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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 22, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and tina daheley. new plans to make buying and selling homes cheaper, faster and less stressful. ministers outline proposals that could see an end to gazumping, but critics say it will do little to fix the housing crisis. good morning, it's sunday the 22nd of october. also this morning: labour threatens to back tory rebels on brexit unless the government makes changes to its eu withdrawal bill. huge demonstrations in barcelona against spanish government plans to impose direct rule on catalonia. jose mourinho heavily criticises his players attitude as huddersfield stun manchester united in the premier league, leaving manchester city to go five clear at the top. the number of people getting 100 candles on their birthday cake and a letter from the queen is growing fast. we'll find out what life
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is like as a centenarian with what must be our oldest ever sofa guest. and nick miller has the weather. it's still windy out there, tamer they will slowly eased today. a wet start for some of us, the weather on the mend this sunday. the bold forecast in the next half an hour. good morning. first, our main story. the government say it's considering ways of making buying and selling houses faster, cheaper and less stressful in england and wales. it's launching a consultation which will look at whether it's possible to reduce moving costs and end practices like gazumping. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. moving home is often compared to getting divorced in terms of stress and worry. picking your new home is the easy part of the process, before venders, surveyors, solicitors, banks, agents and removal vans get involved. currently, it can take three months on average to move home.
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getting the mortgage offer from your bank alone takes around 50 days. and a quarter of all transactions fall through. and so the government will be consulting estate agents, solicitors, as well as buyers and sellers to find out how best to speed up the process and cut costs for households. i think you can use technology to gather as much information about the proposed sale, about the proposed property, to be conveyed at an early opportunity. a purchaser or seller won't talk to his lawyer or conveyancer until after he's agreed the sale. that information can be gathered digitally. i know the land registry is working on this to improve it. so the more we can have ready for oven—ready sales, the quicker it can become. while some people involved in the house—buying process welcomed the consultation, labour said it was a feeble effort and would not tackle the real issue of insufficient homes being built. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, has warned that
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unless the government makes changes to the eu withdrawal bill, labour will side with conservative rebels to block it. hundreds of amendments have already been tabled to the legislation, which aims to transfer eu law into the british statute books. our political correspondent, jonathan blakejoins us now. is theresa may likely to lose any sleep over base? has significant as eight? it is enough tents, it chose how difficult it is going to be the government to get this legislation through parliament. it is transferring european law into uk law. so when the uk leads the european union there isn't a bake legal and regulatory boys that need filling. the government can'tjust put it through, because as we know, it lost its majority after the
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general election, so it need support from mps on all signs. labour set out its shopping list of the month this morning, including a boat in parliament on the final deal, a safeguard on consumer and workers' rights. and also the transition period on us leaving the eu and the new deal coming into force written into law. in response, the government says this bill needs to provide security for people and businesses, it will listen to mps' concerns, but doesn't want to see the legislation wrecked. thank you very much. hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in barcelona last night in protest over plans by the spanish government to sack the regional administration in catalonia. the president of catalonia, carles puigdemont, declared that a coup was being mounted and compared the actions of the government in madrid to that of the fascist dictator, general franco. angrier than ever before. catalans
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who want independence, digesting madrid's unprecedented move to temporarily scrapped their devolved government. the leader of catalonia's government in the ground. he called it the biggest attack on catalonia's autonomy since the dictatorship of franco. translation: this is the worst attack on the institutions and people on catalonia since the dictatorship of franco. earlier, spanish ministers approved what's known here as the nuclear option. in a few days, catalan autonomy will be suspended, the regional government sacked. all of its responsibilities run from a trade. the prime minister said catalan leaders will not be allowed to destroy the whole way in which spain is governed. translation: we apply article 155
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because no government of a democratic country and accept disregard for the law. vt test will come when a trade tries to physically take control of the cata la n physically take control of the catalan authorities. other catalan police and other local officials followed the spanish government's orders or disobey? a new country won't appear through words, even as they will it happen. they know too that bearing down on them is the all—powerful spanish state. the new head of the world health organization says he's rethinking his decision to appoint the president of zimbabwe, robert mugabe, as a goodwill ambassador. mr mugabe, who's 93, has led his country for 37 years but has been condemned over his human rights record. britain and the united states warn the decision could overshadow the work of the global agency.
