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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 20, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello. it's friday. it's 9am. welcome to the programme. the prime minister theresa may is in brussels — she's urging eu leaders to create a "dynamic" in the brexit talks so that both sides can move forward and start talking about trade. but just how much progress is being made? lots of people are worried about no deal in the uk. what's your message to people who are worried about that? inaudible the prime minister will be speaking in the next half hour and we'll bring you that live. in the next half hour and we'll carolyn rossjones was born prematurely in 1973 and when her mum was told she wouldn't survive she fled the hospital. carolyn did survive, was adopted and moved to america. she says the impact on her life has been massive. it was really devastating. i have my good days and i have my bad days. my biggest regret is she passed away at age 47 which was really quite young not knowing that i survived. hollywood director quentin tarantino has admitted he knew of incidents involving harvey weinstein
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mistreating women before the scandal broke as police in los angeles say they‘ re investigating another claim of sexual assault involving the film producer. hello and welcome to the programme, we're live until iiam. we have lots to talk about today — mobile phone operators are being criticised today for not letting customers know when they have paid for the handsets they have bought as part of their contracts. we are also going to talk about proposals for a change in the law to sentencing for people who attack emergency workers. we'll hear from a paramedic and a doctor who have been assaulted and, of course, we will bring you the prime minister's speech in brussels live. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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our top story today: theresa may has arrived ahead of a crucial brexit talks this morning in brussels. last night the prime minister made a personal appeal to break the deadlock at a private dinner for the heads of government. she held a brief bilateral meeting this morning with the european council president donald tusk before a working breakfast with fellow eu leaders. arriving for the talks european commission presidentjean claude juncker spoke to reporters although he didn't give much away. reporter: the last time we met, you told me that you wanted more detail on what the uk wants from brexit. any progress on that? we have some details, but we don't have all the details, but we don't have all the details that we need. work is going on. lots of people are worried about no deal in the uk.
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what's your message to the people who are worried about that? it is not my working assumption that we will have no deal. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has also arrived for this morning's session but he wasn't keen on talking when approached by our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. i'm from the bbc. your recommendation today, sufficient progress. i'm going to work now, sorry. eu leaders will hold talks and we expect theresa may to speak to the media in the next hour or two and we will bring that to you live. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. increased prison sentences should be handed to people who attack emergency workers, that's one of a series of tougher new punishments being discussed by mps. figures show there are nearly 200 assaults on nhs workers every day in england, while home office statistics suggest a police officer is attacked every 22 minutes. labour's chris bryant, who has brought forward the proposal,
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wants it to count as aggravated assault if an emergency worker is attacked on duty, doubling the possible jail term to a year. it's a mystery to me why kids, two yea rs it's a mystery to me why kids, two years ago, i saw in the rhondda, my constituency throwing bricks at fire officers who were trying to put out a fire officers who were trying to put out afire on officers who were trying to put out a fire on the mountains. an attack on an emergency worker is an attack on an emergency worker is an attack on us on an emergency worker is an attack on us all and when we are all attacked we all stand firm together. you can hear that full interview later in the programme. former us presidents, barack obama and george w bush have voiced concerns about the state of american politics in comments seen as a criticism of donald trump's leadership. mr obama urged americans to reject the politics of division and fear, while mr bush, hit out at bullying and prejudice in public life. both men who led the us
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for full eight—year terms were speaking separately. neither mentioned president trump by name. and so the question now, at a time when our politics just seems so divided and so angry and so nasty, is whether... whether we can recapture that spirit, whether we support and embrace somebody who wants to bring people together. the american dream of upward mobility seems out of reach for some who feel left behind. in a changing economy, discontent deepened and sharpened partisan conflicts. bigotry seems emboldened. our politics seems more vulnerable to conspiracy theories and outright fabrication. it has emerged that three of the uk's biggest mobile phone providers are continuing to charge customers for handsets which they have already paid for. citizens advice say customers of vodafone, ee and three are still paying for their phones, after their initial contract has expired. the operators said that
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their billing is fair. unions have warned that the cost of childcare in england is rising much faster than wages. the tuc says in the eight years to 2016, the average pay of parents with a one year old rose by 12% while childcare costs increased by four times that. the government says it has doubled free childcare available for three and four—year—olds. pollution has been linked to the deaths of more than 50,000 people in the uk in 2015, according to a major study. the findings, which are published in the medicaljournal the lancet, looked at the effect of man—made chemicals on people with conditions such as heart disease and stroke. the government says it has a £3 billion plan to improve air quality. here's our health correspondent rob sissons. pollution is well recognised in countries like mexico and this latest study links air pollution to two—thirds of the nine million deaths from pollution around the world. contaminated water accounts
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for many of the others, while there are also hazards for people at work. during 2015 in the uk, 8% of deaths, that's 50,000, have been linked to pollution. it ranks as 55th in the world out of 188 countries investigated. we're behind the us and many other european countries, including germany, france and spain. the british lung foundation wants change. we need the government to act immediately. we want them to use the budget next month to end the tax incentives for diesel vehicles and in the long—term they need to commit to a new clean air act. the large number of diesel cars on our roads emitting poisonous particles is said to be a significant factor in the uk's pollution record and the authors of today's report say for too long pollution has been seen as an environmental issue rather than a big health problem. the director quentin tarrantino has spoken of his shame about continuing
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to work with harvey weinstein despite being aware of rumours about his behaviour. mr tara ntino collaborated with the producer on a number of movies including reservoir dogs and pulp fiction. harvey weinstein denies sexual assault and rape. one of the last known letters to have been written on the titanic is being put up for auction this weekend and is expected to fetch up to £80,000. written by an american businessman, on the day before the disaster in 1912, it's the only known letter on headed titanic paper to have fallen into the atlantic and survived. duncan kennedy reports. "wow, this boat is a giant in size and fitted up like a palatial hotel!" the words of 0skar holverson from a letter he never sent. dated 13th april 1912, it was written the day before the titanic disaster. mr holverson was travelling with his wife mary. they were first—class passengers onboard the luxury liner and had
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been enjoying their voyage. "so far we've had good weather. "if all goes well, we will arrive in new york wednesday am". but mr holverson never did. he died with the 1,500 others. his body and the letter were later recovered. quite simply what we're talking about is the ultimate letter from the titanic. andrew aldridge is a world expert on titanic artefacts and says the letter is unique because... it's the only letter written on titanic stationery to actually have gone into the water, so it's bearing those scars from that immersion in the cold north atlantic. but it's notjust the letter being sold at this auction. this suitcase belonged to millvina dean, the youngest survivor of the titanic tragedy and these keys belonged to sidney daniels, a first—class steward. these alone have a reserve price of between £50,000 and £60,000. the auction of all the titanic items takes place in wiltshire tomorrow. that's a summary of the latest bbc
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news — more at 9.30am. i'm pleased you got the memo about the top. it's my favourite clush. it is mine too. it's because we are pale. it is all good, chloe. let's get some sport now with jessica creighton. you got the memo too. you're in pale green. let's talk about everton. ugly scenes last night in that defeat in the european cup? yes, there was, chloe and growing pressure on the team and the players and the manager because of their poor league form, because they are bottom of their group in the europa
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league and the match they lost last night will be remembered for such ugly scenes. a mass brawl is the only way to describe it. ashley williams on the lyon keeper, this moment here, triggered the fighting between both sets of players, everton and lyon and it spilled over off the pitch and to the fans. a man involved as you can see holding a toddler. you would expect in situations like this for uefa to issue disciplinary action. we wait to see what they have to say and ronald koeman's face says it all. he is facing a crisis. they have one point from three games and face a daunting task of playing against arsenal next and speaking of arsenal, in the champions league, in the europa league, they continued their perfect start. they beat belgrade 1—0 and i just their perfect start. they beat belgrade 1—0 and ijust have to show you this goal. it was sublime. watch
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the build up play. such, short, snappy the build up play. such, short, snappy passes. it is the arsenal of old, isn't it? and then look at the goal. fantastic. a seated, bicycle kick, i don't know what you would call that. they are playing very well, indeed. three wins from three. they're top of group h and then they 90, they're top of group h and then they go, chloe, you would imagine with a great deal of confidence into the league. they face everton on saturday. a beautiful goal. that's what the fans want to see. and ronnie 0'sullivan's been grabbing attention again at snooker‘s english 0pen. iam i am usually talking about ronnie 0'sullivan. a spectator managed to evade security and interrupted his match just as he was about to seal victory. let's show you what happened. ronnie 0'sullivan assumed she was harmless and this was her big movement. he gave her the cue
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stick to pot the black and a big moment for her and she failed twice. after the match, 0'sullivan saw the funny side and said he thought that he'd saved her from funny side and said he thought that he'd saved herfrom getting funny side and said he thought that he'd saved her from getting a funny side and said he thought that he'd saved herfrom getting a rugby tackle from the security and chloe, iimagine tackle from the security and chloe, i imagine he's probably right about that! she was quite small in her frame and! that! she was quite small in her frame and i wouldn't want to be by frame and i wouldn't want to be rugby tackled by a security guard at that point either! jess, thank you very much. pressure is intensifying for theresa may to do more to break the deadlock in the brexit negotiations. last night she urged the other leaders to create a "dynamic" to move the talks forward and start talking about trade. today is the second and final day of the brussels summit and at 9:30, 27 eu leaders will hold a meeting to discuss how negotiations are going without the uk present. it's believed they will conclude that insufficient progress has been made on the first topics which are up for discussion. those include citizens' rights, the uk's financial obligation and the border in northern ireland.
