Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 23, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

9:00 am
hello, it's monday, it's nine o'clock, i'm chloe tilley in for victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. our top story today — from today drivers of older, more polluting vehicles will have to pay almost twice as much to drive in central london. we can either take action to clean up we can either take action to clean up fears that your children have underdeveloped and your adults suffer strokes and asthma, we do nothing which will make things worse. critics say it will "disproportionately penalise london's poorest drivers" but those in favour say it's the only way to improve air quality in the capital. your thoughts very welcome as always. also on the programme, we've discovered that 95% of tv ads during live uk football matches feature at least one gambling advert, with some games being dominated by betting ads. the figures are hugely negative for many people my age group. it is almost seen as the thing to do. that have to put a bet on to kind of get
9:01 am
something out of football. so is there any link between these ads and a rise in gambling addiction? we'll investigate. plus, a government minister says the "only way" to deal with british is fighters in syria is "in almost every case" to kill them. is he right? we're live until 11 this morning. in around half an hour's time the foreign secretary borisjohnson is going to make a speech about north korea. he's expected to say diplomacy and dialogue are the way forward. we'll bring it to you live. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. from today, owners of older, dirtier vehicles will have to pay an extra £10 to drive in central london. the scheme, known as the t—charge, is designed to reduce air pollution and has been described as the toughest emmission standard of any major city in the world. the move has been welcomed by some health charities and environmental groups, although some say it doesn't go far enough. steph mcgovern has been finding out. the t—charge will be charged on top
9:02 am
of the congestion charge up was introduced here a few years ago. the idea is to reduce pollution in the city. the london mea sadiq khan has improving air quality as 30, particularly for children who have been hit hard by the pollution in the city at the moment. in terms of how it works, this is a £10 daily charge, so to find if your vehicle was one has to pay this charge, you can go to the transport for london website and get the details. the rough rules around this is because vehicles registered before 2006, so it is the older, more polluting vehicles that will have to pay this £10 daily charge. that charges for weekdays between 7am and 6pm and it is expected to impact something like 34,000 is expected to impact something like 311,000 cars. if you do not pay the charge, if you come into the area
9:03 am
and do not pay it, you could be hit with a penalty charge notice of £130. this £10 charge is important to pay if you have a vehicle that is not meeting these new emission standards. lots of business people wonder what it is going to mean for them. i was talking to the federation of small businesses who say lots of companies will not be aware of this new charging system coming in so they are wondering whether they are vehicles are in the right spec for this, whether they will have to pay this charge and how much it will mean in total. rebecca is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the uk's biggest business lobby groups — including the insitute of directors and cbi — are calling for an urgent brexit transition deal to safeguard jobs and investment. in a joint letter due to be sent to the brexit secretary, david davis, in the coming days, the groups warn that time is running out. a government spokesman says the talks "are making real, tangible progress". 0ur political correspondent
9:04 am
alex forsyth is at westminster. tell us more about what is in this letter, alex. this comes from five influential business groups. they are effectively saying that uncertainty over brexit can have damaging consequences for investment and trade. they want a commitment to the two—year transition period after the two—year transition period after the brittney reese the eu effectively on the same terms as now, and that is what the government is aiming for but the other 27 eu leaders were not committed until things like the financial settlement are dealt with, which is proving tricky. businesses are urging the prime minister to get on with this but to some degree she's at the mercy of the other eu 27 before they can mercy of the other eu 27 before they ca n start mercy of the other eu 27 before they can start talking about trade. they have agreed to talk about it internally but those formal negotiations have yet to start. the prime minister will be updating mps later on the current negotiations on
9:05 am
brexit. do we know what she is likely say? you can imagine she will give a fairly upbeat assessment of what has happened but the backdrop to this, recent report from a german newspaper about a dinner between the prime minister, jean—claude juncker, and the eu chief negotiator, michel barnier. allegedly leaked report of that said thatjean—claude juncker thought that theresa may looked tired and anxious throughout and that she was asking eu leaders for help because of the domestic political pressure she faces at home with all of the differing views on brexit. this morning, the senior aide to jean todtjunker brexit. this morning, the senior aide tojean todtjunker has denied leaking that the pope and denied that he ever said it. he says that this is trying to undermine the eu side and damage negotiations. this programme has learnt that the government is considering whether new restrictions are needed on gambling adverts on tv during football matches. one in five of the commercials broadcast across 25 matches were for betting firms,
9:06 am
rising to more than one in three in some games. a report on the subject is expected as early as next week. and chloe will have much more on this story shortly. a government minister has said has said british extremists who've gone to fight with the islamic state group in syria will have to be be killed, "in almost every case", because of the threat they pose to the uk. rory stewart, who's a minister at foreign office and the department for international development, said there were difficult moral issues involved. he's told the bbc that british recruits to is had "essentially moved away from any kind of allegiance" towards the uk. patients are being encouraged to go home and rest in order to recover from some illnesses, rather than be prescribed unnecessary antibiotics. the advice is part of a campaign by public health england aimed at limiting the spread of drug—resistant super—bugs. 0ur health correspondent, james gallagher reports. bacteria, like these e—coli,
9:07 am
are getting harder to treat as they evolve ways to resist antibiotics. this is where the most serious infections come for analysis and the staff at these public health england laboratories admit they're worried about growing levels of antibiotic resistance. my lab looks for resistance to the most powerful antibiotics we currently have. if go back to 2005 to 2007, we were seeing these bacteria in maybe two to four cases per year. last year we confirmed these resistant bacteria in over 2,000 cases. drug resistant infections are a growing problem. 5,000 people were killed by such infections last year. if you take e—coli in the blood stream, now four in ten cases can't be treated with the most common antibiotics. # antibiotics, we're wonderful pills...
9:08 am
using too many antibiotics increases drug resistance. this tv campaign is being launched to tell people they'll not be given a pill every time they're ill. the majority of us will get infections from time to time and we will recover because of our own immunity. the fact is if you take an antibiotic when you don't need it then you are more likely to have an infection that the antibiotics then don't work for over the coming months. health officials say we all have a part to play in preventing the rise of antibiotic resistance. from today, hospitals in england will be required to charge up—front fees to foreign patients who receive non—emergency care. the move is part of attempts by the government to crack down on so—called "health tourism". but the british medical association has warned of the risk of confusion and an extra administrative burden for trusts. police in warwickshire
9:09 am
are questioning a man arrested over the four—hour hostage situation at a bowling alley in nuneaton yesterday. armed officers stormed the building in bermuda park, where two people were allegedly held at gunpoint. no—one was injured and police say the incident was not terror related. a group of mps has today launched an inquiry into so called "pop—up" brothels — that's where one or more sex workers set up in residential or holiday premises for a short period. it follows a huge increase in their prevalence, and accusations that they are a hotbed for criminal and human trafficking. sex work campaigners said women have had to resort to this after a number of well—established brothels were raided and subsequently closed, leaving them with nowhere to go. a british diver, who was stalked by a giant tiger shark off the coast of western australia, has said he's lucky to be alive. john craig, from sunderland, became separated from his boat
9:10 am
and was forced to swim several miles to shore as it pursued him. ijust kept my head in the water, watched what the big tiger shark was doing, and it kept coming back towards me, it would circle me, and kind of dart in. ijust had to use my spear gun to try and fend it off, and try and keep it as a safe distance, and then i knew the boat wasn't coming back, so my only option was to swim to shore. i knew it was, you know, seven—and—a—half kilometres to get to the beach, and that's an awful long swim with a big four metre tiger shark. doctor who's first female time lord will bejoined by three new companions. jodie whittaker, who takes over as the thirteenth doctor next year, will be joined by new cast regulars bradley walsh, tosin cole and mandip gill. bradley walsh has said he's looking forward to being part of the show some 50 years after first becoming a fan.
9:11 am
a video has emerged of the french president's dog making his presence known at the elysee palace. emmanuel macron was talking with three junior members of his government, when the labrador—griffin cross, called nemo, began urinating on one of the esteemed fireplaces. the incident was captured by a french tv station. nemo also appeared in mr macron‘s entourage back in august — continuing a tradition of french presidents having a "first dog". that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. i think that eats my cat bringing in a dead squirrel the other day! we fight this message on gambling
9:12 am
from norma. i'm surprised that it is allowed during the day. they are only allowed during live sport. we will be getting into that issue throughout the morning. you can get in touch throughout the programme using the hash tag #victorialive. text will be charge that the standard network rate. let's get some sport now. let's talk about lewis hamilton. touching distance 110w lewis hamilton. touching distance now that formula 1 drivers championship. yes, exactly. incredible when you consider the poor start that he had to the season. poor start that he had to the season. but he is edging closer to that fourth world title. a really impressive win at the us grand prix at the weekend. he had to fight for it. he was overtaken at the start of the race by his title rival sebastian vettel. hamilton, not to be outdone, overtook again on lap six and from there, never looked back. big celebrations from him.