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a woman has been arrested on suspicion of murder, after a baby fell from a sixth—floor window in bradford and died. west yorkshire police say the woman, who's 23, is undergoing a medical assessment in custody. officers have described the death of the 18—month—old child as "extremely traumatic" and say specially—trained officers are working to support his family. research seen by bbc 5 live investigates suggests patients are being denied life—changing drugs because the nhs can't afford them — despite many being developed with taxpayer's money. the nhs spends over a billion pounds on drugs from pharmaceutical companies. adrian goldberg is the presenter of 5 live investigates — tell us a bit more about the research? with this research by a campaign
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group, is that the nhs in england and wales spends over £1 billion a year on drugs that were initially developed using research funded by the uk taxpayer. their argument is that we're effectively paying twice for our medicines, once to fund research and then when the nhs has to buy those drugs after they've been developed by private companies. for one example, there is a drug which is a potentially breakthrough drug in the treatment of cancer. i spoke to one patient who has been told that she has terminal cancer, but she's managed to get a hold of the drug through the nhs and says it has stalled her cancer and transformed her life. but that drug is not routinely available and the moment for prescription on the nhs, not least because of its cost. that drop cost something like £80,000 for a two year course of treatment. campaigners argue the real cost of production that drug is about £1 per
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pill per day. so they say drug companies are taking advantage of the nhs and people who are desperate to get hold of the treatment. that isa to get hold of the treatment. that is a huge mark—up, how have the pharmaceutical companies in the government responded? in the case of this drug, the companies that make it say there was taxpayer funded research which helped develop the drug in the first place, tamer they spend 20 cents then ensuring the drug is safe and ready for use to be offered onto the nhs and the cost of the drug reflects that. many years of research they have taken as a private company. more generally, the trade body that represents drug companies point out that you may have a drug which looks promising, they may invest billions of pounds in it as they may invest billions of pounds in itasa they may invest billions of pounds in it as a private company, but in the end it proves not to be tended chris cracked up today and that research is something they can't
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have any financial advantage of. the nhs say they have an appraisal system designed to ensure the nhs buys drugs at a price that offers full value to the taxpayer. very interesting. and the programmers nets 5p am? prison officers in fourjails are to trial the use of pava spray — similar to pepper spray — to arm themselves against aggressive inmates. the ministry ofjustice will also roll out more than 5000 body cameras to officers in england and wales, as well as police—style handcuffs. violence in prisons rose significantly last year — with assaults on staff reaching record levels. the prisons minister, sam gyimah, has been explaining why the new measures like using pepper spray are necessary. i think we need to give officers the tools they need to do theirjob. now, we obviously need to pilot it to see if it works, but if a prison officer is attacked, surprisingly, then as a last resort, having this could make a difference, then they should have it.
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america's five living former presidents have gathered in texas for a concert in aid of victims of the hurricanes which have ravaged the united states this year. barack obama, george w bush, his father george hw bush, bill clinton, and jimmy carter came together to support the one america appeal, to help those caught up in the wake of hurricanes harvey, irma and maria. president trump wasn't in attendance, but he did record a two—minute video message for the appeal. one of the last—known letters to have been written on the titanic has sold for a record fee of £126,000. the letter was written by the american businessman oscar holverson to his mother the day before the belfast—built ship hit an iceberg. it is the only known letter on headed titanic notepaper to have gone into the atlantic and survived.
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incredible that it survived. yeah, one of my colleagues were saying earlier it was recovered from the businessman‘s body when it was taken out of the water. a 12am, good morning,. receiving a birthday card from the queen used to be a rarity, but now more people than ever before are celebrating turning 100 years old. in fact, one in three children born today are likely to live to beyond that age. a new bbc panorama documentary has filmed with seven people who have already reached that milestone. one of those is ios—year—old, diana. let's take a look. diana gould. i'm going to be 105. i
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think your outlook, your attitude towards life, you have one life, live eight. i don't feel 105. you learn something every day. if i come across a new words, gas, it's made me for that day. i've got these things that i do regularly. time goes very quickly. once a week, i get a taxi and go to the hairdresser. about once a month, i get my nails done. those are my two extravagances. thank you all for coming. and come next year, perhaps they'll make me another party, but
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who knows? she doesn't look105, does she? absolutely incredible. she's 105 does she? absolutely incredible. she's105 years old, we are joined by margaret is atjust 102 she's105 years old, we are joined by margaret is atjust102 years old, also took part in the documentary. she's here with her carer, barbara, and we're also joined from london by the maker of the documentary. good morning, roger, good morning, margaret. how does it feel and 102? well, frustrating sometimes. because i'm so frustrating sometimes. because i'm so dependent now on other people to do things. but, otherwise, i'm quite happy. i'm very well looked after. margaret, how has the world changed, how has life changed for you in 102 yea rs ? how has life changed for you in 102 years? fastly, yes. all the modern
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technology has gone beyond me! you don't use it? no! barbara, you're involved in looking after margaret. she's wonderful to look after. no other, and so independent. she doesn't look her age. you look fantastic for 102. how was your 100th birthday party? lovely, i really enjoyed it. something to think about, a house full of neighbours and friends. i've got lots of friends also all helpful and kind to me. and they all popped in to have a drink and wish me well.