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the second phase of trade discussions can't begin until these are agreed. we can speak to our correspondents in brussels and in germany. we can speak to adam fleming in brussels and damien mcguinness is in berlin. adam, let's start in brussels. take us of what we are expecting to hear, what's expected to happen, just take us through if you would. last night the leaders had a dinner at the end of day one and theresa may over coffee gave a presentation about her thinking on brexit and what she said was you need to get on to phase two as quickly as possible, talking about trade and the future relationship, but she also said that the final deal had to be one that could be sold to voters back home. then the leaders went home. had a bit of a nap and are back in in morning and so we nap and are back in in morning and so we will be getting reviews of theresa may's performance. the president of malta said it was the best performance theresa may has
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given and she was more candid than ever and then you hear from the president of lithuania who says rhetoric is one thing and it needs to be turned into proper commitments that the uk makes in the eu negotiations. theresa may will leave and we think she will do a news conference and speak to us in the media, while the 27 remaining lead letters have a meeting about brexit and we think they are going to sign up and we think they are going to sign up to and we think they are going to sign uptoa and we think they are going to sign up to a draft communique that's been circulating for the last few days which will say there has been not enough progress on the first phase of talks to move to phase two about trade and the future relationship. that's the bad cop bit, but the eu will say they will begin internal preptry work, in other words get ready for phase two to start perhaps at the next eu summit in december. we will be following that intently. let's cross to berlin and speak to damien. how close is theresa may to
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giving angela merkel what she wants before they can start talking trade? the view from germany is how little it's been talked about. from angela merkel‘s perspective, things haven't changed. the british view is that germany has suddenly got tough but the german view is that germany has remained consistent. what germany wa nts, remained consistent. what germany wants, really, is a free trade deal, but before you can even talk about that, there are other issues that need to be dealt with. angela merkel has said she is optimistic about coming up with a deal eventually, bubbly starting out in the december summit but not before then. there's no sign of germany budging. for germany it's a matter of keeping the eu together. there has been an idea in the past in britain that angela merkel would put pressure on brussels, in order to give britain a
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good deal. that's not the case from germany's perspective. for german business, which does want to sell a lot to britain, the key is keeping the eu together and the single market intact. what we are going to see over the next two days is angela merkel trying to bring the eu together, to try and hammer out a common line. angela merkel has already said that is going to be more difficult than the unity they've found so far within the eu. but that is going to be berlin's priority. it's not going to be bowing down to what mrs may once but the aim is more about sticking to what germany sees as key, existential principles that are going to keep the eu together. thank you. let's speak now to terry reintke, who is the youngest female mep from germany — she represents the german european free alliance party.
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and kaja kallas, an mep from estonia and a member of the reform party. kaya kallas has called the urgency in reaching a settlement. let's see if our guests would agree with that. are you hearing, kaja, the kind of language you would want to hear from theresa may at the moment? it's reassuring that she sent this open letter to the european citizens living in the uk saying that their rights will be guaranteed. but as it was said, one thing is rhetoric and the other thing is to make sure that all the legal terms are in place to guarantee the citizens rights. that's top of the agenda, i think. do you feel that letter could have
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come sooner? i've spoken to so many people since the referendum injune last year saying many people want clarification on where they stand as someone clarification on where they stand as someone from the eu living in britain right now. absolutely. it could have come sooner because it's already over a year since the brexit vote. people don't have clarity what is going to happen to them and what kind of rights they have. better now than never, so i think that's also good, to make it clear that there will not be too much bureaucracy relating to the citizens already settled in the uk. but of course, how little works in practice is another question. terry, you are nodding, what are your thoughts on this? i think it should have come earlier. it's about time to get
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serious about negotiations. what we have seen in the past weeks and months has been deeply worrying. very often you could get the idea that 27 member states, the european parliament on the one side and the commission have a plan. 0n the other side, the tory party alone is having many different positions. i think it's about time to get serious and move forward with these negotiations. theresa may would say she is being serious, she's given this £20 billion commitment which she made in her florence speech. is that enough? i think that the calculations that have been made go beyond the 20 billion pains that theresa may has offered. she's also said she is going to honour commitments the uk has made in the past —— £20 billion. citizens rights should already have been clarified by now. we all agree we want to have
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clarity and security for eu citizens in the uk and the rest of the european union. i think we should have already come to an agreement here. with regards to the border, to be honest i still don't know what exactly the british government once. i think we need a detailed plan to clarify that. the impression is it's not the border that is the sticking point, it's about citizens rights and it's also about the divorce settle m e nt and it's also about the divorce settlement bill. kaja, there were hints yesterday from david davis, talking about the eu nationals who live in the uk, hinting that maybe there would be a period of time after which britain has left the european union when family members could potentially come to britain andjoin could potentially come to britain and join their families. is that the kind of thing you think could sway the leaders in brussels right now to move towards trade negotiations? that's what people want here in britain. definitely the family
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reunion issue is an issue, but not the future. now, even. the citizens already living in the uk have the right to be together with their families, and what happens to the social benefits that they have earned from other member states, and after they leave as well. i think that's as terry said, it has to be very clear regarding the citizens rights what will happen, and before that i think everybody here in the european union agrees we can't move to the second phase, which is in the interest of the uk to talk about the future and the trade, as long as we don't have the settlement here how the citizens rights are organised and guaranteed, we can't move to the second phase. terry, what do you
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think about the hinting from the brexit secretary david davis? with that satisfy you and the german people about those rights for eu citizens? i think another crucial question we will have to debate is the role of the european court of justice. who is going to safeguard those rights granted to eu citizens in britain? this will be crucial because for us it is important that the european court ofjustice will still played a major role. i think a statement likely take into account the rulings of the ecj is not enough to bring clarity, because what many people in brussels and the european union are afraid of is that there will be a limbo of what law will actually apply. i think we need to clarify that before we move ahead with the questions. could you both in turn explain for our viewers here in the uk what you feel your
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government's position is, what they need to hear from theresa may for them to say yes, we've heard enough, we'll move on trade talks? well, our government definitely wants to see the clear process and procedure, and the clear process and procedure, and the clear process and procedure, and the clear rights that citizens will have. as terry pointed out, what is the role of the european court of justice, but also how is the deportation rules, for example if those citizens are somebody sent out of the uk, how will that be organised? of the uk, how will that be organised ? there are of the uk, how will that be organised? there are so many questions about how these principles will be translated into legal terms. how be worked out. i guess in the words it's all good that we have less bureaucracy, but in practice
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it's a question of how it will be done. terry, in simple terms what is it that the german people and angela merkel want to hear from theresa may before they say yes, we'll talk trade? a clear position on citizens rights, guaranteed for people, a financial settlement that both sides can agree with. can you give us a number? people at home will be saying theresa may has offered 20 billion. what are we talking about? this is what has been calculated... say that number again? 62 billion. that is the number that has been calculate it. i hope there will be financial commitments in the future. i hope that the uk will stay part of the irascible as programme. i think it is something in the mutual interest to do. —— stay part of the
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erasmus programme. this is not something that the eu has come up withjust now, it was something that was clear from the start, that you have to honour certain commitments. i think the last point is still the border question. there needs to be a clear plan on how we deal with this, how we deal with goods and people who want to cross that border, while at the same time safeguarding the good friday agreement. let me say one thing, i think also the climate of how these negotiations will be doneis of how these negotiations will be done is important. i think there needs to be a sense of, angela merkel called it today, we all need to be on the right mind. i think thatis to be on the right mind. i think that is important. we need clarity, honesty, and we need to have a sincere commitment from both sides that we want to move ahead if we wa nt that we want to move ahead if we want to talk about future relation. kaja, i want to pick up on something
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you said about how britain desperately wants to sort out a trade deal. the eu wants to sort out a trade deal as well. there is pressure within the conservative party in the uk theresa may to walk away. certain sections saying if you don't get what you want today, we'll ta ke don't get what you want today, we'll take no deal. is that good option for you? definitely not. i think on all the issues that are on the table, there are two sides. of course the european union still wa nts course the european union still wants good relations with the uk as well as the uk i hope once good relations with the eu. it's mutual interest. for us, iguess relations with the eu. it's mutual interest. for us, i guess that the european union and the single market where king is a very important, and also the uk is a part of the economy whereas our companies deal with different uk companies and do trade. of course it is very, very important
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that it works out well. but it can't be one—sided, meaning that one side has all the rights and the other side has all the obligations. if we wa nt to side has all the obligations. if we want to have access, or the uk has access to the single market, we have to be very clear what are the rules. you can't only take the best sides. thank you both for speaking to us. still to come: carolyn rossjones was born prematurely in 1973 — her mother was told she wouldn't survive and left the hospital. she did survive and was adopted — we'll be hearing her story. and — the amount of money police forces get from people attending speed awareness has risen by almost a third. time for the latest news, here's annita. the headlines now on bbc news. european leaders are discussing theresa may's request for the brexit talks to move on to discussions about trade relations after the uk leaves.
