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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 19, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11.003m. theresa may heads to brussels in a bid to win over eu leaders with a promise to treat european nationals living in britain fairly after brexit. the spanish government says it's taking steps to impose direct rule over catalonia this weekend. the number of crimes recorded in england and wales has increased by 13% in the space of a year, violent crime increased by 19%. northern ireland's three most senior police officers are under investigation for alleged misconduct in public office. also, as allegations of rape and sexual harassment mount in hollywood singer sir tom jones says abuse is widespread in the music industry too. and actress tippi hedren says the weinstein allegations remind her of the abuse she suffered at the hands of alfred hitchcock. the entire film crew knew what he was trying to do. they knew that i was just in a day—to—day battle just staying out of his way.
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good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may will address eu leaders today at a summit in brussels at which they're expected to confirm they're not yet ready to open talks with britain, about a post—brexit trade deal. the next opportunity to begin negotiations on the relationship will be in december. one of the main brexit pressure groups, leave means leave, has urged mrs may to tell the leaders that the uk is prepared to walk away with no deal, if they continue to refuse to discuss trade.
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our assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster. so, as well as the big pressure from other eu leaders, big pressure from home for theresa may? really a significant stepping up in the pressure on mrs may from those tory brexiteers increasingly anxious about what they see as the european commission, eu leaders, dragging out the negotiations to try to get more money and a better deal out of britain. now saying to mrs may, tonight, she should issue an ultimatum to the eu saying we move on to trade talks or britain will prepare to leave without a deal and go on to world trace organisation terms in march 2019. so, a significant ratcheting up, if you like, of the pressure on mrs may. this as the prime minister sought to
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reassure eu nationals living in the uk with an open letter to them overnight stressing they are very welcome to stay. they are not bargaining chips. they will be invited to take part in a user group designed to set out the new arrangements if they want to apply for settled status in britain, albeit, the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, this morning again stressing not enough was being done to ensure a deal was reached for eu nationals in the uk. the anything that push this is issue on is to be welcomed. there are three million or so welcomed. there are three million or so eu citizens in the uk and a million or so uk citizens in europe who are really anxious about their position. all of us, as politicians have people coming to us who've been in the country for many years but are deeply anxious. injuly last year, we said the eu rights of
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citizens in the uk should be backed. if the prime minister wants to act on the words she put out she should introduce legislation in parliament next week of eu set zins. we'll back it and fast—track it. i think everybody on a very human level absolutely wants to see this issue resolved so the anxiety of people can be put to one side and they can get on with their lives. pleasure on mrs may on all fronts. what do we make of this renewed call from mrs may to walk away if the eu won't agree to talk trade. i'm joined by glenjohn longworth. agree to talk trade. i'm joined by glen john longworth. aren't agree to talk trade. i'm joined by glenjohn longworth. aren't you cutting the ground under mrs may just as the negotiations get going. you have to give her time to strike a deal? the negotiations are not getting started. we're not cutting the ground from under her. we're
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supporting her. reinforcing her argument. by going to wto rules in 2019 all the effects of that are in the hands of uk government and will produce a better result than a free trade arrangement. we can crystallise the real benefits of brexit. if the eu know that, they're more likely to speak on a trade deal anyway. it is the best negotiating tactic. we've heard from various business organisations warning no deal is not what ne want. i was looking at your own former organisation, the chambers of commerce. 0nly organisation, the chambers of commerce. only 2% of their members wa nt to commerce. only 2% of their members want to go on to world trade 0rganisation terms. want to go on to world trade organisation terms. we are not saying there won't be conversations with the eu. there will be administrative issues which need to be sorted. customs, union arrangements, flights across the channel. those things still need to
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be resolved and can be. i'm confident they will be. what we're saying, is the government should not be prepared at this stage to pursue a free trade arangment. that will give certainty, crystallise certainties, boost the economy, reduce the cost of living for poorer people and give theresa may more leverage in her negotiations. you think going on to wto rules would be good for the economy. we'd be better off under those rules? they would provide us with the freedoms we need to boost the economy. it is much more valuable than the free trade arrangement. though that would be helpful. we can repatriate fisheries, reform the cichlt ap. reduce the cost of living on food, clothing and food wear. removing tariffs. we can deregulate and boost business growth under wto rules which we cannot do at the moment.
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critically, we can create trade deals with the rest of the world where 90% of the growth will come from over the future years. but the eu is our biggest eggs port market at the moment. what about —— export market at the moment. what about the ta riffs market at the moment. what about the tariffs likely to be ‘em posed on british manufacturers. what about the potential disruption to customs if there have to be additional checks. that surely will have a negative impact on the economy? customs, there are already rules in place under wto for the movement of goods around the world. we operate them at the moment in the 55% of exports we send to the rest of the world. it is reasonable we could sort those things out fairly easily. 0n tariffs, the uk currency is on such a competitive rate, at least 13% below what it was in june such a competitive rate, at least 13% below what it was injune 2016, we've eliminated the biggest tariffs
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in terms of money. uk manufacturers are already in a the abouter position than they would have been before the referendum even if ta riffs before the referendum even if tariffs are applied by the eu. ta riffs tariffs are applied by the eu. tariffs are self—harm. we have to remove taxes on goods coming into the uk on components to make british industry more productive and reduce the cost of living on poorer people. anita, no deal, wto rules is becoming central to the brexit debate in an increasing push to get mrs may to accept that as an outcome. former remainers saying it would be disa hs outcome. former remainers saying it would be disahs rows for the british economy. adam fleming is in brussels. what reaction has there been to this open letter from theresa may? morning. nothing yet. the first we'll get to that is when the eu leaders arrive for this summit in two hours' time. they hit the red
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carpet. i think they're likely to welcome this open letter. citizens' rights is one of the eu's priorities. they are particularly concerned about the administrative burden eu nationals will be under if they want to stay in the uk after brexit and get settled status. it is something that they talk about a lot. it is a key one here. however, there are other outstanding issues to do with citizens' rights which have to be addressed. the eu wants to know about family reunification. in other words, can eu nationals bring family members from other eu states to come and live with them in the uk? can they export their benefits? send them to other eu countries? what will be the role for the european court ofjustice? and as we've gone through each round
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of discussions and various other talks around the brexit process, we've asked what is the maximum that we've asked what is the maximum that we can expect today? will there be any movement on any of the key issues, do you think? what happens with these summits, in the weeks beforehand, officials and diplomats prepare a draft set of conclusions for the leader to sign up to. we've got the draft conclusions for the brexit section of this summit which will happen tomorrow after brea kfast. will happen tomorrow after breakfast. the leaders will say there's not been enough progress on this first round of brexit talks to move to phase two. they'll want to see more progress on citizens' rights. comcrete commitments in terms of what the uk will pay for and more progress on northern ireland and the irish border. they are putting the challenge to the uk saying here's where we want more for you. moving forward, they will give
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michel barnier the green light to start internal prep artery discussions about getting ready for phase two of talks. saying they're not ready to move to phase two yet but getting their ducks in a row internally for when phase two could start which could be at the next eu summit after this on 14th december. thank you. the government said ministers would meet to activate article 155 of the constitution allowing it to take over running of the region in response to a threat by the catalan leader to declare independence if the other side refuses to enter talks. tim wilcox is in barcelona no end to the constitutional crisis. an extraordinary situation? no end to the constitutional crisis. an extraordinary situation7m no end to the constitutional crisis. an extraordinary situation? it was described as the nuclear option at the time to invote article 155. the
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spanish government's decided to do that, impose direct rule from madrid. that's a huge ask for the madrid. that's a huge ask for the madrid government. you have a region here with a budget of 2.3 billion euros. tens of thousands of civil servants. how on earth is madrid going to do that and impose direct rule from madrid? let's talk to two people on opposing sides. a lawyer who's pro—unity and a pro—independence. who's pro—unity and a pro-independence. what's your reaction to today's decision to invoke article 155? the obligation of the article 155, we consider that an attack on everyone's rights and freedoms. not only for those who are supporting independence. we still don't know what about this article. but, of course, it will bring uncertainty in the field of economics and social rights. so, we think we must be clear what we are doing. we are suspending... madrid
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said you are threatening the unity of the sovereign state. as a result, they've got to impose the rule of law? what we have had here is that ca rles law? what we have had here is that carles puigdemont suspended the state of independence. he was claiming for dialogue. this is not only a thing we are claiming from those who are supporting independence but for the majority of the population here in catalonia. how is madrid going to impose direct rule here? a huge budgets, tens of thousands of civil servants and a huge police force? one measure is to he scheduling elections in two months. regional elections are needed. in september, the regional parliament and government declared themselves above the law. can you imagine any british parish claiming they are above the law. we need new
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and real elections. how's that going to change things? you've carles puigdemont who's dedicated his life to independence. that's his problem asa to independence. that's his problem as a catalan in favour of unity and sovereignty, i need to restore the constitutional situation. if carles puigdemont‘s group say he'll fight for independence if he wins, what happens then? i think we are not talking about something which is extraordinary. scotland held a referendum. we are claiming it is something that can be solved with politics. after elections, the problem will still be there. 2,000 million of those who are supporting independence cannot go back homee million? 2 million, sorry. more than three remain at home. we have the rule of law, any demonstrations or
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popular needs have to be channelled through the law. that's it. i really respect people demonstrating. but what about my rights? in terms of the demonstrations, people are split here. it is 50/50 of those who want independence and those who don't? that's why we think the only thing we must claim here, an agreed referendum between both governments. that's the only thing which can unify those who want independence and those who don't. isn't that a valid point. almost like the british prime minister david cameron said, 0k, have your referendum. the scots didn't win and britain stayed united. every country has some regulations in all democratic constitutions we believe in the principle of solidarity. any decision concerning the territory belongs to anyone. to be pragmatic, this is the real thing i want my british friends to understand, there
