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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 19, 2017 10:45pm-11:00pm BST

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give me a deal to defend, telegraph, give me a deal to defend, theresa may implores the eu. getting there but not quite, seems to be the message from the eu 27. they want an invoice, some sort of document said exactly what they think we should pay back the price goes up and up, one said 20 million is peanuts, and that has been counteracted by brexit is in parliament who have said that if it is subject to a vote at the end of the process and we are being charged money for access to the single market and customs union, they won't vote for it. it's all down to money and the divorce bill and so farwe down to money and the divorce bill and so far we don't have any figures. what is going to happen to eu citizens and our citizens? also a sticking point. that is probably the easiest one for them to resolve, and theresa may has given some warm words on that this evening, but we are still getting this coming in because she is speaking at the end
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of the dinner. some of this is... the advanced text of what she was going to say, but what she says in the telegraph, the idea, give me a deal to defend, that is what david cameron said when he went round before the referendum, give me a deal to defend, that he can take to the british people. and he had a what if you don't. because if not, we might end up leaving the european union, but the problem for the theresa may, she says, give me a deal to defend, and they say, so what if we don't. we have notes on oui’ what if we don't. we have notes on our political editor, saying that theresa may will urge eu leaders to create a new dynamic which will focus onjoint effort create a new dynamic which will focus on joint effort and endeavour. that is the same talk we heard that was the view from the florence speech and what the british side have been saying for a long time, urging the european side... the
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european union, to get on with things, but without giving them any incentive to do so. why should they? they can have it all on their own terms? i have got their own business and financial terms to protect, just because people who are members of the eu are pro the project and like the eu are pro the project and like the vision of a federal superstate, thatis the vision of a federal superstate, that is not representative of the electorates they are serving. there is also the issue of the florence speech, theresa may was open—handed she was reasonable in taking the fight to brussels and saying we will honour our commitment according to the fiscal framework until 2021, but what we pay afterwards then depends on the membership of various different things. do we want our e 1115? different things. do we want our e 111s? so to get to the bottom of the divorce bill they have got to say
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what they would like us to pay. florence was considered considered —— conciliar tree by the brexit is. and now the times. david davis. no deal —— david davis draws up no deal. no deal was better than a bad deal. no deal was better than a bad deal. that is not the view of everyone in the capital, i don't think philip hammond would agree with that and all with some of the others, but this is david davis, the brexit secretary, drawing up a clear picture of what a no deal would actually mean. to be honest, this is actually mean. to be honest, this is a way of putting pressure on the negotiations and they want the eu sighter believe that we do mean it when we say that we are prepared to sanction the possibility of no deal. what in essence he would be saying, we are prepared to take the hit. we
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know it would be damaging in the short term because we would have these... we would lose the prospect of frictionless trade which we have always said we wanted, but we are willing to take that. the question then is whether the other leaders in hose then is whether the other leaders in nose will believe that we really mean it, or that david davis really means it —— the other leaders in europe. for the eu 27, there are indications for them —— implications for them as well. yes, they have so many interests, selling cars to us, andi many interests, selling cars to us, and i think this is also a move to cou ntera ct and i think this is also a move to counteract the rhetoric coming from the cabinet, amber rudd said it is unthinkable, but now david davis is saying we have a strategy. the
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metro, violent crime is up 19%, the number of violent crimes has reached the 5 million mark for the first time ina the 5 million mark for the first time in a decade, and it is the nature of the crime. the fact they are violent, serious offences. when these stories come out, there's a question about whether or not it just means more crimes are being reported rather than being committed, and significantly on this occasion the office for national statistics are saying it really is a genuine increase, not simply the fa ct genuine increase, not simply the fact that more offences are being reported but there really is an increase in crime, and an increase in crimes that the smallest number of people are likely to be caught up m, of people are likely to be caught up in, of course. in relative numbers per head of the population violent crime is small, but the increase nevertheless, the figures, knife
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attacks up by 26%, firearms offences up attacks up by 26%, firearms offences up by attacks up by 26%, firearms offences up by 27%, they are very dramatic figures. the norfolk and study we have said —— constabulary have said they're going to get rid their community police officers, they need co nsta bles. community police officers, they need constables. yes, and also other crime, bike online crime, and that is difficult for the police —— like online crime. the public like visibility and the pco is provided that in space and people felt their neighbourhood was being covered, but you don't often see pco per will and police officers round my way, but i don't live in a town —— pcos. but in recent events we have had a great emergency response, but these terrorist incidents. and now the
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daily mirror. penny lancaster is married to rod stewart. she has talked about a sex attack which happened her when she was in her teens full the harvey weinstein allegations, revelation, have brought so many stories forward from women. revelation, have brought so many stories forward from womenm revelation, have brought so many stories forward from women. it was only a matter of time before every industry, people come forward, this is talking about modelling. we have said, why has this happened in the weinstein situation, because there are men in positions of power and vulnerable young women who want to get ahead in a very competitive field, so presumably the fashion industry is no different. she made this revelation on the tv, she claims to have been drugged and mention work would someone on top her, is horrendous and unthinkable —— and then she woke up with someone
