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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 21, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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hello, and welcome to bbc news. the top stories. afghan officials say nearly 60 people have been killed in two separate suicide attacks on mosques. eu leaders have agreed to begin preparations for trade talks with the uk, but the prime minister of britain says there has not been enough progress to start formal talks. i am ambitious and positive for the future of britain and for these negotiations, but i know we still have some way to go. progress is not sufficient. that does not mean there is no progress. police in brazil arrest more than 100 people in the biggest operation ever against paedophiles in latin america. donald trump promotes here in the uk by linking an increase in recorded crime with what he called a spread in radical terror without
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offering any evidence. —— promotes angen hello, and welcome the bbc news. afg ha n hello, and welcome the bbc news. afghan officials say up to 60 people have been killed in two separate suicide attacks on mosques. first, they entered a shia mosque in kabul and opened fire before setting off explosives. islamic state said they carried out the attack in kabul. elsewhere, another mosque was targeted in ghor province. we have been following the story. the massive suicide attack triggered an emergency in trouble. it was a race against time to save those
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caught up in the last. the evening prayer at this mosque ended in a nightmare. women and children were included in the injured. after slipping through tight security, wind man managed to walk right in the middle of the prayer. —— one. translation: people were praying. the attacker entered the mosque and detonated his explosives. many of the wounded tried to flee, fearing further attacks. in a matter of seconds, a number of families were torn apart. around the same time, there was another suicide attack, this time in the central province of. a pro—government official and several others were killed in the attack. islamic state and the taliban have targeted shia places in
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the country of afghanistan many times. it has been a terrible week up times. it has been a terrible week up to more than 130 people, most of them soldiers, have been killed in targeted attacks. many hoped the new afg ha n targeted attacks. many hoped the new afghan strategy from donald trump would improve things. but now they are desperately hoping for a respite from the spiralling violence. european union leaders have concluded there summit in brussels with an agreement to prepare for talks about a future trade deal with the uk. the british prime minister said she remains ambitious and positive about securing a partnership with the eu. even the eu council president sounded more positive. donald tusk said reports ofa positive. donald tusk said reports of a deadlock were exaggerated, but there was no progress needed. —— more progress. german chancellor
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angela merkel said the sticking point was the bill to be paid by the uk when it leads. eu leaders had previously refused to talk about trade until the divorce bill was settled. i have to warn you, this report does contain flashing images. final press conference. tick tock, tick tock. european leaders took 90 seconds today to decide that brexit talks haven't gone far enough to move on. time is pressing. they will start talks about talks. yet until the uk says it's prepared to pay, no bigger deal. i am ambitious and positive for britain's future and for these negotiations, but i know we still have some way to go. both sides have approached these talks with professionalism and a constructive spirit, and we should recognise what has been achieved to date. do you deny that you've made clear to your eu counterparts that you are willing to pay many more billions than you've already indicated to settle our accounts as we leave?
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what i've made clear to my eu counterparts in relation to financial contribution is what i set out in my florence speech, which is that i have said that nobody need be concerned for the current budget plan that they would have to either pay in more, or receive less, as a result of the uk leaving, and that we will honour the commitments that we have made during our membership. now, there has to be detailed work on those commitments, as david davis has said. we are going through them line by line and we will continue to go through them line by line, and the british taxpayer wouldn't expect its government to do anything else. among the schmoozing, there are whispers she has said privately she is prepared to stump up billions more. number ten says there hasn't yet been the final word on the cash. and while things seem friendlier, eu leaders are clear theresa may has to spell out how much she's prepared to pay before moving onto the main talks on trade and transition. and that means there's no deal yet on citizens‘ rights or northern ireland.
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there is an expectation they could shake on phase one by christmas, but until she budges, it's 27 against one. lonely arguments to make. the reports of the deadlock between the eu and the uk have been exaggerated. and while progress is not sufficient, it doesn't mean there is no progress at all. "there's nothing to say about brexit", says mrjuncker. cue a sigh of relief from the uk. but here's the man who has to try to make it work here. i'm sorry but i don't want to answer a question now. from the look on michel barnier‘s face, he knows it's not going to be easy. angela merkel said, "we hope we can move on in december, but it depends "on the uk paying more". the french verdict, even more gloomy.
