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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 25, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. this is breakfast. an enquiry is launched into e—cigarettes amid concern not enough is known about their impact on the 3 million people who use them. mps will look at their value in helping people stop smoking and the effect on abuses‘ health. good morning. uber watching brea kfast. good morning. uber watching breakfast. also on the programme today, fire chiefs call for in all public schools in england. the man who faced three months injail public schools in england. the man who faced three months in jail after being found guilty of public indecency in dubai, arrives back, in glasgow. good morning. later today we will
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find out how fast the uk economy is growing, finding out what that means for interest rates and what it means for interest rates and what it means for the chancellor in the budget. in sport, crystal palace continue to crumble. bristol city humiliate them in the league cup. no such problems from manchester united. they are through to the quarterfinals. and carol has the weather. good morning from the botanic gardens, we re morning from the botanic gardens, were behind bilate run this evening will be a lot of beautiful lights in the pavilion. this will mark the end of the valley. it has been whetted in the north overnight. as the weather front sinks south, it will weaken. for most today it will be a sunny day with temperatures higher than we expected in october. more in 15 minutes. an enquiry into e—cigarettes has
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been announced by mps amid concerns there are significant gaps in what we actually know about them. everything from their impact on human health to how their consumption affects the nhs and the economy will be examined. here is next trivial. the popularity of e—cigarettes has soared in recent yea rs. of e—cigarettes has soared in recent years. nearly 3 million people in the uk now use them, according to the uk now use them, according to the office for national statistics, a fourfold increase since 2012. this year they were even used in the annual stopped over campaign for the first time. despite this, they are not officially prescribed by the nhs. advisory body in ice say patient should be told there is currently little evidence on the long—term benefits or harms of these products. the house of commons science and technology committee says there is a lack of clear guidelines about their use and it is causing confusion. it has now announced it is launching its own
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enquiry. we need to understand the long—term implications of a far greater number of people using e—cigarettes. it's great news that people are stopping smoking and shifting to e—cigarettes but we need to understand more about the health consequences. the cross-party group of mps has asked anyone who wants to submit written evidence to make sure it reaches the committee by the 8th of december. the national forages council has told his problem it wants to see all schools fitted with sprinkler systems. new schools in scotland and wales must have sprinklers but they are not mandatory independent or northern ireland. dany cotton accused the government of playing with children's lives by not making them compulsory. there are around 700 fires at schools in england every year. an electrician from stirling who was facing three months in prison in dubai for public indecency has spoken of his relief at returning home to the uk. jamie harron had
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been sentenced for touching a man's hip ina been sentenced for touching a man's hip in a public bar. he was freed after dubai's ruler intervened. katrina renton reports. back into the arms of his family. jamie hamill‘s ordeal is finally over. he arrived in scotland to questions from waiting media. his reaction to being home? very good. very happy to being home? very good. very happy to be home. i kept positive all the way through it. i still couldn't believe it and actually happened. even now when i'm home i still can't believe it. he had been on a two-day stopover in dubai injuly. he said he brushed against a man's hip in a crowded bar as he tried to steady himself to avoid spilling his drink. he was also accused of drinking alcohol and making a rude gesture towards the businessman who made the complaint. although the complaint was withdrawn, prosecutors continued
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with the case. on sunday he was sentenced to three months in prison. a day later, following an intervention from the country's ruler, he was exonerated. he has lost hisjob as ruler, he was exonerated. he has lost his job as an electrician in afghanistan and has now spent all his savings on legal fees and expenses. i had expenses. ihada expenses. i had a lot of savings because i had done six months in afghanistan before that. he told reporters he would decide in the next few days whether he would sue the man who made the complaint. but for now, with a cuddle from his mum, it is time to go home. two republican senators have accused president trump of damaging us politics and the country's standing abroad. the president's spokesperson said mrtrump was abroad. the president's spokesperson said mr trump was more popular with the voters than either bob corker or jeff flake. both senators say they
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will stand down. we must never meekly accept the daily sundering of our country, the personal attacks, the threats against principles, freedoms and institutions, the flagrant disregard for truth and decency, the reckless provocations, most often for the pettiest and most personal reasons. later this morning we find out how much the uk economy has grown in the three months to september. this is the last time we will find out how it is doing before next month's budget. colette is at a box factory leamington spa. good morning. iam factory leamington spa. good morning. i am at a cardboard box factory. you can probably see some of the cardboard whizzing around behind me. they make around 3 million boxes a monthjust around behind me. they make around 3 million boxes a month just from this factory. they have a couple of sites. they have been growing pretty well. last year, they saw some good