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roger is waiting in our london studio to talk to us. he produces documentary for panorama. i'm out of the executive producer. thank you for clarifying that. that statistic we quoted that one in three babies born today is likely to look to be 100 is startling? astounding, and the reason we're making this film is because it'll about all. it'll effect the pensions and the nhs and families. margaret is the exception, she was looking after her own sun will stop until very sadly he passed away. mostly, it's down to us to look after our parents, and we will have children and grandchildren. that type of love is a very important part of the programme and i hope everybody understands this
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will change everyone's life. and how ready is the uk for more people living in two over the age of 100?|j don't think it's ready at all. we interviewed someone from the financial institutions, one person was having huge trouble because he was having huge trouble because he was living beyond his mortgage. and so was living beyond his mortgage. and so was his children! nobody has really welcome the fact that life is going to... the irony is that we wa nt to going to... the irony is that we want to look younger, i'm 81, i like the people say that i look around 70 01’ the people say that i look around 70 or 60. but now people that are hundreds, and people like margaret look amazing, and people feel her muscles in the film, she does diablo everyday! you're still executive producing documentaries at 81! they
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go! margaret, what advice would you give to young people today, many of them will live to be 100 like you. what advice would you give them? take advantage of all the modern technology they have and to be respectful to people. particularly the elderly. barbara, do you find, when you're with margaret, are people respectful these days to order people? no. not really. i think a lot of people are very selfish. they have a rather selfish attitude, young people. i'm not
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classing all of then these same, but on the whole, they have so much now that they take for granted. we've been talking today aboutjfk, john f kennedy, one of the big stories that happened in your lifetime. what's the biggest thing that that's happens, do you think, in the last 100 years? the war? yeah, the war. the war broke out soon after i was married. so i started married life with four years of war in front of me. yes. we were talking to roger about the uk being prepared to deal with lots more people living to the age of 100, you shaking your head?
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because there's not a enough places for them to be accommodated when they can't be cared for. more people wa nt to they can't be cared for. more people want to be looked after at home, but it's not always possible. only 19 yea rs it's not always possible. only 19 years for user weight for your telegram, roger, isuspect years for user weight for your telegram, roger, i suspect you will still be making films? there's possibility, i can only hope the system expands to meet our needs. thank you very much for coming in. it's been very nice to meet you. a couple of e—mails on this. this one first of all, i believe it is a wonderful time to be old. i started running at the age of 69, after 11 yea rs of running at the age of 69, after 11 years of running regularly, a recently collected my 40th medal and took part in the london marathon
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just before mike 18th birthday. one more ambition, that's to do a bungee jump. meanwhile a attend my local gym every day. gordon and seth lanarkshire says his neighbour is 100 today. jane, happy birthday. you can watch panorama — life at 100 tomorrow evening at 8:30 on bbc one. thank you again. a21 am, let's get a weather update with nick. i bet margaret has seen a lot of weather in 102 years, and changes in weather during that time. that is another talking point. we have storm brya n another talking point. we have storm bryan yesterday sweeping across the british isles, producing these big scenes. we still have some windy
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weather around this morning, but the winds will slowly ease as the day goes on. notjust when they as brian sits to the east of scotland, but quite wait for some of us. part of scotland, northern england at the moment. going through the day, drier and brighter, sunny spells into northern ireland. we still expect further showers during the day. most of this will pull away, especially east of the pennines. southeast england seeing sunshine at times this morning. showers developing during the day. brining up across east anglia and the easement lens, staying mainly dry in southeast england will stop. your winds this morning, easing off a bit. sunny spells from northern ireland, the midlands and southeast, still a chance of some outbreaks of rain at
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times. around 12 degrees, cooler than yesterday. dry and clear for a time tonight, but temperatures in eastern scotland and northeast england falling away. in the west, cloud and outbreaks of rain moving in across northern ireland and edging into western scotland by the end of the night. milder air coming in with this. tomorrow, cloudy outbreaks of rain, not to windy with this weather system, and a lot of it clearing the way through the afternoon. many of us will see the sunshine coming back in the east of the country. temperatures are a little bit higher, around 16 degrees. through this week, further weather systems coming into the uk, so some wet weather at times. breezy, but nothing like the strong
