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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 22, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc world news, i'm samantha simmonds. our top stories: catalonia's leader says he will not accept madrid's plan to curb the region's powers. as thousands take to the streets of barcelona, carles puigdemont makes a passionate appeal for the defence of catalonia's rights. we do what we do because we believe ina we do what we do because we believe in a democratic and peaceful europe. after growing international criticism, the world health organisation rethinks its decision to make zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, a goodwill ambassador. as afghanistan buries victims of a mosque attack on friday, another car bomb kills 15 army personnel in kabul. also coming up: donald trump has announced he plans to release thousands of classified documents relating to the assassination ofjohn f kennedy in 1963. hello and welcome to bbc world news.
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the political crisis in spain has deepened. the leader of catalonia says the region will not accept madrid's plan to impose direct rule, and carles puigdemont described the spanish prime minister's plans as the worst attack on catalonia's institutions since the fascist dictatorship of general franco. mariano rajoy earlier announced plans to sack the regional government, suspend the parliament, and hold fresh elections. almost 500,000 people protested on saturday against those measures. from barcelona, tom burridge reports. angrier than ever before — catalans who want independence, digesting madrid's unprecedented move to temporarily scrap their devolved government. theyjust want to crush us down. and we've got dignity. we've got our dignity. we've fought for it for years.
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we couldn't speak catalan 40, 50 years ago. are we going to go back to that? i want to see the army here. we're going to see it at this rate. i don't want that. i'm young and i don't have that much knowledge, but i have enough knowledge to know that that isn't normal, and it shouldn't be happening in our country. we are a developed country, this isjust outrageous. i'm speechless. the leader of catalonia's devolved government in the crowd. tonight, he called it the biggest attack on catalonia's autonomy since the dictatorship of franco. translation: this is the worst attack on the institutions and people of catalonia since the dictatorship of franco. earlier, spanish ministers approved what is known here as the nuclear option. in a few days, catalan autonomy will be suspended, the regional government sacked, all of its responsibilities run from madrid. prime minister rajoy said catalan leaders will not be allowed to destroy the whole way
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in which spain is governed. translation: we apply article 155 because no government of any democratic country can accept disregard for the law. catalonia is divided on the issue of independence, and some here, like carlos, accept that the spanish government had no option. he says it is 50% madrid's fault, and 50% catalonia's government, for causing this crisis, a crisis which seems to be getting worse. they won't give up, even as european governments insist this is an internal issue for madrid. the key test will come when madrid tries to physically take control of the catalan authorities. will the catalan police and other local officials follow the spanish government's orders, or disobey? chanting.
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a new country won't appear through words, even as they will it to happen. they know, too, that bearing down on them is the all—powerful spanish state. tom burridge, bbc news, in barcelona. edgar illas, professor and director of catalan studies at indiana university, joined me from bloomington a short while ago. i asked him for his assessment of the day's developments in catalonia. my my assessment is, we've seen a logical step. the spanish government has done what they said they were going to do. and therefore, we have seen another chapter in the same direction. there is no... we don't see a plot shift or anything. i don't think it's... i mean, there is an irony in all this. the suspension of the catalan government is also what the catalan secessionists want. they want to suspend the regional
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government. 0bviously they want to suspend the regional government. obviously the difference is that they want to create a new state. the spanish state wants to establish some sort of a democratic body that somehow manages the situation. but there is an irony here, that what we saw today is in a way a step in the same direction that both sides want to see. carles puigdemont is convinced that he can set upa puigdemont is convinced that he can set up a successful separate country. is that, in your view, doable, given that we have already seen doable, given that we have already seen a doable, given that we have already seen a number of businesses, at least ten or so, including two banks, relocate away from barcelona, fea rful of banks, relocate away from barcelona, fearful of what will happen if this comes to pass. we have had germany and france saying they certainly won't recognise an independent country here. what is going to happen with regards to actually setting one up? well, there are two