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growth. it is a good indication of what is happening in the wider economy. these boxes and up at supermarkets, coming through your door, they go right across the economy. if these guys are doing well, the likelihood is that lots of our retailers are doing well as well. in the last quarter, the second quarter of the year, we saw a 0.3% growth in the economy. this quarter, for the third quarter, most economists are predicting the same kind of ballpark figure, around 0.3% growth. that may not sound like very much but it is at least growth. in terms of how we measure up compared to the rest of the eu,... when you are looking at the wider picture of how the uk economy has been doing in the past year, as i say, we have
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been seeing growth but it has been slowing, and that has caused a lot of concern as to whether we have 90 hit targets. —— whether we are going to hit targets. two people watching that figure later today. one of them is the governor of the bank of england. just next week he will have a meeting where they will decide on interest rates. next week we will be looking out to see whether interest rates are going to go up or not. if we see a good bit of growth, that makes the case stronger for increasing interest rates. the other person looking at that figure closely is the chancellor, because it is the budget next month. he definitely wants the economy to be growing. thank you. the boxes carrying on being made. social media joined twitter has announced new rules about how it displays political adverts. this is
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after criticism that the service was used to try to influence last year's presidential election in the us. twitter ads were now clearly show who fondled them, how much was spent and which users are being targeted. more than half of all british women have encountered sexual harassment at work or at their place of study, according to a survey by bbc radio. most of the women didn't report it. gina campbell has more. sarah has seen gina campbell has more. sarah has seen and been on the receiving end of sexual harassment. her personal experiences started at school. high school teacher, when i was 17, we re high school teacher, when i was 17, were assaulted me. and everybody knew. he later married a student just a year under me. sarah isjust one person. we heard from men and women who experienced all kinds of different harassments. more than
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half of women have experienced sexual harassment at work or in a place of study, according to a survey for bbc five live. around two thirds of men and women say they didn't report it to anyone. and more women than men said they were targeted by a boss or senior manager. in some cases there are blurred lines when it comes to sexual harassment. it can be anything from assault to unwonted obscene comments. it has led to a big online social media campaign using the hash tag me, too. it dates back more than a decade. this is about individuals who are survivors of sexual violence, but it is also about a larger conversation about the systems in place. the survey also found one in ten women who had been harassed left theirjob or place of study. a third of drivers receive a penalty
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notice every year, according to the rac foundation. they say 12 million are issued every year, the equivalent of one every 2.5 seconds. two thirds of those are parking tickets. a million after a speeding or going through red traffic light. that makes the front page of the daily mail. labour leaderjeremy corbyn is going to swap the dispatch box for a gogglebox when he appears ina box for a gogglebox when he appears in a celebrity special next week. mr corbyn will feature in the hit tv programme to raise money for a stand—up to cancer. it is not yet known which shows will be dissected by the labour leader, who is not expected to be found at home. that is half the fun of it. yes, look at the so far, see what's on the book shelf. it would be so carefully managed if it was at home. you might be planning a holiday this
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morning after looking outside of the window out of the gloom. we have no windows! a leading travel guide has announced the number one place in the world to visit is belfast city. and the causeway coast on northern ireland. lonely planet said belfast was full of hip neighbourhoods, while the coast was described as a side of timeless beauty and high—grade distractions like golf, whiskey and rocks. if you have ever seen the film up, these pictures may seem strangely familiar. tom morgan from bristol reached heights of 2500 metres was suspended from 100 helium balloons. he covered nearly 16 miles from his basejust outsidejohannesburg nearly 16 miles from his basejust outside johannesburg in south africa. the 38—year—old spent two days with his friends inflating
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balloons. he said it was unbelievably cool. once you get up there, you get down by putting a balloon loose at a time. once you get released, you would get up there at some pace, then there is a slow descent. good morning, holly. you would love to do that, louise. that looks terrifying. i've got a balloon fear. are you balloon phobic? i'm sure there is a posh name for it. roy hodgson's crystal palace continues to crumble. bristol city humiliate roy's boys to reach the last eight of the efl cup. no such problems for manchester united. jesse lingard's double sent them into the quarterfinals. there are
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three games in the scottish premiership. only one goal. it came from simon murray in edinburgh derby. hibs beat hearts. stuart bingham will miss the uk stooke championships and the masters after being banned for six months for breaching the rules on betting. and the british cycling chief executive says the door is open for track cyclist jess says the door is open for track cyclistjess varnish to return. she was dropped from the great britain squad in april last year after failing to qualify for a rio. global phobia. did you say squirrels? looking forward to seeing those pictures. carol is in cambridge. she is at the