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they are currently holding a working breakfast meeting in brussels and following that meeting the prime minister will leave and speak to the media while the remaining leaders discuss their position on the talks. increased prison sentences should be handed to people who attack emergency workers, that's one of a series of tougher new punishments being discussed by mps. figures show there are nearly 200 assaults on nhs workers every day in england, while home office statistics suggest a police officer is attacked every 22 minutes. labour's chris bryant, who has brought forward the proposal, wants it to count as aggravated assault if an emergency worker is attacked on duty, doubling the possible jail term to a year. pollution has been linked to the deaths of more than 50,000 people in the uk in 2015 according to a new study. the report looked at deaths from illnesses including heart
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disease and stroke and linked it to all forms of pollution such as traffic fumes and industrial chemicals. it ranks the uk 55th out of 188 countries. the government says it has a £3 billion plan to improve air quality. former us presidents, barack obama and george w bush have voiced concerns about the state of american politics in comments seen as a criticism of donald trump's leadership. mr obama urged americans to reject the politics of division and fear, while mr bush, hit out at bullying and prejudice in public life. both men, who led the us for full eight—year terms, were speaking separately. neither mentioned president trump by name. it has emerged that three of the uk's biggest mobile phone providers are continuing to charge customers for handsets which they have already paid for. citizens advice say customers of vodafone, ee and three are still paying for their phones, after their initial contract has expired. the operators said that their billing is fair. the director quentin tarrantino has spoken of his shame about continuing
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to work with harvey weinstein despite being aware of rumours about his behaviour. mr tara ntino collaborated with the producer on a number of movies including reservoir dogs and pulp fiction. harvey weinstein denies sexual assault and rape. one of the last known letters to have been written on the titanic is being put up for auction this weekend. written the day before the disaster in 1912, it's the only letter on headed titanic note paper known to have fallen into the atlantic, and survived. the letter—writer, an american businessman, talks of how he was looking forward to arriving back in new york. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you. here's some sport now withjess. good morning. everton await to hear if they'll face disciplinary action after these ugly scenes in their europa league match against lyon last night. fighting broke out between both sets
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of players with some of the fans also getting involved. everton lost 2—1. better news for arsenal though who have continued their perfect start to the competition. they beat belgrade 1—0 after a sublime goal from oliver giroud. they top group h because of that. pressure continues to mount on senior figures at the fa, over the way they handled discrimination claims, against england women's manager, mark sampson. now, the fa is to investigate the england women's goalkeeping coach, lee kendall. it's after alleged "unacceptable behaviour towards eni alu ko". nigeria—born aluko accused him of speaking to her in a fake caribbean accent. for the moment, it looks as if the jobs of those at the top of the fa are safe, despite calls from ex—players for immediate change. lewis hamilton says he has no plans to ta ke
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lewis hamilton says he has no plans to take a knee before the united states grand prix, but hamilton did think about the movement and he said that it was awesome. carolyn yvonne rossjones was born three months premature at st mary's hospital in 1973. weighing only 1lb 12oz. her mother was told she wouldn't survive and she walked out of hospital, never to be seen again. but miraculously, carolyn did survive. neither the hospital nor social services could trace her mother from the details she left so carolyn was adopted. eventually she moved to america with her family but she was full of questions about who her biological pa rents were. well, earlier this year she made a video appealing for information and it went viral. she's now in touch with her biologicalfamily in the uk and has made a discovery about her birth mother. you were born in paddington in 1937
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andi you were born in paddington in 1937 and i know your mother was told you we re and i know your mother was told you were so premp of premature, you were born at less than 2lbs, weren't you and your mother was told that you wouldn't survive? yes. yes, that's what the doctors had told her. and so what do you know about what happened after your birth? all i know is after the doctors talked to her and said you know, your child is not going to survive, she left the hospital and that's the last that anybody had heard of her. and you through trying to find her have worked out that maybe she didn't wa nt to worked out that maybe she didn't want to be found? yes. that's the, that's what happened. so, the name that's what happened. so, the name that she put on my birth certificate was pat ross and as it turns out, her name was not pat ross, her name was grace meres. so at what point did you start trying to search for
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your mum. i know you were adopted and moved to america with your adopted family, so an added challenge to try and trace your family in the uk? you know, it started about 1k years ago when i met my husband and i had an interest, but i didn't really know where to go. so i started googling her name and when i signed up for facebook, eight years ago, i started searching her name. 0nce facebook, eight years ago, i started searching her name. once in a while i would check keeping and keep googling and nothing game out of it. i had done a bunch of research on my own, you know, writing to different talk show hosts and private investigators and finally, last mother's day, i saw a video on facebook about a young man that was talking about his biological mother soi talking about his biological mother so i decided i was going to go ahead
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and make the video and itjust kind of took off from there. and this was a video that was shot by your 14—year—old and you put it on facebook and it went viral? 14—year—old and you put it on facebook and it went viral7m 14—year—old and you put it on facebook and it went viral? it did. it did. it got 1.6 million views, 50,000 shares and i had over 2,000 comments on it. so is this when you started getting answers about your biological mother? actually, what happened was a lot of people had told me there is this group on facebook called european aussie angels and they connect you with lost fa m ily angels and they connect you with lost family members. so i logged on and talked to a couple of people on there and they said had you done any dna and! there and they said had you done any dna and i said i had done dna through ancestry and they said log on and see if you have any hits and i hadn't logged on in about three yea rs. i hadn't logged on in about three years. so after logging on, i saw that i had a first cousin and i
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contacted the person that you know said was my first cousin and it turned out that she was a cousin in canada and through that cousin in can darks she did dna as well and we found out that she was my fourth cousin, but through her, i got hooked up with some family in the uk which as it turns out is my uncle which as it turns out is my uncle which turns out i have four uncles, and a grandmother in the united kingdom, in newcastle, and through them i found my kingdom, in newcastle, and through them ifound my mum, grace meres who after doing some research with the search angels found out that she had actually passed away in 2003. what did that do to you, to get so close to find out about your family and find out who your mother was only to
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then discover she was no longer here? it was really devastating. it still is. i have my good days and i have my bad days. my biggest regret is that she passed away at age 47 which is really quite young. not knowing that i survived. and that's like the really hard part for me. i never will be able to talk to her or you know, go over and meet her or anything and that's, that's really hard. so, right now i'm working on finding out where she was buried. we don't know where she was buried so that's what i'm working on right now. and i'm working on she was married and divorced. i'm looking for her ex—husband and i'm looking for her ex—husband and i'm looking for anybody that may know her. this is my goal right now. i would like
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to go over and pay my respects and say a final goodbye to her. do you know anything about your dad? there is nothing on my birth certificate. now, my uncle in the uk has actually said sent me his dna, so once we get his dna back then we can start wokking on the paternal side of it. these people on facebook are amazing. they can do dna. so, that's another step that we're going to be working on. do you feel angry with the hospital for telling your very young mum that although you were born, as i say, less than 2lbs in weight, they said, "your daughter is not going to survive." and your mum walked away. are you angry that they said that to your mum, even though you did survive? i was thinking about that yesterday. you know what, iam angry. about that yesterday. you know what, i am angry. why would you tell
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somebody your child is not going to survive without even giving them a, me, a chance. 0bviously survive without even giving them a, me, a chance. obviously i survive, i thrive. yes, iam me, a chance. obviously i survive, i thrive. yes, i am angry. what would make somebody say to 16—year—old or 17—year—old child? make somebody say to 16—year—old or 17—year—old child ? it's make somebody say to 16—year—old or 17—year—old child? it's beyond me. what effect has all of this had on your life? do you think it's made awe different person? shaped new a different way? you know, it's made me bea different way? you know, it's made me be a better mum. knowing what she grace went through. i have a lot of sympathy. i cannot imagine what she went through. i really can't. it must have been heartbreaking and i do think about that. and looking forward , do think about that. and looking forward, your goal now is to come to the uk to meet some of your
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biologicalfamily for the uk to meet some of your biological family for the first time? yes. yes. that is my - meet my u ncles time? yes. yes. that is my - meet my uncles and my grandmother. i actually talked to my uncle via e—mailandi actually talked to my uncle via e—mail and i talked to his wife, via facebook and my cousins in canada as well and i have to tell you that i have received so much welcoming and so much love from these people, it is absolutely amazing. it is lovely to speak to you and best of luck with your search. thank you for staying up late to talk to us. thank you. it is a pleasure. take care bye— bye. you. it is a pleasure. take care bye-bye. thanks, bye. coming up: it's the second and final day of the eu summit, we'll hear the latest on theresa may's brexit negotiation progress. they're designed for police to divert low—end speeding motorists to be re—educated on the road. but the amount forces get from drivers attending speed awareness courses has jumped by almost a third.
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the new figures show the contribution a constabulary gets for each person it sends on a course leapt from £35 to £115 last month. the money is meant to be a fee to reimburse police forces for the expense involved in catching speeding motorists, but there's some substantial difference between different areas around the country. motoring research charity the rac foundation say many people attending speed might not realise there's a "postcode lottery in terms of the costs involved". let's talk now to solicitor neil davies. he defends motoring prosecutions and would like to see greater consistency and uniformity so all motorists are treated "equally". jeanette miller is president of the association of motor 0ffence lawyers and thinks awareness courses are much more effective than fines or points on licences. tim shallcross is a driver training consultant who develops awareness courses for motorists. thank you all for speaking to us.
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jeanette, first of all, do we know why there is a jump in this amount that police forces pr getting from £35 to £45 that police forces pr getting from £35 to £115 per course last month? that police forces pr getting from £35 to £45 per course last month? we don't know the reason for the increase but i think the difference in price for the course is probably more related to the overheads the course actually entails. it is not a fine. this is a service that's provided to the motorist in training and there have to be, the trainer has to be paid, the accommodation where the training takes place has to be paid for so i think that can be partially the explanation for differences, but there isn't really an explanation for the increase in the contribution to the police. neil, do you agree that it's not actually a fine. this is just about covering costs? it's not a fine because we know that because it's an alternative to a fine or a formal prosecution. is it effectively a fine? in many ways, no, it is something that's covering the cost,
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but the real issue people have is that when we look at normal laws across the country, so for instance, if you were to steal something from a shop, or committed an offence, you know what the penalty is throughout the country. in the context of speed awareness courses, however, there is disparity in the different costs across the country we are paying, there is too much of a differential. the law should apply equally. there isa the law should apply equally. there is a strong argument to say the training courses should be the same. are we talking huge amounts? we are looking at disparity between for one course it might be £75, for another course it might be £75, for another course it might be £75, for another course it might be £110. there is a dimpblets many motorists would say we should be treated equally. we are committing the same phoneses and we are all attendingted course, for the same purpose and why aren't we paying the same amount of money.
