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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 24, 2017 6:00am-8:29am BST

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hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. hospitals are told they could do hundreds of thousands of extra operations if they were better organised. a health watchdog claims hours are being wasted in operating theatres in england because of inefficiency. good morning. it's tuesday, 24th october. also this morning: a sharp rise in reports of trolling and online harassment. new figures suggest more than 200 offences are being recorded every day. fewer elephants are being killed by poachers in africa, but the authorities say they seized a record amount of illegal ivory last year. companies who cold call people about pensions are facing scrutiny in the house of lords today. i'm looking at whether it could mean the end of those annoying phonecalls.
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in sport, officially the best footballer in the world — christiano ronaldo wins fifa's best male player award for the second year running beating messi and neymar. and we meet the man who wants to become the first person to walk across the antarctic alone and unaided. and carol has the weather. good morning. today for many of us, it's going to be a fairly cloudy day. there is rain or drizzle in the forecast, but there are bright spells and i'll tell you where in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. hospitals in england could carry out 280,000 extra operations a yearjust by making better use of operating theatres. analysis by the watchdog nhs improvement, due out later this week, suggests that more than two hours a day on average are lost because of late starts and other delays. here's our health editor, hugh pym. waiting lists for routine operations are growing and there's a continuing debate over whether more money
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is needed for the nhs or whether it could be more efficient. now analysis by a health regulator seen by the bbc suggests that more patients could be treated in operating theatres. nhs improvement looked at non—urgent surgery at 100 trusts in england last year. it says 1.61; million operations were carried out, but an extra 280,000 more could have taken place and on average, there was about 140 minutes of unused operating theatre time each day. reducing late starts, early finishes and last minute cancellations would have made a big difference according to the regulator, but the royal college of surgeons says it's a complex issue. i think the nhs can always be more efficient and i think people have worked very hard to try to make it more efficient and i think we should continue to work very hard to make it more efficient, but i don't think those efficiency savings are going to resolve the ever increasing demand that is being put on the health service.
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nhs improvement says it hopes the research will enable hospitals to identify bottlenecks in their system, to ensure operations are scheduled more appropriately and more patients receive the care they need quickly. we'll be speaking to the president of the royal college of surgeons at 8.10am. the reporting of crimes such as cyberbullying, trolling and online harassment has increased by 85% in the last two years, according to figures obtained by bbc yorkshire. more than 200 malicious communication offences are recorded every day by police forces in england and wales, but the officer leading the fight against digital crime says it is just "the tip of an iceberg". emma glasbay reports. thank you for the stars. this is live.me, a video streaming app. victoria from leeds uses it to chat online, but last year she started
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getting abuse and threats. photos of her home were posted online and she was dared to try and leave the house. 0ne user threatened to force himself on her. she was even told "go kill yourself" and her address was posted on twitter as a house to burgle. this hasjust ruined my life. like i used to be an outgoing person and now i'm just getting there, trying to get back to my old self. with more people using smartphones and social media, police are getting more reports of malicious communications offences. that can include threats sent by online trolls, abusive text messages, pornographic images and cyberbullying. research by the bbc has found more than 200 offences are being recorded by police in england and wales every day. the number has risen by 85% over the past two years. i think this is the tip of an iceberg.
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i think as policing and society changes into the digital age, this is only going to increase and providers, government, law enforcement and users all need to get ready how we protect people more effectively and then how we bring the criminals to justice. with the support of her family, victoria is slowly getting her confidence back. so far no one has been arrested over the threts she received. a 53—year—old man is due in court today charged in connection with an armed siege that lasted four hours at a bowling alley in nuneaton in warwickshire on sunday. david clark is charged with false imprisonment, criminal damage, possessing a blade and an imitation firearm. police in england and wales have been accused of letting down victims of modern slavery at every stage. a new report study by her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary found that cases had been closed without any enquiries being made and in some instances detectives
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didn't speak to the victims. police say they fully accept the recommendations in the report. prosecutors in new york have begun an investigation into possible sexual harassments at the weinstein company, the studio founded by the film producer, harvey weinstein. mr weinstein was fired from the board of the company following allegations of sexual assault. he denies any wrongdoing. the us military says an investigation is underway to find out exactly what happened when four soldiers were killed by islamist militants in niger last month. the widow of one of the soldiers, sergeant la david johnson, says president trump made her cry when he called to offer his condolences. she claims he couldn't remember her husband's name. mrsjohnson also claims she hasn't been allowed to view her husband's body. peter bowes reports. sergeant la david johnson was laid to rest at the weekend. donald trump's call to his widow, myeshia johnson, came a few days
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earlier as she waited at miami airport to receive her husband's body. the president said that he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyway. it made me cry because i was very angry at the tone of his voice and how he said it. he couldn't remember my husband's name. she also said the us military had refused to let her see her husband's body. i don't know nothing. they won't show me a finger, a hand. i know my husband's body from head to toe and they won't let me see anything. i don't know what's in the box. it could be empty for all i know, but i need, i need to see my husband. at a news conference, america's top uniformed military officer was asked to address myeshia johnson's concerns about viewing her husband's body. there are times when we make a suggestion to the family that they may not want to review the remains.
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at the end of the day, the policy is, it's the family's decision as to whether or not they do that. general dunford said military investigators were still gathering the facts about exactly what happened when sergeantjohnson and three other soldiers were killed in niger. he said the american people were owed an explanation. jared 0'mara, the labour mp who defeated nick clegg in this year's general election, has apologised for using what members of his party described as "vile" and "horrendous" language in the past. mr 0'mara said he was as a sexist and homophobic young man when he made the remarks in comments posted online in 2002 and 2004, he says his views have changed. he has not been suspended but has now stood down from the women and equalities committee. the communist party in china has officially elevated the status of its president,
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xijinping, making him the most powerful leader since chairman mao. 0n the final day of the party's national congress which takes place every five years. its constitution has been amended to formally enshrine the president's political thinking. elephant poaching in africa has declined for the fifth year running new research suggests. cites, the organisation which monitors illegal trafficking, says a record a0 tonnes of illegal ivory was seized around the world last year. alastair leithead reports from nairobi. the good news is that after a ten year surge in elephant poaching across africa, the level of killing for ivory is on the decline, particularly in east africa which has lost half its elephants in the last decade, but the animals are still being killed across the continent and elephant numbers continue to fall, according to a report from cites which regulates trade in endangered plants and animals. it said a0 tonnes of ivory were recovered in a record number of seizures last year,
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perhaps because of better awareness and law enforcement, but also because ivory has been trafficked in smaller quantities. there has been an increase in the number of ivory being carved into bangles and pendants in africa, rather than being exported to asia as tusks which are easier to intercept. cites secretary generaljohn scanlon said the global collective effort is starting to reap positive results, but he added, "we're certainly not there yet." now, they always say when you're feeling a bit nervous about doing something a bit dangerous. not do it. get somebody to do it with you! this is the moment 2a5 people simultaneously bungee jumped off a 30 foot high bridge in brazil. while guinness world records have not yet officially confirmed the group feat as a record, the previous highest number of group bungee jumpers was 149
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which also took place in brazil last year. look at them. they have all had a bit of fun even if they don't break a record. at least they didn't break anything else, did they? have you ever done bridge swinging? no. fun? well, it depends if you like to see your breakfast again! thanks for that thought. one of those. kat, good morning. they looked like a murmur ration of starlings. i expected them to jump in the river, but they all dangled. when i read the piece, it said, "they jumped from a when i read the piece, it said, "theyjumped from a bridge." i have been up all night waiting to see who w011 been up all night waiting to see who won the fifa player of the year. there is cristiano ronaldo. what do you make of that? very impressive. i