9:13 am
quite a few people in the crowd, including a certain you saying belt, two of the fastest men in their respective sports, there, celebrating. let's hearfrom lewis hamilton now. it has been an incredible year, so far. i enjoyed that in the car. i did not expect to have the pace that we had on sebastian this year, today, but the car felt fantastic, we had the right balance at the start. three more to go, three more to win. let's show why he's in such a dominant position. these stats are very telling. not only has he had more wins and more podium places but he's beenin wins and more podium places but he's been in more positions that are awarded points than sebastian vettel and four sebastian vettel in the red, he had two retirements, and you wonder how costly those will have been for him, early in the year. hamilton needs just a top five finish in mexico next weekend for a fourth world title, chloe. let's
9:14 am
talk about the premier league. a great day for the north london sides, not so great for merseyside sites. pretty much advantage london after a massively heavy defeat for everton and liverpool. everton boss ronald kuhlman was under pressure already before even going into this match. after a 5—2 loss, you could see at full—time, the fans, board members, ronald coman himself looking utterly deflated. no wins in five matches for them, meaning they drop into the bottom three. he gave a very honest assessment after the game. he said that it is not good enough and that the club expects better. and for liverpool, another heavy defeat. they went down 4—1 to spurs. a good day for tottenham and their star spurs. a good day for tottenham and theirstar man, spurs. a good day for tottenham and their star man, harry kane, grabbing two goes in front of 80,000 fans at wembley. liverpool's defensive problems have been an issue all season problems have been an issue all season and were therefore see. the
9:15 am
reds boss jurgen klopp season and were therefore see. the reds bossjurgen klopp was very critical of his players and said he could have done a betterjob himself. we will hear from both of those managers when i returned with the rest of the sport at ten o'clock. 95% of tv ads during live uk football matches feature at least one gambling advert, this programme has found. one in five of the commercials broadcast across 25 matches were for betting firms, rising to more than one in three in some games. the government's considering whether new restrictions are needed, with a report expected as early as this week. 0ur reporterjim reed is here. what is you found out? thfr is manager the government has been looking into for a while. as far as those adverts are concerned there is a rule they won't be shown before 9pm, before the watershed in the evening but there is an exception, thatis evening but there is an exception, that is for live sporting events, almost every football match shown in
9:16 am
this country is going to be before 9pm. in other countries australia for example they have banned this, they have said it is not allowed the live event, the question for the government is should they follow suit and government is should they follow suitand do government is should they follow suit and do the same thing? let's think fast and act faster in play. you can watch it and you can get involved in it. the betting industry and the way it sells itself has changed radically in the last few years. new research for this programme has found adverts like these now dominate live football. more of the good stuff. making up one in every three show means some games. and we see everything. there is growing pressure on the government to follow other countries and tighten the rules. and we gamble responsibly. i think almost betting has become part of the social experience of football. it's part of our culture almost now. whether online or in store, it's almost a normal thing to do. matt has just turned 30.
9:17 am
when he was a teenager he started gambling in bookies and later online. at one point he was spending a couple of hundred pounds a week. any spare money that i had was spent on gambling. two weeks you would be losing, but you would hope to go on a lucky run. the number of problem gamblers has remained fairly stable over the last few years, with around two million people at risk. the latest stats though show if you're under 35 years old, you're far more likely to get in trouble. the sports betting adverts is huge. it has swamped the whole premier league. it's trying to get these bets placed as quickly as possible. i think it is hugely negative. i think for many people of my age group, it is almost seen as the thing you have to do. that you have to put a bet on to kind of get something out of football.
9:18 am
ten years ago, the labour government let bookies advertise on tv for the first time. why don't you put a few quid on it? well, i am going to. i'm going to have a cheeky punt. there was and still is an agreement not to show ads before the 9pm watershed. there is an exception though, in live sporting events that rule doesn't apply. this is all about targeting the new generations. the generations that don't go into the old—fashioned bookies, who wouldn't know what one is really. we looked at 25 games shown on tv this season from the build up through to the post—match analysis. that's total of 1,324 commercials and sponsorship indents. of those 272 were for betting ads, that's one in every five. for some games sponsored by betting firms, the rate was even higher, take a recent everton match, 40% of the adverts were for gambling. 0r scotland's match in slovakia again, 37% of the commercials
9:19 am
were betting related. there's two things. it's definitely about brand building and getting as many customers as possible, but the main thing is getting people to bet now and this is all about, here's a chance, bet on it now. welcome back. right then... last year gambling firms spent £150 million on tv ads, that's up sharply over the last four years. a single advert for premiership football is thought to cost around £35,000. the concern from campaigners is that this makes betting seem too normal especially amongst the next generation of potential customers. these 17—year—olds are training on a cold night in south london. we asked them what gambling brands they associate with the game. bet365. william hill. ladbrokes. i would say like about five years
9:20 am
ago, there weren't really much. i think now there seems to be quite a lot more. even sometimes before the games. there is a game next week and adverts would be on like for betting president week before. would it tempt you to bet? that's the whole point, isn't it? that's the whole point to urge you, to make you feel i want to win some money. i want to get some money. it sucks you in, definitely. if you were going to name one of type of advertiser associated with football, would it be cars, alcohol, gambling? which is the one that first comes to mind? gambling. it's always gambling because you just have it around and itjust catches your eye, yeah. the government is now under pressure to do more on this. at a recent debate in the house of lords, former spurs chairman lord sugar was as blunt as usual. they have recently started to add at the end of the advert, "gamble responsibly. " well, my lords these couple of words are pathetic. i mean absolutely pathetic.
9:21 am
it is my personal belief that it is these adverts that are the major culprits who induce young people to gamble. frankly, these adverts are too clever, and too luring. other countries have been taking action. earlier this year australia banned all gambling ads in live sport before the watershed and in europe, belgium has just done the same thing. the betting industry says there is no evidence that more adverts leads to more problem gambling. is there a danger that this has just gone a bit too far now? you look at the number of adverts, this wasn't the case five or ten years ago? yes, it is a subjective decision, isn't it? do i like it? is there too much of it? there is an interesting question there about whether the current debate is around objective concerns. are they causing harm or is it subjective? people don't like them and there is even people
9:22 am
in the gambling industry to feel that way. we have a major review under way at the moment, that will look at it objectively. it's a great opportunity to look at all these issues. are you comfortable with under—18s seeing lots of these adverts? not comfortable with it, you by i it's inevitable and you can't look at these adverts in isolation. gambling is all around us in this society and has been for a very long time. that's what critics say thought that all the adverts normalise gambling. they will make under—18s think it is just part of sport? i think that debate is probably passed. the reality is gambling is normalised and if you look at why, it was probably the introduction of the national lottery. it changed the whole world in terms of gambling you cans the perception and when you look at underage gambling thankfully the number are very low. it's back to business in the premier league. the thing is, a tv advertising ban can only do so much. take the bbc‘s own programme, match of the day. no commercials maybe, but a study by goldsmith‘s university found over 250 separate gambling adverts on screen — mostly on shirts and hoardings. it's burnley nil,
9:23 am
west ham united one. and if the government does clamp down on tv commercials, some think more spending could just switch to the internet which is harder to police. matt is now getting help for his problem and has excluded himself from most of the sites and apps. like other people we've spoken to, he thinks a blanket ban on adverts is too much. he'd just like to see fewer of them on screen. i personally think the most sensible is to limit the amount of adverts played hourly. i think to stop it completely is probably irrational, but the frequency is intolerable. it's too much. this is all likely to come to a head this autumn. a major government review of the gambling sector is expected soon and greater restrictions on advertising are certainly possible. jim, what do we think
9:24 am
the government is planning to do? it has been a long time coming this review. we expect it as possibly as later this week. a spokesman for the department of culture, media and sport which is in charge, said we have been clear that we expect the gambling sector to protect players an help them stay in control of their gambling, but there is clearly more work that is needed in this area. now that sound strong to me, like there is some sort of change coming. when you speak to people in the tri, they sort of accept they will be more regulations on adverts, the question is how far will the government go? will it copy what has been done in australia? there is likely to be consultation before any final decision is made. it comes down to how much damage these adverts are doing? it does, what the industry says there is no evidence that these ads are leading to
9:25 am
increased levels of problem gambling, part of the issue is the figure, so the latest statistics we on this from the gambling commission, they were published back in august, showing relatively stable level of problem gambling in this country, the thing is they are using figures from back in 2015, that is how they calculated it. this industry is moving so quickly, with technological change, more betting on the phone and adverts have change a lot. a lot of people are saying how relevant are these statistics? it can cause some people real problem, wanted to leave you with an e—mail we got from a viewer a couple of weeks ago, it is one reason we decided to make the film. we won't use his name. he said i discovered my son's gambling problem in sixth form. he has taken my debit card and usedit form. he has taken my debit card and used it to place bets on matches. they are absolutely polluted with gambling adverts, aimed at vulnerable young people. my son, his
9:26 am
son, did win a couple of times but ultimately lost it all. hopefully the government will wake up and realise the football world needs to clea n realise the football world needs to clean its act up and distance itself from gambling. thank you. i know some comments are coming in, the internet is failing me. i will read them when they come in. we can take tojo them when they come in. we can take to jo steven, a them when they come in. we can take tojo steven, a member of the digital culture, media an sport committee. labour want to see a ban on gambling firms from advertising on gambling firms from advertising on football shirt, so first of all, if you watch any football match, any live football match, there so many gambling advert, is your view is that it there are too many it has reached saturation level. i watch a lot of football, i can't think of any other advertisers that target live football game in the the way the betting industry does. i do think it has got to a point where is so much of it, i welcome the fact that the government are going to publish their review and i hope there stringent measureness o there. my
9:27 am
there stringent measureness o there. my internet has worked. james says betting adverts are prevalent with golf coverage too, two out of three are gambling adverts and row can have five ad breaks in an hour. alcohol is shown in adverts throughout the day, alcohol is just or more dangerous than gambling so why is it we are focussing on gambling, is that fair? you would make a point about alcohol, about gambling, tobacco as well, but what we have seen is that there is a growth in problem gamblers over the last few years so there are nearly 500,000 problem gambler bler in the country. two million who gamble regularly who are at risk, and it is the money that is being spent on advertising is growing massively year on year, the betting industry wouldn't be putting that money into advertising if they didn't think it was going to increase their revenue. it is worth remembering of course, it was the labour government under tony blair that liberalised the gambling laws around between years ago, do you think it was thought
9:28 am
through enough? i think that the consequences may be weren't, but we would like to see, we are very clear we would like to see a ban on betting company sponsorship in live coverage and on shirts. it is the shirt sponsorship, it is the hoardings round the ground, how many kids are watching live football? you know, there are millions of people watching live football, every week, and this saturation of the adverts and this saturation of the adverts and the hoardings and seeing the logos, it is happening every single week. as we saw in that report, eve ryo ne week. as we saw in that report, everyone on match of the day we see so many references inadvertently to betting company, do you think labour got it wrong? ten years ago when tony blair said let us liberalise the gambling law, you said you didn't foe foresee it? you can argue we did get it wronging but we would like to have the opportunity to put
9:29 am
it right if we get back in government. this is a wide measure of agreement cross—party agreement. iama of agreement cross—party agreement. i am a member of the group on fixed odd betting terminals where we have done research on those. explain watching a what they are? these are machines in betting shops, where you can bet up to £100 every 20 second, they are described as the crack cocaine of gambling. people who have problems are spending more and more money and the social problems they cause are well documented, notjust to individuals, job loss, crime, break down of families, and in the worst and most severe cases suicide, so there are problems across the industry, this is why row have seen other country like australia and belgian take radical steps to ban sponsorship and so this review by the government is long overdue and the government is long overdue and the industry is moving very quickly, technology, you know, in 2007 we didn't really know what technology
9:30 am
would bring to the gambling industry and to sponsorship and to advert, so now is the very good time for review and it is long overdue. lots more comments coming in, if you want to get in industry is moving very quickly, 'up : up with watching live sports on sky and seeing adverts all the time. sky and seeing adverts all the time. sky makes money without having to rely on them." sponsorship and to 'up : up with watching live sports on sky and seeing adverts all the time. sky and seeing adverts all the time. sky makes money without having to rely on them." tony says "thank grow for covering the ghastly ads. go for the companies that advertise on football shirts and that his do 'up : up with watching live sports on sky and seeing adverts all the time. sky and seeing adverts all the time. sky makes money without having to rely on them." tony says "thank grow for covering the ghastly ads. go for the companies that advertise on football shirts and that his do not support responsible gambling." "the gambling ads are a disgrace, i have watched young men throw hundreds away. the ads before and during the game bombard the network, encouraging outlandish gambling. i have seen men in tears the at full—time." still to come.