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university botanic garden. good morning. the pavilion is all lit up. it is to mark the end of diwali. it is the festival light. it is a hindu festival. if you are coming down tonight, you are in for a treat. but it is sold out. that is also the national tree of india and it does look lovely. especially when it is so dark this morning. talking of the weather this morning we have a weather this morning we have a weather front which has been producing quite a bit of rain across the northern half of the country overnight. it will weaken and for a time we will see cloud, but through the day it will break and for many parts of the uk, today will be sunny and it's going to be mild. we're already off to a mild start, we are looking at temperatures for some parts of the country currently around about 1k parts of the country currently around about 1a or 15 celsius. if we
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start the forecast in scotland at 9am, we have some showers across the north and the north—west. you can see how the cloud is starting to break up and sunshine coming through and temperatures around about ten or 11 celsius. across northern england, it's a similar story. the cloud continuing to break up. as the weather front sinks south this is where we have got the cloud across east anglia and the south midlands and southern counties generally, but it should be mostly dry. as we move northwards, in through wales for example, it is brightening up too by 9am with sunshine starting to come through and drifting across the irish sea, into northern ireland, again, you too will brighten up, but at the moment we have showers in the north coast and we'll hang on to them for a wee while. some of the showers across northern scotland for the next couple of hours could also be thundery, but they will be the exception rather than the rule. through the course of the day, we hang on to the showe in the north and the west. as you can see a lot
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of sunshine coming through as the cloud continues to break. we may hang on to more cloud at times across south—west england. temperatures, we are in good shape, up temperatures, we are in good shape, up to 18 to 20 celsius in the south and that's above average. in the north we are looking at 11s and 12s. as we head through the evening and overnight, ourfront as we head through the evening and overnight, our front which as we head through the evening and overnight, ourfront which has been in south turns around and comes back northwards, bringing rain in across wales, the midlands and then into northern england. behind it, where we have got clear spells, in the south east, we will see fog forming and that could be dense and we'll see the showers continue across the north and the west of scotland. across northern ireland, southern scotla nd across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england it will be a chilly night under clear skies. tomorrow, we start off with that band of rain across parts of england and wales. it's a fairly narrow band. to the north of it and the south of it, some brighter skies. the south of it though seeing a bit more cloud and temperatures down a touch on where we're looking today. and then as we head on into
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friday, well, it's a messy picture. the wind changes direction to a northerly or a north—westerly. so it will feel cooler. not as warm as it will feel cooler. not as warm as it will be for some of us in the next couple of days. there will be showers around, but there will be quite a lot of dry weather around, but as we head into the weekend, particularly on sunday, it looks like it will be much cooler than it currently is, lou and dan. it looks lovely behind you. i suppose when it gets lighter, it's not going look so beautiful. it looks beautiful at 6am. that's the benefits of tuning in early. but we have got more things to reveal later on. have you? looking forward to that. do you remember a tv programme called the mysterious cities of gold? no. i might have to issue an
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apology to you! i'm still not apologising yet. i want to start with this one. shirley from strictly is coming on. you remember that bruno missed strictly last week. is coming on. you remember that bruno missed strictly last weeklj do. shirley is on so we'll ask her about her fellow do. shirley is on so we'll ask her about herfellowjudge do. shirley is on so we'll ask her about her fellow judge and do. shirley is on so we'll ask her about her fellowjudge and this series as well. it's front page of the sun this morning. the telegraph are talking about this young lady. a women's officer who has letter a letter to the university. this story is an interesting story from bermuda. some of the world's richest people last night braced for the financial details to be exposed after a major off—shore company admitted that it's computer records
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had been hacked. the front page of the guardian this morning has a picture of the heir to the saudi throne who said the kingdom had not been normalfor throne who said the kingdom had not been normal for the past throne who said the kingdom had not been normalfor the past 30 throne who said the kingdom had not been normal for the past 30 years. and the main story is brexit is the worst ever decision from bloomberg saying eu is the stupidest thing a nation has done bar electing trump. that's the front page of the guardian. the times and this is a story that is in a few of the papers, the university chief accused a conservative whip of idiotic lennonism after he asked for the names of lecturers teaching about brexit and the content of their courses. the mail, the story about drivers. drivers used as £1 billion cash cow paying more than £1 billion in fines. one—third of drivers, i