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"today, we are not even halfway there". did he mean we'd have to pay at least double the £20 billion? that's not yet clear. this was far from a brussels bust—up, though. number ten's encouraged that negotiations are at least moving. theresa may does not go home empty—handed. she can claim progress of a sort, but this fraught process has gone a couple of inches, and it's a journey of many, many miles. those 27 will decide their next moves without britain even in the room, while at home, the prime minister must calculate how much she can compromise to conclude the whole deal against the clock before we are out for good. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, brussels. there is much more on the website. and now for some other news. egyptian authorities say at least 30 members of the security forces have been killed in a clash with islamist
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militants in the western desert. the interior ministry said the militants had fired on the troops as they raided their hideout in the bahariya 0asis. a number of suspected militants from a group called hasm were also killed. the world health organization has appointed president robert mugabe of zimbabwe as a "goodwill ambassador" to help tackle non—communicable diseases. critics say that during president mugabe's 37—year rule, health services in zimbabwe have sharply deteriorated. forensic experts investigating the death of the left—wing chilean poet, pablo neruda, have said that he didn't die of prostate cancer as previously thought and could have been poisoned. they will now carry out tests on a toxin found in his remains. pablo neruda, a nobel laureate, died less than two weeks after the military coup led by general augusto pinochet in 1973. police in brazil have arrested more than 100 people in the biggest
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operation against paedophiles in the country's history. suspects were arrested in 2a states and the capital, brasilia. the brazilian justice minister said those detained were part of a ring that shared pornographic images of children through computers and mobile phones. leonardo rocha is the bbc world service americas editor. he says it was the biggest ever operation in latin america. it involved more than 1000 police officers, and they had been investigating it for about six months with the cooperation of the european union and also american immigration officials. they checked on the suspects, but also provided special software to try to find those files on what is called the dark web, or the deep web, with people sharing images and also
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a p pa re ntly people sharing images and also apparently producing images of children and teenagers. so, notjust sharing, but also producing. exactly. that is what the police found. initially, the operation was focused on sharing. and when they went to investigate and started to see the images, they actually interviewed some of the children involved and the teenagers involved, and some of the related to the people abusing them, they realised there was a whole ring producing the material and they were in charge of football clu bs, material and they were in charge of football clubs, like, youth clubs, and civil servants, retired. football clubs, like, youth clubs, and civilservants, retired. it football clubs, like, youth clubs, and civil servants, retired. it is a huge scandal. and for the brazilian government, that might be the tip of the iceberg. now they are in a different stage of the investigation to try to analyse these 150,000 images of children, very young children to be defined this network
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operating with rings across the world in europe and other parts of the world. —— to find. world in europe and other parts of the world. -- to find. that is an extraordinary amount of images they had. this must have shocked the country. it has shocked the country. but i think, in many ways, rizal is in denial about what is happening with child paedophilia. —— they associated with other countries. not only that has to be addressed, but also sex, and considering the fact brazil has so many vulnerable people, vulnerable children. thank you very much. this weekend, spain's government is expected to announce that it is dissolving catalonia's regional parliament and imposing direct rule from madrid. it's the latest escalation in the crisis over catalonia's demands for independence.
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spain's prime minister said today the situation has reached critical point. the bbc‘s tom burridge reports. zaragoza in aragon. catalonia is the region next door, and plastered all over this city, among its old streets, a statement of spanish unity. luis' bar is a shrine to spain's national police force and its civil guard. "the spanish government should have intervened "long ago in catalonia," this former spanish soldier tells us. a group of tourists from andalusia in the south agree. "there's been too many concessions given to the catalan government," thinksjose—maria. "it hurts me," she says, "because it's creating an atmosphere of hate in spain." caught in the middle are officers patrolling barcelona's streets. they're part of catalonia's own regional police force,
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and tomorrow, madrid will set out its plan to exert more control, probably on them and other strands of catalan autonomy. translation: we are caught up in a political hurricane, but we are not politicians. we are policemen. after spanish national police disrupted catalonia's disputed referendum, emotions have been running high. we met beth comforting her mother the following day, now horrified that madrid might take control. i don't want violence, i don't want a war, but if i have to go to have a strike, i will do it. if i have to be days on a strike, i will do it. idon‘t mind. it's my future, my parents‘ future, my son's future, you know. and we've been fighting for a lot of time for this. but the argument popular in places like zaragoza is simple. "catalonia is part of spain," says
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this university professor. madrid has to act. translation: catalan nationalists do not have the power to decide on the half of all spaniards that it's a foreign territory. i will never accept being a foreigner in catalonia. but a country whose regions have been glued together over the centuries is nervous. the spanish government has a strategy, but it risks further fractures within catalan society, and deeper divisions between many in that region and the rest of spain. tom burridge, bbc news, in spain. stay with us on bbc world news. still to come: us president donald trump has provoked fury in the uk by linking an increase in recorded crime with what he called the "spread of radical islamic terror" without offering any evidence. a historic moment that many of his victims have waited
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for for decades. the former dictator in the dock, older, slimmer and, as he sat down, obedient enough. dawn, and as the sun breaks through the piercing chill of night on the plain outside korem, it lights up a biblicalfamine, now, in the 20th century. the depressing conclusion — in argentina today, it is actually cheaper to paper your walls with money. we've had controversies in the past with great britain but as good friends, we have always found a good and lasting solution. concorde bows out in style after almost three decades in service. an aircraft that has enthralled its many admirers for so long taxis home one last time. this is bbc news.