9:31 am
foreign secretary borisjohnson's speech on global security — live. he will be talking about the secretive state of north korea. we will bring you his speech. and the german newspaper has published an account that theresa may begged for help with brexit during a dinner with the european commission president. we will bring you the latest. now get the latest headlines. from today, owners of older, more polluting vehicles will have to pay an extra £10 to drive into central london. the scheme known as the t—charge is designed to reduce air pollution and has been described as the toughest emissions standards of any major city award. the move has been welcomed by some health charities and environmental groups. some say that it does not go
9:32 am
far enough. the mirror of the capital has defended the policy. we have children in london whose lungs are underdeveloped because of the poor quality of the air. adults suffering from a variety of conditions from asthma through to dementia and strokes, link to the poor quality air. so today's t—charge is the toughest vehicles emissions charge an award for a reason. we need to get the most polluting vehicles off the streets of london. the uk's biggest business lobby groups including the institute of directors and the cbi are calling foran of directors and the cbi are calling for an urgent brexit transition deal to safeguard jobs and investment. in a joint letter due to be sent to the brexit secretary david davis in the coming days, the groups warn that time is running out. a government spokesman said that the talks are making real, tangible progress. the victoria derbyshire programme has learned that the government is considering whether new restrictions are needed on gambling adverts on tv
9:33 am
during football matches. 0ne are needed on gambling adverts on tv during football matches. one in five of the commercials broadcast across 25 matches were for betting companies, rising to more than one in three on some games. a government report on the subject is expected as early as next week. patients are being encouraged to go home and rest in order to recoverfrom being encouraged to go home and rest in order to recover from some illnesses rather than being prescribed unnecessary and. it's pa rt prescribed unnecessary and. it's part of a new campaign by public health england. health officials warn that the overuse of certain medicines has made some infections harder to treat by creating drug—resistant harder to treat by creating drug—resista nt superbugs. last harder to treat by creating drug—resistant superbugs. last year in england alone, more than 3000 people died from such infections. that's the summary of the latest bbc news. let's get some sport now with jessica. good morning. mercedes driver lewis hamilton is on the brink of winning his fourth formula 1 drivers championship. he won big
9:34 am
us grand prix yesterday ahead of his ferrari rival. iam just us grand prix yesterday ahead of his ferrari rival. i am just handing back to you now, chloe. we can go straight to central london where the foreign secretary, boris johnson, straight to central london where the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, is talking about north korea. this is an example of the kind of infrastructure that you were just talking about. it is an inspirational structure that was created many, many decades ago, over 100 years ago and has been beautifully upgraded and has stood the test of time. and that is what i wa nt to the test of time. and that is what i want to talk about this morning, because all of you young, thrusting chatham house types are looking far too dynamic to remember the early 19805 too dynamic to remember the early 1980s are indeed the late 1970s. do you? i 1980s are indeed the late 1970s. do you ? i certainly 1980s are indeed the late 1970s. do you? i certainly do. i remember being chilled to the marrow, not just by the newspaper graphics, the
9:35 am
hundreds of nuclear missiles trained in this country by the warsaw pact, and scarier still, the attempts by the uk government to reassure the population, the pamphlets and films that told you such things as how to build a fallout shelter. you took several doors off of their hinges and prop them up diagonally against the wall, reinforced them with suitcases full of books and then you we re suitcases full of books and then you were told to tune into radio 4, whether contingency plans would play endless reruns ofjust a minute. there was a time in british children knew all about four—minute warnings and the perils of radiation sickness and the perils of radiation sickness and we all read a book called where the wind blows by raymond briggs. remember that? i remember it, as a teenager, about the horror of those
9:36 am
weapons. for decades now, that threat has seemed to vanish. it went with the end of the cold war. we don't want it back. and that is why people are watching with such interest, and the first stirrings of apprehension, the events in the karim peninsular. kim jong—hyun apprehension, the events in the karim peninsular. kimjong—hyun has tested 19 misano so far this year and has conducted four of the six nuclear tests ever carried out by that country. it is now widely accepted that kim is coming closer to being able to launch a nuclear armed icbm over the continental united states. i should stress this is not only prompted outrage in america but it is a prospect that has been unanimously consent —— condemned by russia, china, the eu,
9:37 am
to say nothing of the dismay of those quintessentially peaceable countries, japan and south korea. it is this increased tempo of nuclear testing, coupled with florid outbursts of verbal belligerence that have reawa kened, outbursts of verbal belligerence that have reawakened, even in this country, those forgotten fears. the public can be forgiven for genuinely starting to wonder whether the nuclear sword of damocles is once again held over the head of a trembling human race. so now is perhaps a good moment in a calm and dispassionate way, to take stock. before we reissue that old pamphlet called protect and survive, before we teach kids how to hide under
9:38 am
desks and lay on stocks of baked beans and spam, let's look at the history of nuclear proliferation, how nuclear weapons have spread and how nuclear weapons have spread and how we have collectively sought to contain their spread. back then, as now, most predictions were gloomy. and yet those gloomy predictions have been utterly confounded by events. america was of course the first to use the bomb in 19115. the soviet union detonated a device in 1949, the uk next in 1952, the french did their testing in the sa ha ra french did their testing in the sahara and 1960. and at that point, the then american presidential candidatejohn the then american presidential candidate john f. kennedy the then american presidential candidatejohn f. kennedy predicted that, by1964, candidatejohn f. kennedy predicted that, by 1964, within only four yea rs, that, by 1964, within only four years, there would be ten, 15 or 20 nations that would acquire nuclear
9:39 am
weapons. as things have turned out, it is now almost 60 years after he issued his warning and, yes, the npt has some notable non—signatories including india and pakistan and yet the number of nuclear armed countries has yet to reach double figures. this is, on the face of it, an absolutely astonishing statistic. and an extraordinary achievement. when you consider that every previous military development, from firearms to fighter jets previous military development, from firearms to fighterjets has spread among humanity like impetigo, you have to ask yourself why. why has nuclear weapons been a great exception? it can't just nuclear weapons been a great exception? it can'tjust be the kit. they cannot be so complex that only a handful of so—called advanced nations have the intellectual
9:40 am
wherewithal to make them. it is true that the process is laborious and highly expensive, but the basic technology is more than 70 years old andindeed technology is more than 70 years old and indeed has been taught in universities, if not schools, for decades. generations. the answer is partly that many countries wisely decided, after the war, that they we re decided, after the war, that they were going to take shelter under the nuclear umbrella provided by the united states, nations in both europe and in asia opted for this protection. a commitment that must be rated one of the greatest contributions by america to the unprecedented epoque of peace and prosperity that we have all been living through. i should observe that some european countries found themselves under a rival umbrella provided by the soviet union, although by that stage, they had no choice in the matter. it was that
9:41 am
american fall, that guarantee, that make possible global consensus embodied by the 1970 nuclear non—proliferation treaty. by this treaty, 191 nations came together to recognise the special role of the five existing nuclear powers and also to insist that there should be no further dispersal of such weapons. nuclear technology would be made available to other countries, provided it was used exclusively for civilian purposes. that was a great diplomatic achievement. it was an effort in which the uk, as one of the leading upholders of the post—war rules —based international order, played a crucial role. the british delegation was led by alan
9:42 am
chalfant, now british delegation was led by alan chalfa nt, now lord british delegation was led by alan chalfant, now lord chalfont, the labour minister, who was, and at the age of 100, almost 100, still is a representative of the days when labour was both hawkish and commonsensical on nuclear deterrence. that diplomacy has helped make the world safer, more secure, more confident and therefore more prosperous. it has helped to avoid what might otherwise have been avoid what might otherwise have been a gathering rush to destruction in which the world was turned into a great arena of mexican stand—offs, a nuclear version of the final scene of reservoir dogs. that far—sightedness is now needed more than ever. not only to keep the npt, but also, one of its most valuable, complementary accords, the nuclear
9:43 am
deal with iran. to grasp the importance of the joint comprehensive plan of action, we should remember that, just before it was signed in 2015, iran had enough centrifuges and low enriched uranium to be only months away from producing the essential material for at least one nuclear weapon. let's remember what the consequences would have been for iran and the walk, if teheran had gone down that road. never mind the response of israel or indeed the united states to the back of nuclear weapons in the hip or the iranians, a regime that has been capable of bloodcurdling rhetoric about the mere existence of the zionist entity. a nuclear armed iran
9:44 am
would have placed irresistible pressure on neighbouring countries to up the anti and to trigger an arms race in what is already one of the most volatile regions of the world. imagine all those mutually contaminating sectarian dynastic internee sign conflicts in the middle east today. then, turn the dialand middle east today. then, turn the dial and add middle east today. then, turn the dialand add a middle east today. then, turn the dial and add a nuclear arms race. it is nightmare we can continue to avoid if we are sensible, and if we show the same generosity and wisdom as the negotiators the of the npt. first and and most important, it is important to understand, vital to understand, that president trump has not withdrawn from the jcpoa. he has
9:45 am
not withdrawn from the jcpoa. he has notjunked not withdrawn from the jcpoa. he has not junked it. he not withdrawn from the jcpoa. he has notjunked it. he has won'ted —— continued to waive nuclear sanctions against iran and having spoken to some of the most influential figures onical tap —— capitol hill, none of them fans of the iranian regime, i have no doubt with determination, and with courage, thejcpoa can be preserved. this is not just preserved. this is notjust because the essential deal is in the interests of western security, though it is. but because it is profoundly in the interests of the iranian people. this is a great nation. of 80 million people. two thirds of whom are under the age of 30. they are highly educated men and women, they watch youtube, they dance to music video, even if it is in the privacy of their own home, they use and
9:46 am
understand technology, they are bursting with capitalist and entrepreneurial spirit. if we can show them they are welcome in the great global market place of ideas and innovation, in time, a very different relationship is possible with the modern heirs of what is after all, one of the greatest of all ancient civilisations, that is the possibility that the jcpoa holds open. notjust averting a perilous and debilitating arms race, but ending the long and largely self imposed exclusion of iran from the global mainstream that so many millions of iranians yearn to join. of course, of course we share, we in the uk share with our american friends and with many of our allies,
9:47 am