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winds, stormy conditions we've had over the last week. then is warming up, critically towards the midweek and weekend. for many of the tat tat, temperatures above average for the time of year, but further south you are, around 20 celsius. unusual for this time in toba. nothing too stormy on the horizon is, as we say goodbye to storm brian. nice as the news. time to have a look at the newspapers. robert meakin is back to tell us what has caught is eye. the ordnance survey will take issue with this first story. there are maps of the uk better than our own. is suggest there were soviet spies back to the
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19505 driving up and down the uk measuring the length of streets, height of bridges, sending it back to the civil unions and they could put together the most extensive maps of this country. they've recently been found in latvia, these mats. they are single or more detailed that ordinance survey is maps in the 19505. that ordinance survey is maps in the 1950s. just the idea of spies, measuring things! it's one of the things that stood out, the idea of spies with measuring seats in llangennech. what do you doing? nothing to see here! as a spectre in 1950, there was a real feeling that there could be a feeling that britain could be taken over. the cold war. now it feels more like an ealing comedy. this one coming here, about the bbc. go on, you explain the story. making sure i is when it properly, it's court object based
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media. they see millennials don't have time to watch half an hour or as hour of television. celebrating isa as hour of television. celebrating is a gathered different packages for different devices. you can choose your favourite character or plot line, so get rid of the bits you don't like. so analytics involving a favourite character in neasdenjosie exactly, favourite character in neasdenjosie exa ctly, get favourite character in neasdenjosie exactly, get rid of the rest. you can see it happening, it makes sense. i must admit, sometimes with box sets, i think there are bits i could do without, ijust want box sets, i think there are bits i could do without, i just want to box sets, i think there are bits i could do without, ijust want to get back tojohn could do without, ijust want to get back to john slowly could do without, ijust want to get back tojohn slowly in game of thrones, you miss out on certain bets. netflix released figures for the first time showing which shows people binge watch. there are a lots of people just sitting through an entire box it in the space of two or three days. you don't actuallyjust watch one episode of your favourite
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show, you're expected to watch them all en masse. we expect that. the bingeing is now commonplace. it's like putting breakfasts on iplayer and cutting at the newspaper review! daniel craig, there is a picture of jamie on the express. explain this. it's not new james bond and moneypenny? the next film is out next year, and there were suggestions that they are working on script ideas and one idea was why don't they finally give fans what they once, a romance between bond and moneypenny, and apparently barbaro broccoli said no, that goes against what it's about. it's means i get flirtatious relationship through the decades, we wouldn't
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wa nt through the decades, we wouldn't want it. and it will soon transit, i think this is great‘s last film. until it offer him more money! you know what, i think i will! just a final one, big trouble for placido offer small wine. i heard a news report that said there are places where a large wine is like two pints of beer. this is good research for some lucky journalist, of beer. this is good research for some luckyjournalist, having to go around hostelries across the united kingdom and checking what counts as a small wine. 125ml counts as a small wine. often these small is larger than that. i don't know how many they had to drink to get to this remarkable exclusive. undercover reporters are requested a small glass were given 105ml, and it
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should have been smaller than that. alcohol, generally, everything has got bigger in terms of wine glasses, but even in terms of beer, it is stronger, 5%becoming the norm. that was considered very strong when i was considered very strong when i was a teenager. chocolate bars are becoming smaller and rings measures are getting bigger. there's hope for us are getting bigger. there's hope for us all! thank you very much. coming up us all! thank you very much. coming up in the next half—hour, i'll be speaking to two young carers being honoured tonight. but will have a summary of the main news soon. hello, this is breakfast
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with rogerjohnson and tina dahely. a summary of this morning's main news. buying and selling a house in england and wales could become faster and less stressful, under plans aimed at making the process smoother. the government is launching an eight week consultation with the industry, which it hopes will lead to a reduction in moving costs and an end to the practice of gazumping. but labour has criticised the move, saying it doesn't tackle what it calls "the real issue" of insufficient homes being built. the shadow brexit secretary,