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tim, would you agree it is unfair? no, it is like complaining that driving lessons are more expensive in london than they are in liverpool or somewhere. the other thing to understand is that, anybody can attend any of these driving courses anywhere they like and i found a website this morning via one of the comparison websites where you can go on and you can check the price of each of the courses in every single area. the cheapest i found was £79 in merseyside. the most expensive was £100 in essex. now, you know, evenif was £100 in essex. now, you know, even if you are in essex and don't fa ncy even if you are in essex and don't fancy that, well in cambridge, not fancy that, well in cambridge, not fa far to the north, it is £90, in bedfordshire, it is £90, do shop around, you can attend any course, anywhere within the six months prescribed period. by by the time you've organised your train and petrol it's going to be
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horses for courses. it's a reflection of the fact it's more expensive to hire hotel rooms in the south—east than in the north—east. do you think speed awareness courses work as a deterrent, or is it more about moneymaking ?|j work as a deterrent, or is it more about moneymaking? i think a lot of motorists will say it's about making money. but when you attend one, and i have to admit i have attended one many years ago, i think it can be surprising that you do learn something. particularly if you passed your driving test many years ago. it's a good way to be refreshed on the rules of the road. i think the punishment element is that it ta kes the punishment element is that it takes four hours. four hours having to learn about the highway code and other rules is probably a bit boring and can be a bit difficult to have to contend with. i think they are a good option, and you don't have to good option, and you don't have to go on one. if you'd rather take the points and pay a fine then you can do. i think it's a much better
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solution, it involves education and i think it acts as a wake—up call to some motorists, who perhaps have become a bit complacent. the truth is that this disparity goes beyond simply the cost of the speed awareness courses. the speed awareness courses. the speed awareness caused kmart has an educational alternative to prosecution. in similar terms there are other causes for other offences such as careless driving. there are courses for motorcyclists. what we also see there is that different police forces offer different courses. wiltshire offers one alternative cause, where as if you look at the met police, there are six or seven look at the met police, there are six or seven courses look at the met police, there are six or seven courses available. we're notjust looking six or seven courses available. we're not just looking at a disparity in terms of cost but in terms of the options available to motorists, depending on where the offe nce motorists, depending on where the offence is committed. what we would
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say is there should be some uniformity. we have it everywhere else, so why don't we have it for motoring offences? is that a fair point? it is a matter of police discretion, this famous discretion as to whether to prosecute or not. different forces decide different things and operate in different ways. it would be nice to see national consistency but they all have their own policies. that's the benefit and the drawback of having separate police forces accountable to the local people. let's talk about smart motorways. do you feel that so—called smart motorways mean that so—called smart motorways mean that more people are caught speeding? just ascribe to smart motorways. they've been introduced in an effort, some people might say, to avoid the cost of road widening and other features of the motorway,
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being that there are temporary speed limits that can be introduced in a relatively low—cost way. the cost of the smart motorway in the first place is substantial in most places. i think because of the work involved in introducing a smart motorway, a lot of motorists are fed up with them and ultimately see the purpose being about creating a cash cow for detecting speeding. they aren't overly popular and are considered to bea overly popular and are considered to be a short cut alternative ways of improving various motorways, widening them for example. do you think they are unpopular?“ widening them for example. do you think they are unpopular? if you speak to the highways agency about improving the flow of traffic, it's a good rationale. the problem i have with smart motorways is the way that they use speed detection equipment
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in orderto they use speed detection equipment in order to enforce variable speed limits. the first issue is that when these were introduced the public wasn't well educated about what they were. you had a lot of people committing offences without realising what they were doing. you may say they should have been obeying the sign anyway. the really obvious signs. yes. but equally and ina rather obvious signs. yes. but equally and in a rather sneaky way, these have also started being used to detect speeding offences when the variable speeding offences when the variable speed limits aren't showing. i've seen numerous examples speed limits aren't showing. i've seen numerous examples particularly around the m25, where they are using these devices to detect speeding offe nces these devices to detect speeding offences when there is no variable speed limit showing, just when it's the usual 70. to put it bluntly, thatis the usual 70. to put it bluntly, that is sneaky. many people will agree with that. thank you for joining us this morning. i want to tell you this which has just come in. the bbc has announced that bruno
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is not going to be on strictly come dancing this weekend. apparently he has got a busy work schedule. a spokesperson said his absence was a lwa ys spokesperson said his absence was always the plan. bruno tonioli will be back for the halloween special but went beyond the panel this saturday for strictly. —— will not be on the panel this saturday. pea. for many people, getting public transport is an essential part of life. but, especially for women, buses, trains and cabs can also be dangerous. there were 450 reports of sexual offences on london's tubes and buses betweenjune and april this year and it is thought as many as only 90% of offences get reported. it's maybe unsurprising then that only around a quarter of people think it is safe for women to get the tube at night. so what exactly constitutes sexual harassment. all you want to do is shut down, but you have to somehow keep going,
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or something bad may happen. harassment in public spaces is something that most women and girls either have experienced or will experience. but what do we mean by harassment? well, here are a few examples — whistling, honking, vulgar gestures, sexually explicit comments, following, sexual touching, public masturbation and sexual assault. and, actually, wherever in the world you look, the numbers are kind of high. a survey in the uk found that four in ten women felt at risk of harassment on city streets. and, in delhi, another survey suggested that nearly nine in ten women have experienced harassment. and, often, a harassment hotspot is public transport. a recent survey in mexico city found that 90% of women asked felt unsafe on buses and on the subway.
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but really what's more concerning is what goes unreported. 0n the new york subway, it's estimated that 96% of harassment and 86% of sexual assault goes entirely unreported. so perhaps it's time to talk about harassment and reclaim our streets. sian lewis is a sociology expert who researches sexual harassment. she decided not to report her own experience and now explains why. decided not to report her own experience and now explains whylj spent the last two years researching sexual harassment on public transport. two months ago when it happened to me, i didn't report it.
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i was on happened to me, i didn't report it. iwas ona happened to me, i didn't report it. i was on a bus heading to meet a friend, and i saw a man i was on a bus heading to meet a friend, and i sawa man a i was on a bus heading to meet a friend, and i saw a man a few seats behind me. i didn't think anything of it. a few moments later i realised he had moved behind me, then he moved across from me. i could see that he was rubbing himself, and then i realised he was masturbating on a public bus. i knew i should take a picture of him and record the bus number, but i froze. ididn't do record the bus number, but i froze. i didn't do anything. why didn't i report it? simply because i was in a rush and i was going to meet a friend, and i didn't want this five minutes to take over my whole day. i'd interviewed over 30 women and their reasons for not reporting range from not having time, not thinking it was a big deal, not thinking it was a big deal, not thinking the police would take it
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seriously, to not thinking the responsibility of reporting is on them. i caught him trying to take a photo of my dress. i thought maybe ifi photo of my dress. i thought maybe if i reported the police would be able to stop him doing it to someone else. if it happens to you and you feel like you can report it, that's amazing. whether you choose to report or not, amazing. whether you choose to report c do)t, amazing. whether you choose to report c do is continue the thing to do is continue the conversation, because it can happen to anyone. we were talking earlier about those brexit talks in brussels. the leaders of 27 eu
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countries having a meeting. theresa may is there. let's speak to adam fleming our correspondent in brussels. we know to reason may had a working breakfast, we are expecting a press conference soon from her. all 28 leaders of the eu had a working breakfast talking about what they are going to do for the next 18 months. then theresa may is going to give a press conference in about 30 minutes. i've learned one thing in brussels which is never believe any timings anyone tells you. we might be waiting a bit longer than that. then the leaders of the remaining 27 countries will sit down and talk about brexit. they'll be looking at that draft document floating around for the last few days which says there hasn't been sufficient progress on the first phase to move to phase two about trade, the future relationship and any transition or implementation phase. we will give the green light to start preparing for the next phase of talks, if not actually
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giving the green light for the next phase to start. here is my guide for what to listen out for. clues about how the uk position might change in the next two months on issues like citizens rights, the rights of eu nationals living in britain after brexit, and also on the so—called brexit, and also on the so—called brexit bill, the uk's financial obligations. lots of spec elation about what theresa may will hint at in terms of the british negotiating position. in the next few months its changes in the british negotiating position that will lead to the decision about whether enough progress has been made. i know it's very progress has been made. i know it's very vague progress has been made. i know it's very vague but we'll get a better idea when the prime minister goes to the podium and tells us how things are going. thank you. theresa may will be speaking in around half an hour. let's get the latest weather update. it's looking pretty stormy for the
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weekend. we are finishing the week with an autumnal storm. storm brian is moving in from the west. it's a fairly quiet day today with a window of dry weather. here's the scene in guernsey taken by one of our weather watchers. as we had through the next 24 hours, the winds will pick up with the arrival of storm brian. an autumnal storm bringing gale force winds and heavy rain. at the moment the storm is out in the atlantic but it's approaching our shores. it's been strengthening recently but will start to weaken as it moves in towards northern ireland and parts of wales. now, not a bad day. we've still got quite a lot of cloud around, fairly breezy with a few spots of light rain for central and eastern areas. for many of us it will be a return to sunny spells, particularly for scotland and down towards north wales. during the afternoon that is where the next
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area of wet and windy weather moves in from the west. ahead of that, 13-16 in from the west. ahead of that, 13—16 degrees. into the evening, the wind picking up across northern ireland, wales, south—west england, with this band of rain moving from west to east across all parts of the country into the early hours of saturday morning. behind the main rain band, the wind is picking up further with this low pressure moving in. the wind will be strongest across coastal parts of wales, down towards southern and sell england —— southern and south—eastern england. enough wind to cause some disruption with the spring tides, that could cause some coastal overtopping. during the day those strong winds slowly transferred their way east, strongest across southern parts of england and wales. plenty of heavy downpours of rain too with scattered
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heavy showers in the west. bringing some thunderstorms and surface water for parts of north—west england, into south—west scotland. feeling chilly with the strength of the wind. the strongest winds slowly easing away overnight, as storm brian slowly clears away towards the east. for sunday a quieter day. still a mix of sunny spells and scattered blustery showers, especially towards the north and west. fairly chilly, but look out for saturday's weather. could see storm brian bringing some disruption. hello. it's 10am. i'm chloe tilley. it's the second and final day of the eu brexit summit. theresa may is urging eu leaders to create a "dynamic" in the brexit talks and start talking about trade. but just how much progress is being made? lots of people are worried about no deal in the uk. what's your message to people who are worried about
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that? it's not my work establishing that. the prime minister will be speaking shortly and we'll bring that to you live. getting on public transport is an essential part of every day life. for women, it can be dangerous. there were 450 reports of sexual offences on london's public transport betweenjune and april this year, but up to 90% of incidents don't get reported. 0ut out of the corner of my eye i could see that he was rubbing himself. i knew what i should do. i knew i should take a picture of him and i should take a picture of him and i should record the bus number that i was on, but i froze. i didn't do anything. we'll speak to di bret walker from the british transport police about why so many incidents go unreported. hollywood director quentin tarantino admits he knew of harvey weinstein's beahviour towards women before the scandal broke. police in los angeles say they're investigating another claim of sexual assault involving the film producer. we will be getting latest on the
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allegations from a hollywood reporter as yet another high—profile actor comes forward. good morning. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the headlines now on bbc news. european leaders are discussing theresa may's request for the brexit talks to move on to discussions about trade relations after the uk leaves. the leaders have held a working breakfast meeting in brussels. the prime minister will then leave and speak to the media, while the remaining leaders discuss their position on what happens when britain leaving the eu. increased prison sentences should be handed to people who attack emergency workers, that's one of a series of tougher new punishments being discussed by mps. figures show there are nearly 200 assaults on nhs workers every day in england, while home office statistics suggest a police officer is attacked every 22 minutes. labour's chris bryant, who has brought forward the proposal, wants it to count as aggravated assault if an emergency worker is attacked on duty, doubling the possible jail term to a year.