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the latest headlines: afghan officials say nearly 60 people have been killed in two separate suicide attacks on mosques. eu leaders have agreed to begin preparations for trade talks with the uk. but britain's prime minister, theresa may, is told there's not been enough progress to start formal talks. the white house is dispelling claims that comments made by two former presidents were criticisms of donald trump. his predecessors barack 0bama and george w bush made separate appearances yesterday, both expressing concerns over the current political climate in the us. meanwhile, president trump has drawn criticism in the uk by linking an increase in crime here to islamist terrorism, as our north america editorjon sopel reports. it was just before dawn, when most of america was still sleeping that
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the president suddenly tweeted about britain's crime figures. then giving the impression that this was from an official report, the president used quotation marks to say: the figures he referred to were, in fact, just for england and wales, and nowhere in the crime survey is the phrase used "radical islamic terror". nevertheless, his tweet will have a resonance for many people in the united states. because the president's ban on people travelling from several muslim countries has failed again. it will have to come here to the supreme court to be resolved, after it was blocked by lower courts earlier this week. but in the last 2a hours, two former presidents, without mentioning donald trump's name, took aim and fired
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an unmistakable broadside. bigotry seems in emboldened. 0ur politics seems more vulnerable to conspiracy theories and outright fabrication. we've got folks who are deliberately trying to make folks angry. to demonise people who have different ideas. to get the base all riled up, because it provides a short—term tactical advantage. and there was friendly fire, too. this is the republican speaker of the house, paul ryan, at a charity dinner. i know last year that donald trump offended some people. i know his comments, according to critics, went too far. some said it was unbecoming for a public figure, and they said that his comments were offensive. well, thank god he's learned his lesson! the president wasn't there. it would have been interesting to see if he'd have laughed. jon sopel, bbc news, washington.
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well, anger over donald trump's tweet about the increase in crime in the uk is not his only controversy this week. the fallout continues from a phone call between the us president and the widow of a fallen soldier. the president is denying claims that he'd told the widow that her husband knew what he signed up for. i've been speaking tojoe chenelly from the american veterans organisation and he gave me his reaction. it's a very disappointing situation here, that our president chose to politicise the families of the fallen in the way that he and us presidents have expressed our nation's condolences and gratefulness for the sacrifices that they've made and this has caused obviously our media to speak with a lot of offence, which is something ofa
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lot of offence, which is something of a silver lining, because we've been able to find out as a nation more about our heroes and the legacy they've left behind, but has also caused controversy on who has been contacted, who hasn't and the nature of some of those contacts. what is the procedure? donald trump is claiming that he is calling every family, whereas other presidents happened. what is the procedure? is it expected that every president calls every single family of a fallen soldier? no, it is not expected. in fact, a man i have a lot of respect for, generaljohn kelly, the chief of staff at the white house now, a marine general i've served within the past, he actually said in a press conference yesterday that he had recommended to the president not to call in this particular case. i believe that it should be up to the family. every family, as soon as they are notified
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of their loss, is assigned and military liaison and a casualty notification 0fficer military liaison and a casualty notification officer and i think the communication should go through there. if the family would like to hear from there. if the family would like to hearfrom our there. if the family would like to hear from our commander in there. if the family would like to hearfrom our commander in chief, and that's something the president wa nts to and that's something the president wants to do, i think the president should. in some of these cases, in particular the sajid johnson, a soldier that a lot of this... his family has become front and centre of this, i think it is probably a little too early in this process, the grieving process. everyone treats it differently and this was very early in the process. 9 million people died in 2015 because of exposure to illness linked to air and water pollution, according to a major new study. heart disease, strokes and lung cancer are linked with toxins in the air and accounted for 6.5 million premature deaths, according to a report in the lancet medicaljournal. water pollution killed nearly 2 million people. low and middle income
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countries are worst hit, with pollution linked to one to four deaths in india. china and certain countries in africa are also hit hard by the problem, which has become a global scourge, as our correspondents around the world have been telling us. here in kenya about 57,000 people are thought to have died from the effects of pollution in 2015. that's nearly two out of every ten deaths and here there are many examples of why. this is the nairobi river. 0nce upona time why. this is the nairobi river. 0nce upon a time it was clear, but years of pollution has made it this way and this is one example. small businesses like grocers and car washes dispose of their waste here at it's been washed into the river. this contaminated water flows downstrea m this contaminated water flows downstream through some residential areas and some places consummate and in some instances without treating
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it. here in delhi it is the morning after the hindu festival of divali and it is officially regarded as the beginning of what they call the pollution season. that's because diwali is celebrated by lighting lots of oil lamps and setting off fireworks, creating a lot of smoke. the three hours one of the pollution monitors here recorded a level of 999 of the smallest and most dangerous pollution particulates, that's more than a0 times the safe limit. pollution has become a significant political issue in india, so in delhi, for example, there have been restrictions on the sound of fireworks, limits on burning by farmers in neighbouring states and restriction on diesel ca rs states and restriction on diesel cars and lorries coming into delhi, which may be one reason why the day by the standards of delhi and by the standards of the season pollution levels are actually fairly though.