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can't remember the statistic, but anyway, it's a lot of people, every two—and—a—half seconds. and there is hugh grant, he has found his perfect role which is shakespeare. he is playing the disgraced former liberal leaderjeremy thorpe. playing the disgraced former liberal leader jeremy thorpe. we playing the disgraced former liberal leaderjeremy thorpe. we are talking about the me too campaign later. virgin money chief warning about sexism in the city. she has been head of the a financial organisation. one interesting story that a lot of people have been talking about today, pep guardiola has got ball problems. he says the ball is unacceptable, the one used la st ball is unacceptable, the one used last night. it ended up goal last city, last night. what's wrong with it? he is blaming the cup. he said
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the ball that's used in these games isjust not the ball that's used in these games is just not acceptable for a the ball that's used in these games isjust not acceptable for a high level competition. well... something that's going to have to be looked at. it's different from the premier league ball. it's lighter. yeah, he says that's the issue. that and the other story that the papers are talking about today, squirrelgate. this little guy seems to have taken much of the headlines away from any of the league games last night. he appeared on the pitch and they got to the get him off. have we got moving pictures of the squirrel? we are looking into it. i don't think the programme is long enough to show how long it took to get them. they missed out, "0h, how long it took to get them. they missed out, "oh, it's definitely not a red! " men have 40 minutes more leisure time a day than women! would you believe? women have less time,
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partially because they use it differently. yes. to do... yes, it's called multitasking. and men are far more likely to play computer games or sport in their leisure time. they enjoy it more. these terrible men! what are you doing enjoying yourselves for goodness' sake? ! fire chiefs in england have told this programme they are calling for all new and refurbished schools to be fitted with sprinklers a policy that's already mandatory in scotland and wales. breakfast has learnt that just 5% of all schools in england and wales currently have sprinklers as graham satchell reports. fire at rift house primary school in hartlepool. it happened on a sunday evening last may. i just saw smoke and then when i looked over my back garden fence, it was just fire. i think i was terrified.
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there are around 700 school fires a year in england. this one completely destroyed the nursing building. like the vast majority of schools, 95%, there was no sprinkler system here. fitting sprinklers in new and refurbished schools is mandatory in scotland and wales, not so in england and northern ireland. last year, the department for education in england consulted on new draft guidance. it said, "building regulations don't require the installation of sprinklers so the guidance would no longer include an expectation that most new school buildings will be fitted with them". do you think grenfell has changed everything? absolutely. i think it will change everything and quite rightly so. dany cotton led the fire service response at grenfell tower. she says she was appalled when the draft guidance came out last year. i thought it was outrageous. ijust thought how can we play with children's lives like that? ijust do not understand why it wouldn't be made compulsory, made a requirement to fit sprinklers in schools at a new—build stage and what i don't want to see
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is a very large school fire to be the thing that brings about that change. in the days following the fire at grenfell tower, the government's draft guidance was withdrawn. so the current guidance says this, "all new schools should have fire sprinklers installed, except in a few low risk schools". and yet, figures from the government's own schools building programme show that of the 260 schools built since 2014, only 74 have sprinklers, that's 28%. typically we don't always fit sprinklers in schools because there are other ways of making sure that schools are fire safe. andrew works for a construction company that builds new schools like this just finished library in london. with budgets tight, he says schools can be designed to be low fire risk with exit routes, fire doors and reence forced walls. i think if there was more money involved in school buildings i'd be looking at the need for new school places around the country, the bits of the school estate which are in really poor
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condition rather than that sprinklers was the first call. pupils are safe in their schools today. back in hartlepool, the destroyed building has been cleared and plans are being made for its replacement. when this building is rebuilt, will it be fitted with sprinklers? having seen what fires can actually do to a school, without a shadow of a doubt it would be something that i would be considering for any future building work on a school site. in a statement the department for education in england told us, "the safety of children is our priority. and where a risk assessment recommends sprinklers they must be installed. fire chiefs say that's not good enough and fitting sprinklers in new schools should now be mandatory in all parts of the uk. we will be talking about that later. it is time for an apology? we have
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had it checked. it is blobphobia. it is the fear of a popping balloon. no, that's different. here is the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a public consultation into the third ru nway a public consultation into the third runway at heathrow has been reopened because of new evidence. the department for transport has published a report on noise and air quality. it is a year ago since the government named heathrow as its preferred site for expansion. campaigners will mark it with a