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and we'll be talking to three emergency workers who were assaulted at work in the next couple of minutes. pollution has been linked to the deaths of more than 50 thousand people in the uk in 2015, according to a new study. the report, published in the lancet medicaljournal, looked at deaths from illnesses including heart disease and stroke, linked to all forms of pollution, such as traffic fumes and industrial chemicals. it ranks the uk 55th out of 188 countries. the government says it has a £3 billion plan to improve air quality. there was some good news for the chancellor ahead of next month's budget as the latest public finance figures show smaller than expected deficit in september. the government saw its borrowing levels fall by £700 million last month and the office for national statistics said public sector net borrowing, excluding state—owned banks, came in at £59 billion in september. economists had been expecting a higher figure. former us presidents,
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barack obama and george w. bush have voiced concerns about the state of american politics in comments seen as a criticism of donald trump's leadership. mr obama urged americans to reject the politics of division and fear, while mr bush, hit out at bullying and prejudice in public life. both men who led the us for full eight—year terms were speaking separately. neither mentioned president trump by name. and so the question now, at a time when our politics just seems so divided and so angry and so nasty, is whether... whether we can recapture that spirit, whether we support and embrace somebody who wants to bring people together. the american dream of upward mobility seems out of reach for some who feel left behind. in a changing economy,
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discontent deepened and sharpened partisan conflicts. bigotry seems emboldened. 0ur politics seems more vulnerable to conspiracy theories and outright fabrication. it's emerged that three of the uk's biggest mobile phone providers are continuing to charge customers for handsets which they have already paid for. citizens advice say customers of vodafone, ee and three are still paying for their phones, after their initial contract has expired. the operators said that their billing is fair. unions have warned that the cost of childcare in england is rising much faster than wages. the tuc says in the eight years to 2016, the average pay of parents with a one year old rose by 12% while childcare costs increased by four times that. the government says it has doubled free childcare available for three and four—year—olds. the director quentin tarrantino has spoken of his shame about continuing
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to work with harvey weinstein despite being aware of rumours about his behaviour. mr tara ntino collaborated with the producer on a number of movies including reservoir dogs and pulp fiction. harvey weinstein denies sexual assault and rape. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. we are keeping an eye out for the british prime minister, she is, of course, in brussels. she will be holding a news conference we believe in the next half an hour. of course, we will bring that to you live. lots of you getting in touch with the conversation they were having before the news on speed awareness courses and whether the news on speed awareness courses and whether they actually work. they have gone up in price a lot and some people wondering whether there is
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profiteering going on. a viewer says, "a waste of time. i have been driving for 60 years and exceeded the speed limit by four miles. spotless driving licence before that." mike sale says, "drivers who attend speed awareness courses are safe drivers. the lack of previous convictions for unsafe driving. surely the more serious and persistent offenders should be made attend the courses at an increased cost. the minor offender should just be cautioned." your comments are welcome. here's some sport now withjess. merseyside police said this morning that officers are investigating following a disturbance on the pitch in the manchester between everton and lyon last night. we can show you what happened. fighting broke out after this, ashley williams barging into the lyon goalkeeper. scuffles involving both sets of players and
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fa ns involving both sets of players and fans are drawn into the chaos, including a man who is soon to be getting involved whilst holding a child. uefa is yet to comment. no one was sent off and williams went one was sent off and williams went on to equalise, but lyon grabbed a winner. everton are bottom of their group and the pressure is mounting on the manager, but one former scotla nd on the manager, but one former scotland star thinks he should stay. he spent big money and for the evertonians the expectation goes through the roof. he needs more time. he has proven that he can work in the premier league and the job time. he has proven that he can work in the premier league and thejob he did at southampton, he is an experienced man. give him time. arsenal had a much better time of it. they continued their perfect start to the competition and are looking good for a place in the knockout stages. they beat red star belgrade 1—0 thanks to this acrobatic finish from 0livier giroud. manager arsene wenger seemed happy enough with the performance. we played against a good red star
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team. they were always dangerous on counterattack. petr cech made good saves and again we got a win that gives credit to the mentality of the team. pressure continues to mount on senior figures at the fa over the way they handled discrimination claims against england women's manager, mark sampson. now, the fa, is to investigate the england women's goalkeeping coach, lee kendall's alleged "unacceptable behaviour towards eni alu ko". nigeria—born aluko accused him of speaking to her in a fake caribbean accent. for the moment, it looks as if the jobs of those at the top of the fa are safe despite calls from ex—players for immediate change. now, the doctor who received a "mystery package" for sir bradley wiggins in 2011 has resigned from british cycling because of ill health. dr richard freeman is part of separate investigations by british cycling and uk
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anti—doping, but has been off work with stress—related illness. british cycling said it had not been able to finalise its investigation, but they've said it hopes to help ukad bring their enquiry to a "satisfactory conclusion". lewis hamilton says he has "no plans" to "take a knee" during the american national anthem before sunday's united states grand prix. hamilton did say he thought the movement, which protests against racial injustice in the us, was "awesome", but the world championship leader added his priority, was to win sunday's race and a fourth world title. the protests were started by nfl player colin kaepernick, who sat during the national anthem in august last year. now, there are nearly 200 assaults on nhs workers each day in england and home office statistics suggest a police officer is
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attacked every 22 minutes. but a bill from a labour mp being debated now in parliament would introduce tougher penalties for people who attack emergency workers. chris bryant wants it to count as aggravated assault if an emergency worker is attacked on duty which would double the possible sentence to 12 months. the bill would also make it mandatory for someone who's bitten or spat at a member of staff to have to give a saliva or blood sample so the hiv or hepatitis risk is known. at the moment consent is needed from the perpetrator. earlier i spoke to the labour mp chris bryant who is presenting the bill. the number of assaults has risen to more than 70,000, that's just on nhs workers last year. 70,000 attacks. and on top of that, 24,000 attacks in the last year on police officers. and all too often, people complain that they don't getjustice out of
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the criminaljustice system today when they are the victim of an assault. there maybe all sorts of different reasons why they don't get, there aren't proper prosecutions taken or long enough sentences, but what i want to do is i want to say that, an attack on an emergency worker is an attack on us all and when we are all attacked we all and when we are all attacked we all stand firm together. so what is the current law regarding an attack ona the current law regarding an attack on a public worker? what's the current sentencing guidelines for example? it is a mess is the truth. because there is an offence of common assault on any member of the public which is up to six months. that's all and it can only be tried ina that's all and it can only be tried in a magistrates' court. there is an offence of an assault on a police officer or a prison officer or an immigration officer. again only up to six months, only in the magistrates' court. but we already have in law, statutory aggravating factors, if it is racially or religiously motivated or related to
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someone's sexual orientation, i want to double the maximum sentence you can get for common assault on an emergency worker to up to 12 months and secondly, make sure that this is and secondly, make sure that this is a statutory aggravating factor which has to be read out in court and therefore, has to be considered when sentencing happens in relation to the more serious things like actual bodily harm and threats to kill and things like that. people watching this at home may well be completely flabbergasted that this isn't already the case, that aggravating assault when you are attacking a paramedics or a firefighter or a police officer, isn't already in pa rt police officer, isn't already in part of the law? look, it's an absolute mystery to me why kids two yea rs absolute mystery to me why kids two years ago, i saw in the rhondda, my constituency, throwing bricks at fire officers who were trying to put out a fire on the mountains. it's a mystery to me why you know there are
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large number of houses, 400 houses in south wales alone which are now flagged by the ambulance service as too dangerous to attend without police officers. all of this is a mystery to me, but that's why i think we in parliament, you know, just changing the law, won't stop all of these assaults, but i hope it will make a difference that and victims will get properjustice now. that's the labour mp chris bryant speaking to me earlier on. he's bringing forward the private members' bill. now we can speak to sara sleeman, an inspector from gloucestershire who was punched and knocked unconscious while on duty and is a member of the police federation. laura barrett, a paramedic who was punched and kicked to the ground while treating a patient and is a unison member, and maryann noronha, an a&e registrar who says she's been spat at twice this month alone. thank you for coming in. we were talking there as we were listening to chris bryant and you were saying
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you don't think there is a single emergency worker, is that what you said, who hasn't been attacked? emergency worker or nhs hospital worker, doctors, nurses, most of them at some point have been attacked whether it be verbally or physically in their career. what happened to you? what happened to you ?|j what happened to you? i was working a night shift in gloucester. i had gone to two males who are causing a bit of a problem. i then had a lady push me. i was walking away with the lady not realising she was connected to the two men. as i was walking away, iman came behind me, jumped in the air with his mobile phone in his fist and smashed me on the side of the head. he knocked me unconscious, left me lying in the floor on the road, bleeding. that's in your line of work? yes. what does that do to
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you? it makes you feel that you aren't safe doing yourjob, you aren't safe doing yourjob, you aren't protected. the result he got aren't protected. the result he got a nine—month suspended sentence, because he was doing a college course. because it's an attack on society as well. i'm representing members of the public, keeping people from chaim in the night—time economy, so people from chaim in the night—time economy, so it's an attack on every memberof the economy, so it's an attack on every member of the public —— keeping people from harm. what happened to you? we were transporting a female to hospital. while on the way i turned to speak to my colleague who was driving the ambulance, she took a seat belt off, jumped up, grabbed me by the hair, pulled me onto the floor and was continuously kicking and punching me. i had clumps of hair falling out and and punching me. i had clumps of hairfalling out and covered in bruises. did the driver managed to stop? the
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driver got into the back of the vehicle. she started making sexual allegations so he felt that he couldn't keep going. is this commonplace, when you speak to your collea g u es commonplace, when you speak to your colleagues who are paramedics? how often a re colleagues who are paramedics? how often are they faced with this kind often are they faced with this kind of abuse? daily we are being verbally abused, all of us. it's a lot higher than you think. we are being spat at, bitton, punched, just going about our daily duties. let's talk about being spat out. you've been spat at twice this month alone. yes, this was an unusual month but it happens. twice this month. once wasjust the person it happens. twice this month. once was just the person who was unhappy with the way the consultation had gone. this is in a&e? this is in a&e. spat at the nursing staff and