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think they are trying to outdo each other with theirfashion think they are trying to outdo each other with their fashion sense. and football. cristiano ronaldo is the world's best football player at the fifa football awards in london last night. the portugal international beat lionel messi and neymar to claim the honourfor a beat lionel messi and neymar to claim the honour for a second year. lieke martens of barcelona and the netherlands won best female player. everton‘s search for a new manager is underway after ronald koeman‘s sacking yesterday. the former netherland's international spent just 16 months in the job and the weekend's 5—2 defeat to arsenal leaves them in the relegation zone. scotland flankerjohn hardie's suspension from edinburgh and scotland duty is due to alleged cocaine use, the bbc understands. hardie will be left out of scotland's squad for the autumn international tests, though its understood he hasn't failed any drugs tests. and the women's end of season tour finals are under way in singapore. johanna konta missed out on a place, but world number one simona halep and caroline wozniaki
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win their opening matches. it feels like the end of year rolling round when the starts. it feels like the end of year rolling round when the startslj a lwa ys rolling round when the startslj alwaysjudge where you rolling round when the startslj always judge where you are when sporting events. six nations in spring time. i can tell my life by what is happening in the olympics. 0nce what is happening in the olympics. once every four years! oh, that's when my daughter was born or whatever it happens to be. you judge, it, but you can remember what happened in those years. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. the weather is mixed. it is a mild start to the day. temperatures in the low teens. some of us seeing 16 celsius. higher. we have got a lot
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of cloud coming in from the atlantic. it has been producing rain through the night and some of us will continue with rain through the course of this morning. cloudy and murky, low cloud and hill fog around as well across the south—west and it is the same as we drift over towards the east. a lot of cloud around. one 01’ the east. a lot of cloud around. one or two brighter spells for example across parts of norfolk and suffolk and then we run into the rain across the midlands. rain across northern england and the north—east at this stage dry and it is a wet start, but a mild one across scotland. some of this rain too on the heavy side. still windy out towards the west. today will be a windier day generally than it was yesterday. across northern ireland you have got the rain first thing, but it will clear as we go through the morning and it will brighten up. but for wales, you have got the rain on and off through much of the day. heading up off through much of the day. heading up into north—west england, so again, if you're stepping out, make sure you make something water proof with you. through the day, the rain clears northern ireland, the sun comes out, the rain moves across scotla nd comes out, the rain moves across scotland leaving showers p quite a windy day. and across southern
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counties, we will see brightness develop, but the rain persists across wales and north—west england. but look at those temperatures. they are above average for this stage in october. 11 to 19 celsius. 19 celsius in the sunshine, will feel pleasant. then as we head through the evening and overnight, we have a weather front. you can the evening and overnight, we have a weatherfront. you can see how the evening and overnight, we have a weather front. you can see how it is wiggling away there. coming further south, it will be a wet night for a time. there will be rain around. but another exceptionally mild night. those temperatures are close tore what we would expect as the maximum temperature rather than the minimum overnight temperature. so tomorrow, we start once again on that note with the rain sinking further south, cloud with it, but the rain is patchy. for most tomorrow, it is going to be a fine day. there will bea going to be a fine day. there will be a lot of sunshine around. but you can see in the south—west, more in the way of murky conditions. showers in the north. and highs up to 18 celsius. again, not too shabby at all for this time of year. on thursday, that weather front that's wiggling moves further north. and again, it still has its cloud with
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it. some splashes of rain, but one thing is you will notice the win changes direction. so it will be coming from the north—west which is a fresher direction for us, but nonetheless, in the sunshine it will feel nice enough. but you can see how the high pressure builds in behind the weather front. the wind comes around it so the weather front is pushed away so it will turn cooler. we are not entering the next ice age by any stretch, but you can see how the cool air indicated with the blue with the north wind coming m, the blue with the north wind coming in, but still something milder out towards the west as we head into the weekend, but the weekend, lou and dan, compared to what we're going to see in the next few days, will be cooler. thank you very much indeed. kat has stayed on, and steph has joined us on the sofa of dreams! shall we start with jeremy corbyn? this is the front page of the
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guardian. that is tracey ullman dressed up as jeremy corbyn for her show. the main story is... she has the dishevelled type perfectly! they are also talking about this call that donald trump made to a soldier's widow, wejust call that donald trump made to a soldier's widow, we just talked about it in the news. he didn't even remember his name. the daily mirror has a story about... it always falls out, what have we got here... the most affordable life cover for the over 50s! you keep giving that to me! this is in spite of failing to
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submit new questions. it's a new expenses scandal. and this is the veg pledge. this story is about breast cancer, one in five women are at higher risk of breast cancer due to faulty genes. the daily telegraph, excuse me... a mixed bag today. it's always bigger than you think. doctors putting patients off statins, prescriptions dropped for those at risk. this photograph is terry richardson, known for his sexually explicit work and pictured with kate moss at paris fashion show, he has been dropped by some magazines, including vogue and glamour. on the front page of the times, these are alleged leaks about risley‘s meeting on brexit. this is in mexico, as they do at this time of year, it is day of the dead ——
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theresa may's meeting on brexit. this is a day in the life of princess margaret... this is how i like to live my life. the morning routine, she gets up at nine o'clock, with breakfast in bed. 9—11 she goes back to bed. she listens to the radio and reads the papers. 11 o'clock, the maid comes in and runs her bath, she is there from 11—12, at the day she gets dressed, at 12:30pm she goes downstairs for a vodka pick me up... at what time? because she is shattered after that morning routine, she has a four course lunch served with the queen mum, plus fruit and a variety of native and continental cheeses at one o'clock. that sounds boring! one day a month, maybe... once a year, not every day. i cannot do more than ten minutes in the bath anyway, a
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whole hour. someone says where can i apply to be a modern—day princess, i have the lack of skills and drive required! we mentioned the life insurance for the over 505, an interesting article in the financial time5. .. interesting article in the financial time5... are you sponsored interesting article in the financial times... are you sponsored by them? good morning everyone! in 2015, george osborne announced plans to make pensioners have more control over what they do with their pension pots when they retire. obviously, it led to a lot of people wondering what they would do with the money. everybody was joking about them buying lamborghinis. it's been a couple of years since it came out, there has been evidence put to the pensions committee, saying that there are examples of people using there are examples of people using the money to fund alcohol and gambling, like lancashire county council have done some work into this, they say that they have seen individuals who have come to them
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who are blowing their pension pots. that is such a shame, you saved up all of those years... but people also think they do not know how they are going to live —— they do not know how long they are going to live for, so they may as well enjoy themselves. and daydreamers at work, kat... sorry, i was themselves. and daydreamers at work, kat... sorry, iwas reading! it is good for your work, apparently. it says your brain is at a level where it is functioning without it overworking. there you go, you see! later on, we will be talking about sleepwalking. this week i ate an entire thing of spanish tapas in the fridge, i didn't even know until my friend staying over came in and said, what are you doing? most people grow out of sleepwalking... it explains me putting on weight! that was the other night. and you've
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got no recollection? i only woke up when my friend walked in the kitchen and said, what are you doing? umm... by and said, what are you doing? umm... by mike do you have cutlery with you? just my hands! sorry, gosh, you need analysis from our expert later. some nice pictures in the daily mail this morning, this is ronaldo introducing his son to lionel messi at the fifa player of the year awards. he is the headline. a lovely contrast piece, those with their multi—million pound pay cheques per week, and this is about what life was like when stanley matthews won, he won the inaugural ballon d'or, that was back in 1956. this is then
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storing the pitch out at stoke, and dribbling the ball on blackpool beach with his son in 1953. lovely stories about what it was like being his son. at one point, they would go to the cinema but wait in the manager's office, missed the first ten minutes of the film so they did not cause a stir when they sat down and they would leave ten minutes before the end. they never saw the beginning or the end of a film! on your sleepwalking, is this a recent thing or have you always done it?|j think i have always done it, at different stages in my life... we will talk about it later, thank you. lam will talk about it later, thank you. i am looking forward to being analysed! and more on sleep eating! if you have a child with a peanut allergy you'll know how stressful it can be making sure they don't eat something that contains the nut — for some it can be fatal. it affects around one in every 50 school—age children. now, a clinic at addenbrooke's hospital is reporting great success. out of 100 patients, 98 have so far shown increased resistance. emma baugh reports.