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things here. first, the european union is not as unanimous as it may seem. union is not as unanimous as it may seem. the big countries, france, italy and germany, tend to side with the spanish government. 0ther smaller countries, belgium, slovenia, denmark, maybe other countries outside the european union, israel, are suggesting that they will probably side with the cata la n they will probably side with the catalan seceded or declared state. so that is one thing. the other thing is the question of the economy. the banks, they have not moved. no company has moved from catalonia. they have threatened to move their legal headquarters, and thatis move their legal headquarters, and that is not the same. it is, in a way, again, ironically, the two main cata la n way, again, ironically, the two main catalan banks are moving their legal headquarters to continue to have access to the european central bank during this transition period. so this can, you know, potentially be good for the catalan economy. means
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all businesses can continue to do business as usual, and have liquidity. a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul, is reported to have killed at least 15 army cadets on a bus. it is the second such attack in the city in two days. 56 people were killed when a suicide bomber set off explosives at a packed shia mosque on friday evening. the bbc‘s anbarasan ethirajan has this report. the minibus carrying the army cadets was leaving the military academy in kabul when it was targeted. police are investigating how a suicide bomber managed to reach the high security compound. it was the second suicide attack on the afghan capital in less than 2a hours. 56 people we re in less than 2a hours. 56 people were killed when a suicide bomber set off explosives at a packed shia mosque last night. the victims were buried in this cemetery outside
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kabul. those who died in a suicide attack have been remembered during funeral prayers. families have lost fathers, mothers, sons and daughters in the devastating attack. there was tight security outside the burial place, as funerals were also targeted in the past. shia mosques in afghanistan have been repeatedly attacked. translation: the government has to provide security for its citizens in any situation. the incident that took place was very tragic, and we strongly condemn it. a routine friday evening prayer at this mosque ended in a nightmare. the bloodsoaked at this mosque ended in a nightmare. the bloodsoa ked carpets at this mosque ended in a nightmare. the bloodsoaked carpets and broken windows show the level of devastation. the streets of kabul are tense today, and many residents say they are worried about the worsening security situation. many are angry that even a place of
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worship is not safe any more. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news: 2a hours after a militant ambush on policemen in egypt's western desert, the interior ministry says 16 policemen were killed in the attack. a figure given earlier by security and medical sources suggested at least 53 security personnel had been killed. thousands of italians have taken part in an anti—racism rally in rome. they marched in solidarity with migrants and refugees. more than 146,000 migrants are estimated to have crossed the mediterranean to europe this year. injapan, polls have opened in a general election which follows prime minister shinzo abe's decision to dissolve the lower house of parliament last month. mr abe's liberal democratic party is expected to again emerge as the biggest party. 0pinion polls have suggested that the ldp and its junior coalition partner, komeito, could retain their two—thirds supermajority in the lower house. the head of the world health organisation has said he is rethinking the approach,
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after his decision to appoint zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, as a goodwill ambassador was met with widespread condemnation. the role is symbolic, but mr mugabe is expected to tackle non—communicable diseases like cancer and heart disease. 0ur south africa correspondent andrew harding reports. 93 years old, and in frail health, president robert mugabe is an unexpected choice to be the new goodwill ambassador for the world health organization. and it is notjust a question of stamina. the president's defenders insist he has earned this new honour. and yet, during his 37 years in power, mr mugabe has overseen the collapse of zimbabwe's currency and economy, and of its once—impressive health system. zimbabweans who have fled abroad are outraged by today's news. it angers me, because i've seen millions of zimbabweans die. incurable diseases, some things which could be cured, but because of the health facilities
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that have collapsed, it has really been their death row. zimbabwe's falling apart. there's absolutely nothing that is all right. if i fall sick, where will i get just the consultation fee? critics point to a long history of human rights abuses in zimbabwe, too. on that note, today the british government called mr mugabe's appointment... perhaps the mostjarring irony is the fact that, for years, mr mugabe has spent taxpayers' money travelling abroad for his own healthcare. we know that every — every other month president mugabe, even for eye cataract, president mugabe goes to singapore,