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me as he walked out. it is really disgusting. we would almost prefer a physical assault ban someone spitting, and having that is alive or new is really gross. and the risk of infection. this was the point chris bryant was making. at the moment if someone spec that you you need their consent to test hiv, etc. this private members bill would change that and it would be mandatory. as i understand that, if they didn't give the sample that would be considered in their sentencing. they would still have the opportunity to refuse but they would be penalised for refusing.“ you've been spat at as a doctor in a&e, are you constantly having to be tested for things to protect yourself? it's not regular, it happens. we are more subject to verbal abuse. luckily physical attacks our — —
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verbal abuse. luckily physical attacks our —— physical attacks are rare but they do happen. you would only test if it went into your eye, mouth or open wound. that would be the any situation where you would be concerned about infection. does this mean you're afraid to go to work? you never know what's going to happen. this was a routine cool for me, there were no bad vibes about the situation. i thought it was ok. it highlights the fact that somebody can change at any given moment, when you are least expecting it. sara, you've got teenage children. when you've got teenage children. when you were attacked and knocked unconscious, what does it do to them when you go off to work? it makes everyone feel unsafe. i go to work andl everyone feel unsafe. i go to work and i want my children to feel unsafe. i don't want to bring my worklife home with me. you come home with a head wound and you can't do
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anything, i had to have a month off work and i couldn't drive. it impacts on the children, and myjob shouldn't impact on my children. they are children and they should be allowed to think i'm safe. one of my junior doctors was punched at work, completely unexpectedly. this was a few years ago. she had to have some time off. i think in a profession where we are already struggling to recruit, people don't want to work in the emergency department as it is. when you add on people getting assaulted, people don't want to do that on a daily basis. why is it getting worse? drink and drugs play a big part. drugs are more readily available, quite cheap to get drugs on the street, and alcohol. it plays a massive part in situations. there
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isa a massive part in situations. there is a lack of respect as well from younger people, towards authority in general. it's more acceptable for them to assault us. when we look at this private members bill, will it make you safer at work? hopefully it will act as more of a deterrent. we go out, we get assaulted and abused and we almost feel like they are going to get away with it, nothing is going to happen, which generally is going to happen, which generally is the case. hopefully it will be more of a deterrent. and to know that the law is behind you in as strong a way as possible, i think thatis strong a way as possible, i think that is very reassuring to front—line workers. that is very reassuring to front-line workers. thank you so much for coming in and sharing your stories, and good luck. i hope you're safe in yourjobs. still to come, transport for london say that up to 90% of incidents of unwanted sexual advances on public transport don't get reported — we ask why that is. quentin tarantino has spoken out
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about his shame over continuing to work with harvey weinstein despite being aware of rumours about his behaviour. the film director who has made dozens of movies with the disgraced hollywood mogul told the new york times i knew enough to do more that i did, there was more to it than just the normal rumours, the normal gossip. it wasn't secondhand. i knew he did a couple of these things." it comes as los angeles police say they are investigating a possible sexual assault case against harvey weinstein, involving a victim who reported an incident that occurred in 2013. lupita nyong'o has written an opinion piece for the new york times, detailing several encounters with harvey weinstein in which the producer allegedly offered to help her career in exchange for sex. the 12 years a slave actor wrote
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that she "felt sick in the pit of her stomach" after allegations by more than 50 women became public and she realised her alleged treatment was part of a "sinister pattern of behaviour". harvey weinstein denies all allegations of non—consensual sex. jeanne wolf is an entertainment journalist based in hollywood. shejoins us now from la. bring us up to date with these allegations which the la police are investigating. the la police put out a notice saying if you have a charge against harvey weinstein, we would be anxious to prosecute or to find out. a woman calls them, alleges that he followed her to her hotel room, and raped her. the thing that
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makes this case even more extraordinary is that it is within the time of statute of limitations. the lapd police —— if the lapd police decide to go after him it would be more likely there could be legal proceedings. it's a long way between she alleges and they sort out the case and do something against him. what's interesting is that a lot of people are coming forward. partly because they are embarrassed, ashamed, confused why they didn't speak out before. quentin tarantino, who considers himself a bold activist kind of guy, now says that he didn't take the proper responsibility. the community is acting with revulsion and disbelief, but also with total embarrassment because a lot of people had to know about this, and a
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lot of people now know that what they say now, yes it will build a case against harvey weinstein, but it will not help all the women who might have avoided this.” it will not help all the women who might have avoided this. i know that you have been a hollywood journalist for many years, you've lived in la, you've mixed with these people. was itan you've mixed with these people. was it an open secret that people felt that these incidents had happened and harvey weinstein had targeted women, young women?|j and harvey weinstein had targeted women, young women? i think many, many people knew, and i think many people including me had no idea that he was a predator. he was a crude, rude, tough guy. he could also be charming. a brilliant pic of films, a brilliant discoverer of stars.
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like meryl streep said, people were accusing her. no, not everybody knew. people thought harvey was a nice guy. part of what's going on now is that producers and people all over hollywood feel angry at themselves for not checking further, for letting themselves be duped by him, for not speaking up. i think there is a shame, i think there is a pylon, get the guy now, but get him partly because you feel you didn't do your part —— there is a pile on. there was an interview with tom hanks yesterday and he said he felt this was a watershed moment. not only would there be no comeback for harvey weinstein, he also felt hollywood would have to change and move forward. do you agree with him? ido move forward. do you agree with him? i do think hollywood has to change, andi i do think hollywood has to change, and i share a lot of women saying if anything good comes out of this, people will change. i don't think change happens that quickly. i think
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it's part of our society, and not just the film industry. i think things will have to change. there area things will have to change. there are a lot of people who are frightened that they wrong deeds are going to be brought out. women saying yes, this happen to me, it's frightening to a lot of guys who have had the power and somehow the slimy ability to get away with this. yes, i think there's a lot of fear, i think there's a lot of open talk and proud talk now, but i think it ta kes a and proud talk now, but i think it takes a long time to change. you have to understand how badly people wa nt to have to understand how badly people want to be in movies. you also have to understand that especially for young women, this is so confusing. the attention of a famous producer is something you fill complimented by at the beginning. so many women, weather in this instance or other occupations, talk about the shame, the embarrassment, what part of this
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was i, the embarrassment, what part of this wasi,i the embarrassment, what part of this was i, i couldn't believe it could happen to me, and how they punished themselves almost by keeping the secret this long. they don't want to keep the secret any longer, but right now the secret coming out may not help people in the past, and may not help people in the past, and may not help people in the past, and may not help this guy get anyjustice. thank you very much for speaking to us. thank you very much for speaking to us. in the next few minutes we are expecting theresa may to speak in brussels. she will be doing a press conference. the podium is waiting for her. she's had a breakfast meeting with the 27 other leaders as pa rt meeting with the 27 other leaders as part of those brexit—lite negotiations. as soon as she begins speaking we will cross live to brussels. time for the latest news, here's annita. the headlines now on bbc news. european leaders are discussing theresa may's request for the brexit talks to move on to the issue of trade relations after the uk leaves. the leaders have held a working breakfast meeting in brussels. the prime minister will then leave and speak to the media, while the remaining leaders discuss their position on what
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happens when britain leaving the eu. increased prison sentences should be handed to people who attack emergency workers, that's one of a series of tougher new punishments being discussed by mps. figures show there are nearly 200 assaults on nhs workers every day in england, while home office statistics suggest a police officer is attacked every 22 minutes. labour's chris bryant, who's brought forward the proposal, wants it to count as aggravated assault if an emergency worker is attacked on duty, doubling the possible jail term to a year. pollution has been linked to the deaths of more than 50,000 people in the uk in 2015, according to a new study. the report, published in the lancet medicaljournal, looked at deaths from illnesses including heart disease and stroke, linked to all forms of pollution, such as traffic fumes and industrial chemicals. it ranks the uk 55th out of 188 countries. the government says it has a three billion pound plan
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to improve air quality. it's emerged that three of the uk's biggest mobile phone providers are continuing to charge customers for handsets which they have already paid for. citizens advice say customers of vodafone, ee and three are still paying for their phones, after their initial contract has expired. the operators said that their billing is fair. and we'll have more on that story in the next half hour and advice for how to deal with this situation. unions have warned that the cost of childcare in england is rising much faster than wages. the tuc says in the eight years to 2016, the average pay of parents with a one—year—old rose by 12% while childcare costs increased by four times that. the government says it has doubled free childcare available for three and four—year—olds. the director quentin tarantino has spoken of his shame about continuing to work with harvey weinstein despite being aware of rumours about his behaviour. mr tara ntino collaborated with the producer on a number
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of movies including reservoir dogs and pulp fiction. harvey weinstein denies sexual assault and rape. former us presidents, barack obama and george w bush have voiced concerns about the state of american politics in comments seen as a criticism of donald trump's leadership. mr obama urged americans to reject the politics of division and fear, while mr bush, hit out at bullying and prejudice in public life. both men who led the us for full eight—year terms were speaking separately. neither mentioned president trump by name. and so the question now, at a time when our politics just seems so divided and so angry and so nasty, is whether... whether we can recapture that spirit, whether we support and embrace somebody who wants to bring people together. the american dream of upward mobility seems out of reach for some
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who feel left behind. in a changing economy, discontent deepened and sharpened partisan conflicts. bigotry seems emboldened. our politics seems more vulnerable to conspiracy theories and outright fabrication. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now withjess. merseyside police say their officers are investigating after a disturbance on the pitch between everton and lyon last night. it is because of these ugly scenes in the europa league match. fighting broke out with both sets of players with some fans getting involved. everton lost 2—1. better news for arsenal though who have continued their perfect start to the competition. from oliver giroud.