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protest in the capital later. the london mayor says the capital is becoming better prepared for a terror attack. the london mayor says the capital is becoming better prepared for a terror attack. a report a year ago into london's preparedness to respond to the threat of terrorism made specific recommendations — the london mayor says the capital is becoming better prepared historians are trying to save a gas cylinder. this structure at the former gasworks in poplar is thought to be the last of its kind and campaigners want to stop it being dismantled. we are actively working with them to try a way of preserving the industrial shadow of the area if you like so that people who move there in the future can understand something about halfs there before. if you go around other parts of london, there is a gas holder at king's cross which has been turned into housing. if you look at it, it has worked well. it is time to take a look at travel situation. and we have got a good service on the
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tubes. jubs problem on the overground. on tubes. jubs problem on the overg round. on the tubes. jubs problem on the overground. on the roads, the high street in wealdstone remains closed and in catford, there are temporary traffic lights for waterworks too. now the weather. bottom hello. temperatures above average for what we would expect to see fort time of year. we will start off cloudy for a time, but brightening up with sunny spells. that cloud could be thick enough to produce rain and drizzle this morning. some good spells of sunshine developing as we move into the afternoon. light winds and highs of around 18 celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, it the cloud will return though. that cloud coming in from the south—west. where there are a few brea ks south—west. where there are a few breaks in the cloud, we could see a few patches of mist and fog forming and again, a fairly mild night to
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come. overnight lows of 12 and 14 celsius. fairly grey and cloudy start to the day tomorrow. we could see a few showery outbreaks of rain. it will be dry as we move through the day with a few brighter intervals developing. the best chance of seeing any of those are the further south you are. as we move into friday, a fairly cloudy start to begin with a few outbreaks of rain and drizzle, but it will brighten up. sunny spells developing, but feeling a touch fresher. temperatures down to average for the time of year. a maximum of 14 celsius. and it will stay fresher as we move into the weekend. that's all for now. good morning. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's just gone 6:30am. coming
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it'sjust gone 6:30am. coming up, with little known about the long—term health benefits or arm of e—cigarettes, we ask an industry expert how they should be regulated. text and while crossing the road has been banned in hawaii's largest city. we ask you something similar should happen here. and shirley ballas will be here to tell us what it's like to criticise the cha—cha—cha. good morning. a summary of the main stories. mps are beginning an enquiry into e—cigarettes, looking at regulations on the use and their effect on human health. the committee will also look into whether it does actually help people stop smoking. nearly 3 million people in the uk now use the devices regularly. we still have a lot to learn about the health consequences of e—cigarettes as opposed to smoking. we know it is safer but we don't yet know all of the health consequences,
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particularly in terms of long—term use of e—cigarettes. we need to fill that evidence gap. the national fire chiefs council has said it wants to see all schools fitted with sprinkler systems. new schools in scotland and wales must have sprinklers but they are not mandatory in england or northern ireland. london fire brigade commissioner dany cotton accused the government are playing with children's lives by not making them consult —— compulsory. there are around 700 fires at schools in england every year. two us republican senators have accused president trump of damaging us politics. the president's spokesperson said mr trump was more popular than either bob corker or jeff flake. both senators say they will stand down. a man from stirling who had been facing three months injail in dubai has returned to the uk. jamie harron was freed after a personal intervention by the emirates ruler.
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he was accused of touching a man's hip ina he was accused of touching a man's hip in a bar. later this morning we find out how much the uk economy has grown in the three months to september. this is the last time we will find out how it is doing before next month's budget. today's figure is important because the number will play heavily into deliberations next week on whether to raise interest rates. more than half of all british women have encountered sexual harassment at work or at their place of study, according to a survey by bbc five live. nearly 70% of those questioned said they hadn't reported. the survey of 2000 adults also found a fifth of men had been sexually harassed. a third of drivers receive a penalty notice every year, according to the rac foundation. they say 12 million are issued every year, the equivalent of one every 2.5 seconds. two thirds of those are parking tickets. a million after a speeding or going through red traffic light. you might be planning a holiday this
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morning after looking outside at the gloom. a leading travel guide has announced the number one place the world to visit is belfast city and the causeway coast on northern ireland. lonely planet said belfast was full of hip neighbourhoods, while the coast was described as a side of timeless beauty and high—grade distractions like golf, whiskey and rocks. it does look beautiful. i fancy a bit of that. yesterday we told you about the note written by albert einstein which described the theory of happy living. it sold for nearly £1.2 million. einstein gave the nod toa £1.2 million. einstein gave the nod to a career in tokyo in 1922 after he refused to accept a tip. the message said, quiet and modest life brings morejoy message said, quiet and modest life brings more joy than the pursuit of success than with constant unrest.