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president mugabe goes to the far east. he doesn't even trust his own public health system. and tonight, news that the backlash may be working, the who announcing a rethink. mr mugabe's goodwill ambassadorship may prove to be short—lived. andrew harding, bbc news, johannesburg. the party led by the billionaire businessman, andrej babis, has secured a convincing victory in the czech republic's general election. with nearly all the votes counted, the ano party has won about 30%. it is not enough to govern alone, but the anti—establishment party could lead a coalition. the bbc world service europe editor mike sanders has been telling me more about mr babis and his ano party. well, he is 63. he is a big is this man. forbes magazine puts his wealth at about 4 billion euros, so an extremely wealthy man. that has led to comparisons with people like donald trump. he also controls a media empire, so there is another
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comparison there with silvio berlusconi in italy. he began as an anti—corruption campaign back in 2011, with a movement called action for dissatisfied citizens, which is where this ano word comes from, and ano means yes in czech, he entered politics in 2013 and he hears four yea rs politics in 2013 and he hears four years later, in power. and what does his party want, then? his party wa nts a his party want, then? his party wants a better relationship with brussels, primarily. he did campaign ona brussels, primarily. he did campaign on a platform that slightly eurosceptic overtones, but he has been clear to state, after his victory, that ano was a pro—european party. what he doesn't like is this idea of the two speed europe, which he fears may leave the czech republic behind, and he certainly doesn't want to take the country into the european single currency, the euro, unless there is some kind
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of structural reform within the eurozone. he needs to form a coalition. is he going to find it difficult to do that? well, it is a very fragmented parliament. there are seven, eight, maybe even nine parties in the parliament. he has got 30%, and the closest rival, the civic pygott democrats, one of the traditional powerhouses inject politics, they are closest to him, with 20%, and they have said they won't go into a coalition with them -- civic won't go into a coalition with them —— civic democrats, one of the traditional powerhouses in czech politics. since the split from slovakia in 1993. so 30 plus seven is not going to give him the majority, so he will be looking for parties elsewhere. stay with us on bbc world news. still to come: donald trump plans to allow the opening of a trove of long—classified files on the assassination of former presidentjohn f kennedy. a historic moment that many of his victims have waited
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for for decades. the former dictator in the dock, older, slimmer and, as he sat down, obedient enough. dawn, and as the sun breaks through the piercing chill of night on the plain outside korem, it lights up a biblicalfamine, now, in the 20th century. the depressing conclusion — in argentina today, it is actually cheaper to paper your walls with money. we've had controversies in the past with great britain but as good friends, we have always found a good and lasting solution. concorde bows out in style after almost three decades in service. an aircraft that has enthralled its many admirers for so long, taxis home one last time.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines: in a passionate appeal for the defence of catalonia's rights, carles puigdemont says he will not accept madrid's plan to curb the region's powers. after growing international criticism the world health 0rganisation says it's rethinking its decision to make zimbabwe's president robert mugabe a good will ambassador. let's get more on our top story, now — the rising tensions in spain over catalonia. a short time ago i spoke to our correspondent in barcelona tom burridge — i asked him what would happen next. the spanish government's plan has to be approved by the spanish senate, which could take several days. in the meantime, what i think we will see is the catalan leader tried to convene the regional parliament here, and probably make a more emphatic declaration of independence. that might not mean
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very much in practice, because you cannot create a state overnight. it will be interesting to see how plays out on the ground. what you think that intervention could look like? good question. i think the spanish government has said quite clearly today that really the institutional organs at a regional level will be directed at a ministerial level in madrid. so madrid will have direct control over the running of what was a devolved government. now the spanish government is saying, tonight, that it will not actually suspend the autonomy of catalonia, because it argues that the actual institutions themselves will remain. it will be taking, as i say, direct control. the other interesting thing, really, will be the roll of the catalan police. they have their own regional police force. it is controlled by the devolved