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is not enough majority here for independence to force for a referendum. it is divisive. we've seen consequences referendum. it is divisive. we've seen consequences in referendum. it is divisive. we've seen consequences in brexitm referendum. it is divisive. we've seen consequences in brexit if there is not enough majority, what is the fear? we'll end it there. otherwise we'll are here for hours in the rain! thank you very much. so, there you have it. this doesn't really go away. it is a big decision for madrid to impose direct rule. the first time article 155 has ever been invoked according to the constitution of 1978. many people here saying this is the biggest crisis for spain since the attempted coup back in 1981. thank you. theresa may is meeting the former us president bill clinton to discuss the continuing political deadlock in northern ireland. earlier this week, bill clinton held private talks with the main northern ireland party leaders in belfast. as president, he played a key role in helping to secure the 1998 good friday agreement which led
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to power—sharing at stormont. there's been a large increase in the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales. official figures show recorded crimes rose thirteen per cent in the twelve months to the end ofjune. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw is here. the headline is that overall number, the rise and overall number of crimes? yes, the overall number of owe fences recorded by police, that's important to remember, these are only the crimes that come to the notice of police and they log and record, that has past the five million mark for the first time in a decade. it isjust million mark for the first time in a decade. it is just short of 5.2 million offences recorded in the
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period to the end ofjune. that's an increase of 13% on the previous year. violent crime is up a fifth. by year. violent crime is up a fifth. by 19%. the increase in violent crime. we can see there are particularly categories of violent crimes. firearms offences, knife crimes, stalking and haars amount is up crimes, stalking and haars amount is up sharply as well. cases of murder and manslaughter. these are grouped under the definition of homicide in terms of the statistics. there were 629 cases of murder and manslaughter. that's excluding the deaths caused by the terror attacks in london and manchester. also taking away the hillsborough deaths which were included in last year's figures, that shows a rise of 46 more cases compared to has year. the overall number of offences recorded above five million for the first time in ten years. what's bind that?
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is the number of offences actually going up orare is the number of offences actually going up or are more crimes being recorded? there's a mix. there is undoubtedly an element of police recording processes have improved. they are now registering offences they didn't previously register. perhaps they were no crimed or recorded differently. that is a large element of the increase. but the statisticians say there is a genuine increase particularly in some of the high harm categories of crime. murder, attempted murder, knife crime, firearms offences. they are knife crime, firearms offences. they a re less knife crime, firearms offences. they are less likely to being prone to changing in recording practices. that's a big concern as we hear from police, police representatives, about the strain on resources? absolutely. we know their numbers have been cut considerably since 2010. they are now having to find from their budget an extra 1% bonus to give to all police officers. that
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means that they will be further cuts as well. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. theresa may heads to brussels to try to win over eu leaders with a promise to treat european nationals living in britain fairly after brexit. the spanish government says it's taking speps to impose direct rule over catalonia this weekend. and as you've heard, there's been a big increase in the number of crimes particularly violent offences in england and wales. and and in sport after what was described as a shambolic performance in front of a d cms committee yesterday, the leadership of the fa has been called into question. the failure of senior figures to acknowledge their short comings in the handling of racism and bullying claims raises doubts over their ability to take the fa forward. celtic boss brendan rodgers admits their hopes of reaching the
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champions league knockout stages are all but over after defeat to bayern munich. chelsea were held to a draw last night by roma. the british number one, johan last night by roma. the british number one,johan ina last night by roma. the british number one, johan in a copt ta split from her coach after less than a year together. she lost her last five matches. she will not appear until next season due to a foot injury. i'll be back with more on those stories just after half past. northern ireland's three most senior police officers are under investigation for alleged misconduct in public office. the bbc understands that the police 0mbudsman is examining allegations of criminal activity involving the chief and deputy chief constable that could amount to trying to pervert the course ofjustice. they strongly deny any wrongdoing. ina in a statement, the psni say they com pletely in a statement, the psni say they completely refute the allegations. 0ur ireland correspondent, chris buckler, is in belfast. what's happening now relates to an
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investigation three years ago? take us investigation three years ago? take us back to then. good morning. this is ombudsman investigation into how a police investigation from 2014 was handled. back in 2014, in the summer, 9 police investigated allegations of bribery and misconduct in public office which related to the awarding of contracts to provide police vehicles. an investigation into the police service of northern ireland itself. some senior officers then were questioned back in that summer in 2014. those senior officers were never prosecuted. the public prosecution service decided to no prosecutions would result. those senior officers have now made complaints about senior officers now in the way they conducted and handled that investigation. that includes the chief constable george
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hamilton, his deputy drew harris and assista nt hamilton, his deputy drew harris and assistant chief constable mark hamilton. when you look at what they are complaining about, allegations of misconduct in public office and criminal activity that could lead to the perverting of the course of justice. practically, we understand that means there are flaws in the way the investigation was conducted. allegations in police entries in note burkes. journals were changed. claims the psni didn't on taint wa rra nts claims the psni didn't on taint warrants properly. the chief co nsta ble warrants properly. the chief constable george hamilton made those die nialls in public this morning. in any big investigation when you review it and reflect on what has happened there will be issues for organisation learning around the margins. i'm absolutely confident there will be no misconduct, no serious misconduct found against me or he any of the other officers. i have confidence in the police
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ombudsmen. let them do theirjob. let them vindicate us rather than me saying it. that he is the way it is supposed to work. people introducing public discourse on this is unwise. i'd encourage the complainants to have confidence in the police ombudsmen. it is interesting the psni issued that very robust response. they are concerned about a loss of public confidence in the police service? it is extremely unusual. generally, the police service of northern ireland whenever a police 0mbudsmen police investigation takes place made a point they will not comment during a police investigation. that gives you a sense of how seriously they are taking this issue. in the same they said they are concerned in the organisation's view this has the potential to negatively impact on public confidence. they've made this point of stepping out at the early
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stage of the investigation. the police ombudsman investigation is expected to take over a year. 0mbudsman's set up a dedicated team of six investigators looking into this issue. thank you. we've received a clip ofjeremy corbyn interviewed in brussels. he's there as is the prime minister theresa may, heading for that important meeting with other eu leaders today in brussels. under pressure, of course, from brexiteers at home who are urging her to say to other eu leaders if they're not prepared to move forward with trade talks, the uk is prepared to walk away without a deal. so, let's hear from jeremy corbyn, this interview coming into us from brussels. we are hear to meet labour members of the european parliament. the prime ministers of sweden and italy. we're having an hour with michel barnier
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this afternoon. i'm meeting the president of the european parliament. we're here to make sure negotiations get on track. that we defend jobs in britain and that we make sure there is a trade access to europe in the future. we have to defend jobs in britain and have a trade relationship with europe. we don't need to be threatening europe with an offshore tax haven. will you be supporting or undermining the prime minister's stance in these operations? we're here to support the people of britain in our negotiations with europe. the prime minister's managed to upsetjust about everybody and have a warring cabinet around her. it is up to her to get the negotiations back on track. we cannot rush headlong into no deal with europe. that would be very dangerous for employment and jobs in britain. but, do you com pletely jobs in britain. but, do you completely rule out the idea there could be no deal. does that not give
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all the power to brussels? wto rules would be implemented in bfrn 2019, that would be catastrophic for manufacturing industryjobs that would be catastrophic for manufacturing industry jobs and that would be catastrophic for manufacturing industryjobs and we would have real problems all through the economy. i don't want to see that. i want to see an agreement being reached. that is why we're here. that's why we're doing our best to ensure that agreement can be reached. i believe it can be reached. i believe it can be reached. we have to recognise the seriousness of the situation and the chaos in which our government's operating at the present time. it is a chaos of their own making. jeremy corbyn in brussels saying no deal with europe would be very dangerous. of course we'll bring you all the build—up to that key summit throughout the day here on bbc news. sir tom jones has told bbc news that the sexual harassment and abuse
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alleged to take place in hollywood is also rife in the music industry. he said he was propositioned when he was a young singer, and the experience left him feeling "terrible". here's our arts and entertainment correspondent colin paterson. for more than 50 years, sir tom jones has played up his reputation as a sex symbol. but in an interview for 5live's afternoon edition for the series launch of the voice, he revealed he was sexually harassed by a man in the music industry and it happened at the start of his career in the 1960s. at the beginning, there were a few things like that. but you avoid it. good grief. what is tried on women is tried on men as well. he did tell other people about the proposition at the time and the incident was never repeated. it was only once, really. how did it make you feel? terrible. but you think, "i've got to get away from this person" and it can't be like this. sir tom jones had been giving his reaction to recent
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allegations and revelations surrounding the us film industry and said that, to him, it was an all—too—familiar story. things have always happened in the music industry as well. people complaining about publicists and different things. that they have been expected to get a record contractjust like they do to get a film contract. there has always been that element there — that people with power sometimes abuse it. he also said that when it came to the world of entertainment as a whole, he hopes that, as he put it, the cork was now out of the bottle and justice would be done. just before the weather, northern ireland football manager michael 0'neill‘s pleaded guilty to drink—driving just outside the city
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on september 10th last month. northern ireland football manager michael 0'neill pleading guilty add edinburgh sheriff court to drink—driving just out sides the city. time now for the weather forecast. simon king has the latest. it has been a rather misty, murky and foggy start to the day over england and wales. that fog is gradually lifting up. still quite misty in places. this is the scene in hungerford in berkshire. to add to that, outbreaks of rain affecting parts of the midlands. moving northwards towards the north of england. in the meantime, more rain spreading into the west. for northern ireland that rain will be particularly heavy and persistent into the afternoon. a yellow warning in force from the met office to be aware. this evening, the rain from the west is accompanied by gales along the bristol and english chapel coast. the rain will ease off into the early hours of friday morning.