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hello, jack. how are you doing? shake hands... ten—year—old jack at the peanut allergy clinic. he is getting gradually increasing amounts of peanut protein in a controlled way. in essence, it's an old—fashioned treatment way. in essence, it's an old —fashioned treatment available for pollen hay fever on the nhs. but for pollen hay fever on the nhs. but for years, people have been afraid of using it for food due to the potential for severe reactions. we went ahead and did an initial trial in 2000, and we found it was successful and we should really press ahead as it seems to be working well. he's one of 100 people being treated here for the potentially life—threatening allergy. it's worrying sometimes. sometimes in the shops, there are a lot of peanuts around. it worries me that i would react suddenly or something like that. we feel very
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lucky and fortunate that we can do this for him. hopefully his quality—of—life at the end of it will be so much better because he isn't going to walk around with worry isn't going to walk around with woi’i’y on isn't going to walk around with worry on his shoulders the whole time. but the treatment does not come cheap. a two—year course costs £17,000, and it isn't available on the nhs. this isn't a licensed medicine yet, in order to get a drug licence we have to do further clinical trials, which are planned. until we've done that, we will not be able to get nhs commissioning. but it is something that we really wa nt to but it is something that we really want to achieve. it's hoped eventually the treatment could be free to help stop reactions to peanuts, meaning a trip to a&e. m baugh, bbc news, cambridge. you're watching breakfast.
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still to come... we'll find out why sleepwalkers have more awareness of their movements than those who don't walk in their sleep. we'll speak to the lead researcher who made the discovery and says it is an enhanced form of "autopilot". and more on why steph eats tapas at 3am. and i was a sleepwalker and my children now are. tell us your amusing stories! my son would go downstairs and help himself to serial, i would only do that when i was little. i usually do not any more? i'm was little. i usually do not any mor 7 ' was little. i usually do not any more? i'm pretty sure... i will have to camp out in the kitchen! i don't think i do... time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the same type of flammable cladding believed to have contributed to the grenfell disaster is on at least 52 tower blocks in london, a bbc london investigation has revealed. grenfell tower was encased in panels made up of aluminium sheets with a polyethylene core, which melts and burns when exposed to extreme temperatures.
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the association that runs this block in kilburn, which has the same type of cladding, had no plans to remove it — but is now reviewing that — adding that the safety of their residents is of utmost importance. a driver of a train that crashed into buffers at king's cross station in august was suffering from ‘fatigue', an investigation has found. the crash pushed the buffers back more than a metre. the report by the rail accident investigation branch, found the driver "briefly closed her eyes because they felt tired" in the seconds before the collision. a woman from buckhursthill made an incredible debut at the ironman world championships in hawaii last week
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. lucy charles finished second. an ironman race includes a two and a half mile swim, followed by 112 miles on a bike and then a marathon on foot. lucy finished in just under nine hours and now she's home, thoughts are already turning to next yea r‘s thoughts are already turning to next year's competition. the goal has a lwa ys year's competition. the goal has always been to win the world championships, but it has happened a lot earlier than i anticipated. obviously there's only one place better than i can go and that is what i'm working towards, winning the world championships next year. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a look at the weather now. good morning. you may notice how mild it is to begin the day, setting the tone for much of the week. some mist and fog first thing, it's cloudy generally. that cloud is breaking upa cloudy generally. that cloud is breaking up a little as we get some brightness this afternoon. some rain to the north, the further north, the more chance you have it seemed
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drizzly outbreaks of rain. some of us drizzly outbreaks of rain. some of us may feel a little damp but mostly staying dry. temperatures of 19 degrees with a noticeable south—westerly breeze. overnight, we hold on to the cloud, it is mild, temperatures of 14 degrees, but tomorrow, a cloudy start of the day. some outbreaks of rain, but not affecting everyone. by the afternoon, we see quite a difference with the cloud. it really breaks up to give us brightness and even sunshine with highs of 18 degrees. thursday we see some wet weather but by friday, things dry up a little. a more subtle day, perhaps with brightness and even sunny spells. it sta rts brightness and even sunny spells. it starts to feel a little fresher. for most of the week, temperatures where we would expect them for this time of year but by friday, and into the weekend, feeling cooler and more settled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you the latest news and sport injust a moment. coming up this morning, a ban on cold calling, that's what members of the house of lords want. we'll ask whether today could be the day that spells the end for those annoying calls. do you struggle to get your five a day? we'll find out why shops, cafes and food firms are pledging to include more vegetables in their products in an attempt to get more greens on our plates. he has stunned audiences worldwide with his jaw dropping tricks. the magician, dynamo, will be here with his guide to creating magical moments. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. hospitals in england could carry out 280,000 extra operations a yearjust by making better use of operating theatres. analysis by the watchdog nhs improvement, due out later this week, suggests that more than two hours a day on average are lost because of late starts
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and other delays. the royal college of surgeons says it isa the royal college of surgeons says it is a complex issue. people have tried hard to make the nhs more efficient and i think we should continue to work hard to make it more efficient, but i don't think the efficiency savings will resolve the efficiency savings will resolve the ever increasing demand that's being put on the health service. reports of crimes such as cyberbullying and online harassment have increased by 85% in the last two years according to figures obtain by the bbc. over 200 malicious communication offences are recorded every day by police forces in england and wales. the officer leading fight against digital crime, chief constable stephen kavanagh, says it is just the tip of an iceberg. i think as policing and society changes into the digital age, this is only going to increase and providers, government, law
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enforcement and users all need to get ready, how we protect people for effectively and then how we bring the criminals to justice. a 53—year—old man is due in court today charged in connection with an armed siege that lasted four hours at a bowling alley in nuneaton in warwickshire on sunday. david clark is charged with false imprisonment, criminal damage, possessing a blade and an imitation firearm. police in england and wales have been accused of letting down victims of modern slavery at every stage. a report by her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary found that cases had been closed without any enquiries being made, and in some instances detectives didn't speak to victims. police say they fully accept the recommendations in the report. the us military says an investigation is under way to find out how four soldiers were killed in
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niger. mrsjohnson says she hasn't been allowed to view her husband's body. the labour mp who defeated nick clegg in this year's general election, jared o'mara, has apologised for using what members of his party described as "vile" and "horrendous" language in the past. mr o'mara said he was a sexist and homophobic young man when he made the remarks in comments posted online in 2002 and 2004, he says his views have changed. he has not been suspended but he has stood down from the women and equalities committee. the number of elephants killed for ivory is declining. that's the finding of cites. a record 40 tonnes of illegal ivory was seized around the world last year due to better awareness and law enforcement. now, it is the trusty satnav or mobile we pick up when heading out
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ona mobile we pick up when heading out on a journey. i still have a map. but do you use the map? for what purpose? to know the general direction in which i'm going. then you look at your phone... not really. no. ok. anyway, but it seems people have been relying on their devices for the past 600 years. archaeologists said they found the old est archaeologists said they found the oldest known example of an early bit of navigational equip. equipment. it was used by sailors to track the sun and help them to find their way on the high seas. that's the kind of thing i need! iwould be happy the high seas. that's the kind of thing i need! i would be happy with that! that reminds me of a pointless piece of information! do you know sound effects... i do. you know how they make the sown effect for a flock of birds on the radio... no.