in europe and across the middle east, the concern, the legitimate concern over the disruptive behaviour of the iranian revolutionary guard, in countries hundreds of miles from their borders. it is simply provocative and dangerous that iran has supplied tens of thousands of rockets and missiles to hezbollah, weapons that are point at israel but whose use would bring the most destructive retaliation not on iran, the responsible party, but upon the people of lebanon. it is of no conceivable benefit to the tormented people of yemen, that iran should be supplying missiles to the houthi rebels who they use to target saudi arabia. behaviour which alalas can only strengthen the consickions of those in the region who believe they have no choice but
9:48 am
to respond to iran's actions. frankly, it is astonishing, that the iranians, who rightly complain that the world looked the other way when they suffered so tragically from the chemical weapons deployed by saddam hussein in the 0s should even now by a betting and concealing the crimes of bashar al—assad who has used the same methods against his own people. soi same methods against his own people. so i think it is right that we should join with our american friends and allies to counter this kind of behaviour, where ever possible. but that does not mean for one minute that with should write iran off orwe one minute that with should write iran off or we should refuse to engage with iran, or we should show disrespect to its people, on the contrary. we should continue to work, to demonstrate to that
9:49 am
population, in iran, that they will be better off, that they will be better off under this deal, and the path of reengagement it prescribes, and that is the model of toughness, but engagement. each reinforcing the other. that we should have at the front of our mind, as we try to resolve the tensions in the korean peninsula. i think it is right that rex tillerson has specifically opened the door to dialogue. he has tried to give some sensible reassu ra nces to tried to give some sensible reassurances to the regime, to enable them to take up this offer. 0ffer. remember the four noes that have been offered by the south korean president and reinforce bed i the us secretary of state. no seeking regime regime change, no seeks to force the collapse of north korea's regime, no seeking to deploy us forces beyond the 38th parallel,
9:50 am
no attempt to accelerate the reunification of korea. these are the commitments that we hope will encourage kim jong—un to halt his nuclear weapons programme. to come to the negotiating table and there to take the only path that can guarantee the security of the region asa guarantee the security of the region as a whole. you will often here it —— hear it said that in weighing up those options kim must bear in mind the woeful precedence of those whoa disarmed. 0f the woeful precedence of those whoa disarmed. of libya, where the leader listens to the ambulance dishments of the west and gave up his nuclear weapons programme over to be overthrown with western connigh vans or ukraine which surrendered its nuclear arsenal to suffer the forcea ble nuclear arsenal to suffer the forceable loss of territory in europe since 1945. 1945. it is
9:51 am
therefore suggested that kim would be sealing his own fate if he were to comply. i reject those analogies. what finished gaddafi was an up rising of his own people, including on the streets of tripoli. even if he had been able to perfect a nuke arsenal in time, and if it is true, that he had a justified reputation for mercurial behaviour, it seems unlikely that he would have december decided to nuke his own capical, —— capital, including himself. as survival strategies go, that would have been eccentric even by his own standards. as for ukraine, the fundamental difference is that no—one, not south korea, nor any other neighbour has any designs on
9:52 am
the national territory of north korea. and the crucial question kim jong—un surely needs to ask himself is whether his current activities are making pyongyang any saver for himself and for his regime? no—one, iam sure himself and for his regime? no—one, i am sure no—one in this room, certainly no—one in the uk and indeed around the world wants any kind of military solution to this problem. known actively desire —— no—one actively desires that outcome. but kim —— kimjong—un and the world need to understand that when the 45th president of the united states contemplates a regime led by a man who not only threatens
9:53 am
to reduce new york to ashes, but who stands on the verge of acquiring the power to make good on his threat, i am afraid that the us president, whoever he or she might be, will have an absolute duty to prepare any option to keep safe not only the american people, but all those who have sheltered under the american nuclear umbrella. i hope kim will also consider this. that if he is objective is to intimidate the us, into wholesale withdrawal from east asia, it strikes me his current course might also be designed to produce the opposite effect. already president moon of south korea is
9:54 am
installing us—made missile defences. and injapan and south korea, it is easy to imagine the growth of domestic pressure for those governments to take further steps to protect their own populations, from a nuclear north korea. in short, pyongyang faces the same dilemma as tehran. by continuing to develop nuclear capabilities kim risks provoking a reaction in the region that it at one defensive and competitive. that reduces not increases his security and reduces the survival chances of the regime. and therefore, i hope that kim will see that it is no part of his family doctrine of national self—reliance, no is it in the interests of his
9:55 am
national security to end up with an escalation of america's military presence in east asia, let althrown run the risks that could emperil his regime. until he understands that i am afraid we have no choice collectively but to step up the pressure on pyongyang. it is one of the most encouraging developments this year that the un security council, with the strong support of the uk, has unanimously passed three resolutions to tighten the economic ligature around the regime. when i joined a debate on north korea in the security council earlier this year, i was struck by the unaccustomed absence of discord. for the first time, the chinese have agreed to impose strict limits on the export of oil to north korea, which until now was taboo. there has
9:56 am
been an unmistakable change in chinese policy, that is warmly to be welcomed. in his speech to the 19th party congress president xi hailed china's standing as a world power. i would say there is no more urgent problem for china to address, nor anywhere beijing has greater influence than the threat to international security represented by the behaviour of north korea. there is also unprecedented discussion between china and the us, on how to handle this crisis, a thing i think bodes well for the world. i should thing i think bodes well for the world. ishould pay thing i think bodes well for the world. i should pay tribute to my colleague rex tillerson for his efforts. whatever we may think of the regime and its behaviour, the ruling elite in north korea is in the end composed of human beings. we must find ways of getting through to
9:57 am
them. and at the same time, notjust toughening the sanctions regime, but enforcing those already in place, and, in this respect, again, the chinese hold the key. this is the moment for north korea's regime to change course. and, if they do, the world can show that it is once again capable of the diplomatic imagination that produced the nuclear non—proliferation treaty, and after 12 years of continuous effort produced thejcpoa nuclear deal with iran. it won't be easy but the costs of failure could be catastrophic. we cannot disinvent nuclear weapons or wish them away. and the events in the korean pins
9:58 am
peninsula are the clearest possible rejoinder to those such alas as jeremy corbyn in at least some of his pronouncement although i accept on this matter he says different things ass different times. to those who say we should unilaterally cast aside our nuclear weapons. to wield a nuclear deterrent as this country does is neither easy, nor cheap. indeed it imposes a huge responsibility on any country. we are one of the handful specifically recognised by the mpt to possess such dreadful weapons and we do so not just such dreadful weapons and we do so notjust in the name of our own security but via nato for the protection of dozens of our allies. and by holding that stockpile, a minimum stockpile i should say which
9:59 am
has been reduced by half since its cold war peak we play or part in deterring the ambitions of rogue states. it is 25 years since the end of the cold war. and a new generation has grown up with no memory of the threat of nuclear winter and little education in the appalling logic of mutually assured destruction. hiroshima, nagasaki, their destruction, the full horror of what took place is now fading from living memory. when people like alan chalfant drew up when people like alan chalfant drew up the npt, those horrors were still fresh in the hearts of the world. we must not be so forgetful or so complacent as to require a new lesson in what these weapons can do,
10:00 am
or of the price of failing to limit their spread. the npt is one of the great diplomatic achievements of the last century. it has stood the test of time. in its restraint and its maturity, it shows an unexpected wisdom on the part of humanity, and almost evolutionary instinct for the survival of our species. it is the job of our generation now to preserve that agreement and british diplomacy will be at the forefront of that endeavour. thank you all very much indeed for your attention this morning. thank you so much. and thatis this morning. thank you so much. and that is the foreign secretary boris johnson making a speech in central london. he's been talking about north korea, saying that the us secretary of state rex tillerson is right to keep an open dialogue. he says that there needs to be toughness but engagement and they have to step up pressure on north
10:01 am
korea. he also says iran should continue to be engaged. good morning. it is ten o'clock. some 95% of tv advert breaks during live football feature at least one gambling ad and in some cases as many as one in three adverts are for betting firms. the sports betting adverts is absolutely huge. it's swamped the whole premier league. it's trying get these bets placed as quickly as possible. so many of you getting in touch with others on this this morning. we'll be talking to people with experience of gambling addiction and its impact. also, a government minister says the "only way" to deal with british is fighters in syria is "in almost every case" to kill them. sir david attenborough is back on our screens this sunday with another
10:02 am
series of blue planet. he talks about the threat to the oceans and says that climate change scepticism must be in decline. i think any sceptics that there were ten or 20 yea rs sceptics that there were ten or 20 years ago about global warming, climate change, and there were lots, must surely be diminishing almost vanishing point when you see the evidence. good morning. here's rebecca in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. from today, owners of older, dirtier vehicles will have to pay an extra £10 to drive in central london. the scheme, known as the t—charge, is designed to reduce air pollution and has been described as the toughest emission standard of any major city in the world. the move has been welcomed by some health charities and environmental groups, although some say it doesn't go far enough. the mayor of the capital has
10:03 am
defended the policy. the uk's biggest business lobby groups, including the institute of directors and the cbi, are calling for an urgent brexit transition deal to safeguard jobs and investment. in a joint letter due to be sent to the brexit secretary, david davis, in the coming days, the groups warn that time is running out. a government spokesman says the talks "are making real, tangible progress". the foreign secretary borisjohnson has backed those in the united states urging restraint on president trump over both iran and north korea. ina trump over both iran and north korea. in a speech in central london, mrjohnson said dialogue and diplomacy are needed to counter any threat of nuclear war. however, he warned that the increased tempo of nuclear testing by north korea has reawakened forgotten fears. the victoria derbyshire programme has learnt
10:04 am
that the government is considering whether new restrictions are needed on gambling adverts on tv during football matches. one in five of the commercials broadcast across 25 matches were for betting firms, rising to more than one in three in some games. a government report on the subject is expected as early as next week. patients are being encouraged to go home and rest in order to recover from some illnesses, rather than be prescribed unnecessary antibiotics, as part of a new campaign by public health england. health officials are warning the overuse of certain medicines has made some infections harder to treat by creating drug—resista nt superbugs. last year, in england alone, more than 5,000 people died from such infections. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. moore at 1030 the am. bruce, doctor who, three new companions
10:05 am