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by the early hours of friday morning. by the afternoon, some good spells of sunshine developing. but then, more rain starts to move in from the west. initially towards south—west england, across wales. eventually northern ireland by the end of the day. a strengthening wind as well. 14-16 day. a strengthening wind as well. 14—16 degrees on friday. bye—bye. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: theresa may is urged by pro—brexit colleagues to issue an ultimatum to eu leaders at a summit in brussels this evening — that if trade talks don't begin soon britain will settle for "no deal".
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the government in spain is taking steps to impose direct rule over catalonia this weekend. the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales has passed the five million mark for the first time in ten years. northern ireland's three most senior police officers are under investigation for alleged misconduct in public office. let's get the sport now. we will have to talk about the fla first of all... mp damian collins says there are "serious doubts" whether fa bosses are fit to stay on after what he called a "shambolic" performance at a hearing in parliament yesterday. fa chairman greg clarke and chief executive martin glenn were answering questions after discrimination claims against ex—england women's boss mark sampson. aluko had
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alu ko had to aluko had to wait 18 months to get an answer from the serious allegations. the reason she had to wait that long is the failures of the fa to investigate. what was disappointing is the people directly involved in the process, they weren't prepared to apologise for their failings weren't prepared to apologise for theirfailings and weren't prepared to apologise for their failings and the way this was investigated. that raises serious doubts about whether they are the right people to take the 0rganisation forward. i think we need to see an acknowledgement from the fa on their own internal failings, not just the the fa on their own internal failings, notjust the conduct of mark sampson. former england striker ian wright has made clear his desire to help change the football association but he's said he'd find it difficult to take up a role within the fa if he was asked to help improve its governance. i don't want to work under these people. if i go in and they tell me,
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you should do this and that and you get this wave of people weighing you down because they don't understand and they cover you up. i will be accused of being uncle tom. i will be accused of being the black guy they put up. it needs to be changed. radically changed up there. with people i can go to as well. i can't be the only one that's there. antonio conte says he wants manchester united manager, jose mourinho to look at himself and stop talking about his former side. antonio conte had complained about chelsea's injuries this season and said his side were in an emergency situation after their 3—3 champions league draw with roma last night. jose mourinho who had two spells as
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chelsea boss said there are other managers who cry about injuries. chelsea boss said there are other managers who cry about injurieslj don't managers who cry about injuries.” don't complain about injuries. we focus on the players who are available, give focus on the players who are available. if i want to moan and cry like the others, i can cry for the next five minutes. i can cry. but i don't. what are your reactions to that? do you think that was for me? he has to think about his team and stop to look at himself. i think a lot of the time, jose mourinho has two has dizzy anything other than chelsea. what do you mean by that? think about his
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team. despite last night's door, chelsea still top the group. manchester united have three wins out of three in group a, but needed a misjudgement by benfica goalkeeper on his european debut to secure victory last night. he carried marcus rashford's free kick over the goal line. brendan rogers said celtic would welcome europa league football after another champions league setback, this time against bayern munich. the 3—0 defeat in germany leaves celtic in third in their group. that is all the sport. let's get more now on the news that the prime minister is due to address leaders at an eu summit in brussels, which will discuss progress in the brexit talks. before setting off, theresa may posted an open letter on facebook offering more assurances to eu nationals living in the uk. in the letter, she said "we want people to stay and we want families to stay together".
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nicolas hatton is the founder of ‘the three million' pressure group, which campaigns for the rights of the three million eu citizens who live in the uk. he's in our bristol studio. good morning. good morning. you have questions about the timing of this open letter, you think it is dubious, don't you? we welcome that finally the prime minister is writing to others to say you can stay. she could have done that 12 months ago, she could have done it 15 months ago. to do it on the day she goes to brussels because she wa nts to she goes to brussels because she wants to see sufficient progress in the negotiation to move to the next phase,is the negotiation to move to the next phase, is not great timing for us. it makes the letter slightly this ingenious, possibly. tell us about your background in the uk? i moved
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to london in 1995. i was a young graduate. i wanted a new adventure, i lived in paris and i lived in belgian. i thought, i lived in paris and i lived in belgian. ithought, i might try london because i love the british music, i love the music scene. i had a great time in london and slowly i integrated. now i am married, i have a 13—year—old daughter and i think that's one of the debates that is missing, is about integration. for centuries, europeans have been integrating in britain. trying to put a stop to that is very worrying. what is worrying is the people who are already here, have lived here in good faith are being treated almost like criminals. your campaign calls for citizens rights for international protection and for a simplified process for eu nationals
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who want to stay in the uk posts brexit. just, if you would, explain what your chief concerns are at the moment, especially with brexiteers in some quarters putting pressure on theresa may to potentially walk away without a deal? the key concern we haveis without a deal? the key concern we have is the home office could actually manage the registration of 3 million people. beyond the discussion of their rights, the home 0ffice discussion of their rights, the home office has got a very bad track record in terms of registering people, issuing them with certificates. we saw this summer, they sent 106 erroneous letters of deportation teu citizens. we have very little confidence in being able to continue to live normally with the home office being in charge. we do welcome the fact is simple
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process , do welcome the fact is simple process, but why wait so long and why not design a process which would be much more simple, based on, for example, applying with your local authority, like it is in germany, not having to go through this registration process by the home 0ffice, registration process by the home office, because honestly... registration process by the home office, because honestly...” registration process by the home office, because honestly... iwant it as you, the prime minister's letter talks about families who have built their lives together and the eu is talking about rights for future family members. do you have concerns that say, a french citizen who lives in the uk, goes abroad, meet a citizen from another eu country and they want to return to the eu together as partners to get married, whatever. do you have concerns those sorts of relationships could be affected?
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they won't be able to do it, it is as simple as this. in 2012, theresa may as the home secretary stop the family reunification rights for british citizens and now she wants to do the same with eu citizens. the argument we would have more rights than the brits, it is only because these rights were stripped from them five years ago. so it would make the uk are less attractive country. but for the people who have built their lives here, we are anxious, we are worried. we don't think the settled status is the right policy for us after brexit. we hope the prime minister will engage with us. we met michel barnier in march and we are meeting with him again on the 13th of november and we are still waiting foran of november and we are still waiting for an invite from theresa may or david davis at number ten. thank you very much for your time today. more than 530,000 rohingya muslim
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refugees have now fled myanmar into bangladesh. they face horrendous conditions and the united nations is urging bangladesh to speed up the vetting process so the refugees can be moved to safety further inland. save the children is warning of an impending "child protection disaster waiting to happen" in the refugee camps. save the children's evan schuurman is in cox' bazar and has been working in one of the refugee camps. thank you forjoining us. you say, unsurprisingly you have found children extremely distressed i what they have experienced and what they have seen. give us your impression of what life is like in this refugee campfor of what life is like in this refugee camp for the children?