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pressure continues to mount on senior figures at the fa. they're now investigating the england women's goalkeeping coach lee kendall because of alleged "unacceptable behaviour towards eni alu ko". aluko, who was born in nigeria, accused him of speaking to her in a fake caribbean accent. there have been call from ex—players for immediate change at the top of the fa. lewis hamilton says he has "no plans" to "take a knee" during the american national anthem before sunday's united states grand prix. but hamilton said he thought the movement protesting against racial injustice in the us was "awesome". thank you, jessica. lots of you getting in touch after we we re lots of you getting in touch after we were talking to the emergency workers about their experiences of being assaulted and harassed at work. there is an attempt by a labour mp to change the law so there are tougher sentences for these people. we had a tweet from a viewer, "it is
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harsh but if emergency services are continually abused and assaulted then they should just walk away. you can't help some people." a tweet from mummy here, "poor emergency workers being knocked unconscious when these people go and help people." yes, when these people go and help people. " yes, astounding when these people go and help people." yes, astounding stories about the level of abuse that they getjust going to work. we are expecting the prime minister, theresa may, to be speaking in the next few minutes to be honest. she had a working breakfast this morning. you can see the podium there at the european council in brussels. she had a working brea kfast brussels. she had a working breakfast with the other 27 leaders of the eu. this is all part of the brexit negotiations. they are now continuing those discussions. the prime minister has left those. she is meant to be coming out to do a press co nfe re nce is meant to be coming out to do a press conference with the british media to update us. she wants to move on to trade conversations to try and find out if there can be a
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trade deal, but at the moment the other 27 eu leaders are saying not enough progress has been made on citizens rights, on the so—called divorce bill and also on that border with northern ireland. so we will keep an eye on that. as soon as so we will keep an eye on that. as soon as theresa may steps up to speak, we will go over live. carolyn yvonne rossjones was born three months premature at st mary's hospital in 1973, weighing only 1lb 12oz, her mother was told she wouldn't survive and she walked out of hospital, never to be seen again. but miraculously, carolyn did survive. neither the hospital nor social services could trace her mother from the details she left so carolyn was adopted. eventually she moved to america with her family but she was full of questions about who her biological pa rents were. earlier this year she made a video appealing for information and it went viral. she's now in touch with her biologicalfamily in the uk and has made a discovery about her birth mother. she told me what she'd found out. all i know is after the doctors
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talked to her and said you know, your child is not going to survive, she left the hospital and that's the last that anybody had heard of her. and you through trying to find her have worked out that maybe she didn't want to be found? yes, that's what happened. so, the name that she put on my birth certificate was pat ross and as it turns out, her name was not pat ross, her name was grace meers. and this was a video that was shot by your 14—year—old and you put it on facebook and it went viral? it did. it got 1.6 million views, 50,000 shares and i had over 2,000 comments on it. so is this when you started getting answers about
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your biological mother? actually, what happened was a lot of people had told me there is this group on facebook called uk and aussie angels and they connect you with lost family members. and so i logged on and talked to a couple of people on there and they said had you done any dna and i said i had done dna through ancestry and they said log on and see if you have any hits and i hadn't logged on in about three years. so after logging on, i saw that i had a first cousin and i contacted the person that said was my first cousin and it turned out that she was a cousin in canada and through that cousin in canada, she did dna as well and we found out that she was my fourth cousin, but through her, i got hooked up with some family in the uk which, as it turns out is my uncle which turns out i have four uncles, and a grandmother
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in the united kingdom, in newcastle, and through them ifound my mum, grace meers, who after doing some research with the search angels, found out that she had actually passed away in 2003. what did that do to you, to get so close to find out about your family and find out who your mother was only to then discover she was no longer here? it was really devastating. it still is. i have my good days and i have my bad days. my biggest regret is that she passed away at age 47 young not knowing that i survived. and that's like the really hard part for me. i never will be able to talk to her or, you know,
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go over and meet her or anything and that's really hard. so, right now i'm working on finding out where she was buried. we don't know where she was buried so that's what i'm working on right now. i'm working on she was married and divorced. i'm looking for her ex—husband and i'm looking for anybody that may know her. this is my goal right now. i would like to go over and pay my respects and say a final goodbye to her. do you know anything about your dad? there is nothing on my birth certificate. now, my uncle in the uk has actually sent me his dna, so once we get his dna back then we can start working on the paternal side of it.
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these people on facebook are amazing. they can do dna. so, that's another step that we're going to be working on. an update from brussels. we are waiting for the prime minister, theresa may, to do a conference to bring us an update on brexit negotiationses. leaders of the 27 remaining eu states have given the green light to preparations for the second phase of brexit talks. that's the all—importa nt phase second phase of brexit talks. that's the all—important phase which will deal with trade. that is coming from the european council president, donald tusk. he said that the leaders of the 27 remaining eu states have given the green light to preparations for the second phase of brexit talks which, of course, deals with trade and that's what theresa may wants to get on and talk about as soon as may wants to get on and talk about as soon as possible. so, as soon as the british prime minister stands up to speak in brussels, we will bring that live to you. for many people, getting public transport is an essential part of life.