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goverment, as things stand. if madrid takes control of the interior ministry locally speaking, then in theory it takes control of the local police. will those local police a baby orders from madrid, all they rebel? those kind of dynamics will play out. the other thing to mention quickly is that the spanish government is saying that it has a close eye, now, on the public tv and public radio. catalan public tv and radio hearing catalonia. it is saying, basically, that if it does not like what it seas and hears, it might intervene there too. that would be hugely controversial. tom burridge, they are. —— there. almost a month after hurricane maria devastated puerto rico, the us territory is still struggling to provide basic services like electricity and running water. 3a people were killed by the storm, and some estimates have put the cleanup bill as high a ninety five billion dollars. speaking on thursday, president trump gave his administration "10 out of 10" for its handling of the disaster. but there was strong criticism of the response from the very start
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— and some of the strongest came from the mayor of the island's capital sanjuan, carmen yulin cruz. she's been talking to the bbc‘s yalda hakim for an upcoming edition or our world. she told yalda about the recovery operation, and her feud with the president. in one of this tweets, donald trump said that puerto rico is more less broken, and has broken infrastructure and debt. 0ne broken, and has broken infrastructure and debt. one of those things are factually incorrect? -- nine. no, they are not. tell us and then we didn't know, right? what is incorrect is for a president that is supposed to be the commander—in—chief to come the eight in chief and to become the person that just weeks away the eight in chief and to become the person thatjust weeks away his hate. that is what is incorrect. do you think it became personal, you? he called you nasty, and you called him a hater—in—chief. that is a
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little personal. that is personal. it is personal. it was the one who spoke about the debt? the president. who was the one they called us ingrates. the president. who threw paper covered us? the president. harry, i would start a fight, but i won't shy away from one either. —— hey. when you deny people clean water, you are denying them any rights. is he denying puerto rico clea n rights. is he denying puerto rico clean water? it is not enough. if you are not giving people what they need, and you are chaining me to a piece of legislation that does not allow others to help me, then you are making me just allow others to help me, then you are making mejust depend on you. and that is not the spirit that the american democracy was made of. you
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choose to play or not to play. food through churches, faith —based organisations, community leaders, and we have 21 committee kitchens that have sprung up. —— community kitchens. yalda hakim there speaking to the mayor of san juan. 0ur washington correspondent laura bicker explained the 1992 law which ordered certain files on the assassination of presidentjohn f kennedy to be held in secret. laura bicker now. these documents have been held for 25 years. it was a law that was designed to quell conspiracy theories, but did did
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anything but. a recent poll showed that around 30% of americans believe that around 30% of americans believe that the man accused of assassinating john f kennedy did not act alone. —— but it did anything but will stop they say that lee harvey oswald was an agent can according to conspiracy theorists. these document were to be released on thursday. lastly, a president came out that donald trump would not release the governors. today he has treated that he will, unless those documents are made to him. the documents are made to him. the documents that people are most interested in relate to lee harvey 0swald's visit to mexico cityjust weeks before the assassination. it is there that he is thought to have mactiernan soviet spies. it is even alleged that there he spoke of his players to kill the president. that is the fact that is currently
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disputed. —— met cuban and soviet spies. conspiracy theories have wa nted spies. conspiracy theories have wanted these documents for sometime. if this information is correct and no further information comes to light, they could come out on thursday. not long to wait. and for those who waited years for them to come out, there must be thousands of documents, surely? over 3000 documents. they include the likes of bca profile on the man accused of the assassination, lee harvey oswald, the testimony of cia officers at the time, which was kept top secret. —— cia. there is also letters from jaeger hoover and letters from jaeger hoover and letters to and from jk's wife, jackie kennedy. intriguing documents we re jackie kennedy. intriguing documents were able to pore over. ——j edgar hoover. in a landmark ruling three years ago, india's supreme court recognised it's estimated 2 million transgender people as a third gender, stating that "it is the right of every human being to choose their gender."