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we have spent a lot of time interviewing families over the last few weeks. children are visibly traumatised and distressed from what they experienced in myanmar. it is a difficult situation and they need a lot of support. one of the areas where save the children is doing a lot of work, helping to get children into child friendly spaces and help them with psychological support. but it is an incredible thing to walk around and see so many children who are visibly distressed. at night, they cannot sleep, suffering night terrors and things like that so the psychosocial elements of the response is critical. many people might wonder how you and any other
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charity working with these children can manage to get them into child friendly spaces, as you put it, in these chaotic conditions, it must be incredibly challenging? it is, but it is amazing when you walk into a child friendly space and you see 20, 30 children, singing and dancing and having fun. really being children again and that is what it is all about, giving children back their childhood and providing an environment where they can remember what it is like to be children again. one of the big things at the moment, we have about 150,000 rohingya children out of school in bangladesh. school is a critical place for them, both for the mental health, their protection and their future learning as well. not only do we need these child friendly spaces, but we need to get children into some form of education going forward. in the immediate term, how
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worried are you about disease? there isa worried are you about disease? there is a lot of health risks... there is a serious risk of some form of out—brake. a serious risk of some form of out—bra ke. there a serious risk of some form of out—brake. there have been thousands of cases of diarrhoea and all you need to do is walk around the camps and see how the camp is rife for that disease to take hold. crowded conditions, lots of dirty, contaminated water. it is hard for people living in basic shelters with dirty floors and plastic on the roofs, to maintain a clean standard. we wish you good luck with the difficultjob. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may heads to brussels to try to win over eu leaders, with a promise to treat european nationals living in britain fairly after brexit.
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the spanish government says it's taking steps to impose direct rule over catalonia this weekend. there's been a big increase in the number of crimes, particularly violent offences, in england and wales. in the business news... the uk chancellor has asked financial regulators and the serious fraud office to review whether the banks hsbc and standard chartered are linked to a corruption scandal in south africa. former cabinet minister lord hain has raised concerns the banks may "inadvertently have been conduits" for laundered money. neither bank has yet commented. theresa may has vowed to make it as easy as possible for eu citizens to remain in the uk after brexit ahead of a key summit of european leaders. in a facebook post, the prime minister insisted the application process for settled status would be "streamlined" and the cost "as low as possible".
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campaigners have welcomed her message but said it seemed more aimed at persuading the eu to progress brexit talks. one in four low paid workers are permanently stuck in poorly paid jobs in the uk with little chance of earning more, according to the social mobility commission. the government body says low pay is "endemic" in the uk, with women more likely to get stuck on low pay. we've had a snap shot about the health of the high street. retail sales unexpectedly fell by 0.8% in september. eversing a jump in august, according to the office for national statistics. it meant that third—quarter retail growth slowed to a year—on—year rate of 1.5%, its lowest since the second quarter of 2013. the figures come at the bank of england contemplates its first interest rate rise in a decade. joining us now is kate hardcastle, a retail analyst, at insight with passion. hello. what accounts do you think
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that this drop in retail sales? is it the rise in the cost of living, really squeezing consumers? that and many more reasons as well. we are buying more travel in summer holidays. we spend money on summer holidays. we spend money on summer holidays and enjoyed the travel, eating out but that means there is less money to spend. most of the retailers, these figures affect mainly nonfood retail had exceptional sales period really in the summer, june and july, they brought the calendar forward. there is no ability to run themselves into that period. the new rangers were launched in a lot of stores and we are seeing a reflection in that. we have credit on the increase and we have credit on the increase and we have this talk of an inflation crisis and we have seen some of that in retail space. prices are going up
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in the shop and we have had a report that particularly young people are mounting up their credit card debt, is it having an impact and we don't know where interest rates are going to go, there is speculation the bank of england will put them up next month? they thinking that these are uncertain times? we call the period between september and december, the golden quarter. it is when we are meant to come good with our sales quotas. there isn't a finite amount of credit to lend to people. there isa of credit to lend to people. there is a limited amount of money. those essentials like food items are going up essentials like food items are going up so essentials like food items are going upsoi essentials like food items are going up so i think we will see a little bit more steadiness from the consumers as they start to rein in and buy necessities. plus they are enjoying buying experiences, they are enjoying life against buying material goods. kate, i want are enjoying life against buying material goods. kate, iwant to are enjoying life against buying material goods. kate, i want to find out what you think will be the
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impact on the high street, do you think we will see those pre—christmas sales coming any closer? it is going to be a challenge, everyone will be fighting to make sure they get the consumers in their stores. that will lead to discounting. in november, black friday and cyber monday will hit. we have seen in this report, 17% of sales online. that's not going to mean extra sales for the high street, so there will be shrinkage is in the high street so retailers will be competing very hard just to survive. thank you very much. let's ta ke let's take a look at the news today. growth in the world's second biggest economy has slowed slightly. china's economy grew 6.8% in the three months to september, down from 6.9% in the previous quarter. china is trying to rein in debt and contain a housing bubble without hurting growth. those efforts are expected to have weighed on economic activity in some areas, but growth has been supported by higher—than—expected rise in trade and bank lending. the figures come as china
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holds its communist party congress to determine the country's direction for the next term. you might remember we told you about japan's kobe steel that was at the centre of a scandal over faked test results. well, today, toyota, honda and mazda have come to its defence saying its aluminium components are safe to use. this has eased fears that kobe's scandal could have affected the safety of its products. hundreds of other companies around the world are still checking their products. uk made films, adverts and video games could be hit by a post brexit restriction. the economy generates $87 billion a year and it could be at risk. just time to check with the financial markets. those disappointing retail sales pushed down the pound that's helped the ftse reduce earlier losses slightly — due to the inverse relationship with sterling —
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as many international companies listed get a boost when overseas earnings are converted. there was a pretty weak third quarter update from the consumer goods firm unilever, whose brands include dove, marmite and ben &jerry‘s. their sales growth lower than expectations and shares ebay fell sharply in after—hours trade after warning that profits this quarter could be lower than wall street is predicting. the online marketplace is spending heavily on marketing to try and catch up with amazon. but at the same time, ebay said it sold goods via its website worth nearly 22 billion in the three months to september. that's up 8% and the fastest growth in three years. that's all the business news. james cook has been talking to
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tippee heparin in southern california. i was really angry he would have put that on me. it was so unnecessary and so degrading. because he was essentially saying, sleep with me or i ruin your career? exactly, that is exactly what he was saying. i thought it was sad, we had such a good working relationship and everything was going so well. to have that throw at me and it was something i could not and would not accept under any condition. when i
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sailed out the door, you said i will ruin your career sailed out the door, you said i will ruin yourcareerandi sailed out the door, you said i will ruin your career and i said, do what you have to do. i slammed the door so hard. the entire film crew knew what he was trying to do and they knew that i was just in the day—to—day battle with just staying out of his way. do you think the expose of harvey weinstein's behaviour will make it easier for women to say no? i think it will. i hope it will. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two, first we leave you with for a look at the weather. we have had a misty and murky start to the day across the uk. fog patches, which are lifting and starting to clear away. it will stay quite misty for some of us. this is
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hungerford in berkshire. we have had heavy rain and some of the roads in coventry have been filling up a bit. you can see where the ray mears, in the midlands into the northern areas of england as we go through this afternoon. in the meantime, heavy rain spreading in towards the west. the rain will not last a great deal of time but it will be heavy and it will be accompanied by strengthening and isa will be accompanied by strengthening and is a southerly wind. on the whole, it is going to stay pretty cloudy this afternoon. misty and murky conditions, particularly over the high ground with heavy rain spreading into the far north east. heavy rain campuses to rein in northern ireland. that can lead to problems for the evening rush hour. through this evening, gail is developing around the bristol channel coasts and the english channel coasts and the english channel as well. a little bit breezy, lots of cloud around, misty
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and murky conditions and the rain is going to gradually ease throughout friday morning. let's look at friday. might be a damp start to the day. lots of cloud and mr rau first thing but it is an improving picture because while there could be dribs and drabs of rain in the afternoon, for many, turning dry and brighter during friday afternoon before further rain spreads into northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england, late in the day. that is all i had, head of this deep area of pressure developing over the atla ntic pressure developing over the atlantic at the moment. it will move in across the uk through friday night and into saturday. the isobars close together, so we are expecting some gales, severe gales, around western coast of wales. there could be some coastal flooding across the south and some heavy rain spreading in. the rain will continue on sunday. much of it will clear. but
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some heavy showers around. temperature is about 12 to 14. the wind is easing down as well. stormy start and heavy rain and gales which could cause problems. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 12.00am. reporter: are you confident of progress today, prime minister? deal or no deal? theresa may heads to brussels to try to win over eu leaders with a promise to treat european nationals living in britain fairly after brexit. the spanish government says it's taking steps to impose direct rule i over catalonia this weekend. the world's fastest—growing humanitarian crisis continues. we're at a medical facility at a refugee camp treating severe malnourished children. on my first day, four people died. that was really shocking to me, even though i'm a hardened old doctor.
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it was difficult for me. also as allegations of rape and sexual harassment grow in hollywood singer sir tom jones says abuse is widespread in the music industry too. and actress tippi hedren says the weinstein allegations remind her of abuse she says she suffered at the hands of alfred hitchcock. the entire film crew knew what he was trying to do. they knew that i was just in a day—to—day battle just staying out of his way. good afternoon.