have been announced. but are they new companions? as someone who spends a lot of time on doctor who forums and websites... if they do not ashley travelled with the doctor on his adventures, do they count as a companion? b don't know how these people are going to fit in. we have afamiliar people are going to fit in. we have a familiarface, people are going to fit in. we have a familiar face, bradley walsh, known for his comedy, presenting the chase on itv, and a versatile talent. he has long been rumoured to be taking part. we have got tosin cole from eastenders, and mandeep gill, who has appeared in hollyoaks and on casualty. we have to talk about video footage that has emerged of harry styles being groped in the crotch during a concert in los
10:06 am
angeles on saturday night. let's have a look at the video. screaming. let's have a look at the video. we are going to play that again... hopefully. we will play again. you can see that he's pushing that fan away. this video has gone up on social media and it has been a huge reaction from people pointing out of course that any kind of contact like this is inappropriate one of the figures involved, harry styles, one of the biggest male stars in the world, with a very kind of adoring fan base, but really, people saying that this kind of thing, it doesn't matter who is affected by it, it is absolutely unacceptable. we haven't heard anything from harry styles or his people and no complaints have been made to the authorities at this point, but it shines a spotlight on the ongoing issue of any kind of
10:07 am
inappropriate contact between celebrities and other people. thank you, liso, a la entertainment correspondent. let's get some sports news now. lewis hamilton is edging closer to a fourth f1 world title after winning the us grand prix. he was made to work early in the race, after being overtaken by title rival sebastian vettel from the off. hamilton managed to regain the lead on lap six and never looked back. there were many in attendance to watch hamilton take his ninth victory of the season, including a certain usain bolt. it means that hamilton needs just a top five finish in mexico next weekend to clinch the drivers' championship. it has been an incredible year, so far. i enjoyed that in the car. i did not expect to have the pace that we had on sebastian this year, today, but the car felt fantastic, we had the right balance at the start. three more to go, three more to win. he sounds very confident.
10:08 am
on to football, where it was another loss for everton. and yet more pressure heaped on manager ronald kooman. everton were thrashed 5—2 by arsenal at goodison park despite going ahead. but they conceded four second half goals, and means they've not won a match in five matches in all competitions. manager koeman admitted his club expects better. it isa it is a tough time. the team is not performing well. the position in the table was not the position that everton should be on. everybody knows that. we had a lot of expectation after last season. and that, those expectations are not filling in at the moment. and that makes the situation really difficult. it was a miserable day for the merseyside rivals liverpool. they lost 4—1 to spurs at wembley. harry kane scored twice to increase his tally to 15 in all competitions
10:09 am
this season. liverpool paid for bad defensive errors. congratulations this morning to motherwell. they've have reached the scottish league cup final for the first time in more than a decade. they beat rangers 2—0. they'll take on current holders celtic in the final next month. the chief of staff for the president of the european commission has denied leaking an account of theresa may's dinner with eu negotiators last week to a german newspaper which claimed theresa may "begged" jean—claude juncker "for help" with brexit. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier can tell us more. what details do we have unworthily came from? this is a report in the german newspaper. it is about a dinner that theresa may had last week with the president of the commission, jean—claude juncker, and also the eu chief negotiator, michel barnier. after that dinner this german newspaper is reporting that theresa may seemed tired and
10:10 am
despondent, she was apparently anxious and tormented and apparently asked those eu leaders for help, because of the domestic pressure she is facing back home, with her cabinet so divided over brexit. we have heard from jean—claude juncker‘s chief of staff this morning. he has denied leaking those reports to this german newspaper. he has denied thatjean—claude juncker even said those things. he said this is an attempt to frame the eu, undermine negotiations and he has insisted that brussels does not want to undermine theresa may's position. another thing i would like to speak about as this letter that has emerged from britain's five biggest business lobby groups. they are calling for an urgent brexit transitional deal. explain what it is what they are calling for. these business groups say that things are so uncertain now, and they are worried about the future, and the decisions they need to make in order to secure the growth that they think their businesses need, but of course
10:11 am
lead into the uk's economy. they say that the country needs an urgent transition deal put in place as soon as possible to end that uncertainty. what this transition deal would do would be to keep things as they are, the day after we leave the eu. they say things need to be as close as possible to the existing arrangements, the day after we leave the eu. we know theresa may has said she does want a transition deal of about two years. but we also know that the eu would agree on that until further progress is that the eu would agree on that untilfurther progress is made on the divorce side of things, the divorce talks. issues like the rights of eu citizens and of course the big sticking point that we have seen so far, money, that issue of how much the uk is willing to pay the eu, as it leaves the union. that's what business leaders want. it just shows that's what business leaders want. itjust shows how much pressure theresa may is under. she is fighting on all fronts, notjust in
10:12 am
the eu with negotiations there, trying to persuade those in brussels to move onto talks about trade. she has pressure here in westminster from mps, not just has pressure here in westminster from mps, notjust on the opposition parties but behind, on own backbenches and of course from businesses, too. now we can speak to kwasi kwarteng, a conservative mp who was a leading leave campaigner and heidi alexander, labour mp and remain supporter who is part of the campaign group 0pen britain. thank you both for coming in. let's talk first of all about that embarrassing leak today. it has been quoted that theresa may begged for help last week from jean—claude juncker. she was anxious, tormented, despondent and discouraged. that is not the sort of language you want to hear one woman who is meant to be leaving these brexit negotiations. we have had these looks before. i'm not sure how much credence we can give them. i think the chief of staff ofjean—claude juncker has already been fingered for leaking
10:13 am
the first meeting, if you remember, all those months ago. the story appeared in the same newspaper, in the property. that doesn't mean it is not true. they have been playing lots of games on the eu side. what the prime minister has always said has been consistent. if you look at the lancaster house speech, and what she said subsequently, she's had a consistent line. there will be lots of noise, lots of different word said about her position but i think her position is actually quite clear one. it is worth saying that the source of the league has denied making it. i think there is no smoke without fire, to be honest and this is probably underlining the extent to which these negotiations are going so badly wrong. i think that theresa may may find some friendly faces round the negotiating table in brussels than she actually finds
10:14 am
around the cabinet table in number ten. she has got huge problems on her own backbenches and with some of her own backbenches and with some of her cabinet colleagues. and so, i think the news that we have heard this morning about this letter from a numberof this morning about this letter from a number of significant employers just underscores how critical it is that we get an agreement on transition which is essentially staying in the single market and customs union for a number of years following the conclusion of article 50 negotiations. does it worry you, this letter from these business leaders? they are worried, and if they are worried that is not good for the economy. a couple of things you must bear in mind, the transition give something the chancellor has mentioned. liam fox, lots of people on both sides of the unit within the conservative party are signed up to this. this is nothing new. secondly, iwould say... forgive me, forgive me, heidi
10:15 am
has made a number of remarks about disagree with and i would like to counter. these business leaders have said that there is support in the government for transitional arrangements and they are putting together budgets for next year and they are saying, if you do not start telling as soon... what i am saying, heidi said that the negotiations are going badly. they are not. angela merkel has said that we can talk about trade in december after the first stage is done. many people on your side were saying that it was going to be next year. we have talked down the british diplomacy and government and economy, but actually, if you strip away all of the rhetoric, we are not in a bad place. i think we will get a deal. everyone involved is confident that we can get the deal, and then we can move on. people said this summit in october was going to be crunch time. businesses need the certainty about what the trading arrangements are
10:16 am
going to be, whether they are going to have to make customs declaration, whether they their supply chain is going to hold up, they need that certainty, because we are looking at a situation in march 2019, which is less than a year—and—a—half away now, and so, you know, the fact that we haven't been able to progress to the talks about the future trading arrangement, all we have got from this summit is an agreement that we are going to start talking about having talks in the future, when this is now 16 months since the referendum, for government ministers to be describing this summit as a success when it was an unambiguous failure is nauseating in my view. i don't think she has got this right at all if we lock at it. it not from the referendum it have from the signing of the article 50, in march. in the last six month, nine nonths we have had a lot of progress. have we? people will be saying are you sure about that? we have had no
10:17 am
progress on eu citizens right, on northern ireland, we haven't got agreement about moving to the next talk, these talks are failing and it isa talk, these talks are failing and it is a mess and you have to accept that. if you let me talk, if we look where we were in march, no—one was talking about a transition deal in march, no—one was talking about that, now we are talking about that. in terms of eu migrants the prime minister has written a letter and said they will be allowed to stay, that wasn't the case in march. 0k. then when she say, when heidi says we haven't made progress, three weeks' ago we were saying we would never get to a point where we talk about trade. last week angela merkel said that we could get to that point before the end of the year. that is all progress. those are three things in which we have made big steps. i think, eheidi said it was nauseating it is nauseating for me to have the negotiationtive attitude on what is
10:18 am
a sensitive discussion. we are make progress. thank you for coming in. still to come: sir david attenborough talks about sea life and the threats it faces as he returns to screens this sunday with a new series of blue planet. gambling ads are banned on british tv before the 9pm watershed — except in live sporting matches — and now an investigation for this programme has found that 95% of ad breaks during football matches contain at least one gambling advert. a fifth of the commercials broadcast across 25 matches were for betting firms, rising to more than a third in some games. it comes as the government is considering whether new restrictions are needed, with a report expected as early as this week. jim reed has this report. you can watch it and you can get involved in it. the betting industry and the way it sells itself has changed radically. ten years ago, the labour government let bookies advertise on tv for the first time. there was and still is
10:19 am
an agreement not to show ads before the 9pm watershed. see everything. there is an exception though, in live sporting events that rule doesn't apply. we gamble responsibly. matt has just turned 30. when he was a teenager he started gambling in bookies and later online. any spare money that i had was spent on gambling, you know, two weeks you would be losing, but you hoped to go on a lucky run. the number of problem gamblers has remained fairly stable over the last few years with around two million people at risk. the latest stats show if you are under 35 years old, you're far more likely to get in trouble. the sports betting adverts is absolutely huge. it has swamped the whole premier league. it's almost seen that it's the thing to do. that you have to put a bet on to kind of get something out of football.