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now, the country's first trans—gender couple, are planning a wedding. some people say that we are mad. some people say that we are mad. some people say that we are mad. some people even abusers, sexually. lama some people even abusers, sexually. i am a transsexual person, e—mail to mail. —— mandatory. we will make a new storyline. it was very difficult. now i am happy. new storyline. it was very difficult. nowl am happy. abby kane who i wanted to be. —— iab team who i wanted to be. i am getting minimum two 325 appointment today. —— i became who i wanted. one is at doing
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all these things, i was all alone. —— three to five. so if it happened with somebody else, ijust —— three to five. so if it happened with somebody else, i just wanted —— three to five. so if it happened with somebody else, ijust wanted to help them. we just wanted to work for the betterment and welfare of people who are having gender dysphoria. many congratulations to them. that is it from even now. don't forget you can get in touch on twitter. i'm @thesamsimmonds. all the top stories coming up in the moment, so stay with us here on bbc news, all catch up online. —— three.
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—— or catch. hello. storm brian has been bringing strong winds across the united kingdom is the last 2a hours. the centre of brian moving out into the north sea, were it will weaken through the course of the day. rain or showers showing up on the radar picture today. strong winds around the coastline of wales and south—west england, yesterday. the forecast was for gusts up to 70 mph, not far off the mark. inland, they got to a0 or 50 miles an hour. those kinds of values in many inland areas. it was a typical autumnal day. strong winds still with us for the early rises for the first part of the morning. 0utbreaks the early rises for the first part of the morning. outbreaks of red across western scotland, north—west england, north wales. the gusts around a0 to 50 miles an hour. maybe one or two slowly stronger gusts. temperatures 9— 11 degrees bursting. there is brian, working to the north
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sea, were it will continue to weaken and die. —— 11 degrees first thing. —— where it will continue. what follows through sunday afternoon will be a measurejohnson change hours. the majority of the showers and western areas of the uk. dry weather across the east. north—westerly winds bringing call and fresher air. temperatures of the uk. dry weather across the east. north—westerly winds bringing call and fresher air. cambridge is a bit down on those of yesterday. i is between 11 — 1a degrees. through sunday night, the next weather systems coming through bringing some rain. -- systems coming through bringing some rain. —— highs. averages rising in the south—west. the degrees as a low down towards south—west england. conditions for a time across scotla nd conditions for a time across scotland a north—east england. this strip of rain will continue to push in on monday. a lot of cloud and outbreaks for rent for many. heavy for northern scotland at a time. the sky is working to northern ireland
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and scotland as we go through monday afternoon. it gets milder, with temperatures of 70 degrees across some areas monday afternoon. that is a sign of things to come. this weather system comes through on tuesday through the south—west. pay for many of us, but the best in the sunshine really for eastern scotland and parts of north—east england. notice the temperatures continue to rise. temperatures between 1a — 80 degrees. thursday, mile ever this time of year. highs of 22 degrees. pretty unusual for them this time in 0ctober. and that is your weather. this is bbc news. the headlines: the catalan leader has made a passionate appeal for the defence of catalonia's rights in the face of what he called a coup by the spanish state. carles puigdemont has compared the actions of madrid to those of spain's fascist dictator general franco. the new head of the world health organization says he is rethinking his decision to appoint zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, as a goodwill
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ambassador for the global health agency. it follows international criticism of the decision. a suicide attack in the afghan capital, kabul, has killed at least 15 military cadets. the defence ministry said the attacker targeted a bus carrying the cadets outside the main military academy. and the party led by the billionaire businessman andrej babis has scored a convincing victory in the czech republic's general election. the ano party has won about 30% — not enough to govern alone, but it could lead a coalition. now on bbc news: a weather world special. from florida and the bbc weather centre, the team examines why this year's atlantic hurricane season has been so active.
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