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sir keir starmer, says labour could join forces with conservative rebels to block the eu withdrawal bill — a key piece of brexit legislation which transfers eu law into british law. writing in the sunday times, sir keir starmer has warned the prime minister that unless she accepts a number of changes proposed by labour — including giving mps final approval — the bill could be defeated in parliament. the government has said it will listen to suggestions from mps but would not allow the legislation to be wrecked. hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in barcelona last night in protest over plans by the spanish government to sack the regional administration in catalonia. the president of catalonia, carles puigdemont, declared that a coup was being mounted and compared the actions of the government in madrid to that of the fascist dictator, general franco. the spanish prime minister said he'd been left with no choice but to impose direct rule after a controversial independence referendum. the new head of the world health organization says he's rethinking his decision to appoint the president of zimbabwe, robert mugabe, as a goodwill ambassador. mr mugabe, who's 93, has led his country for 37 years but has been condemned over his human rights record. britain and the united states warn
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the decision could overshadow the work of the global agency. research seen by 5live investigates suggests patients are being denied groundbreaking treatments because the nhs can't afford them — despite the drugs being developed with money from the taxpayer. last year nhs england spent over a billion pounds on medicine. pharmaceutical companies argue it costs billions of extra pounds turning scientific research into medicine. prison officers in fourjails are to trial the use of pava spray — similar to pepper spray — to arm themselves against aggressive inmates. the ministry ofjustice will also roll out more than five—thousand body—cameras to officers in england and wales, as well as police—style handcuffs. violence in prisons rose significantly last year — with assaults on staff reaching record levels. america's five living former presidents have gathered in texas
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for a concert in aid of victims of the hurricanes which have ravaged the united states this year. barack obama, george w bush, his father george hw bush, bill clinton, and jimmy carter came together to support the one america appeal, to help those caught up in the wake of hurricanes harvey, irma and maria. president trump wasn't in attendance, but he did record a two minute video message for the appeal. to have been a fly on the wall in the green room when they all got together. a mexican cliff diver has just been crowned world champion in a sport that's not for the faint hearted. jonathan paredes won this year's world series in chile. he beat six—time world champion, gary hunt from britain. the competition involved launching from 90 foot high ledge, before
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performing somersaults and twists. he gets there eventually. someone else who has all of the deep end. jose mourinho. not a happy man. his expression in comparison to that of the huddersfield players, is squad members, celebrating, such a stark difference. jose mourinho was robust in his criticism of his players, i don't like their attitude. it was poor from don't like their attitude. it was poorfrom them, like don't like their attitude. it was poor from them, like gloucester indeed. and not what you would expect from 18 open to win the premier league. good morning. —— from a team hoping to win. huddersfield claimed their highest profile scalp in their debut premier league season, and condemned united to theirfirst defeat of the season. coupled with manchester city's victory over burnley, it's opened up a five point gap at the top of the table. ben croucher reports on yesterday's action. three cheers for huddersfield town.
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eight teams tried and failed to beat manchester united this season, most of them failing to score. aaron moores put that right, the defence tethering, dashing in two claim a win over united since 1952. a famous tabor huddersfield town. think everyone at the stadium could feel in the first couple of minutes but one team wants to compete on one team wants to be aggressive and one team wants to be aggressive and one team is ready to give up everything and another team was not ready for that. so, the best team won. but gave manchester city the chance to capitalise and they made the most of it. sergio aguero came city's joint leading goal—scorer with a 3—0 win over burnley. they are five points clear at the top. chelsea were struggling against, this time watford left antonio conte feeling down, three goals in the last 20 minutes and prove to his mood, he just needed somebody to celebrate
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with. so the pressure eased on the chelsea boss, lester was discovering what it was all about, michael appleton's first game in caretaker charge ended with a 2—1win at swa nsea charge ended with a 2—1win at swansea and left him overjoyed, honest. there was a surprise at stoke, the weather not one of them, bournemouth‘s win was, andrew sermon setting them on the way to the second win of the season, that's how to do it. south coast rival saipan ten were made to wait at home to west brom, was it worth waiting for! his scores, absolutely brilliant goal. from the substitute. a 1-0 win ta kes goal. from the substitute. a 1-0 win takes intense, same scoreline, late drama at st james's takes intense, same scoreline, late drama at stjames's park, a late goalfor drama at stjames's park, a late goal for newcastle kept crystal palace rooted to the bottom of the table. then croucher, bbc news. and some big matches today in the premier league, struggling everton host arsenal, & tottenham take on liverpool in the late kick—off....