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einstein told the career the note would become valuable at some stage. 95 years on he was proved correct once again. it is probably not the person who got the note. you would like to think it is their family. good morning. i don't believe him about the fear of squirrels. it is not global phobia. it doesn't sound very nice. it doesn't sound very nice. it doesn't sound very nice. it doesn't changed the fact that i am. a big night last night in the league cup. a big night for crystal palace. roy hodgson will be picking up palace. roy hodgson will be picking up the pieces this morning. concentrate on the league. the result did not go out of their
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way on an evening where bristol city thrashed crystal palace by 4—1. elsewhere, manchester city needed a penalty shoot out to get past wolves. no problems for manchester united, who eased past swansea by 2-0. a united, who eased past swansea by 2—0. a goal in either half byjesse lingard. here are those results from last night. two late goals helped arsenal past norwich. pep guardiola said the ball used in the league cup wasn't fit for purpose. there were three games in the scottish premiership last night but just one goal between them. it came in the edinburgh derby. simon murray scoring in the opening three minutes to give hibs victory. scotland's
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women made it two wins out of two in their world cup qualifying campaign, beating albania 5—0 in paisley. wales drew 0—0 in russia. the 2015 world snooker championship stuart bingham, will mr uk championship and the masters after he was banned for six months for breaching betting rules. just over half of the band will be suspended if it complies with the recommended treatment for his gambling issues. and if he commits no further rule breaches, bingham is also ordered to pay £20,000 in costs but still has the option to appeal. he is due to miss two of the sport's top three tournaments. it isa tournaments. it is a serious case because it undermines the integrity of the sport if you are us our players playing within it who were betting on much as they are involved in. we saw it as a serious case. we don't
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have an actual benchmark. we thought the longer ban was more appropriate. we do accept the ban. british cycling says the door is open for a former sprinterjess varnish to return to the sport. she was dropped from the british squad 18 months ago after failing to qualify for the rio olympics. she made allegations of bullying and sexual discrimination against former coach shane sutton. although he was cleared of bullying, he quit after being found to have used sexist language. serena williams has been a fixture at the end of season wta tour finals fixture at the end of season wta tourfinals for a fixture at the end of season wta tour finals for a number of years. but in her absence, the singapore crowd had sister venus williams to keep entertained. she recorded her first win of the tournament yesterday. after defeat in her opener, the seven time grand slam winner beat french open champion jelena ostapenko in three hard—fought jelena ostapenko in three hard —fought sets. third jelena ostapenko in three
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hard—fought sets. third seed —— seed karolina pliskova beat garbine muguruza. the squirrel is going to make an appearance on breakfast, later. not in real life, but... it was running around the head of the game? that's right. it was at the game? that's right. it was at the etihad stadium last night. thank you. nearly 3 million people in the uk use e—cigarettes but mps are worried about how it affects people's held in the long term. an enquiry will be set up to look at the impact on health as well as how effective they are in stopping people giving up smoking. professor john brittonjoins me now. we know e—cigarettes have been around for a while. could there be long—term effects we are not aware of? it is
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very likely there will be long—term effects from electronic cigarettes. the products are not completely safe. where the important distinction is, the relative risk against smoking tobacco. if you are against smoking tobacco. if you are a cigarette smoker, the long—term risks of tobacco smoking are so massive that it is inconceivable electronic cigarettes could reproduce them. any smoker who switches to electronic cigarette is doing there health a favour. but what we need to know is whether these products carry any long—term hazard that is avoidable. for that reason i welcome the new enquiry. it is an opportunity to set in place the kinds of observational systems we need to pick up any avoidable health problems. you mentioned about helping people to quit. e—cigarettes we re helping people to quit. e—cigarettes were used in public health england's stop smoking campaign for the first time. other not recommending that
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people quit because there is not enough evidence? nice operator different rules. the empirical evidence is extremely clear. we have nearly 3 million users in the uk. 1.5 million of those are former smokers. if you look at smoking prevalence figures for the uk over the last three years, you see a decline which is most twice as fast as was happening before electronic cigarettes came along. these products are having a huge impact on public health. the challenge for all of us now is to make sure we harness that benefit while just protecting users against any unnecessary or avoidable risk. do you think we will get to a point where you will visit your doctor and they will prescribe e—cigarettes? again, one of the difficulties is that a gp or anybody else can't prescribe a product that isn't
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licensed as a medicine. there is one licensed as a medicine. there is one licensed electronic cigarette but it has never come to market. the problem is that medicines regulation is so onerous and unsuited to these products, but i can't see decent electronic cigarettes getting the license in the predictable future. that is another thing that it would be nice if the committee had a look at. we need a way to be able to integrate these into health services, despite the fact the current licensing systems we have don't work. one of the other concerns is that it offers a gateway into smoking, or normalising smoking, particularly for young people. is that borne out by the evidence? it is a genuine concern that the evidence in the uk and around the world is very clear, that young people do experiment with these products as they experiment with lots of things. but the numbers a transfer from electronic cigarettes to tobacco smoking is extremely small. the numbers who tra nsfer extremely small. the numbers who transfer from tobacco smoking who would not in any case had become a