10:20 am
we looked at 25 games shown on tv this season. that's total of 1,324 commercials and sponsorship idents. of those 272 were for betting ads — that's one in every five. for some games sponsored by betting firms, the rate was even higher. take a recent everton match, 40% of the adverts were for gambling. or scotland's match in slovakia. again, 37% of the commercials were betting related. the government is now under pressure to do more on this. at a recent debate in the house of lords, former spurs chairman lord sugar was as blunt as usual. it's my personal belief that it is these adverts that are the major culprits who induce young people to gamble. frankly, these adverts are too clever, and too luring. the betting industry says there is no evidence that more adverts leads to more problem gambling. there's an interesting question
10:21 am
there about whether the current debate is around objective concerns. are they causing harm or is it subjective? people don't like them and there's even people in the gambling industry who feel that way. but we have a major review under way at the moment, that will look at it objectively. it's a great opportunity to look at all these issues. the thing is a tv advertising ban can only do so much. take the bbc‘s own programme, match of the day. no commercials maybe, but a study by goldsmith‘s university still found over 250 separate gambling adverts on screen — mostly on shirts and hoardings. it's burnley nil, west ham united one. this is all likely to come to a head this autumn. a major government review of the gambling sector is expected soon and greater restrictions on advertising are certainly possible. the government told us, "we have been clear that we expect the gambling sector to help people
10:22 am
stay in control of their gambling, but there is clearly more work that is needed in this area". liz karter is a gambling addiction therapist who specialises in getting people through addiction. matt zarb—cousin is a former gambling addict now working with the campaign for fairer gambling. in devon, justyn larcombe, a former gambler and trained money negative attitude on what is a sensitive discussion. we are make progress. thank you for coming in. tell us hour your addiction took hold? it started when i was very young, 16, i got addicted to fixed odds betting machines, part of the review that is imminent. and i think the adverts, gambling adverts really area the adverts, gambling adverts really are a triggerfor the adverts, gambling adverts really are a trigger for people who are addicted. i think it is very difficult, you feel like you can't get away from gambling, whenever you go shopping, down the high street, there is dozens of betting shop, you turn on the tv to watch a sporting event, there is the ads again, and
10:23 am
the feeling of gambling becoming more and more normalised i think is a cause for concern, particularly among young people. there was a study out last week, a australian study out last week, a australian study on young people and how gambling adverts affect them. they, children as young as 11 were able to recall exactly what the. amling advert was, how to place a bet. they knew about odds, i think that is a a particular concern, and i think it speaks to actually how bloated the gambling industry has got. last year it generated 14 billion, and what does it say about our economy that these ads are everywhere, and half of football teams are sponsored by gambling companies. liz, when you speak to people who have gapening addictions, are they talking about adverts in football matches being a triggerfor adverts in football matches being a trigger for them. it is a trigger, if we look at recovery, the area i
10:24 am
have been working in for the last 16 year, whatever the evidence says i know through my professional experience, that the gambling adverts cause huge problems for people in their recovery, and doesn't recovery require some sort of personal responsibility, we are always asked, yes, of course it does, but we have to bear in mind, that when somebody is in recovery from gambling addiction they are in a massive conflict with themselves on the one hand there is one part of them that desperately wants to stop because they know their gambling is destroying their lives, their mental health and the lives of those round them they love and care about. they are, especially in the early weeks driven by huge intense cravings to gamble that are every bit as difficult to negotiate as anyone who is going through withdrawal from class a drugs or alcohol so to be consta ntly class a drugs or alcohol so to be constantly drip fed adverts
10:25 am
encouraging them what they are trying not to do is incredibly difficult. i want to introduce you tojon difficult. i want to introduce you to jon brian who difficult. i want to introduce you tojon brian who has written about gambling adverts. i don't know how much you have heard of what liz and matt have said, they are talking about the prevalence of the tv adverts being a real problem for people trying to recover from gambling addiction, would you agree with that? i think they could be a problem, but i think, the bit i did hear was where someone said whatever the evidence shows, we have to stop this. ijust don't the evidence shows, we have to stop this. i just don't think that is the case. i think the research is inconclusive in terms of whether or not they have an impact. i think they, there is a kind of tendency to think a common—sense idea, which there must be something we can do to stop these adverts and therefore regulate them. i don't think that, i think there is this assumption we immediate to do these things, to prevent the amount of adverts, but i think we can make our own choices
10:26 am
from watching adverts about what it is we choose to do, overall, the gambling commission have just is we choose to do, overall, the gambling commission havejust done a, some research that shows the level of problem gambling is statistically stable and in fact has been over the last few year, so i don't think there is anything that needs doing, i don't think we need any further regularings —— regulation. a quick one it has gone up. it went up to 430,000 in 2015 but aside from that, do you think it is appropriate young people are targeted with these advert, particularly when there is a prewatershed exemption, do you not think there is a case for these ads, if they are allowed they should be after the watershed. it depend that you you by young people. there is an assumption we need to protect children. the gambling commission and others have kind of recently writ frn and said that people need
10:27 am
to adjust their adverts to make sure they don't attract children. i think thatis they don't attract children. i think that is a legitimate thing to do. when you saw young people are we talking about 16—year—old, 18—year—old, 20—year—olds, what is, that we are talking about? it is clearly the case that gambling is something that the majority of people in this country enjoy, at least once a year, i the most recent research says 65% of people gambling at some point throughout the year, so, the fact there are a number of gambling advert, you know, ithink thatis gambling advert, you know, ithink that is a reflection of the way that things are, i think that you know, in terms of protecting children, you know, then, as i said, there has been recent intervention to try and do that, but, i don't think that we should all be treated. that is a real problem. if i could come should all be treated. that is a real problem. ifi could come in there i would like to be clear what
10:28 am
isaid there i would like to be clear what i said certainly wasn't let's stop all gambling advertising, because i don't believe that would work, i think we need to have sensible reasonable discussions about the current level, i don't believe if we eradicate all advertising we will eradicate all advertising we will eradicate addiction to gambling, what i know is for the majority of people that i work with, their gambling addiction whether they are consciously wear of it is an attempt to medicate often high lesses of stress depression or anxiety by absorption in their addiction or getting a high from the experience, we talk about the fobts a lot and they have been dubbed the crack cocaine of the gambling industry. these fixed betting terminals. exactly. so, to eradicate the adverts would not eradicate the problem, because the problem exists because of problems often that
10:29 am
person has in their life, but what i think we do need to do, along with having sensible conversations about the level of advertising is look at how we are going to educate people in the real risks they are taking, if they do, as you said, choose to gamble, because for many people it will remain fun, for some people, they will become hooked not by the loss chasing initially but how hay feel when they are in the activity of gambling. i am sorry that we don't educate better in that, we can'tjust educate don't educate better in that, we can't just educate about the odds of winning or being sensible with money, to safeguard young people or indeed anybody of any age. we need to educate people that if they get hooked it might be they are going through a particularly difficult time in theirlife through a particularly difficult time in their life and gambling lifts their mood. thank you ever so much. if let me bring this to you. gemma
10:30 am
proctor has been charged with the murder of 18—month—old elliot potter to go from a sixth floor window in bradford in west yorkshire. still to come, reaction to the comments from a government minister that the only way to deal with british extremists who have gone to fight with the so—called islamic state in syria is to kill them in almost every case. a group of mps is to launch an inquiry into so—called pop—up brothels, where sex workers set up on premises for a short period before moving on. time to the latest news now with rebecca. here are the headlines on bbc news. from today, owners of older, dirtier vehicles will have to pay an extra £10 to drive
10:31 am
in central london. the scheme, known as the t—charge, is designed to reduce air pollution and has been described as the toughest emission standard of any major city in the world. the move has been welcomed by some health charities and environmental groups, although some say it doesn't go far enough. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has backed those in the united states urging restraint on president trump over both iran and north korea. ina trump over both iran and north korea. in a speech in central london, mrjohnson said dialogue and diplomacy are needed to counter any threat of nuclear war. he said recent activity by north korea had raised fears around the world. recent activity by north korea had raised fears around the worldm recent activity by north korea had raised fears around the world. it is this increased tempo of nuclear testing, coupled with florid outbursts of verbal belligerence that have reawa kened, outbursts of verbal belligerence that have reawakened, even in this country, those forgotten peers. ——
10:32 am
fears. the public can be forgiven for once again starting to wonder whether the nuclear sword of da mocles whether the nuclear sword of damocles is once again held over the head of a trembling human race. the victoria derbyshire programme has learnt that the government is considering whether new restrictions are needed on gambling adverts on tv during football matches. one in five of the commercials broadcast across 25 matches were for betting firms, rising to more than one in three in some games. a government report on the subject is expected as early as next week. patients are being encouraged to go home and rest in order to recover from some illnesses, rather than be prescribed unnecessary antibiotics, as part of a new campaign by public health england. health officials are warning the overuse of certain medicines has made some infections harder to treat by creating drug—resista nt superbugs. last year, in england alone, more than 5,000 people died from such infections. that's a summary of
10:33 am