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it's 19th october. i'm anita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may will address eu leaders today during a summit in brussels at which they're expected to confirm they're not yet ready to open talks with britain, about a post—brexit trade deal. the next opportunity to begin negotiations on the relationship will be in december. one of the main brexit pressure groups, leave means leave, has urged mrs may to tell the leaders that the uk is prepared to walk away with no deal, if they continue to refuse to discuss trade. adam fleming is in brussels. our assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster. when you assess today as part of this wider process, how crucial is what's going to be happening today in brussels? it's crucial but i think overall, there's a consensus there's not going to be any
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significant movement today. there's not going to be a shift on to those trade talks which is what the government wants. but it is crucial in terms of the mood music, the signs of how willing the eu might be prepared to move on to those talks in december. but, mrs may really is under some pressure now, notjust from eu leaders to give more, mainly more money, but also from brexiteers here at westminster who are in effect saying to mrs may the negotiations are going nowhere. you need to issue an ultimatum to the eu that if they do not move to trade talks we are going to leave without a deal and move on to world trade organisation terms. interestingly, the labour leader who's also in brussels today was asked about that. he was very clear he thought such a move would be catastrophic. we're here to support the interests of the people of britain in our negotiations with europe. the prime
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minister seems to have managed to upset just about everybody and have a warring cabinet around her. it is up a warring cabinet around her. it is up to herto a warring cabinet around her. it is up to her to get the negotiations back on track. we cannot count ennance the idea that we just rush headlong into no deal with europe. no deal with europe would be very dangerous for employment and jobs in britain. but do you completely rule out the idea there could be no deal? does that not give all the negotiating power toborough else? the idea of no deal would mean world trade organisation rules would be implemented straight away in march 2019, it would be catastrophic for manufacturing industryjobs 2019, it would be catastrophic for manufacturing industry jobs and 2019, it would be catastrophic for manufacturing industryjobs and we would have real problems all through the economy. i don't want to see that. i want to see an agreement being reached. that's why we're here. that's why we're doing our best to ensure that agreement can be reached. i believe it can be reached. i believe it can be reached. we have to recognise the seriousness of the situation and the
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chaos in which our government is operating at the present time. it is a chaos of their own making. i'm joined by kate hoey. is your leader wrong to describe wto rules as catastrophic? i think it is good the leader of the opposition is out in brussels. listening to the mood music coming from there. i think he probably has to say that at this saming as leader of the labour party and the view of the labour shadow cabinet. the reality is, of course, and part of the reason we've put a letter through to the prime minister, is to show the european union that they think they've got us up union that they think they've got us up againsta union that they think they've got us up against a barrel to use a coll oak we'llism. we haven't. we have an alternative. i'd like to see a good deal. other countries trade without ta riffs deal. other countries trade without tariffs with the eu. we've got the same regulatory reforms. there should be no problem. the real
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problem is the eu actually, genuinely seems to want to punish us for daring to leave their wonderful clu b for daring to leave their wonderful club and to get more money from us. the longer they can keep this process going, the more chance they hope that they will get what they want. i think it is important we stand up for the country and say, sorry, you know, we want to be reasonable, to cop rat but we're not going to play your game. what do you say to those many business organisations who say if we moved on to world trade organisation rules they would face tariffs and exporting to the single market. there would be difficulties in terms it of customs and trade. in other words, it would damage business. many business leaders say they would welcome the certainty of knowing rather than a really bad deal that would leave us with all the regulatory issues and paying into the eu, we would be our own boss as a country. wto rules, of course, the
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eu isn't going to want to have to pay tariffs to export into our country. so, there is a lot of shadow boxing going on here. ijust think it is time for us to speak plainly and say we could cope very well with wto rules. we would be a member of the wto in our own right. this is something that the eu has to realise. we're not going to be pushed over. if we went on to wto rules, if there was no deal, there wouldn't just be questions rules, if there was no deal, there wouldn'tjust be questions about the economy. what would happen in terms of the eu nationals and uk nash names in the rest of europe, the northern ireland border. snow deal in those areas either? those issues have moved a great deal. there's almost agreement on practically everything. we can't move on the border because the eu don't want to talk about trade. i'm certain eu citizens will not be affected whether we get a deal, a bad deal,
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which i hope we won't be getting or agreeing to, or we're in wto rules. the government and opposition both agree eu citizens living here must be protected and must be allowed to stay. quite simple. let me ask you about the labour party's position on brecht the. jeremy corbyn seemed to say brexit means brexit. we've soon labour's position shift. it seems you're open to staying in the single market and customs union during the transition and maybe even afterwards. is mr corbyn being led along by the nose by sir keir starmer? there is a substantial number of hard remainers within the labour party who want to stay in and will use any excuse to push nearer to staying in staying in the single market is not possible. not what people voted for. they were clear, need to leave the single market and customs union. i think our leader
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jeremy is in a difficult situation. he's very much trying to keep the party together. there is a good left—wing analysis within the labour party which says we would be better, we would be able to nationalise our railways, take control of our own economy if we were outside the eu. there's no doubt about it or denying it, there is a difference within the party. the question is, who's making the running? my suggestion is it is no longer mr coach enwhen it comes to brexit? i don't think that's true. the shadow chancellor's crucial in all of this. john mcdonnell has very strong views and gets his views across. our labour voters out there, particularly in the north east offence land will not recognise a labour party and will not want to support a labour party who reneges on what the referendum decision was. it was very clear, we're leaving full stop. thank you for your time. an awful long way to go on this. just one other thing to
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tell you, the brexit bill, the eu withdrawal bill, we learnt from the leader of the house in the last few minutes there will be a slight pause, it will not appear in the commons next week, we really don't know when the government will put it before mps to debate and vote on. norman, thank you. now the view from brussels. adam fleming's there for us. to what extent a re adam fleming's there for us. to what extent are the developments here in the uk filtering through and setting the uk filtering through and setting the tone for those discussions theresa may will have with other eu leaders today. that open letter on eu nationals living in britain and that pressure from breck tears within the tory party urging her to issue an ultimatum to other leaders if they won't move on to trade talks? the officials working on brexit here in brussels following the british media and developments at westminster avidly. they know the
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pressure being applied to theresa may affects how she behaves in these negotiations apted her ability to deliver the brexit withdrawal agreement at the end of this process. it has to go through parliament. they hear all the stuff we focus on here. in terms of the reaction to the letter, to the eu nationals living in the uk, we've not had any reaction yet. eu leaders about to start arriving. we'll ask them about that and see what they think. i imagine they'll welcome it. the rights for eu nationals living in the eu after brexit is a priority issue. they are really concerned about the administrative process those people will have to go through to stay in the uk. a message of reassurance that will be streamlined, not too difficult or burton some and not too expensive will go down well. there are other outstanding issues to do with eu citizens which need to be resolved.
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can they earn benefits to send back to other eu countries. can they bring family members from eu countries into the uk? who oversees it? there's still unresolved issues on citizens' rights. that's before we get to the thorny issue of the uk's financial obligations. eu leaders want theresa may to be specific about concrete things that she is willing to pay for. adam, thank you. spain is to start suspending catalonian autonomy at the weekend after its leader threatened to declare independence. the government said ministers would meet to activate article 155 of the constitution allowing it to take over running of the region. that's in response to a threat by the catalan leader to declare independence if the other side refuses to enter talks. tim willcox is in barcelona. a continuing constitutional crisis.