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on to scottish football, where rangers will be aiming to make it an old firm scottish league cup final when they play motherwell this afternoon. celtic booked their place in the final with a 11—2 win over hibs. moussa dembele came off the bench to score twice. the scottish champions have now gone 60 domestic games unbeaten. to end up getting four goals was absolutely brilliant so i tip my hat to them, it could have been a real ba na na to them, it could have been a real banana skin for us today, coming here, as probably a lot of people might have thought. what we dealt with that really well, to get to the third final in a year. in the scottish premiership, bottom side partick thistle earned their first win of the season. miles storey got the winner against dundee at the death, for a 2—1. they're still at the foot of the table though. there were wins elsewhere for hearts and ross county. australia have won the first one day game of the women's ashes
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series by 2 wickets. the host won with 5 balls remaining chasing a target of 228 in brisbane. the win gives them 2 points in the multi format series ahead of the second one day game on thursday. is this the day lewis hamilton wraps up a fourth formula one world title? well he's given himself a great chance, he'll be on pole position for this evening's us grand prix in texas. his main championship rival sebastian vettel will be right alongside him on the front row. hamilton must finish at least first or second to stand a chance of wrapping up the title, with three races to spare. saracens narrowly beat ospreys 36—34 to continue their 100% start to their champions cup defence. the match could have gone either way, but sarries got the decisive converted try to win the game, with seven minutes remaining. both sides gained a bonus point. leicester tigers put seven tries past french side castres at welford road. the tigers earned themselves a bonus point by half time, and three more tries in the second half, including this one from jonny may, made the game secure. a team who may not make
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it through to the next round is glasgow, they lost against leinster despite taking an early lead. northampton also lost to french side clermont. two time olympic championjadejones praised the loud london crowd as she won her first title of the year competing for the first time in the capital since london 2012, jones produced a confident display to win her world grand prix final against world champion air—um lee. it avenges her defeat to the south korean in the world chamionships injune the way i am built, i want to get gold all the time, it is quite hard when you and you are used to getting gold. to do it in london and against the girl who beat me in the world championships, it is bittersweet, it is nice. what a win too for bianca walkden, really underlining her status as one of the best in the world,
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with a gold medal in the over 67kg class. she easily beat her polish opponent alexandra kowalchook to claim her third grand prix win of the season. fantastic. really good to win medals but when you win them alongside your friends it's extra special. fantastic, really great achievement. jess, thank you. thank you for having me. for many of us, buying a home is one of the most important decisions we will make. today, the government announces a consultation for england and wales which looks at how to make the process smoother. estate agents, solicitors and mortgage lenders are being asked to use their expertise, and suggest how to simplify the process of buying or selling homes. earlier we spoke to one buyer who
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described the process is immensely stressful. we looked at about 30-40 houses, we find a house injuly, we thought it would be plain sailing. but really from the beginning it was highly stressful, i mean even applying for the mortgage was a really stressful process, my partner toby was a freelancer and they really sordid insisted that he needed a properjob so he even, stopped contracting and got a new job. —— they really sort of insisted that he needed a properjob. bearing in mind we are chain free at either end, we have no dates, it's been quite horrendous. joining us in the studio now is property analyst expert, henry pryor.
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and from our london newsroom, paula higgins, from the the homeowners alliance website. what can we do better? we can make it cheaper, slicker, this is the age where people are used ordering something before breakfast and getting it before lunchtime. we need to make this system transparent, the government has had a go at doing that, sadly i am old enough to have seen four enquiries by various governments into the house buying and selling process over my career. there's no shortage of people asking questions how we can do it, i've been to denmark, one of the places the secretary of state has suggested we might look for inspiration and ideas, they have the home information pack which we deployed some years ago. . . information pack which we deployed some years ago... briefly... at great expense to a lot of businesses, trying to make the house
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buying process that transparent by urging homeowners to provide all the information super bowl can make an informed decision when they were thinking about adding. buying a houseis thinking about adding. buying a house is right up there with the force, but treatment, forfun house is right up there with the force, but treatment, for fun and excitement, not surprisingly lots of people would like to make it easier and less painful. estate agents have and less painful. estate agents have a bad reputation, not all but some of the stresses, delays, the reasons behind the process being quite stressful. they do and understandably, that's where much of the pressure and pain comes from kabul people don't understand, as private individuals, not doing something as serious as this that frequently to give you an understanding how important and serious the process is. the french word for death is where we get the word for death is where we get the word mortgage from so you understand how important this is. most people's only experience with estate agents is when they go to buy or rent a property and then they do that they
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find themselves dealing with someone who is both paid by and represents the other side so understandably they are not necessarily getting the best experience. let's talk to paul in our central london studio. good morning. you represent homeowners, aspiring homeowners, one word that we hear a lot in england and wales, which strikes fear into perspective purchasers is gazumping. how much of the problem is it? it is. you think your house purchases going to go through and all of a sudden there is a higher offer through and all of a sudden there is a higherofferand through and all of a sudden there is a higher offer and there through and all of a sudden there is a higher offerand there is through and all of a sudden there is a higher offer and there is a lack of certainty. some people can decide to pull out of a phone, there is no repercussions, you find you might be out of pocket to £1500, a lack of certainty in the house—buying system, it scales. what then do you think needs to be done to stop that from half in the first place? a