the latest bbc news. here's some sport now withjess. lewis hamilton is edging closer to a fourth f1 world title after winning the us grand prix. if he finishes in the top five in mexico next weekend he will seal the championship. everton manager ronald koeman is leaving training today and preparing as normalfor koeman is leaving training today and preparing as normal for everton's next match. there is increasing speculation about his future after everton drop into the relegation zone following defeat at arsenal. i will try to carry on... you don't have to carry on. i have been there. it is not pleasant. take a drink of water. i was going to give you the
10:34 am
rest of the sport but it is not going to happen, i'm afraid. don't apologise, it has happened to all of us. a group of mps have today launched an inquiry into so called "pop—up" brothels which are growing in popularity across the uk. it's where sex workers use rented properties for between one day and a few weeks before packing up and moving on. many of the pop—up brothels are linked to organised crime gangs, with women being trafficked from poland and romania. let's talk now to carrie mitchell from the english collective of prostitutes, who says women are being forced into this predicament. inspector dave meredith is from newquay police, whose force discovered 14 pop—up brothels in the seaside town over a six month period. thank you both for coming in and speaking to us. why are these pop—up brothels increasing, do we know? well, we think they are caused, the name pop—up brothels is a bit of a misnomer. these are short—term lets,
10:35 am
as you said, and they are caused by the police closing down longer—term premises where women have been working in many cases stably, the premises have been there and have been stable for a while, but the police are raiding and closing premises using closure orders or they are just premises using closure orders or they arejust coming premises using closure orders or they are just coming round and saying, if you don't close in a week, i will come back and prosecute. that has happened widely around the country. and this has forced women to move to short—term lets to keep ahead of the police. so this isn't about criminal gangs trafficking eastern european woman? this is about women who have, for yea rs, this is about women who have, for years, work in brothels, they have been closed down. there may be immigrant women working in short—term lets, but the trafficking initiatives are really based on outdated figures. less than 6% of sex workers are trafficked, have
10:36 am
been forced to work. so people shouldn't worry so much and if anybody is being forced to work in the sex industry or any industry they should be able to come forward and report it to the police but that again isa and report it to the police but that again is a problem because then you fear that you're going to be thrown out of your premises or deported, and that is big fear for out of your premises or deported, and that is big fearfor women, because most of them are mothers or they are working to send money home to other countries. can you pick up and respond to those points? good morning. i would like to clarify that the police approach to dealing with pop—up brothels is very much a victim centred. it is not like it was done decades ago, when they were arrested and taken in handcuffs. when we do visit a pop—up brothel, it is very much a safeguarding approach to checking their wealth of the sex workers, to check on their welfare and perhaps give them signposting advice to various welfare agencies and secondly to gather evidence to see if they are
10:37 am
victims of sex trafficking. that is good, as long as women can come forward and report and they know that they can report to the police without fear of deportation. our experience is that the police are raiding widely around the country. we've add women coming to our group who have been threatened by the police that if they do not close down they are going to prosecute anybody who works in the premises, including somebody who has had a violent attack and burglary to the police, that's the only reason she came to their pension then she was threatened with personal prosecution and then with deportation. —— came to the attention of the police. the police said that she had to close down. they said that she was allowing under age clients in. they have a strict policy of not doing that. the police evidence was they sat outside on a particular night
10:38 am
and they had the evidence but in fa ct and they had the evidence but in fact they did not have any clients, that night. so the police are not being straightforward, and we think there is something else behind it. what do you think? they are probably getting money in order to do these trafficking rates. that is what we think. you think there is an incentive to do this? there is an incentive to do this? there is an incentive to do this, and they should be leading women alone so that they can work together safely without fear of arrest. that has to be the way that the police go. let's get a response to that. there is most sinister element to our approach to dealing with sex workers or pop—up brothels. —— there is no sinister element. it is a victim centred. the approach from the police is to visit rather than to raid a pop—up brothel and, when we do visit, we have a caring and compassionate approach. we go along
10:39 am
and most of the visits are planned and most of the visits are planned and structured and our intention when we go there is to safeguard and operate on a compassionate and victim centred approach. and that includes signposting sex workers to various aid agencies and doing everything we can to find out if they are the subject of modern slavery and sex trafficking. as i said, we have moved on in leeds and bounds in the last decades and our overall approach is far removed from what it used to be, arrest and prosecution, and now it is a question of welfare. we are going to have to move on. thank you for coming in. any remaining scepticism about climate change must be at vanishing point, when you see what's happening to the oceans — so says sir david attenborough, who's back on our screens this sunday with another series of blue planet. he talked about the fragility of the ocean, the threats it faces, and the remarkable communication between sea life, and exploding lakes of methane gas,
10:40 am
when he sat down for an interview with our science editor david shukman. hidden beneath the waves, right beneath my feet there are creatures beyond our imagination. it's always said we know more about the moon and mars than the ocean. is that really true and do you think this adventure shows that? this world is infinitely more complex than anything we've discovered out in the universe as far as i know. the degree of complexity of what we need to know or do know about the moon and mars are not very great actually because there are no life, there's no complex communities of life to know things about on those two satellites. do you think we will ever reach a point where we do know enough or is there always going to be a journey of curiosity and enquiry? as far as i can see,
10:41 am
what we are discovering is almost always that the world is more intricate, more wonderful, more astonishing than we ever dreamed of. david, you have been involved in so many documentary series and this one, i've seen the first episode, it's completely stunning. what, for you, is the most startling revelation if you like about this new venture into the deep ocean? i think it's the degree to which marine animals communicate with one another, not only individually within a species, but also between species. a mother walrus still needs to find a place where her young can rest. there was a very moving scene in episode one of a walrus mother trying to get her calf onto a piece of ice and there wasn't much left
10:42 am
because it's all melting. what is your sense about the scale and rate of change in, for example, the arctic? i think any sceptics that there were ten years ago, 20 years ago, about global warming and so on, climate change, and there were lots, must surely be diminishing, almost to vanishing point when you see the evidence we have collected. world scientists around the world have collected about what's happened to our seas. and the fact we are responsible for that. what is it that motivates you to remain engaged at this active pace, if i may say, at your age? it's so wonderful, so astonishing. what more do you want out of life? this amazing panoply of astonishment and beauty and intricacy and wonder in areas we don't know about. discovery in the natural world
10:43 am
isjust a never ending delight. the extraordinary behaviours of all these creatures doing so, they are all so beautiful and extraordinary and so unlike anything else we encounter on our dry land. the world of the underwater is just amazing. sir david attenborough talking to our science editor, david shukman. sunday at 8pm on bbc1. next this morning, in an incredibly rare interview we can hear now from an active fbi undercover agent who was able to infiltrate himself inside an al-qaeda linked cell and prevent the bombing of the new york—toronto railway line. his story is published today under the pseudonym of tamer el—noury. his words have been revoiced to protect his identity. he was talking to scott pelley at cbs. it starts that morning that i'm travelling. i assume i'm travelling
10:44 am
covertly in alias. i take a shower and i put on — for this case i put on tamer‘s clothes. i put on tamer‘s watch, his shoes. i drive tamer‘s car. his wallet is in my pocket. his phone is on me. and i drive to the beach and i sit at the beach and i talk to myself out loud like a crazy person reciting everything there is to know about tamer el—noury, his company, his family, his legend over and over. the fbi created a history for tamer el—noury, an online presence and actual office for his investment company, where a receptionist answered the phone. there were ownership records, a home, fake ids and critical to the legend, there was a false personal tragedy. el—noury‘s fake background said that his mother had died of neglect in a us hospital because of anti—muslim discrimination. that lie completed the picture of a wealthy arab american
10:45 am
who had a reason to hate. chiheb esseghaier thought that his new friend was made to order which, of course, he was. for ten months, the men drew close. esseghaier twisted the koran to justify attacking the west. he admitted that his trips to iran were for meetings with a senior al-qaeda leader. surveillance showed that esseghaier was checking tamer el—noury‘s back story and one night in a basement in toronto, el—noury was grilled by esseghaier and three accomplices. what do you do you? how do you do it? is it commercial real estate? is it residential? what do you do when you fly here? what do you do here? it sounded like an interrogation. this interrogation was so sharp el—noury feared that his cover had been blown. he analysed the room in case he had to escape. but the cop within you had figured out where the exit
10:46 am
was and had decided what order he was going to shoot the people in the room in, if it came to that? well, absolutely. as you get older and slower, you realise you always go for the young ones first. that was a rare interview with an active fbi undercover agent who infiltrated himself inside an al-qaeda linked cell. meanwhile, a government minister has said the "only way" to deal with british is fighters in syria is "in almost every case" to kill them. rory stewart, a foreign office minister, says converts to so—called islamic state believed in an "extremely hateful doctrine" and had moved away from any allegiance to britain. this is what rory stewart told bbc 5 live. i don't think anybody should be in any doubt these are people who have essentially moved away from any kind of allegiance towards the british government. they are absolutely dedicated as members of islamic state towards the creation of a caliphate. they believe in an extremely hateful
10:47 am