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get two marigolds. i'm not kidding you, if you have got a pair of marigolds. do you think there are other brands available or does it only work with that? is marigold a brand name. oh, otheryellow only work with that? is marigold a brand name. oh, other yellow gloves are available. whack them together and that's how you do a flock of birds and that's been used in horror films for years. no wonder it is so scary. added value every morning. hey, kids, look at that. watch out for the birds! yes, close your eyes. super stuff. shall we move on to talk about cristiano ronaldo...” need a pair of rubber gloves to demonstrate this. get the gloves on! cristiano ronaldo was crowned the best footballer in the world. this
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is the new awards that fifa set—up because they split from the ballon d'orand because they split from the ballon d'or and they said, "n0, because they split from the ballon d'or and they said, "no, we are going to set up our own awards for the best coaches and teams and fans." celtic the best coaches and teams and fans. " celtic fans the best coaches and teams and fans." celtic fans won the best fans award. well done to them. cristiano ronaldo is the best player. he beat lionel messi and neymar to the honour after helping real to a champions league and la liga double last season. thank you a lot. i mentioned neymar to be here. i'm really glad. it's a great moment for me. i know i have fa ns great moment for me. i know i have fans over the world. thank you a lot for the support. lieke martens of barcelona and the netherlands won best female player. she was player of the tournament at euro 2017 as her country won the title
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and her international manager sarina wiegman was named best female coach. everton‘s search for a new manager is underway after ronald koeman‘s sacking yesterday. he spentjust 16 months in the job and the weekend's 5—2 defeat to arsenal leaves them in the relegation zone. former everton winger pat nevin believes the club will once again look for a big name manager to lead the club forward. i think the everton board and the new everton owner will be looking worldwide. i think he will be looking for the biggest name that's available to world football to try and bring him to everton. he has got the money to do it, but has he got the money to do it, but has he got the club or the group of players to do that just the club or the group of players to do thatjust now and that's a big, big question? so who will be the person to take over? david unsworth.
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theirformer boss david moyes may be an unpopular choice after less than successful spells with manchester united and sunderland sean dyche has impressed during his time with burnley but he has also been linked with the vacantjob at leicester city. the former england boss sam allardyce said he wasn't interested in coaching scotland, but could a prefer club role suit him and how about a surprise name on the list — ryan giggs? he missed out on the job at swansea but is reportedly interested in thejob. alan pardew alan pa rdew is alan pardew is available.|j alan pardew is available. i have not got a picture of him, dan.|j alan pardew is available. i have not got a picture of him, dan. i don't know. who would you back? of those i
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think sam allardyce, but it is a case of whether he wants it. exactly. i think he misses being involved, doesn't he, in the premier league was chris coleman on your list. no, he was not. iwill get pictures for the next hour! scotland flankerjohn hardie's suspension from edinburgh and scotland duty is because of alleged cocaine use, the bbc understands. scottish rugby announced last week that he would not be considered for selection pending an internal investigation. hardie will be omitted from scotland's squad for the autumn international tests when it's announced later today. it's understood hardie has not failed any drugs tests. gloucestershire's jack taylor has been suspended from bowling for a year after his action was found to be illegal for the second time within a 12—month period. the off—spinner, who has served two previous bans from bowling, was again reported for "throwing" this summer. his suspension runs until 26th september next year, after which, he'll be able to ask for a re—evaluation of his action. caroline wozniacki and simona halep
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have both won their opening round robin matches on day two at the end of season wta finals in singapore. wozniacki beat elina svitolina 6—2, 6—0 in under an hour while world number one, simona halep saw off caroline garcia in straight sets. now you don't see this very often in tennis, watch carefully or you might miss bernard tomic serving an underarm at the erste open in vienna. blink and you miss it. as an epoint i think blink and you miss it. as an epoint ithinki blink and you miss it. as an epoint i think i would be narked by that. dink, over it goes. cheeky. it is legal though, isn't it? dink, over it goes. cheeky. it is legalthough, isn't it? it dink, over it goes. cheeky. it is legal though, isn't it? it is, dink, over it goes. cheeky. it is legalthough, isn't it? it is, yes. don't see players doing that that often. i remember at wimbledon michael chang did it because he was having a bad time with his service action. it did annoy his opponent.
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you would be so annoyed. hang on, i have been working all year on my big serve and you've won the point. this is my favourite of the year. bangkok sports club, penalty, in thailand. oh no. no! i love it. keeper. i don't believe it. that penalty shoot—out went to 20—19! this is the winning penalty for bangkok sports club. oh, i don't believe it. he's off celebrating. and he doesn't... spin on believe it. he's off celebrating. and he doesn't. .. spin on the ball from hitting the post. that's one of my favourites. it is my favourite this year. "i have had enough. if you're going to score like that, that's it, i'm off."