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stronger commitment earlier, what we are calling for is a reservation agreement, at point of agreed, when you agreed a price, both sides put in the bed of money and they pay for each other's's cost of the other pool side. gets rid of the home of the people, so it's actually being more consistent and especially for first—time buyers, when it's very ha rd first—time buyers, when it's very hard to put up front £5,000 and then find out they are still not moving, they don't have that old. henry you mentioned denmark as a possible place to look for inspiration. lots of people getting in touch with horror stories about things taking so long and people vacillating, looking at offers, gazumping... fiery doesn't look to scotland, you never hear these problems? why doesn't the rest of the uk simply not adopt what they do in scotland? it works but it's not perfect, the
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problems, they look rather enviously across—the—board what we do in england and wales. i think there are are elements of our systems that would work better for them. the are elements of our systems that would work betterfor them. the big issue as paul indicated is the difficulty that they have it comes to when do they make a commitment? it used to be done with a handshake a gentleman's word was his bond, then moved forward to home information packs, paula has this idea of a financial commitment, the difficulty is in the letting scenario... the government nearly 12 months ago called for an end to letting fees, we don't want to see that kind of problem translate or weep into the sales market as inevitably home—buyers might be incurred by estate agents to pay money up front in order to secure the property was no possible prospect of doing so. it's difficult to get right, it's good the
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government is looking into it and frankly, a lot of people in the industry who would hope government can get on with doing more helpful and imaginative things like opening houses. henry and paula, thank you both for your insights. this is for i say goodbye. i am off to read the news for andrew marr. yes, but before you do, let's find out what's happening with the weather. i thought i would show you have the day is shaping up, storm brian out into the north sea, still blustery, don't get me wrong. the wind around this system easing during the day, not just windy but this system easing during the day, notjust windy but it's wet as well. the weekend so far has been all about the wind, this is an image from cornwall yesterday, rough seas, big waves, the coastal areas taking
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a head the wind is on the way out. that will take some of us longer to get rid of that rain. it is on the website but bare with it, it will turn drier and brighter, sunny spells coming through this morning for northern ireland, wales and south—west england. a shower band coming through cornwall at the moment, outbreaks of rain in northern england, perhaps feeding into used anglia before fading, it will start to brighton here, the swirl wind around the weakening brown. the wind easing those. variable cloud. temperatures down come third with yesterday, not too high yesterday, little lower at 11-14. high yesterday, little lower at 11—111. tonight quite quiet for a time, clear skies down the easter inside, parts of eastern scotland and for these england turning chilly, most single figures in rural
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spots but this other weather system coming in firstly through northern ireland overnight, then reaching western england, scotland, wales, it will be around for all of us during the day. it will linger for a time, along the south coast. not brightening up much year but elsewhere, you can see the transformation after the rain, the sunshine comes out, the odd shower for northern ireland, scotland, a little bit pc, temperatures a little higher between 35 and 16. the week ahead nothing stormy in the forecast but it will be changeable, expect some rain at times, not all the time but lighter winds than we have had. but, warmer weather, especially from midweek towards the end of the week, a weather system feeding or allowing warmerairto a weather system feeding or allowing warmer air to come a weather system feeding or allowing warmerairto come in a weather system feeding or allowing warmer air to come in from the south, southern parts of england, the temperatures will increase. high teens may be around 20, that is quite unusualfor this teens may be around 20, that is quite unusual for this time of year.
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if you are a fan of this out of season once, it is slightly bizarre at the end of october but i'm not complaining. at the age of 21, alex tew had a brainwave. aiming to become a millionaire, he set up a website and sold the pixels it contained to advertisers for a dollar each. by the time he appeared on the breakfast sofa in 2005, he'd achieved his dream. but what came next for the young entrepreneur? our correspondent robert hall has been to meet him. on the streets of san francisco, alex tew has travelled a long way from the day he made a million. 21—year—old alex tew set up the website in his bedroom after spending a restless night working out how he could become a millionaire before going to university. every computer image is made up of tiny dots or pixels. alex sold a million of them, in blocks at $1 each, just enough screen space for advertisers to show their own logo or a link to their website. alex, and this happens
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while you a sleeping, effectively? yeah. that's the beauty of the internet. i am sitting here right now and i have probably made a few more dollars since i woke up. that idea and that time of my life was really a turning point. the true value of the million dollar homepage was not the money it made me, but actually the relationships that formed as a result. 12 years on with a string of successful projects behind him, alex has embarked on another but this time the high flyer is trying to persuade the rest of us to slow down. i was actually working on something to do with meditation and the internet combined, even when i was about 16. it was always in the back of my mind to combine those two interests. well over 8 million people are now using the website and app. we are on track to do about $20 million of revenue this year. mental health issues are on the rise.
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what is more important is the value it's creating in the world. a trip back home to gloucestershire offers a chance to draw breath and to reflect on the past. he had always been an ideas guy even from seven or eight. all these experiences opened doors he never imagined. what he has also shown is he is really committed to continuing with ideas. alex may have found a new direction of travel but what advice had he for today's would—be entrepreneurs? we live in a culture where everything is instant. people expect things to happen and go perfectly for them and it's not the case. be doggedly persistent and go after your goals with relentless focus and drive because it is a competitive world out there. he may be a little more thoughtful, but alex tew is not slowing down. there are so many more challenges down the track.