doctrine which involves killing themselves and killing others and trying to use violence and brutality to create an eighth century or seventh century state. so i'm afraid we have to be serious about the fact these people are a serious danger to us and unfortunately the only way of dealing with them, in almost every case, will be to kill them. is that always the case? or should brits whojoin through "naiveity" be allowed to integrate back at home? thank you for taking the time to speak to us. what do you make of the comments in light of what your family has been through? they are very uneducated, dangerous, blanket generalised statements, by putting
10:48 am
out statementsches that level of violence, and generalising it over everybody who has joined these organisations without the individualty of each case you are creating hypocrisy in wondering who is the more evil of the two groups government or these extreme mist groups by stating just kill them all. colonel bob stewart speak to christian. did you know your son was going out to the middle east, if you did, did you try and stop him?|j going out to the middle east, if you did, did you try and stop him? i had no idea he was going out to the middle east. this was 2012 and my government decided it was not up to me to try to stop him, so didn't inform me of the information they had all this time. was he fighting against the, against us, when he was killed? when he went
10:49 am
over he went over with al—nusra and changed over to is. he was fighting against bashar al—assad for what he thought was the right thing to do because of the torture, on the women and children, that nobody else was doing anything about. in his mind, thatis doing anything about. in his mind, that is the reason he went. it wasn't about brutality, or killing everybody, or anything else and there are a lot of youth over there, children, women, that are there for different reasons, that aren't necessarily there to kill everybody in sightjust because that is what they must do. did he communicate back to you and tell you this? absolutely. we communicated on a regular basis on the telephone, right up until he changed over the is and communications became strained. so he realised yeast was an enemy of this country —— is was an enemy of this country —— is was an enemy of this country —— is was an enemy of this country. he didn't say that. not once did he say they we re say that. not once did he say they were an enemy, nor am i say that. not once did he say they were an enemy, nor am i defending their action, i am were an enemy, nor am i defending theiraction, iam not
10:50 am
were an enemy, nor am i defending their action, i am not defending anybody‘s actions when it comes to violence, i am saying to make a broad statement, uneducated and creating more danger at those youth that are sitting on the fence, without reaching out, by creating an environment of hostility on both sides, makes it very difficult for the youth to decide who is right and who is wrong. unfortunately they have got off the fence, they have gone and they are fighting and they are killing people, by their actions, this is, this is a real problem. our problem is if we allow such people back, can we trust them? imean, i such people back, can we trust them? i mean, i have actually been on the ground on operations and seen this, they change. i agree. there is a lot of things there, but we let them go, we let this happen. our community, we let this happen. our community, we are failing our communities the and our youth. until we start make changes ourselves and the way we start integrating programmes for youth and giving them a voice where they can be heard and stop dealing
10:51 am
with hypocrisy s how can they make informed decisions properly, especially when representatives of our government are making uneducated state m e nts our government are making uneducated statements themselves and general hiding is proving their point. you are aiding these extremists in their arguments by saying these statements. i am arguments by saying these statements. iam not arguments by saying these statements. i am not saying anything is right or wrong in this case, in the... forgive me forjumping in, tell me, if your son hadn't been killed, fighting for islamic state and he decided he wanted to return home, do you feel he would have been safe to return home, or do you feel he would have posed a threat to society? very difficult to say. i mean unless you sit down with each individual as to where they are at in their own ideological process, we have heard of many youth that get over there, that realise it is not what they expected. they want to escape but they are not allowed to,
10:52 am
there are so many other conditions we don't necessarily understand for each case, i would expect him to go straight into prison, absolutely, without a doubt. there would need to be some assessments and everything else, in this case, we also have to look at women and children that are there, that were brought unwillingly, that were forced, some of the young children at this point have been indoctrinated but that mean we don't give them a chance ain? mean we don't give them a chance again? they are ten, 11 years old, do we create that blanket statement for them as well? they could be dangerous too. unless we reach out and try to help them, how can we know? colonel bob stewart respond to that point. the problem is, i have seen evidence, personally, in africa, for example, in northern uganda of children that have been taken uganda of children that have been ta ken by uganda of children that have been taken by the lords liberation army, brainwashed and they come back saying all the well, they go back to their families and they turn guns on them. ijust, i am
10:53 am
their families and they turn guns on them. ijust, lam sorry their families and they turn guns on them. ijust, i am sorry but we have got to be extremely careful. when someone deliberately goes against his background here, or her background here, and says you know, this is awful i'm going to a much better place, they go to the much better place, they go to the much better place, they go to the much better place and they pick up arms against us, i am afraid we ought to look at this and say frankly i don't trust this person, and i'm not sure i want trust this person, and i'm not sure iwant them trust this person, and i'm not sure i want them back in my society. i agree we have to be cautious, without a doubt we have to be cautious, it is not like we are just going to let them in and say live your life pick up where you left off. hopefully we are intelligent enough to sit with them and determine, are we saying we don't have that level of intelligence and education to deal with the problem appropriately? ijust... education to deal with the problem appropriately? i just... we have education to deal with the problem appropriately? ijust... we have a problem. how many people did your son kill. do you know how many people your son killed? son kill. do you know how many people your son killed ?|j son kill. do you know how many people your son killed? i have no idea. honestly. there we are. i couldn't begin to tell you.”
10:54 am
idea. honestly. there we are. i couldn't begin to tell you. i am extremely cautious about allowing people back in to our society, who have rejected us absolutely, and frankly, we have got good evidence of them going against and killing women and children, in our own country, so why the heck should we ta ke country, so why the heck should we take such a risk? i agree we should be cautious but again that blanket statement, by stating we are going to fight violence with violence and killing is ok, how can you turn round to say to the extremist, the killing is not ok. it doesn't matter we are a member of a government or community, it doesn't make it easy for youth to distinguish right from wrong when we are making the same statements but saying it is ok for us to do it but not them. what i am saying here is that we have to be very cautious about a rhetoric, we have to be cautious about what we are putting throughout in the public, and how it is being viewed and seen. by making those types of statement it is very dangerous and
10:55 am
push those youth that are still at home, sitting down not sure about what direction what path they are taking, can be a motivational push to take the choice of that extremist view. that is what these types of statements, uneducated statements, dangerous statements. they are not uneducated. can i ask you colonel bob stewart if there are naive vulnerable young people who went over to join vulnerable young people who went over tojoin so—called vulnerable young people who went over to join so—called islamist sla, why can't they come hope and be put in prison why is the british government is suggesting a country where we don't have the death penalty it is ok to fight them.” think rory was referring to people that are still fighting, that is the way i would interpret that, if you are still fighting, you are actually ina combat are still fighting, you are actually in a combat situation. i don't think that we were actual, he was referring to people that got out. we have to deal with them in a
10:56 am
civilised way. we don't have the death penalty. they shouldn't be shot on sight, of course not. but we should deal with people that get back to this country and please stay there, but if they get back to this country, we have to deal with them in accordance with our laws and as humanly as possible. i don't like them coming back, i prefer them to stay because i don't trust them. there are a lot of people in society we don't trust, there are a lot of... not necessarilyjust in the extremist ideological view, we see that on a daily basis we can't start saying we don't trust everybody because that creates division. we don't trust people that have gone to fight for is. we don't trust... not making these choice, we need to start supporting people that have mental health issue, we need to provide that which we are no longer doing and that... you are broadening
10:57 am
out the subject. i am sad your boy has been killed. i am very sad about that. i wish he hasn't been. he was fighting for is and they are an enemy of this country.” fighting for is and they are an enemy of this country. i accept that, he put himself in the position. thank you both forjoining us. a scottish man who was sentenced to three months injailfor touching man's hip in a dubai bar has had the case against him dropped. 27—year—old jamie harrow was charged with public indecency so we are getting that information reaching us from dubai, on the programme tomorrow we are looking at how drugs gangs are targeting vulnerable people in market towns to work as drug runners for them. thanks for your company today. these are the grey skies. a bit of
10:58 am
blue skies and it is theme as we go through this afternoon there will be sunshine, especially in northern ireland into northern and western scotland. eventually north—west england through wales into central southern england but the rain dragging its heels in far south and east and cloud cancer skies, a bit of mist and murk in the far south—west later on. and that m isttyness south—west later on. and that misttyness and murkiness working northward, still outbreaks of rain across south wales and southern england, further north, a few clear spell, temperatures could get down into single figure, during tuesday this area of rain will move northward, a wet day for the north—west of england but drier brightererfor north—west of england but drier brighterer for scotland and northern ireland, staying cloudy to the south—east, still misty and murky if place, especially over the hills and top temperatures tomorrow, about 18 celsius. still feeling quite warm. bye. this is bbc news and these are
10:59 am
the top stories developing at 11. borisjohnson urges the eu to think creatively to strike a deal on brexit amid reports claiming theresa may "begged" the european commission president "for help" at a recent dinner: they have given a fair wind to the idea of themselves now discussing the eu trade deal and other it to proceed. i suggest to our friends and partners in brussels that now is the time to get on with it.
11:00 am
the reports come as the uk's biggest business lobby groups call for an urgent brexit transition deal to safeguard jobs and investment. the cost of driving older, dirtier cars in central london goes up by £10 in order to combat air pollution.

36 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on