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researchers used a test to compare sleepwalkers and non sleepwalkers, the former were harder to distract if they had to do several things at once. let's get more detail now from doctor oliver kannape who lead the research. we have given the bare bones there. what else did you find out? what has the research been telling you? we are the research been telling you? we a re interested the research been telling you? we are interested in looking at motor control and to what extent we are aware of our own control and to what extent we are aware of oui’ own movement. control and to what extent we are aware of our own movement. a lot of what we do is automated. working with sleepwalkers they presented an extreme example where they can get up extreme example where they can get up in the middle of the night, usually and children almost every kid does it at one point in their life, but as you get older, 2% to 4%
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adults do it and they might get into the car and drive around. so, what this research we were interested in looking at can we find differences in sleepwalkers while they are awake using the new technology. what did you make them do? we gave them full fod motion capture suit and showed them a life size avatar and we asked them a life size avatar and we asked them to walk in a target cylinder and so we could see how they correct the movement. and the first task we actually found sleepwalkers and non sleepwalkers were identical. the non sleepwalkers, like everybody else, slows down or stops and we make more errors looking at detecting a mismatch and the sleepwalkers were better. they maintain the same walking speed and made fewer errors. we have a short piece of animation. can you talk us through what we are
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seeing? you will see two avatars. the first trial there was no mismatch. now you see a mismatch between the grey and the green avatar. here you can see it. what the participant has to do is compensate for the mismatch to reach the target cylinder. what does it tell you about the brains of sleepwalkers and non sleepwalkers? is it sleepwalkers and non sleepwalkers? isita sleepwalkers and non sleepwalkers? is it a good thing to be a sleepwalker? in some ways, it is seems to be an advantage to the extent their movement, the automation is improved compared to non sleepwalkers. we cannot study any of this using techniques so we have goat them in the lab and track them and this is the first time where we can show a difference whilst they are awake. we have a new way of investigating this. we were talking about this and steph wag saying she is a sleep eater. she was
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found at 3am eating tapas out of the fridge. is that next level up? yes, there are different types of sleep disorder. some are very common. yes, some of them are extremes so people have been reported to get into a car and drive. so, you can imagine on the legal side, there is a big issue there, understanding who what extent they are aware. you say a lot of children sleepwalk, what is your advice to parents if they find their children sleepwalking, i calmly told them to go back to bed? you want to be sensible about it, you do not want to wa ke sensible about it, you do not want to wake them up with a big gong. common sense says lead them back to bed. sleepwalking happens in the first third of the night. it is in the deep sleep phase. usually, pa rents the deep sleep phase. usually, parents will still be awake so that they can then carefully guide them
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out to bed. they would be walking back from a quicker out of the house. this is all education to me, i've never been a sleepwalker. this is all education to me, i've never been a sleepwalkerlj this is all education to me, i've never been a sleepwalker. i used to go downstairs and help myself to a bowl of cereal. my children have both sleepwalked as well. wow. i think we need to know more about this. if you have any instances of what you've been up to in the night, maybe tapas, or what you've been up to in the night, maybe ta pas, or cornfla kes, what you've been up to in the night, maybe tapas, or cornflakes, and keep it clean. none of that! we will come to that later in the programme. were you a sleepwalker, carol?|j to that later in the programme. were you a sleepwalker, carol? i was packing boxes once while i was moving house, very helpful as i was —— very helpful for me in the morning! belfast and edinburgh are currently at 11 or 12 degrees. bang on for what we would expect to be
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the maximum temperature at this time of year. london, saint athan and bude are above the average temperatures for this time of year. it's a mild start unless you are in balmoral or at strathallan where it is for 5 degrees. a lot of cloud coming in from the atlantic, a weather for producing notjust cloud but hill fog, murky conditions and some rain in the forecast too. this morning, some cloud in southern areas. its murky and warm, one of those days where you do not know what to wear. in norfolk and suffolk, a bright and a dry start. then, we move into the rain across the midlands, heading into north—west england. at this point, it's dry with bright spells. in scotland, the rain, and it moves eastwards through the course of the day. at the moment, heavy bursts of rain in it. windy in the west. across the board, it will be windier than yesterday. we also have early
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rain in northern ireland, that clears and it will brighten up. in wales, the rain to stay on and off as we go through the day. the wind arrows indicate that it will be a windy day. it clears northern ireland, there will be some sunshine, rain clears scotland, a mix of sunshine and showers but it persists across england and north—west england. coming in across the wash, and temperature wise, we are in good shape, 11—19d, above average for this time in october. this is due to a wiggling weather front overnight, producing rain. by the end of the night, a lot of rain is left, and it will be another mild night. 9—14d, those are the overnight lows. we start off tomorrow with a wiggling weather front wiggling southwards, taking cloud and sporadic rain with it. it brightens up for a bulk of the uk. tomorrow will not be a bad day at
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all, a lot of sunshine, showers in the north and the west, but more murky in the south—west. temperatures of 11—18d, above average for this time of year. on thursday, the wiggling french moves further north, into wales, parts of the midlands, and east anglia. we have spots of rain, nothing heavy, lucky if you see them. you see the wind changing direction, a north—westerly wind is a cooler direction for us. heading into the weekend, high pressure pushes this weather front away, allowing the wind to go more north—westerly, and it will feel colder than it has been through today and tomorrow. change is afoot. not a sleeper will —— not a sleepwalking one at that! i love that you unpacked boxes, that
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is brilliant! thank you. she is perfect, isn't she? a final push for a change in the law around cold calling is set to be discussed in the house of lords today. steph is taking a look... it is really annoying when people get cold calls, they still happen despite the fact that i have talked a lot about the rules in reducing them. let me tell you this one. companies who call people about pensions are facing scrutiny in the house of lords today. they want the rules to change to stop annoying calls, they think there should be compulsory advice before people decide what to do with their pension pots as well. this is to give more information. ros altmann, the former pensions minister and a peer in the house of lordsjoins pensions minister and a peer in the house of lords joins us now. it's interesting, since the rules were relaxed around pensions in 2015, pensioners have become a popular target for cold calling, haven't they? they have, people with pension
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funds are getting calls from people, or e—mails or texts saying, do you need help with your pension? would you like a free pension review? u nfortu nately, you like a free pension review? unfortunately, those people who respond to those kinds of unsolicited approaches have often ended up being the subject of scams, and they have sometimes lost their entire pension when they have transferred their money into a different scheme. we want to ensure that customers are better protected against this kind of unsolicited approach. the government has said in the past, in august they talked about a crackdown on cold calling pensioners, why is this bill needed? the government has talked about banning cold calling, and talked about protecting pensioners. but, it hasn't done anything yet. the bill is an opportunity to put legislation in place, that could ban on cold calling. then, you can tell anyone
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that if somebody calls you out of the blue about your pension all day, sending you a text or an e—mail, they are a criminal, and you should not have anything to do with them. they will not be on your side. at the moment, you cannot do that. you cannot tell the public, a nice friendly person who calls you about your pension or any other kind of financial products, if they call you, you cannot fashion you cannot tell them they are breaking the law. we wa nt tell them they are breaking the law. we want to change the law saying future people can better protect themselves. the message should be of somebody cold calls you about your pension, just hang up. u nfortu nately, pension, just hang up. unfortunately, a lot of people are worried about being rude. if someone calls you, they don't want to slam the phone down but that is exactly
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what they should be doing. the bill is going through the house of lords, do you have the power to force the government to do something about it? this afternoon, we are tabling amendments to the bill which will introduce this ban on cold calling, and it also has other consumer protection clauses we are trying to put in to protect people with big debt. if the government accepts our amendments, that is fine but if not, i think this will go to a vote in the house of lords. the chances are that the government will lose, which means these clauses have to be included in the bill when it goes to the house of commons and we hope that the house of commons will not overturn it. the difficulty that i have, and the sadness i have, is that i cannot understand why the government wants to resist doing this. it has support across all political parties, or consumer groups, and even the providers are anxious for this kind of cold calling to stop. we've already
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banned it from mortgage is, so we should now just take banned it from mortgage is, so we should nowjust take the opportunity to ban it for pensions as well. ros altmann there, thank you for your time. it is interesting, we get so many messages about this, why can't we get rid of cold calling? and she is clear, just put the phone down. sometimes my mum cold calls me, it's a nightmare! good point! describing his theory of happy living, a message was given to a career when he was injapan in lieu ofa tip. career when he was injapan in lieu of a tip. the note goes on sale today. we've got some of your tips for happiness now. let's have a look... # ifound look... # i found myself look...
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# ifound myself in happiness... # my # ifound myself in happiness... # my top tip is to be content within your own skin... take each day as it comes. my top tip is not to worry. it only leads to a coronary. take pleasure from the little things in life. wife and beer! my top tip for happiness is to surround yourself with friends. you can cry with them, laugh with them, you can be yourself. my top tip is my dog teddy because he is super cute and gives me lots of cuddles. a lot of different options there. wife, beer, dog. of. family,.... sleepwalking... your sleepwalking stories are interesting this morning. genius this morning. time for a look at the
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news and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the same type of flammable cladding believed to have contributed to the grenfell fire disaster — is on at least 52 tower blocks in london, a bbc london investigation has revealed. grenfell tower was encased in panels made up of aluminium sheets with a poly—ethylene core, which melts and burns when exposed to extreme temperatures. the association that runs this block in kilburn, which has the same type of cladding, had no plans to remove it — but is now reviewing that — adding that the safety of their residents is of utmost importance. police say they have destroyed the largest cannabis factory ever found in the county of hertfordshire. around 1,000 plants with a street value of £700,000 were discovered at an address in potters bar. the factory was so large it took officers two days to dismantle. a 23—year—old man has been arrested and bailed.
