidentjean—claude juncker suggested britain will need to pay around $70 billion to settle its commitments before leaving, the so—called divorce bill. so far, it's agreed to just a fraction of that. last month, prime minister theresa may said the uk would keep paying into the eu budget until 2020 as part of a transition period the problem is the vast sums the eu has committed to in its long—term budget, but hasn't spent yet, $281 billion worth. some estimates put the uk's share
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of that at over $35 billion. all those figures look tiny when compared with this one, the $727 billion of trade done between the uk and eu last year. the future of that will remain uncertain until talks move to the next stage. on wednesday, european council president, donald tusk, told reporters there was still a lot do to before talks could progress. when it comes to brexit negotiations, i don't expect any kind of breakthrough tomorrow. we
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have to work really hard in between 0ctober have to work really hard in between october and december to finalise this so—called first phase and to start our negotiations on our future relations with the uk. a lot at stake and very little clarity. with me is simon french, chief economist, panmure gordon. it is good to see you. thank you. if we don't go to the next stage now, how big a deal is that for british business? we are starting to see british business deferring investment decisions based on uncertainty over future relationships. we will not get any clarity for some weeks, to be honest. i to be clarity for some weeks, to be honest. ito be honest, the information today for businesses will be whether michel barnier will be given the lead negotiator for the eu, will be given the ability to
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talk about the future state of relationships and the divorce settle m e nt relationships and the divorce settlement and the northern ireland border. if he can, businesses will ta ke border. if he can, businesses will take a positive take. in the meantime, as you said, businesses are deferring business decisions and are deferring business decisions and are initiating secondary plans. yes. many contingency plans put in place straight after the vote were actually, they were not going to be executed until such point they felt they were close enough to the key date, the end of march, 2019, when the uk leads the eu, the closer they get to it, most businesses we speak to say that the first quarter of 2018, that is when they will need to spend contingency money and work on relocation. how confident are you in the process of this despite of the
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sticking point, the divorce bill?” am optimistic the euro 27 will give michel barnier more wriggle room around the divorce money and the irish border. ultimately, it is asymmetrical. most of the time, most of the benefits of pushing this closer and closer to the deadline helps the eu. the uk government are acknowledging that. it is them who will have to ultimately concede the next 18 months. thank you very much for your time and analysis, simon. of course, any news we get, we will feel —— fill you in. we are also talking about the e—commerce giant amazon. it's set a deadline of today for cities to put in their bids to host its new headquarters.
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amazon says it will employ around 50,000 people on an average salary of $100,000. not surprisingly dozens of cities have put themselves up so far. but alongside the likes of new york and toronto there are some more surprising bids, as samira hussain reports. austin, denver, new york city, toronto, canada, camden, new jersey... camden, newjersey? yes, camden, newjersey, home to 77,000 people. this once bustling industrial town has fallen on some ha rd industrial town has fallen on some hard times. but camden believes it too has a shot at becoming home to the next headquarters for amazon. it sits between york city and washington, dc below the delaware river. below the bridge, it is offering billions in tax breaks. and this large waterfront property,
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which was once a state prison, could be the location for the second headquarters of amazon. no matter where amazon goes, we will have a tremendous impact on the location. it will be a transformative one if they come here. it will transform they come here. it will transform the city. a renaissance has begun in the city. a renaissance has begun in the past three years. they would put this on steroids. camden sees itself as the comeback kid. in 2012, it had the highest crime rate of any city in america. unemployment peaked at 20%. the city was hurting. a lot of it is poverty. but now the city is on the rebound, says the county police commissioner. we are in north camden. the early 2000 were notoriously violent. it has undergone a tremendous change. the