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is there any danger we could see the sort of unrest that happened on the weekend of the disputed referendum? i don't think so, actually. but it has been described as the nuclear option. what the government in madrid has done. the significance of this is huge. this is the first ever autonomous region in spain, one of 17, to be taken back under control by madrid because of that october 1st referendum which was deemed illegal by madrid and unconscious institutional. article 155 has never been invoked before. i don't think you'll see heavy—handed police tactics. the government of inned rid has learned his lesson on that. it would be count remember productive. it would probably lead more people to come on in favour of separatism
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and make this crisis worse. let's talk about what might happen over the next few days with a correspondent here for the guardian newspaper and the observer. do you think the symbolism of this is greater than the effect will be on the ground ? greater than the effect will be on the ground? the symbolism is extraordinary. very powerful. i think though the, i talked to a seepier government minister during the week. he said you have to think of article 155 as a battery of things they can use and it doesn't mean they'll use all of them. he said you should think of it more as a cal pe than an axe. does madrid wa nt a cal pe than an axe. does madrid want the headache of taking over a region like this. tens of thousands of civil servants. its own police force. how would madrid do it practically? it will be extremely difficult, take years to organise i
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doubt they want to do it. i think they'll do something that saves theirface and they'll do something that saves their face and gives the catalans a significant slap on the wrist. but the outcome of all of this surely is elections. ok. elections which in the next month or two, would carles puigdemont win? he says he doesn't wa nt to puigdemont win? he says he doesn't want to stand again. but he would wa nt to want to stand again. but he would want to stand again. but he would want to stand if it was an independent republic. so, we'll see. the polls suggest his party is not benefitting from any of this. it may well be certainly his coalition partner is ahead in the polls. it may be people on the left who haven't had a voice recently and aren't in favour of independence, they may well come out and vote in numbers. thank you very much, stephen. this constitutional crisis continues. all eyes now on madrid on saturday when they'll decide which measures they'll put into effect as
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pa rt measures they'll put into effect as part of article 155. that's the latest from a rainy barcelona here. we'll follow every development. thank you very much tim. more than 530,000 rohingya muslim refugees have now fled myanmar into bangladesh. they face horrendous conditions and the united nations is urging bangladesh to speed up the vetting process so the refugees can be moved to safety further inland. save the children is warning of an impending "child protection disaster waiting to happen" in the refugee camps. i'm surrounded by babies, children under the age of two months. they're all fighting for their lives. they're all severely, acutely malnourished. many of them have #2r568ed with their families from across the border in myanmar escaping the military there and the militias who've burnt them out of
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their homes. they've ended up here. as you can imagine, it has been an arduous journey as you can imagine, it has been an arduousjourney for as you can imagine, it has been an arduous journey for them. they've picked up ailments, the lack of food and water on that long trip has meant they've ended up being cared for in here. sadly, the doctors here have been telling me that several simply don't make it. only yesterday, four actually died. with me is ian cross one of the senior doctors here. a former gp from leicester. good to see you. thank you for allowing us in here. just tell us about some of the ailments a lot of children are suffering from? the main ailments are acute respiratory infections. britoning eel pneumonia. a lot of children who are very eel pneumonia. a lot of children who are very malnourished. when they get chest infections they find it very difficult to fight off infection. you've covered a lot of emergencies in yourtime. you've covered a lot of emergencies in your time. this must be one of the worst? the worse i've been
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involved n it's shocking. i was very moved by this when i first came. on my first day, four people died. it was really shocking to me. i'm hardened old doctor but it was difficult for me. this is a crisis that's been going on for such a long time. just a couple of days ago, we saw ten,000, 15,000 pour over the border. you'll get more and more people coming here with their children? yes. we're trying our best to upgrade our facilities and our health posts to provide services for these people. msf has gone from a tea m these people. msf has gone from a team of seven to 40 in a matter of a couple of weeks. all this must be heartbreaking for you to see? absolutely. terrible. you look around. tears come to my eyes sometimes. it's dreadful. you just do what you can, you know. in a way, i'm lucky i'm a doctor, i have my hands, my tools, i can help to make people better. if i wasn't able to
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do that, i'd feel so frustrated and even worse. when you're hard at work, you can cope. that was dr ian cross talking to clive myrie about the rohingya crisis. the chance the chancellor, philip hammond, has asked uk enforcement agencies the chance forcement agencies to look into allegations that british banking groups hsbc and standard chartered are linked to a corruption scandal in south africa. the former labour cabinet minister peter hain has raised concerns about whether the banks were inadvertently used to launder money siphoned out of the country. at the centre of the allegations are jacob zuma. both deny any wrongdoing. and we can talk to lord hain now, who joins us from johannesburg. thank you for your time today. a number of whistleblowers have spoken to you. what have they alleged? that
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a massive scale of money laundering has been going on through standard chartered, hsbc and baroda banks which all come under uk jurisdiction. it is very welcome the chancellor's referred this to the rtes authorities, the financial authorities, including the serious fraud office. it is vital britain is taking action to identify the money, track it down and return it to the south african treasury. it is money stolen from south african taxpayers and should go back to the south african treasury so it can be spent on schools and hospitals and housing and other essential needs. not corru ptly stolen by and other essential needs. not corruptly stolen by those running the country politically and their business cronies. what sort of impact do you think this is having on the political situation in south africa? a country with which you've been involved for many, many years?
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i've been involved. i spent my childhood there. my mum and dad were active in the anti—apartheid struggle in pretoria. both were jailed. then issued with banning orders. we were forced to come into exile. i've kept in close touch. for quite a while, i was very enthusiastic and supportive of what south africa had become since apartheid. under president zuma and his business cronies, corruption and cronyism has become so endemic and cancerous right the way through the system with the former finance minister gordon, sacked by president zuma for exposing all of this, he says around 100 billion rand has been stolen in that way. that's nearly £6 billion in an economy that size of out africa. a monumental amount. a lot of money that should
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have spent on the services government normally spend for their people. these allegations are suggesting that has been siphoned off? absolutely. whistleblowers provided me with the evidence i've given to the chancellor. the identities of the 27 people i've named in the letter to him. they will be investigated by the three bankses i trust. i hope any british company, we saw what happened to bell pot i thinker, it went bankrupt over its nefarious activities with these same individuals. kpmg is in these same individuals. kpmg is in the firing line. it admitted wrongdoing. mckinsey, the international conglomerate, that too is in the firing line. anyone doing business or allowing their banking facilities with these people will be badly contaminated and suffer tremendous damage. it is vital
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britain, the government and everybody else and all the finance institutions do everything they can to stop this. peter hain, thank you. presidentjacob president jacob zuma and presidentjacob zuma and the gupta family didi any any wrongdoing. it is time now for sport. mp damian collins says there are "serious doubts" whether fa bosses are fit to stay on after what he called a "shambolic" performance at a hearing in parliament yesterday. fa chairman greg clarke and chief executive martin glenn were answering questions after discrimination claims against ex—england women's boss mark sampson. luka had lu ka had to luka had to wait 18 months to get a proper answer to serious allegations of racism and bully from the fa. the reason she had to wait that long was because of failures by the fa to
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investigate them properly. the people directly involved in that, the chief executive and dan ash worth were not apologising for their involvement. we need to see a real acknowledgement from the fa on their own internal failings notjust acknowledgement from the fa on their own internalfailings notjust the conduct of mark sampson. chelsea manager antonio conte says manchester united manager jose mourinho needs to "look at himself" and stop talking about his former side. conte has complained about chelsea's injuries this season and said his side were in an "emergency situation"after their 3—3 champions league draw with roma last night. mourinho, who had two spells as chelsea boss, said there are other managers who always ‘cry‘ about injuries. i never speak about injuries. other managers they cry, they cry, they cry when some player is injured. i don't cry. i think the way to do it
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is to ignore the players that are injured. to focus on the players that are available. to give confidence on the players available. but, if i want to moan and cry like the others, i can cry for the next five minutes. ibrahimovic, pogba, fellaini, rojo, ican five minutes. ibrahimovic, pogba, fellaini, rojo, i can cry. five minutes. ibrahimovic, pogba, fellaini, rojo, ican cry. but five minutes. ibrahimovic, pogba, fellaini, rojo, i can cry. buti don't. reporter: what's your reaction to injuries? do you think it was for me? yeah. i think so. injuries? do you think it was for me? yeah. ithink so. ithink injuries? do you think it was for me? yeah. i think so. i think he has to think about his team. to look at himself. not the others. i think a lot of time moruinho has to see what happened at chelsea. reporter: what do you mean by that? a lot of time, also last season. to think about his team. am sure
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they're looking forward to the next meeting. that's all the sport. the rest of the details on the bbc sports website and a. back at 1.30pm. theresa may is meeting the former us president bill clinton to discuss the continuing political deadlock in northern ireland. earlier this week, bill clinton held private talks with the main northern ireland party leaders in belfast. as president, he played a key role in helping to secure the 1998 good friday agreement which led to power—sharing at stormont. northern ireland's football manager michael o'neill has been found guilty of drinking driving earlier this week bill clinton held private talks with the main he face as 16 month driving ban and fine. sir tom jones has told bbc news that the sexual harassment and abuse alleged to take place in hollywood is also rife in the music industry. he said he was propositioned when he was a young singer, and the experience left
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him feeling "terrible". here's our arts and entertainment correspondent colin paterson. for more than 50 years, sir tom jones has played up his reputation as a sex symbol. but in an interview for 5live's afternoon edition for the series launch of the voice, he revealed he was sexually harassed by a man in the music industry and it happened at the start of his career in the 1960s. at the beginning, there were a few things like that. but you avoid it. good grief. what is tried on women is tried on men as well. he did tell other people about the proposition at the time and the incident was never repeated. it was only once, really. how did it make you feel? terrible. but you think, "i've got to get away from this person" and it can't be like this. sir tom jones had been giving his reaction to recent allegations and revelations
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surrounding the us film industry and said that, to him, it was an all—too—familiar story. things have always happened in the music industry as well. people complaining about publicists and different things. that they have been expected to do to get a record contractjust like they do to get a film contract. there has always been that element there — that people with power sometimes abuse it. he also said that when it came to the world of entertainment as a whole, he hoped that, as he put it, the cork was now out of the bottle and justice would be done. it's almost 1230. let's take a look at the weather forecast to join darren bett. good afternoon. the calm weather of recent days has led to much more mist and fog and low
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cloud. today, that is slowly lifting. there's still a lot of cloud around through the rest of the day. there is some rain too. two main areas of rain. this is quite heavy moving northwards. rain settling over northern ireland. may be some flooding here given how wet it's been recently. that rain will work further into wales and into the south—west. this rain could be heavy as it pushing away from the midlands up as it pushing away from the midlands up into northern england. allowing skies to brighten up in the south—east. it could be quite warm. it will be windy in that rain area in northern ireland, and the south—west in particular. gales likely for the evening. a messy picture overnight. we'll all see some rain at times. where the winds are lighter over the north, more most, fog and low cloud. clearer skies coming into northern ireland. hopefully brightening up here for a while. maybe sunshine in the south—west where the winds are easing. things will improve deuce the day as rain peters out. slow process to brighten up in scotland.