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a woman from buckhursthill who came finished second at the ironman world championships — is already thinking about next year's race. lucy charles finished in just under nine hours. the race includes a two and a half mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride and then a marathon. the goal has always been to win the world championships, but it has happened a lot earlier than i anticipated. obviously there's only one place better than i can go and that is what i'm working towards, winning the world let's take a look at the weather with georgina burnett.
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good morning. you may notice how mild it is to begin the day, setting the tone for much of the week. some mist and fog first thing, it's cloudy generally. that cloud is breaking up a little as we get some brightness this afternoon. some rain to the north, the further north, the more chance you have of seeing drizzly outbreaks of rain. some of us may feel a little damp but mostly staying dry. temperatures of 19 degrees with a noticeable south—westerly breeze. overnight, we hold on to the cloud, it is mild, temperatures of 14 degrees, but tomorrow, a cloudy start of the day. some outbreaks of rain, but not affecting everyone. by the afternoon, we see quite a difference with the cloud. it really breaks up to give us brightness and even sunshine with highs of 18 degrees. thursday we see some wet weather but by friday,
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things dry up a little. a more subtle day, perhaps with brightness and even sunny spells. it starts to feel a little fresher. for most of the week, temperatures where we would expect them for this time of year but by friday, and into the weekend, feeling cooler and more settled. i'm back in 30 minutes, goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. hospitals are told they could do hundreds of thousands of extra a operations if they were better organised. a health watchdog claims hours are being wasted in operating theatres in england because of inefficiency. good morning. it's tuesday, 24th october. also this morning: a sharp rise in reports of trolling
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and online harassment. new figures suggest more than 200 offences are being recorded every day. fewer elephants are being killed by poachers in africa, but the authorities say they seized a record amount of illegal ivory last year. it's a business of two halfs for the firm behind costa and premier inn. i'll be speaking to the boss about their latest results shortly. in sport, officially the best footballer in the world. christiano ronaldo wins fifa's best male player award for the second year running, beating messi and neymar. also this morning, a senior executive form tesco tells us how his firm and dozens of other food companies are pledging to get us eating more veg. and carol has the weather. good morning. it's a fairly mild start to the day. more or less across—the—board. it's also a cloudy murky one with some rain. the rain will clear, all but wales and
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north—west england, you will have it for much of the day and some of us will see some sunshine, but i will have more in 15 minutes. thank you, we will see you at 7.15am. good morning. first, our main story. hospitals in england could carry out 280,000 extra operations a yearjust by making better use of operating theatres. analysis by the watchdog nhs improvement, due out later this week, suggests that more than two hours a day on average are lost because of late starts and other delays. here's our health editor, hugh pym. waiting lists for routine operations are growing and there's a continuing debate over whether more money is needed for the nhs or whether it could be more efficient. now analysis by a health regulator, seen by the bbc, suggests that more patients could be treated in operating theatres. nhs improvement looked at non—urgent surgery at 100 trusts in england last year. it says 1.64 million operations were carried out, but an extra 280,000 more could have taken place and on average, there was about 140 minutes of unused operating theatre time each day.
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reducing late starts, early finishes and last minute cancellations would have made a big difference according to the regulator, but the royal college of surgeons says it's a complex issue. i think the nhs can always be more efficient and i think people have worked very hard to try to make it more efficient and i think we should continue to work very hard to make it more efficient, but i don't think those efficiency savings are going to resolve the ever increasing demand that is being put on the health service. nhs improvement says it hopes the research will enable hospitals to identify bottlenecks in their system, to ensure operations are scheduled more appropriately and more patients receive the care they need quickly. the reporting of crimes such as cyberbullying, trolling and online harassment has increased by 85% in the last two years, according to figures obtained by bbc yorkshire. more than 200 malicious
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communication offences are recorded every day by police forces in england and wales, but the officer leading the fight against digital crime says it is just "the tip of an iceberg". emma glasbay reports. thank you for the stars. this is live.me, a video streaming app. victoria from leeds uses it to chat online, but last year she started getting abuse and threats. photos of her home were posted online and she was dared to try and leave the house. one user threatened to force himself on her. she was even told "go kill yourself" and her address was posted on twitter as a house to burgle. this hasjust ruined my life. like i used to be an outgoing person and now i'm just getting there, trying to get back to my old self. with more people using smartphones and social media, police
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are getting more reports of malicious communications offences. that can include threats sent by online trolls, abusive text messages, pornographic images and cyberbullying. research by the bbc has found more than 200 offences are being recorded by police in england and wales every day. the number has risen by 85% over the past two years. i think this is the tip of an iceberg. i think as policing and society changes into the digital age, this is only going to increase and providers, government, law enforcement and users all need to get ready how we protect people more effectively and then how we bring the criminals to justice. with the support of her family, victoria is slowly getting her confidence back. so far no one has been arrested over the threts she received. a 53—year—old man is due in court today charged in connection with an armed siege that lasted four hours at a bowling alley in nuneaton
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in warwickshire on sunday. david clark is charged with false imprisonment, criminal damage, possessing a blade and an imitation firearm. police in england and wales have been accused of letting down victims of modern slavery at every stage. a report by her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary found that cases had been closed without any enquiries being made and in some instances, detectives didn't speak to the victims. police say they fully accept the recommendations in the report. the us military says an investigation is underway to find out exactly what happened when four soldiers were killed by islamist militants in niger last month. the widow of one of the soldiers, sergeant la david johnson, says president trump made her cry when he called to offer his condolences. she claims he couldn't remember her husband's name. mrsjohnson also claims she hasn't been allowed to view her husband's body. peter bowes reports. sergeant la david johnson was laid to rest at the weekend.
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donald trump's call to his widow, myeshia johnson, came a few days earlier as she waited at miami airport to receive her husband's body. the president said that he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyway. it made me cry because i was very angry at the tone of his voice and how he said it. he couldn't remember my husband's name. she also said the us military had refused to let her see her husband's body. i don't know nothing. they won't show me a finger, a hand. i know my husband's body from head to toe and they won't let me see anything. i don't know what's in that box. it could be empty for all i know, but i need to see my husband. at a news conference, america's top uniformed military officer was asked to address myeshia johnson's concerns about viewing her husband's body.