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just over nine times the safe limit. let's compared the air quality in the city, beijing, to say london. these very harmful pm 2.5 particular in the air, in london a level of say 50 triggers an official emergency. ifi 50 triggers an official emergency. if i check my air quality up now it is 120 -- if i check my air quality up now it is 120 —— air—quality app. we play football here up to 300. at this mansard reporter says football here up to 300. at this mansa rd reporter says china football here up to 300. at this mansard reporter says china is improving on this front every year and the tributes this to public awareness, tougher regulations and crucially a big shift away from fossil fuels crucially a big shift away from fossilfuels in crucially a big shift away from fossil fuels in favour of renewable energy. that was a look around the world at that situation. let's end of some good news. a 25 day old spider monkey is being nursed back to health in colombia, after it fell from the arms of its mother. the offspring, which has been named 0livia by vets, suffered injuries
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to one of her toes. but she is expected to make a full recovery. take a look. 0h oh my goodness, 20 of milk. she is possibly the cutest spider monkey that i have ever seen! lots more on our website. if you want to get in touch with us here at bbc world news, you can do so on social media. i'm @bbckasiamadera on twitter. you can also find us on facebook. thanks for watching. today's weather is brought to you
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courtesy of storm brian, but second look. 0ver courtesy of storm brian, but second look. over the last 2a hours it has rapidly developed. the strongest winds at the city and as the storm crosses the british isles it will gradually weakened. a slow process and winds will remain pretty strong and winds will remain pretty strong and gusty throughout saturday. we have rain for the early rises. still lingering in north—east scotland. there were thereabouts towards the eastern coast of england. plenty of showers out west and it is in the showery air mass that we will have a fairly strong gust of wind working m, fairly strong gust of wind working in, giving us a blow with start the day. it will be mild. 10— 13 degrees for early rises. some of the strongest winds will be targeting the coast of south—west england and wales. gusts of 50— 60 mph. maybe some isolated gusts of up to 70 mph.
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0ne concern is that strong winds could coincide with high tide, so we could coincide with high tide, so we could see some localised surface water flooding impacts. inland typically up to 50 mph. that will blow lots of leaves off the trees. maybe some small branches coming down. the winds picking up later in the afternoon and towards the evening across north wales and north—west england as we see a lengthy spell of rain here. again the winds could reach up to 60 mph. had stronger on some of the exposed areas. for the most part on saturday brian will bring fairly typical weather for an autumn day. heading through the night time, the low pressure works out into the north sea and we have showers or even lengthy spells of rain working in the north—west england overnight. still blow we. 9— 10 degrees. for sunday, as brian works out into the north sea over the coming days it will die. that's the life of brian and on the bright side of life on
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sunday there will be fewer showers. the winds turning lighter. coming in from a north—westerly direction. it is cooler. the richer wife, between 10- 1a is cooler. the richer wife, between 10— 1a degrees. what with fewer showers you have a better chance of getting away with lengthy and drier spells of weather. the north—westerly winds are shortly. i monday most winds back to the south—west, with the exception of the far north of scotland. south—westerly winds dragging in mild air. temperatures up to 70 degrees. that mild dean stays with us. “— degrees. that mild dean stays with us. —— mild theme. that's your weather. hello, this is bbc news. the main headlines. afghan officials say nearly 60 people have been killed in two separate suicide attacks on mosques. in the first, the bomber entered a shia mosque in kabul. a second attack targeted a mosque in ghor province. european union leaders have concluded their summit in brussels with an agreement to prepare for talks about a future trade deal with the uk.
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the eu says that rumours of deadlock in brexit negotiations are simply not true. police in brazil have arrested more than 100 people in the biggest operation ever against paedophiles in latin america. the suspects were accessed through the dark web. the world health organization has appointed president robert mugabe of zimbabwe as a "goodwill ambassador" to help tackle non—communicable diseases. critics say that during his 37—year rule, health services in zimbabwe have sharply deteriorated. now on bbc news, "michael fish: the great storm and me."
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