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more wind and rain arriving close to northern ireland and the far south—west at the end of the day. a sign of things to come with wet and windy weather this weekend. good afternoon, this is bbc newsroom live. the latest headlines... theresa may is urged by pro—brexit colleagues to issue an ultimatum to eu leaders at a summit in brussels this evening, that if trade talks don't begin soon britain will settle for "no deal". the government in spain is taking steps to impose rule over catalonia this weekend. the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales has passed the five million mark for the first time in ten years. sir tom jones has said that sexual abuse and harrassment is widespread in the music industry and that he experienced being propositioned early in his career. as we've heard eu leaders are expected to confirm they're not ready to begin the second phase of brexit talks on the uk's future relationship with the eu, but what are the key sticking points and what can be done to reach a breakthrough. our reality check correspondent
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chris morris is here to explain. after five rounds of brexit negotiations, the eu has decided that "sufficient progress" has not yet been made. eu leaders are set to confirm that tomorrow, friday. there are several things to be resolved. but basically, at the moment, it all comes down to money. in her speech in florence, theresa may pledged to pay up to £18 billion into the eu budget in 2019 and 2020, to ensure that other countries aren't out of pocket. she also said the uk would "honour commitments" it has made as a member state. but eu negotiators, urged on by all the other member states, want to know what that means in practice. looming large in the background is something called the reste a liquider — eu money that has already been committed to projects in the long—term budget but has not yet been spent.
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the ral is currently running at an eye—watering £213 billion, which could mean a uk share of more than 26 billion. much of it is due to be spent on big infrastructure or development projects that have been delayed. there are also pensions and contingent liabilities such as loans to other countries to consider. now the eu isn't asking for a final figure to be publicly agreed — it understands the political sensitivities in the uk. but as part of the brexit negotiations, led by these two, it wants some sort of guarantee, probably in writing, that "honouring commitments" means "all commitments." the uk position, on the other hand, is that the prime minister made a substantial gesture in her florence speech, and it is in no position to move further unless it gets something in return. this is what david davis told the house of commons this week: "they are using time pressure to get more money out of us." "bluntly," he said, "that is what's going on." so it sounds like deadlock, but that's not necessarily the case. three more rounds of negotiation
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have been suggested between this week's summit and another one in december. the hope is that a way will be found to move forward, although it could well take a moment of crisis to get there. as theresa may prepares to meet eu leaders in brussels, the government has confirmed that a key brexit bill will not be debated in parliament next week. commons leader andrea leadsom told mps this morning that there was "nothing odd" about the delay in discussing the european union withdrawal bill, which would pave the way for eu legislation to be transferred into british law. our assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster. andrea leadsome describing this as a slight pause? it does underline just as things are getting sticky and snarled up in brussels, the same
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appears to be happening here at westminster. because the widespread assumption is the government would wa nt to assumption is the government would want to get onto this key bits of bread jet legislation as soon as possible. but at the moment, there is no sign of it being timetabled into the government's schedule any time soon. andrea leadsome, the leader of the house has said that is because something like 300 amendments have been tabled and the government have to work through them. it points to the fact the government is deeply nervous about the emerging alliances building between tory rebels and opposition mps to try and derail the legislation, to try and ensure that parliament can get a veto over any final deal. so, andrea leadsome had to tell mps today the legislation, well it was going to be paused before it was brought to the house. i do just want to reassure honourable members, there have,
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as has been widely reported and is well—known, 300 amendments and 54 new clauses put forward. and it should be reassuring to the house to know that government is looking very carefully at those amendments and new clauses, to ensure that when it does come back to this chamber for its response and for the debate in this chamber where we have eight days of debate with eight protected hours on each day, that the responses will be well thought through. but i would like to point out to members across the house who may not be aware of this, is that there is nothing odd at all about a pause between second reading and committee of the whole house. ina in a separate spat that andrea leadsome had to deal with, there was further criticism of that decision last night by the government to tell its mps and not to vote in the vote on universal credit. you remember,
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there have been other controversial debates and votes called on issues like the nhs pays cap. the government now has faced criticism from some of its own mps for that tactic and that includes from the former tory minister, sir edward leigh. may output to my good friend, the leader of the house, a long—time conservative point of view about the events of last night? it may be, in the future, there is a minority labour government. they may produce policies which we think are deeply contrary to our personal liberties. we may muster a majority in parliament against it. what happens ifa parliament against it. what happens if a future labour government says, lam if a future labour government says, i am sorry, you set the precedent.
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it is only expression of opinion, we are going to ignore parliament. the road to tyranny is paved by executive ignoring parliaments. so, ido urge executive ignoring parliaments. so, i do urge my right honourable friend, to listen to parliament. i believe the secretary of state should come back and make a statement and it should be a statement and it should be a statement full of meat. parliament does matter, because if we, as conservatives, live by the sword now, our conservative values in the future might die by the sword. the clear view of critics of the government is that ministers are instructing their mps not to take pa rt instructing their mps not to take part in vote so they can avoid headlines saying government defeated in tuition fees vote. andrea leadsome said there was no precedent being set, they would judge each vote on a case—by—case basis. we
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have a debate next week on social care. the row that blew up over that over dementia tax and it will be interesting to see if the government instructs its mps to abstain. norman smith, thank you very much. let's show you the scene in brussels where eu leaders. to arrive soon. short red carpet, so only a short running of the gauntlet pass the media who are there to capture the arrivals and we will be back in brussels very soon. three of northern ireland's most senior police officers are under investigation for alleged misconduct in public office. the bbc understands that the police ombudsman is examining allegations of criminal activity involving the chief and deputy chief constable and the assistant chief constable — that could amount to trying to pervert the course ofjustice. they strongly deny any wrongdoing. in a statement, the psni said they "completely refute the allegations".
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our ireland correspondent, chris buckler, told me the background to this story. this is an ombudsman investigation into how a police investigation from 2014 was handled. in 2014, in the summer, the police investigated allegations of bribery and misconduct in public office which related to the awarding of contracts to provide police vehicles. so an investigation into the police service of northern ireland itself. some senior officers were questioned in that investigation. the public prosecution service decided no prosecutions should result from that investigation. however, those senior officers who were questioned then, have made complaints about senior officers now. in the way that they conducted an handled that
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investigation. that includes the chief constable george hamilton, his deputy to harris and assistant chief co nsta ble, deputy to harris and assistant chief constable, mark hamilton. when you look at what they are complaining about, they are making allegations of misconduct in public office and criminal activity that could lead to perverting the course ofjustice. what we understand is that there we re what we understand is that there were flaws in the way the investigation was investigated, there were changes in notebooks and claims that the psni didn't follow proper procedures in obtaining warrants. all of those opposites are strongly denying any wrongdoing. george hamilton took the step in making those denials in public. george hamilton took the step in making those denials in publicm any big investigation, when you review and reflect what does happen, there will be misuse for organisational learning around the margins. but i am confident there will be no serious misconduct found about me or any of the other officers. i have confidence in the
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police ombudsman, let them do their job, let them vindicate us, rather than me saying this because that is the way it is supposed to work. i think people introducing public discourse in this is unwise and i would encourage the complainants to have confidence in the police ombudsman. chris, it is interesting that the psni has issued that robust response, because they are concerned about a loss of public confidence in the police service? it is extremely unusual and generally the psni, whenever police ombudsman investigation is taking place, makes the point they will not comment during a live investigation. it gives you a sense of how seriously they are taking this issue. in the statement they actually say they are concerned in the organisation's view, this is a potential to negatively impact on public confidence in policing. they have made the point in stepping out at
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this early stage in the investigation to issue these strong denials. the investigation is expected to take over a year and the ombudsman has set up a dedicated tea m ombudsman has set up a dedicated team of six officers who are looking into this issue. that was chris buckler speaking to meet a little earlier. there's been a big increase in the number of violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales. official figures show a rise of 19% in the 12 months to the end ofjune. overall, crime increased by 13% — with 5.2 million offences recorded year—on—year. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw has been looking in to the figures. the overall number of offences recorded by police, and that is important to remember, these are only the crimes that come to the notice of the police, that is passed the 5 million mark for the first time ina the 5 million mark for the first time in a decade. it is nowjust
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short of 5.2 million offences recorded in the period to the end of june. and the comparison is with the same period in the previous year and we can see in increase of 13%. in terms of violent crime, that is up bya terms of violent crime, that is up by a fifth, up by 19%, the increase in violent crime. we can see there are particular categories of crime, firearms offences are up, knife crime is up and cases of stalking and harassment is up sharply as well. also, one of the other categories are cases of murder and manslaughter. these are grouped under the definition of homicide. there were 629 cases of murder and manslaughter, that is excluding the deaths caused by the terror attacks in london and manchester and if you ta ke in london and manchester and if you take away the hillsborough deaths that were included in last year's figures, it shows a rise of 46 more