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there are times when we make a suggestion to the family that they may not want to review the remains. at the end of the day, the policy is, it's the family's decision as to whether or not they do that. general dunford said military investigators were still gathering the facts about exactly what happened when sergeantjohnson and three other soldiers were killed in niger. he said the american people were owed an explanation. jared o'mara, the labour mp who defeated nick clegg in this year's general election, has apologised for using what members of his party described as "vile" and "horrendous" language in the past. mr o'mara said he was as a sexist and homophobic young man when he made the remarks in comments posted online in 2002 and 2004, he says his views have changed. he has not been suspended but has now stood down from the women and equalities committee. elephant poaching in africa has
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declined for the fifth year running new research suggests. cites, the organisation which monitors illegal trafficking, says a record 40 tonnes of illegal ivory was seized around the world last year. alastair leithead reports from nairobi. the good news is that after a ten year surge in elephant poaching across africa, the level of killing for ivory is on the decline, particularly in east africa which has lost half its elephants in the last decade, but the animals are still being killed across the continent and elephant numbers continue to fall, according to a report from cites which regulates trade in endangered plants and animals. it said 40 tonnes of ivory were recovered in a record number of seizures last year, perhaps because of better awareness and law enforcement, but also because ivory has been trafficked in smaller quantities. there has been an increase in the number of ivory being carved into bangles and pendants in africa, rather than being exported to asia as tusks which are easier to intercept. cites secretary general, john scanlon, said
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the global collective effort is starting to reap positive results, but he added, "we're certainly not there yet." would you like to see lots of people bungy jumping off would you like to see lots of people bungyjumping offa would you like to see lots of people bungyjumping off a bridge? ok. this is the moment 245 people simultaneously budgie jumped off a 30—foot high bridge in brazil. it looks like a murmur ration of starlings. the guinness book of records have not confirmed that it is a record. the previous group of bungyjumpers was 149. they have got to work that out carefully so they didn't bump into each of each other. do you think you stagger the jump as well so you don't go... i don't know. i think we're look nothing this too deeply. i'm not sure if it has been
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established as a world record just yet. carol will have the weather shortly. eat more vegetables, it is a message that we constantly hear from doctors, dieticians and chefs — yet sales of greens suggests that the advice is being ignored. according to government guidance on a healthy diet, 20% of our shopping should be made up of vegetables, but in reality we only reach 7.2%. research by the think—tank the food foundation says that this lack of veg in our diets is contributing to 20,000 premature deaths every year in the uk. so they've encouraged over 40 companies and organisations to take the veg pledge, to put more vegetables into their products such as ready meals, soups, recipes and promotional deals. let's speak now to tim smith, food policy adviser at tesco, who's in our london newsroom for us this morning and we're also joined in the studio by dr rangan chaterjee, who is a gp. tim, we will come to you first of all if we can. i mean, the easy way
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to sort of get people buying more vegeta bles to sort of get people buying more vegetables is to drop the price of vegetables, isn't it? that's one of the main methods that one would chose, yes. we are the nation's biggest green grocer so we are experienced at this. we have had decades of persuading people to eat more fruit and veg and that's because our customers asked them to help them live more healthily and one of the best ways you can do that, as part of any healthy eating plan is to eat more fruit and veg. so what can you do about the price? that's what lots of people who get in touch with the programme, when we talk about this, they talk about vegetable are expensive? so, last year, in response to what customers asked us to do, we found a new range of vegetables and fruit. we introduced that to the british public last year. our customers love them. they appear in 70% of their baskets and our sales have continued to move upwards as a consequence of being able to bring the new range to that customer base. i know we have
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asked the same question twice. but i will ask it one more time. it is great to have' greater variety of veg, but in terms of getting people to buy more, if it is only 7% of the shopping basket and we need to get to to 20% to reduce the premature deaths, surely the effective way of doing that, rather than paying 10 pence, it becomes 15 pence or rather than £1, it is 70 pence, it is the price drop that would encourage more people to buy more vegetables? that's what happened when we introduced the new range. customers ask us to help them live more healthy, we have introduced spiralised vegetables and the introduction of mushroom steaks and cauliflower cou rg ette. introduction of mushroom steaks and cauliflower courgette. it is a combination of price, it is innovation and it's
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combination of price, it is innovation and its quality, all of those things matter. this is, i mean this idea is that the vegetables will be included in i don't know, for example, ready meals, more of them. how, you struggled with this, and you're a gp, i know that, how do you think we can start making a difference to people's disnets look, the one thing we all agree on in nutrition is that eating more vegetables is a good thing. it doesn't matter whether you are into carbs or fat, our intake is declining and we are not eating enough. one idea is that we empower the public and give them information. people know they should be eating more, so why aren't we? the food industry need to play a role in making it easier for us to make the choices. in my last practise, i worked at for seven years, it was a poor population. a lot were on benefits and i could give them the best advice in my ten minute consultation, but i know they struggled when they walked out, they we re struggled when they walked out, they were surrounded by kebab shops and
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fries, attractive prices that were, that are going to fill them up and it's not that they want to make unhealthy choices, that was the easy option for them. sol unhealthy choices, that was the easy option for them. so i think anything, where the food industry can make it easier, with price, with availability, or even you know cafes, we live in a modern world where we're, you know, we're on the go, we're grabbing snacks. having carrots and humanous, you have got some here, something like that would be incredibly helpful for people if they could get that. louise, mentioned your dad, when you go shopping with your kids, it is ha rd go shopping with your kids, it is hard sometimes, isn't it, the aisles are filled with things that aren't as healthy as the stuff we have got on the table here and it is sometimes simpler and quicker to put the unhealthy stuff in your shopping basket? dan, you're right. many parents struggle with this idea. if the kids are at home and we bring the kids are at home and we bring the shopping in, it is easier, we can control what is there, but if we go to the supermarkets, yes, they start asking for things that you
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know they wouldn't be asking for at home because we don't keep them at home. it is an incredibly big problem these days and i thinkjust saying that, consumers and patients should be doing better is missing the big picture. we're really struggling with our health and actually eating more veg is a good idea and the food industry have got their role to play here. tim smith, how will you measure your success? i think because we share that responsibility with others, it will be fairly straightforward to do. for example, let me address your point about supermarkets. anybody who visits a tesco store recently will notice that we provide free fruit for kids. that's because mums and dads have asked us to help them to help theirfamilies dads have asked us to help them to help their families lead healthier lives. so it isn'tjust about price, it isn't just about sales, in fact, it isn't just about sales, in fact, it isn't just about sales, in fact, it isn't about sales per se but giving people choice. and just about
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food waste, we talk about this a lot here on bbc breakfast, there was a report in september about the government with one fifth of lettu ces, government with one fifth of lettuces, one tenth of strawberries wasted on farms because of cosmetic standards, if we are talking about price, food is going wasted? we are going further, we have actively been working with our brilliant supply base, ourfarmers working with our brilliant supply base, our farmers and working with our brilliant supply base, ourfarmers and growers, to ensure that we have relaxed specifications, we have bought whole crop and taken the view that if a farmer is going to all of the effort of producing food, then the food should not be wasted. so, our intent is food produced for human consumption should be eaten by people and not for any other purpose. it's an important feature and one of those things where you balance the consumption of fruit and vegeta bles balance the consumption of fruit and vegetables which needs to go up with the potential for a risk
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vegetables which needs to go up with the potentialfor a risk of vegetables which needs to go up with the potential for a risk of food waste. we have to get that right. food waste is really important. tim, thanks for would you like to take a vegetable with you this morning? you can have a free grab?|j vegetable with you this morning? you can have a free grab? i will take this one... that is my favourite! 0k, this one... that is my favourite! ok, i will this one... that is my favourite! 0k, iwill take this one... that is my favourite! ok, i will take the sweet potato. they are delicious in the oven. we do that a lot at the moment, 20 minutes in the oven, it's easy. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. carol is talking about called on the way... mild conditions this morning. we have some rain around. if you are in north—west england, there is rain for a lot of the day on and off. we are pulling in all of this cloud