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smoker, vanishingly small. although it isa smoker, vanishingly small. although it is a genuine concern it is not happening in the uk. we are seeing falling prevalence of smoking in young people and in adults. one more for clarity. e—cigarettes may not contain the same toxic chemicals as cigarettes, but there is still nicotine in there. there are long—term dangers associated with that? the long-term dangers of nicotine use seem to be much the same as the long—term dangers of caffeine. we are all going to have a cup of copy this morning and i would afford the same amount of concerns to the long—term use of nicotine is. it is not the nicotine that kills, it is other things in the smoke. i give very much for that. let us know what you think. getting contact through the usual means, on e—mail and social media. you are watching breakfast. these are the main stories. mps are to
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launch an enquiry into e—cigarettes after concerns were raised about the effects on the health of the uk's 3 million vapours. a man from stirling who faced three months in prison in dubai has returned to the uk after the emirates ruler overturned his sentenced. we are going to get the weather from carol. she has got a rather lovely light show as well. she's at cambridge university's botanic gardens. good morning. what a beautiful sight. you can see this tree. it has been cut out of felt by two designers, one from india and one from london. the tree is the national tree of india. you can also see some of the shapes cut out like fossils. they are to represent the university of cambridge museums and it is a chilly start to the day here, but not everywhere. we have got a breeze. temperatures in some parts of the
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country are around about 14 or 15 celsius, but we have a weather front. president weather front has been producing a lot of rain across the north of the country overnight. as it sinks southwards, it will take quite a bit of cloud with it, but through the course of the morning, that cloud will break up and for many of us today, it's going to be sunny and it's going to be mild. if we start the forecast in scotland this morning, at 9am, you can see we have got some showers in the north and the west. some of those for the next couple of hours could be heavy, with the odd rumble of thunder, but the cloud will be continuing to break up and we will continue to see sunshine break through. it's the same across northern england. after the rain and the cloud move away, we will see it brightening up with sunshine coming through. for the north and the east midlands, the same thing, but for east anglia, the south midlands and southern counties, this is by 9am where we will have our weather front so there will have our weather front so there will be more cloud around. the exception could be the south—west
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where we could hang on to more cloud through the course of the day. for wales and the west midlands brightening up with sunshine coming through. across northern ireland, you too will brighten up. we have showers currently across the north coast and by 9am, there will be a few left behind, but they will fade as we go through the day. so the showers across the north and the north—west of scotland will. here too, there will be blustery winds. but for most of us, the sun will come out. at best we will see sunny spells and many of us will see sunny spells. temperatures in the north around about 11 celsius or 12 celsius. as we come further south, we are looking at perhaps up to 20 celsius in london, even though it is not on the chart. that's way above average. the average in london is 14 celsius. through this evening and overnight, our weather front which has moved south and cleared the south coast comes back bringing rain across wales, the midlands and into northern england. behind it, there will be clear skies and somewhere
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like the south east of england could see fog formling and that could be dense. the showers continue in the north and the west, but for northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england, it will be chilly. here we will have some clear spells. so tomorrow, we start off with the rain, resting. it's a narrow band across parts of wales and northern england. to the south of that, there will be quite a bit of cloud around, but even so, some of that will break. to the north of the weather front for scotland and northern ireland, it will brighten up and we will see sunshine, but still, those showers and the wind starting to change direction. by friday the wind really does change direction. we are looking at a westerly or north—westerly. the north—westerly isa north—westerly. the north—westerly is a fresher direction for us. across the north and the east, you will notice a difference in the temperatures, but for many of us, it will be dry and bright with one or two showers and sunny spells. into the weekend, it will feel cooler thanit the weekend, it will feel cooler than it is going to do today or tomorrow, lou and dan. tell us about the beautiful lights that we're
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seeing behind you? oh, they're gorgeous, aren't they? they are there to mark the end of diwali and there to mark the end of diwali and the 70th anniversary of indian independence. they have been cut out. the felt behind the glass has been cut out into the shape of a banion tree. later today we'll get the last figure on economic growth before the chancellor finalises his budget. so we've sent colletta to a box factory in lemington spa this morning. what a great day out! good morning, everyone. welcome to the box factory. if you have ever wondered where the boxes come from, that end up where the boxes come from, that end up on your doorstep when you order anything online, well this is the answer. this is where so many cardboard boxes are made, three million a month. the man in charge is neil. thank you for letting us be here. tell us about how business has
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been going for you over the last year. this year, we found it, it's been good. it has been challenging to us and our customers actually. we have been subjected with raw material increases due to sterling exchange rates and a shortage globally actually in paper. so, it has been what challenge to get — our margin has been eroded this year. we are finding our customers are generally busy. that's a good sign because if you're doing well, retailers are doing well? absolutely, absolutely. ithink everybody is cautious. i think we are all waiting for brexit and the outcome of that. i think it's an interesting time. i think uk plc will be fine. and i think that the future looks rosy actually. well, henrietta is with us to talk us through the numbers that we are expecting later on today. what are