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cases compared to last year. the overall number of offences recorded above 5 million for the first time in ten years, what is behind that? is the number of offences going up, orare is the number of offences going up, or are more crimes being recorded?” think there is a mix. there is an element of police recording processes a re element of police recording processes are improved. they are just ring offences they didn't previously register. there is no doubt that is a large element of the increase, but the statisticians said there is a genuine increase, particularly in some of the high harm categories, murder, attempted murder, knife crime, firearms offences. those are less likely to be prone to changes in recording practices, so genuine increases there. that is a big line when we hear from police representatives when we talk about a strain on
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resources ? when we talk about a strain on resources? we know they have been cut considerably since 2010 and now they have got to find 1% bonuses to give to all police officers so there will be further cuts as well. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may heads to brussels to try to win over eu leaders with a promise to treat european nationals living in britain fairly after brexit. the spanish government says it's taking steps to impose direct rule over catalonia this weekend. there's been a big increase in the number of crimes, particularly violent offences, in england and wales. there are calls for the men at the top of the fa to resign. elio aluko accuse them of blackmail after she
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was told to publicly declare the governing body was not institutionally racist. lianne sanderson, who gave evidence to the committee has described the fa's handling of the situation as a disgrace. they need to take a look at themselves and think about how this has been handled. it is a shambles and has been handled this gracefully. it has made our national tea m gracefully. it has made our national team look, not that great. football in this country is our religion, so to speak. men and women's football. the way the fa has handled a lot of situations of late have not been acceptable. whoever is still there, can learn from what happened yesterday and the findings and how the whole situation has been treated. we don't want this to happen again. it wasn't about me or about alu ko, it happen again. it wasn't about me or about aluko, it was about finding the truth and let people realise that if you have a grievance you can bring it forward and you will not be
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ostracised from the team. a bbc investigation has discovered that more than 500 families have objected to a deceased relative donating an organ over the past five years, despite them being on the donor register. nhs blood and transplant says the most common reason for families overriding a loved—one's wishes, is that the donation process takes too long. mark hutchings reports. for many, becoming an organ donor is a crucially important life—and—death decision. now, data from nhs blood and transplant shows that since 2012, 505 people who had signed the donor register had that wish vetoed by their families. in the past year, the number of deceased donors was 1400, but 91 cases were blocked. under legislation, relatives don't have a right to override their loved one's pledge, but in practice, objections are being adhered to. the most frequent were from relatives who thought the donation process took too long, with other common complaints that the patient had suffered enough, or that there was divided
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opinion in the family. one teenager who signed a register is clear her views should hold sway. i want the final say of what happens to me i die. when i signed, i wasn't aware of the whole thing that my family had to be supportive of the decision. and it seems like, well, what's the point of signing up if it could be overruled anyway? in 2015, in addition to the register, the welsh government introduced a policy of deemed consent under which it's assumed an individual has no objection to donating organs unless they've said otherwise. though families are still consulted. similar changes are planned in england and scotland. and the message from those promoting organ donation is, whatever the law, it is as important as ever to discuss your wishes with loved ones. mark hutchings, bbc news. this week, our reporter has been
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following the progress of a team of five experts as they attempt to come up five experts as they attempt to come up with novel and bespoke solutions to sexual harassment on public transport. it may look like an ordinary boss, but in 24 hours it will be transformed. it is a big pa rt will be transformed. it is a big part of some of the solutions experts have been coming up with. they have had brainstorming sessions, focus groups and gone through countless cups of coffey, as they try to commence the world that sexual harassment on public transport is too big to ignore but not too big to tackle. let's meet a couple of the women on our 100 women list this year. hannah, you drove a train on the london underground for 13 years. sexual harassment on public transport is a big problem,
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but it is underreported, why is that? i think it is down to society today. we are either too busy, we are embarrassed. you are ashamed. there is a lot of shame in the ladies this has happened to, pitches wrong because they didn't do the bad acts. some people don't know it has happened to them and some people just think, let me get out of here because the effect, i am shaking, sweating and really upset, so let me get out of here. hopefully in the future, these people will come back and report it. as we know, it is severely underreported at the moment. as we have seen with other insta nces moment. as we have seen with other instances of harassment, there is a lot of silence around this issue and thatis lot of silence around this issue and that is something our experts have been thinking about. next we talked tojohn been thinking about. next we talked to john jordan, what are
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been thinking about. next we talked tojothordan, what are you thinking about? when we were looking for solutions it is a big problem. the way that we have chosen to tackle it is looking at how we can educate people more about what they need to do, either as a bystander, so to safely intervene, or what they need to do if something has happened to them. but to mobilise the people on public transport to do something, because there is not only silence and underreporting from people it has happened to but a lot of silence that goes on around these incidents on public transport. we are going to transform this boss. upstairs will be an experienced... we're going to brussels where theresa may has just arrived. we will also be looking at the concrete progress that has been made in ourexit concrete progress that has been made in our exit negotiations and looking at setting out ambitious plans for the weeks ahead. i want to see an
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urgency in reaching an agreement on citizens rights, but also this isn't just about our exit negotiations, it is also about various other important issues, defence, security, counterterrorism and migration. i will be showing how the uk will continue to play a full role. are you here primarily progressing brexit talks, the eu says britain has two compromise to move on, are you willing to budge?” has two compromise to move on, are you willing to budge? i set out a few weeks ago in florence, are bold and ambitious vision for our partnership between the eu and the uk. at the heart of that remains cooperation on the key issues and the shared challenges we face. that speech set out that ambitious vision andl speech set out that ambitious vision and i look forward for progressing that in the weeks ahead. we will be talking about a variety issues today. i set up the uk's vision in
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that speech and i look forward to discussing that but also the challenges we share, migration, defence, security and counterterrorism. these are issues that are shared across europe and the uk wants to play a full role and cooperating with the eu in dealing with these. thank you. theresa may arriving for those discussions in brussels, referencing her florence speech. new heard her do that, and talking about the urgency, that is the word she used, the urgency of getting an agreement on citizens rights. that follows on from the open letter which she sent to eu nationals living in the uk. meanwhile, pro—brexit members of the tory party have been urging her to potentially issue an ultimatum to the other eu leaders if they don't agree to move on to discussions on trade talks with the uk. much more on developments in brussels
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throughout the day here on bbc news. ina throughout the day here on bbc news. in a moment the news at one with sophie bray worth, but now let's get the weather. the next few days will see the wind is picking up. in the atlantic, this area of cloud is developing and is hiding a deepening area of low pressure and that will bring wind and rain. most of the uk is covered by cloud at the moment and there is still rain, heavy at times, running through the midlands into northern england. rain continues into northern ireland, and the south—west with the wind picking up. it brightens up in the south—west for a while. through this evening, we'll see the wind strengthening in the south—west and for a while, in the english channel, gales likely. we will all get spells of rain. a messy picture overnight. where the winds are there will be low cloud, mist and fog. another mild night again. no frost. head into southern part of
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the uk on friday morning where the winds are stronger and we will have some sunshine in the south—west. but much of wales, midlands and towards the south—east and east anglia, still cloudy and grey and outbreaks of rain. perhaps the rain turning lighter. further north and into northern england, any breaks in the cloud will lead to fog. hill fog across scotland and maybe the odd patch of fog in northern ireland under the clear skies. but for a while we should see things brightening up with sunshine. we may see some of the sunshine from the south—west moving into wales, the south—west moving into wales, the south—west of england. the rain further north petering out and sky is bright for a while. winds dropping the picking up in the south—west and northern ireland as the next batch of rain arrives. temperatures pretty much where they should beat, 13 to 15. the rain coming into the west on friday is on the weather front. it skips away across the uk overnight. it is as low pressure that will affect our weather as the centre gets closer,
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the winds strengthen. on saturday across west wales, southern england, gusts up to 60 miles an hour and perhaps 70 around suncoast. big waves. heavy showers further north where the winds are keen as well. heavy day on saturday, but not as wendy perhaps but there will be sunshine but there will be quite a few showers and it will feel cooler perhaps, but more rain in the offing. the prime minister is in brussels hoping for a breakthrough in the brexit negotations as an eu summit gets under way. some in her party are urging her to walk away with no deal unless future trade relations are discussed. she says she remained hopeful. the speech i set out in florence set out the ambitious vision and i look forward to us progressing that in the weeks ahead. also this lunchtime... the latest on the rohingya refugee crisis. we're live near the border in bangladesh as thousands continue to flee myanmar.
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the refugee camp in bangladesh where the heavens have just opened the refugee camp in bangladesh where the heavens havejust opened is home to hundreds of thousands of refugees, but it will have to be extended because of the severity of this crisis.
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