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on top of her. this story has opened up on top of her. this story has opened upa can on top of her. this story has opened up a can of worms, and there is no suggestion anyone is jumping up a can of worms, and there is no suggestion anyone isjumping on up a can of worms, and there is no suggestion anyone is jumping on the bandwagon, it is being openly discussed what we have kind of accepted discussed what we have kind of a cce pted to discussed what we have kind of accepted to think of as part of the job, but it is not acceptable to think of. as we saw a few years ago with sexual offences against children, it was not talked about for a long children, it was not talked about fora longtime but then we heard about it and it went to all sectors of the community, the same is likely to happen here. it does start in those industries where not only you lack women in senior positions and have done historically, but also where individuals hold an extraordinary power, someone like weinstein, media mogul, he had so much power over people's careers, but i'm sure in other industries where there is a more traditional
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career where there is a more traditional career structure we will also see stories like this coming out. the guardian, 0xbridge still failing black british pupils, one in three ta ke black british pupils, one in three take no black a—level students despite commitments going back quite a few years that this will change. absolutely scandalous figures, quite extraordinary that some of colleges have not ta ken extraordinary that some of colleges have not taken on a british—born black student in five years, not a single one over that period. david lammy the labourmp single one over that period. david lammy the labour mp has been trying to get the figures out cambridge was a bit more willing to respond in terms of polishing the figures, oxford was very reluctant. and they did at the last moment when they heard the guardian were going to publish this story. it is partly about racism and also economic background, oxford and cambridge and oxford in particular haven't succeeded as they promised in broadening the base of the
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applicants. successful applicants. and this is not representative of modern britain. well, it's not. young black people make up 3% of the population but only 1.5% of all offers from those universities were two black students with good a—levels. this comes on the back of the racial disparity audit that theresa may carried out which is adjusted young black male pupils we re adjusted young black male pupils were three times as likely to be excluded from school. a lot of work needs to be done. other figures show fewer black students are applying for these jobs because they look at oxford and cambridge and think that is not for them. finally. this is the new prime minister in new zealand. she's only 37 and she got thejob of leading her party in august. what is it with young new politicians? always good to see a woman in power, clearly, but equally
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it is interesting with my royal hat, this lady is a republican and she wa nts to this lady is a republican and she wants to ditch the queen as the head of state. the polling there for a commonwealth country is quite stuck, 30% would like to ditch the queen and 76% of young people would like to ditch her. her party came second but she ended up as prime minister, so but she ended up as prime minister, so if you think back to the referendum we had on whether we should change the system, you could come second and still win. that is the momentum attitude. well, sometimes, that is how it looks! that's true. thanks very much. coming up next, the weather forecast. we have a second named storm of the season, storm brian, named by the
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all ireland office, —— the irish met office. this will weaken a touch by the time it reaches the uk, but the time being, quite a windy night across southern areas, gales time being, quite a windy night across southern areas, gates in places around southern coasts, outbreaks of rain, just about anywhere through the night, the odd heavy burst. turning dry around scotla nd heavy burst. turning dry around scotland but patchy fork. —— patchy fog. into friday morning, a grey staff are many, —— a grey start the many. most places slowly brightening up, and it may take a while, and some hills might stay for the even into the afternoon, but most will see sunshine through the day. if you haven't by the end of friday, you are unlucky, but if you avoid it, temperatures a bit fresher. it won't feel especially nice, but by the end of the day, the wet weather returns.
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wet and windy, spreading into wales and south—west england. it is the forerunner to storm brian. it is becoming less of a strong feature but we still have a punch to pack in across southern parts of england and wales and southern england, and this is where we could see winds around 50,60, is where we could see winds around 50, 60, maybe 70 miles proud, coupled with high seas, it will be pretty rough around the coast. winds is only part of the story, we also have rain at times, heavy and frequent showers across western areas, merging into longer spells of rain, dry and bright through much of other areas. a few showers, blustery day, rather than a stormy day, and the winds will weaken. they will become cooler to the afternoon, temperatures will drop, and it will bea temperatures will drop, and it will be a cool night to take us into sunday. winds will remain very blustery. and we start to see things
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back to just sunshine and showers for many with blustery winds, showers most likely across northern parts and a bit dry to the south and east. the headlines. theresa may purges eu leaders to create a new dynamic in brexit negotiations. crime rises in england and wales. norfolk police say they are getting rid of community officers. and thousands flee myanmar. i am surrounded by children under the age of two months. they are all fighting for their lives. they are severely malnourished. on newsnight, positive smoke signals from inside theresa may's eu showdown. and we talk about racism and sexism in football.
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