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the bbc radio 1 teen awards are taking place tonight to honour young people from across the uk who have helped others through selfless, brave and exceptional achievements. among the winners — known as teen heroes — are brother and sister, holly and ollie. they set up a charity for young carers, based on their own experiences of supporting their mum. we'll speak to them in a moment but first let's take a look at their story. lam i am molder, i am 13. i am holly and lam 15, i am molder, i am 13. i am holly and i am 15, we are from towcester in northamptonshire. in 2011amond suffered from a traumatic experience which resulted in the development of her mental illness. associative identity disorder. amond has about 13 personalities and they all
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completely very. at one point say, she will get the smell of a flower and she will turn into a three—year—old and will not know how to tie her lasers. the adams movement is a charity that we are pa rt movement is a charity that we are part of, we started the movement because we wanted there to be a support system for young carers. we wanted to give these young people an opportunity to reach out and have that support from people who do know for what it's like to be young carer. and we can speak to ollie and holly now as well as bbc radio 1 presenter cel spellman. good morning to all of you. slight delay on the line. good morning. congratulations on winning the award. how does it feel? it's quite surreal to be honest, amazing experience all round. i'll it's going to be amazing, i am so
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excited. it's going to be good. we heard a little bit about your mum's condition, can you tell us what it's like for you, day—to—day, the biggest challenges?” like for you, day—to—day, the biggest challenges? i think the main biggest challenges? i think the main biggest challenges? i think the main biggest challenge for us is the fact that it's so unpredictable, you don't actually know what it's going to be like on a daily basis, you can wa ke to be like on a daily basis, you can wake up and it will be one thing but then on another day it's going to be completely different. i think that's the main challenge to both ways. ollie, could you give us some examples? well, just like we could be making breakfast and then she'll turn into a three—year—old and should have the mental state of a three—year—old, not safe around fire if you're making extra something, you have to move her away and make sure she is safe so everyone around her is safe. what's it like being
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the age you are, you are getting on with your own lives, studying, hanging out with your friends, to have those additional responsibilities? it's really challenging, i think for a young person it's quite daunting as well, you don't quite know what to do and when to do it but i think as a family, we are all quite those and just makes the support system a lot better and a lot easier so we can do out better and a lot easier so we can do our own things like going out with friends or studying as well and have the support forum on in place at the same time. why was important for you both to set up a charity specifically aimed at helping young carers? just because it was something we never really had while we we re something we never really had while we were going through caring for mum so we were going through caring for mum so it kind of gives us that motivation to keep helping mum and to help other people whilst
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obviously caring for our own mum because it's then a personal helpline for people their own age, to talk to, to get help and support. and to reduce the stigma around dental health in itself, i think when someone mentions a young carer is kind of stereotypically about some of the physical disability rather than mentally. we wanted to reduce that stigma and make sure young people know it's ok and that young people know it's ok and that you are not alone. some really incredible young people, cel spellman, being celebrated at the teen awards including holly and ollie. why are these award so important and ollie. why are these award so importantand can ollie. why are these award so important and can you tell us about the event? yes, we have got holly and ollie here and we have charlotte and ollie here and we have charlotte and harrison who are the other heroes and its special for a number of reasons. most importantly give
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these guys such as special day because they really, truly are incredible, inspirationalteam because they really, truly are incredible, inspirational team is doing so much good in the world and it's nice to kind of say, we see what you are doing and we thank you for what you are doing. but as well it's for the teams around the uk, if they can hear these stories and look at our teen heroes and address mates with them, cause them to go out and get help and it's what we are all about. some great music, people joining us and we get to celebrate the inspirational teen heroes. joining us and we get to celebrate the inspirationalteen heroes. who are you most looking forward to seeing, holly and ollie? rita rural or the bands, probably. have to agree with that one! so many! some great artists, we might have
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some surprises. we will be begin forward to finding out what they might be, thanks so much. you can listen to the teen awards live on bbc radio 1 from noon and can also watch the action on the iplayer from 2.30 this afternoon. that's it from us this morning, dan and louise will be back tomorrow morning from 6am. have a lovely weekend. this is bbc news. the headlines: ministers consider ways to make buying and selling houses faster, cheaper and less stressful.
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labour's brexit spokesperson says the party will back conservative rebels over brexit. the catalan president, carles puigdemont, says the region will not accept madrid's plan for direct rule. also in the next hour — lewis hamilton could win his world title at today's united states grand prix. hamilton will clinch the title if he wins the race — and rival sebastian vettel finishes lower than fifth. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 this morning's reviewers are the spectator‘s katy balls and journalist and broadcaster rachel shabi.

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