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police and offices have done an incredible job police and offices have done an incrediblejob in this police and offices have done an incredible job in this area. -- officers. 50,000 jobs would help the city rebound, but this competition is not about what amazon can do for camden, but the opposite. 0ther cities are offering promises that camden cannot match, but they are promising amazon would turn the city around, a story other cities cannot match. to asia now. and growth in the world's second biggest economy has slowed slightly. china's economy grew 6.8% in the three months to september, down from 6.9% in the previous quarter. the figure is exactly in line with expectations. beijing has been taking steps to curb speculation in the property market which has cooled growth rates. rico hizon is following this for us in singapore. it is nice to see you. what is the story? powers china doing? growth may have gone back a touch. economic expansion maintained
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momentum in the third quarter. this is fuelled by robust factory output and consumer spending. apart from the gdp, there were retail sales, fixed asset investments, they all showed rising numbers in the third quarter. those breaking down the numbers say they are optimistic. it is solid, supporting growth and consumption. it could have performed better if not for efforts to rein in speculation in the property market and reduce high levels of debt. according to economist, this fourth quarter, growth will moderate a bit merely due to possible slow investment. but in general, this year is quite stable. as data was released coinciding with the five yearly congress, president xi jinping is likely to get another
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term. and that is what business report. thank you for being with us. —— world business report. more than 500 families have blocked organ donation from a deceased relative over the past five years. that's despite them being on the organ donor register. legally, the deceased person's wishes should be respected, but that doesn't happen in practice. the bbc‘s mark hutchings reports. for many, becoming an organ donor is a crucially important life and death decision. now, data from nhs blood and transplant shows that in 2012, 505 people signing the donor register had been vetoed by families. in the past year, it was 1400, but 91 were blocked. under legislation, relatives do not have a right to override the pledge, but in practice, they are not being adhered to. the most frequent were from
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relatives who said the process was too long. the patient had suffered enough, divided opinion in the family. one teenager who signed a register is clear her views should hold sway. i want the final say what happens to me i die. when i signed, i wasn't aware that my family had to be supportive of the decision. it seems like, well, what is the point of signing up? it can be overruled anyway. in 2015, in addition to the register, the welsh government introduced a policy of deemed consent under which it is assumed an individual has no objection to donating organs unless said otherwise, though families are still consulted to be similar changes are planned in england and scotland. but the message is whatever the law, it is as important as ever to discuss your wishes with loved ones. mark,
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bbc news. coming up at 6am on breakfast: charlie stayt and naga munchetty will have all the day's news, business and sport. they'll also have more on revelations made by sir tom jones that he fell victim to sexual harassment at the start of his career. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: madrid has demanded catalonia's devolved government confirms whether or not it is declaring independence. the spanish government has insisted catalonia's leader retract a unilateral declaration of independence made last week, even though it was also suspended. ahead of britain's prime minister addressing european leaders, theresa may is offering more reassurance to eu citizens living in the uk about their rights after brexit. but trade looks like it's still off the agenda as the deadlock over cash continues. nationals will be able to remain in the country following brexit. that is one of our stories in the
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news review. we begin with the metro which leads on a promise from british prime minister theresa may that eu nationals will be able to remain in the country following brexit. the new york times reports on us president donald trump's condolence call to the widow of a slain soldier where he's accused of saying her husband knew what he signed up for. the guardian is leading on a racist row at england's football association where senior management are facing calls to quit amid accusations of behaviour bordering on blackmail. the international edition of the new york times looks at whether the economic boom in romania — now europe's fastest growing economy — can be sustained. and whether romanians are really feeling the benefit. the guardian's business section is covering ‘nudge trials' being carried out in britain,
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which are persuading the public into making healthier and safer choices without them realising it. sounds like parenting to me. and finally, it's enough to make your eyes water — the gulf news reveals you can spend $60,000 to quench your thirst in dubai. that is a bottle of water on the front page. so let's begin. with me is jane foley, who is the head of fx strategy strategy at rabobank. it seems a suitable place to start. the press cannot let go of it. theresa may shifting ground a bit on eu citizens rights? this is the message she put out on her facebook page, it is going

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