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but, especially for women, buses, trains and cabs can also be dangerous. there were 450 reports of sexual offences on london's tubes and buses betweenjune and april this year and it is thought as many as 90% of offences are not reported. it's maybe unsurprising then that only around a quarter of people think it is safe for women to get the tube at night. so what exactly constitutes sexual harassment. all you want to do is shut down, but you have to somehow keep going, or something bad may happen. harassment in public spaces is something that most women and girls either have experienced or will experience. but what do we mean by harassment? well, here are a few examples — whistling, honking, vulgar gestures, sexually explicit comments, following, sexual touching, public masturbation and sexual assault. and, actually, wherever
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in the world you look, the numbers are kind of high. a survey in the uk found that four in ten women felt at risk of harassment on city streets. and, in delhi, another survey suggested that nearly nine in ten women have experienced harassment. and, often, a harassment hotspot is public transport. a recent survey in mexico city found that 90% of women asked felt unsafe on buses and on the subway. but really what's more concerning is what goes unreported. on the new york subway, it's estimated that 96% of harassment and 86% of sexual assault goes entirely unreported. so perhaps it's time
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to talk about harassment and reclaim our streets. we are expecting theresa may to speak in the next few minutes from brussels to bring us an update on the brexit negotiations. we have seen the brexit negotiations. we have seen that empty podium a few times. hopefully the british plaoum will step up in the next few minutes. let me bring you more details on what eu leaders have been saying in the last few minutes. they have adopted their brexit summit conclusions. they are saying they are making preparations to move on to phase two of the negotiations which crucially involves those trade talks. that's what the british prime minister wa nts to what the british prime minister wants to get on to as soon as possible. so preparations are being made to move on to phase two. what's quite interesting is we are being told that leaders spent 90 seconds discussing this issue and they are
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getting an update on the process. that's what we are hearing. as soon as theresa may steps up to speak, we will bring it to you live. so we may have to interrupt this discussion. i apologise, but we will speak to di bret walker from the british transport police. and lucy russell, uk girls rights campaign manager for the charity plan uk. many people who travel on public transport when be surprised by the statistics. not surprised at all. we produced a report about the state of girls writes in the uk last year and what led tatin surprised us was that girls talked about sexual harassment on the streets everywhere. it was on buses, wearing school uniform, walking into school, feeling unsafe when they went out for a jog. so many different stories and types of harassment, but it was all about
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public spaces. do they see that as harassment? some are quite conscious of it and perhaps that's why they we re of it and perhaps that's why they were speaking to us. some accepted it as part of day—to—day life, and that's really concerning. what we found was that girls were facing harassment on the streets, in the classroom and online. they were being told just put up with it, boys will be boys, hejust likes being told just put up with it, boys will be boys, he just likes you, maybe you should live with it. right from a really early age they were getting this message that maybe you should live with it, put up with it, be quiet. that's what we think that is telling us is that it's reading into this bigger picture about girls not reporting sexual harassment. why do you think they aren't reporting it? certainly on the transport network there is a misconception that it network there is a misconception thatitis network there is a misconception that it is accepted contact sometimes, on board a train. it's busy, the movement of the train, this is the norm. what we are desperate to get out there is that this isn't the norm. if you feel it
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is sexualised behaviour, don't suffer in silence. sometimes that is difficult. if you're on a crowded train and someone brushes against you, you can sometimes question yourself. certainly and a lot of victims do question themselves. often they wouldn't necessarily report on the first contact. it might be that repeated contact. the first touch could be innocent, the second and third touch possibly not. it's down to the individual but most people know when it'sjust not right. we travel a lot on the underground. when it's no longer the gorman and macro norm, that's when it's time to tell someone. if you don't tell safe then find someone when you get. whether that be a memberof when you get. whether that be a member of staff or a help point or a police officer. if you can't see anyone, there is a text service available. you can text us on 61016. you can also phone us on 0800
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405040.. you can also phone us on 0800 405040. . if you can also phone us on 0800 405040.. if you get off a train, tube or bus and this has happened, and you report it, what's the likelihood of that person being found? likelihood of that person being found ? is that likelihood of that person being found? is that the problem? i'm sorry, we must go to brussels. theresa may is bringing us an update on brexit. we have important work to achieve together in this time. cooperation with our european friends will not stop in march 2000 and 19. the uk will stand alongside the eu as a strong and committed partner, working to promote our shared interests and values. nowhere is this more important than in our approach to the global challenges we face. whether security and defence, migration orforeign face. whether security and defence, migration or foreign policy issues, we face common opportunities and risks. we must continue to address them together. as i've said before,
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them together. as i've said before, the uk is unconditionally committed to the security and defence of europe. we share the vision of a strong, secure and successful eu with global reach and influence, and eu capable of countering shared threats to a continent working alongside a confident, outward looking uk. yesterday we discussed a range of subjects including migration, the digital economy and some of the most pressing foreign policy issues such as north korea and iran. we stand united in our clear condemnation of north korea's aggressive and illegal missile and nuclear tests and urge all states including china to play their part in changing the course of pyongyang is taking. on iran, we have reiterated our firm commitment is taking. on iran, we have reiterated ourfirm commitment to the nuclear deal which we believe is vitally important for our shared security. last night at dinner, i spoke to my fellow leaders about my
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vision for a new deep and special partnership between the uk and the european union after brexit. a partnership based on the same set of fundamental beliefs, in notjust democracy and rule of law, but also free trade, rigorous and fair competition, strong consumer rights and high regulatory standards. i am ambitious and positive for britain's future and for these negotiations. i know we still have some way to go. both sides have approached these talks with professionalism and a constructive spirit, and we should recognise what has been achieved to date. the uk and eu share the same objective of safeguarding the rights of eu nationals living in the uk and uk nationals living in the eu. eu citizens have made a huge contribution to country and whatever happens we want them and our families to stay. while there are a
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small number of issues that remain outstanding on citizens rights, i am confident we are in touching distance of a deal. on northern ireland we have agreed the belfast agreement must be at the heart of our approach, and that northern ireland's unique circumstances demand specific solutions. it is vital that joint work demand specific solutions. it is vital thatjoint work on the peace process is not affected in any way, it is too important for that. both sides agreed there cannot be any physical infrastructure at the border and that the common travel area must continue. we've both committed to delivering a flexible and imaginative approach on this vital issue. this council is an important moment. it is a point at which to assess and reflect on how to make further progress. my speech in florence made two important steps which have added impetus to the negotiations. i gave a firm commitment on the financial settle m e nt commitment on the financial settlement and i proposed a
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time—limited implementation period based on current terms which is in the interest of both the uk and the eu. both sides agree that subsequent rounds have been conducted in new spirit. my fellow leaders have been discussing this this morning, and i believe it is in the interests of the uk that the eu 27 continues to ta ke the uk that the eu 27 continues to take a united approach. if we are going to take a step forward together, it must be on the basis of joint effort and endeavour. we must work together to get to an outcome that we can stand behind and that works for all our people. i'll take a few questions. let's start with the bbc. do you deny that you've made clear to your eu counterparts that you are willing to pay many more billions than you've already indicated to settle our accounts as we leave? what i've made clear to my eu counterparts in relation to financial contribution is what i set out in my florence speech, which is
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that i have said nobody need to be concerned for the current budget plan that they would have to either pay in more or receive less, as a result of the uk leaving, and that we will honour the commitments we have made during our membership. there has to be detailed work on those commitments as david davis has said. we'll continue to go through their line by line, said. we'll continue to go through theirline byline, and said. we'll continue to go through their line by line, and the british taxpayer wouldn't expect its government to do anything else. tom. thank you, prime minister. the deal thatis thank you, prime minister. the deal that is now on the table for the decembersummit is quite that is now on the table for the december summit is quite clear, it's if you detailed further your thinking on what commitments you mean and what your prepared to pay for, the eu 27 will move onto the next phase. you prepared to spell out any more details to them, for anybody? what we are doing as we look across the weeks coming up to
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the december council is looking at a range of issues on which we are still, some of which we are still within touching distance of an agreement. i have always made clear that i think citizens rights should bea that i think citizens rights should be a top priority. as i'vejust said in answer to the first question on the financial issue, we will be going line by line through those commitments. i'm positive and optimistic about where we can get to in relation to the future partnership that we want with the european union, it's not only in the interest of the british people, it's in the interest of people across the remaining 27 members of the european union as well. as i understand it, following the discussion that has taken place this morning, we will see the eu considering their response into the florence speech in terms of the sort of vision that they have for the partnership we can have for the future. i'm optimistic it will be a good one because it will be to the benefit of people
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across the united kingdom and the rest of the european union. faisal. prime minister, if you're brexit secretary is preparing upbeat presentations on no deal for the cabinet, and if your foreign secretary saying the uk could cope very well, why shouldn't eu citizens also prepare for no deal and why shouldn't business groups, cars, irrigation, nuclear industry, also prepare their contingency plans for no deal as well? i'm clear we are working for a good deal and i'm optimistic about getting that. as i've said and others have said consistently, it would be responsible for the british government not to look across at the changes that will be necessary regardless of the eventuality. some of the changes that will be necessary would be necessary in the event of an ideal, would be changes made in relation to us achieving a
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deal. when the cabinet looks at this it will be looking across the board at what work is being done across government departments for all eventualities. that includes four getting a positive deal that i am confident we can achieve, and we have seen from european leaders here, believe it is achievable as well. rowena. is it conceivable that when the negotiators have finished going through the budget contributions and financial commitments, that the total sum could be as high as 60 billion euros? i've been very clear on where we are in relation to the financial settlement. i've set out the reassurance to our european collea g u es reassurance to our european colleagues in relation to the current budget plan, and we will go through that line by line issue in relation to the commitments we have made in our membership. i've also said in the past that if there are particular projects or programmes that we wish to continue to be a
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member of, then of course we would look to paying relevant costs in relation to that. programme such as on science and research and perhaps in some of the criminaljustice issues. i'll take a couple more from our european colleagues. we are all european. laughter non-british media. i spoke to the opposition leaderjeremy corbyn yesterday and he said he couldn't put any sort of numberon the he said he couldn't put any sort of number on the brexit bill. i understand you're working on the number but your eu colleagues want a more clear and detailed negotiating position before they can move onto trade talks. you're working on it, when do you expect to be able to put a numberon the when do you expect to be able to put a number on the brexit bill? time is of the essence. i've been clear all along, as the uk has all along
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throughout this, that the full and final settlement will come as part of the final agreement that we are getting in relation to the future partnership. i think that is absolutely right and can only be donein absolutely right and can only be done in that particular context. i've made that point in the florence speech and that point remains. this will be the last one. a question on catalonia. the catalonia leader has said he will declare independence of madrid doesn't engage in dialogue, the parliament is split on the issue and so is catalan society. the economic consequences are somewhat unclear. what advice do you have for him? i have made clear that the united kingdom's position is clear. we believe people should be abiding by the rule of law and uphold the spanish constitution. thank you.
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studio: that foster is a taking questions and doing a press conference there about brexit negotiations and the progress that has been made. she was saying she is confident they are within touching distance of a deal on citizens rights. stay with us. good morning. a pretty rough 24 hours ahead. storm brian has been brewing in the atlantic. it's going to be with us for the early hours of tomorrow morning. in the meantime, things are fairly quiet. we've got some cloudy skies and outbreaks of rain affecting eastern england. that will clear away and then we are looking at some sunny spells developing across most areas. it is late in the day when rain will return in northern ireland, west wales and the far south—west of england. maximum temperatures today
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about 14—16. here is storm brian. it will move in fairly quickly. the white lines indicating strong gusts around western and southern areas of england and wales. potentially 70 miles an hour. high tides across southern and western areas could bring coastal flooding southern and western areas could bring coastalflooding into saturday. for many of us a wet and windy day on saturday. more coming up windy day on saturday. more coming upfor windy day on saturday. more coming up for you through the morning. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11.00am: theresa may says she's optimistic about a good dealfor the uk in the brexit talks —
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but there's still some way to go. while there are a small number of issues that remain outstanding on citizen's rights, i'm confident that we are within touching distance of the deal. a new study links pollution to the deaths of more than 50,000 people in the uk. former us presidents obama and bush hit out at state of american politics, in what's seen as an unprecedented intervention. left on hold — it's emerged some mobile phone customers have continued to be charged for handsets they've already paid for. the cost of childcare — research shows it has risen more than four times faster than wages over the last 10 years. also this hour: split class — as oxford and cambridge universities

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