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from the atlantic. not only is it cloudy but we have hill fog, murky conditions and the rain. that rain affects parts of wales, the midlands and northern england, and in the south, it's a dry picture. a lot of cloud around. low cloud and hill fog. some dampness here and there. as we push towards the south—east, temperature wise, many of us see highs and lows, i should say, of 16 degrees. rain in the midlands, north west england, and scotland. some of it is heavy, if you are travelling, some surface it is heavy, if you are travelling, some surface water it is heavy, if you are travelling, some surface water and spray on the roads to content with. windy in the west. across the uk, it will be windier than yesterday. a wet start in northern ireland but it will brighten through the day, sunny spells develop. rainey ensconced across wales from now onwards, through the afternoon and into the evening time as well before it begins to weaken. it clears northern ireland and scotland, leaving some showers in its wake and in southern
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and south—eastern areas, it's mostly dry. rain skirts across parts of lincolnshire and norfolk. again, cloud around. it's bright in the south rather than sunny. temperature wise, it's above average across the board. 11 degrees in the north, highs of 19 board. 11 degrees in the north, highs of19 in board. 11 degrees in the north, highs of 19 in the south. the rain is courtesy of this wiggling weather front, we call it a way the weather front. it pushes further south. there will be rain around. look at these temperatures. no problems with these temperatures. no problems with the frost. overnight lows of 9—14, it's a mild start of the day tomorrow. tomorrow it pushes southwards. there will not be a lot of rain but it is murky in south—west england. for the rest of the uk, sunny spells and temperatures are above average for this stage in october. a peppering of showers in the north and north—west. by thursday, this
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weather front is wiggling, and wiggles further north. into east anglia, but in the charts, not a lot of it. brighter spells as we push further north, and some rain in the far north of scotland. temperatures of 11-18d, far north of scotland. temperatures of 11—18d, but on thursday, this change in wind direction pulls in a fresh direction. through the weekend, it pushes the weather front away, it opens the gates, for norway —— for more north—westerly winds, it will feel cool compared to the next couple of days. late starts, early finishes and cancellations. descriptions you might not expect to hear associated with a valuable resource such as an national health service
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operating theatre. yet, nhs improvement, which scrutinises hospitals in england, says hundreds of thousands of operations a year aren't happening because of wasted time. it's medical director, doctor kathy mclean joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning, thank you for being here this morning. this research amazes me. there is so much capacity in the system, how is that possible? this particular analysis has found that there are some late starts and early finishes, and there are gaps between. by looking at that in detail, more operations can take place, more patients can be treated faster so there is an all—round benefit. what causes these problems? why would you start an operation late orfinish one why would you start an operation late or finish one early? by the
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time the patient has been brought down from the ward after a scheduled appointment, it could start later. it is making sure that everything ru ns it is making sure that everything runs efficiently. if you do that, hospitals have already found that they can fit in more patients. these surgeons are waiting to get on with the operations, they are working ha rd the operations, they are working hard and by doing that, they use the same resources, more patients can be treated and get their operations a lot earlier. are you in danger of oversimplifying a hugely complicated not only operation system but the nhs generally. you are looking at it in isolation and some of the tiny minute factors that have been come —— that has come to bear, you have ignored? having the analysis is helpful, it allows the hospitals to work on that. the operations that
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start late and finish early because everything wasn't running smoothly but without that information, they do not know how to do that. hospitals are making an enormous difference with that. we will speak toa difference with that. we will speak to a doctor about this later on. and the pressure on the system, could it be used by more hands on deck. what could solve that issue? programmes like what we have been talking about, they will help to improve efficiency. we know that staff are working really hard but if we can make things easier, so that they can get on with the work they want to do, so surgeons and anaesthetists getting on with operating on patients, that is going to help enormously. that's really interesting analysis and research that has been done. i'm sure doctors and surgeons will be thinking, there
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is no way we can streamline the system but there are delays for a good reason. let us know what you think, we will be speaking to a doctor about why there are those delays and thousands of operations that could be done each year if the system was better organised. i've looked to my left and steph has walked off... go back! she was sleepwalking! we've had a lot of messages about sleepwalking. .. sleepwalking! we've had a lot of messages about sleepwalking. . ij know, messages about sleepwalking. . i know, but you are a sleep eat. research into sleep walkers may be a good thing! let's talk about costa coffee! their parent company say that they have opened 200 more companies this year. the company that owns premier inn as well say they have over 2000
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new rooms at the hotel, i will be speaking to a boss in about 30 minutes. and companies who cold call people about pensions, they could be facing a ban. in the house of lords they will be putting forward changes to stop that from happening. they want the rules to change to stop the annoying calls and also they think there should be compulsory advice before people decide what to do with their pension pot. one peer has told us this morning it will go to a vote tonight. and for those of you who find yourselves staring into space in a bit of a daydream at work later today — it's good for you. so say scientists from cambridge university. they've found brain activity when we're paying attention to nothing in particular is very useful for getting on with tasks. would you believe! and these two are daydreaming as i speak. at least we we re daydreaming as i speak. at least we were not sleepwalking! i've been looking at the messages about sleepwalking and sleep eating, what people get up to. amazing things. annabel says that her daughter once made a proper welsh rabbit and washed up for the first time ever in
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her sleep expert someone else said that their 15—year—old sister left for school at 3am entirely naked with her pillow, but they caught her in time. once lee peter peeled and entire orange and ate it in the dining room. —— one sleep eat. -- one sleep eat. i am quite mad in my head. it is all a good thing. if you can multitask! and it is good for productivity... am i missing out? imagine all of the things you could get done! such fun in the night... let's find out what is happening with the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. the same type of flammable cladding
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believed to have contributed to the grenfell disaster is on at least 52 tower blocks in london, a bbc london investigation has revealed. grenfell tower was encased in panels made up of aluminium sheets with a polyethylene core, which melts and burns when exposed to extreme temperatures. the association that runs this block in kilburn, which has the same type of cladding, had no plans to remove it — but is now reviewing that — adding that the safety of their residents is of utmost importance. police are investigating a collision in leyton which has a nine—year—old police say they have destroyed the largest cannabis factory ever to be found in the county of hertfordshire. around 1,000 plants with a street value of £700,000 were discovered at an address in potters bar after an anonymous tip off. police also found electrical equipment used in growing the plants. the factory was so large it took officers two days to dismantle it.
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the crash pushed the buffers back more than a metre. the report by the rail accident investigation branch, found the driver "briefly closed her eyes because they felt tired" in the seconds before the collision. voting papers are being sent out to train drivers on southern railway and gatwick express, in fresh attempt to end the industry's longest running dispute. 1,000 drivers are being recommended by their union, aslef, to accept a revised deal. it follows months of negotiations. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a look at the weather now. good morning.
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you may notice how mild it is to begin the day, setting the tone for much of the week. some mist and fog first thing, it's cloudy generally. that cloud is breaking up a little as we get some brightness this afternoon. some rain to the north, the further north, the more chance you have of seeing drizzly outbreaks of rain. some of us may feel a little damp but mostly staying dry. temperatures of 19 degrees with a noticeable south—westerly breeze. overnight, we hold on to the cloud, it is mild, temperatures of 14 degrees, but tomorrow, a cloudy start of the day. some outbreaks of rain, but not affecting everyone. by the afternoon, we see quite a difference with the cloud. it really breaks up to give us brightness and even sunshine with highs of 18 degrees. thursday we see some wet weather but by friday, things dry up a little. a more settled day, perhaps with brightness
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and even sunny spells. it starts to feel a little fresher. for most of the week, temperatures where we would expect them for this time of year we would expect them for this time of y everything is making sure that everything is running really efficiently and if you do that, hospitals have already
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