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we looking for in terms of growth for the uk economy? what are you predicting? well, the expectations is 0.3% for this quarter and that's in line for what we have seen for the last two quarters in the uk. the important underlying numbers are such as things as retailing and consumer spending, here in the uk, services which include the retail numberare 80% of services which include the retail number are 80% of that gdp number. so, the consumer here is very important. the other driving factor behind that services sector is business investment. particularly from the likes of financial services and as we have seen businesses seem to be reticent at the moment to invest until they have some certainty of the brexit outcome. and if we are going to see 0.3% growth, it doesn't sound huge. what does that mean for next week for the governor of the bank of england who is looking at changing interest rates ? is looking at changing interest rates? the gdp number is part of that consideration. they are going to be thinking about the inflation figure. we have seen inflation move up figure. we have seen inflation move °/. figure. we have seen inflation move
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up 3%, but a lot is due to the impact on sterling. they are going to be looking at wage growth and whether consumers and businesses in the uk can stomach an interest rate hike. it is a number that we will watch carefully. the other person who will be watching it carefully is the chancellor. the budget is next month. if the uk economy is growing and if the figure is 0.3% or higher, that's good news for him. if it's less, it means he gets less in taxes and he has got less to spend in the budget. thank you. british explorer ben saunders is aiming to complete a world first, a solo, and unaided crossing of antarctica. he is following in the footsteps of his friend henry worsley, who died making the attempt last year. breakfast‘s tim muffett went to meet ben as he made his last minute preparations to finish the journey henry started. when you've trekked to the north and south pole, what next? the plan is to make a solo,
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completely unassisted and unsupported crossing of antarctica on foot. so i'm walking from one side to the south pole and then carrying on to the opposite side of antarctica. it's never been done before. no one has ever sort of walked under their own human motive power. the motivation for ben saunders is deeply friend. his friend henry worsley died last year attempting the same feat. henry had been to me a good friend for a long time. my initial reaction for a few weeks was that i didn't want anything more to do with antarctica ever again. itjust seemed too tragic. i started thinking perhaps the best way to honour the friendship and inspiration he gave me would be to finish the job for him. ben, this looks exhausting. tell us about the exercises you're having to do. this is a dead lift which uses almost your whole body. so it's a strong pulling movement, off the floor with a lot of weight. this is more than
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twice my body weight. and you have to kind of bulk up with excess fat to last you. yes, i put on since the summer, ten kilos, 22lbs, about a stone—and—a—half. some of that is muscle and some of that is deliberately fat. it must be very difficult knowing what happened to henry, that ben's going to attempt the same journey. ben has prepared well. it's hisjob. he spent 17 years doing this so ijust have to trust that he knows what he's doing and he'll look after himself. ben's last trip to the south pole saw him complete the route which captain robert falcon scott attempted before he died in 1912. but this time, ben will be going past the south pole and onwards, alone. we will be speaking to ben on breakfast over the course of his expedition including on christmas day when he hopes to be near the south pole.
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are you doing christmas day this year? i don't know who it is. i hope i'm not doing it. i'm meant to be somewhere else on christmas day. i will find out when the rota comes out! coming up: # it's a mystery. star of the 80, toyah willcox is in a new theatre play. and she will join us after 9am to talk about that. becky has got in contact, "without my e—cigarette i couldn't stop smoking." let us know what you think. it's time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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a public consultation into the planned third runway at heathrow has been reopened because of new evidence. the department for transport has published updated analysis on noise and air quality and says the capital's airports will hit full capacity six years sooner than expected. the government says the case for building a third runway is as strong as ever, but anti—expansion campaigners say it's unconvincing. security measures brought in over the past year have made the capital better prepared for a terror attack according to the mayor. he says two—thirds of the recommendations made in a report a year ago have been met such as having more armed officers and increased security on the thames. work still needed includes installing more permanent barriers and bollards in public places. historians are trying to save a victorian gas holder in london's
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east london from being demolish. this wrought iron structure in poplar is thought to be the last of its kind and campaigners want to stop it being dismantled to make way for new homes. we seem to be having a few problems with our audio and visuals there. the travel situation. a good service on the tubes. moving on to the roads and in wealdstone the high street is closed. in catford there is traffic lights on the south circular because of waterworks. temperatures above average. yesterday we recorded 20 celsius in kew gardens. today, is not looking too cool either. we will start off cloudy, but brightening up with
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sunny spells. the cloud could be thick enough to produce rain and drizzle, but good spells of sunshine developing as we move into the afternoon. light winds and highs of 18 celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, the cloud will return though. that cloud coming in from the south—west. where there are a few breaks in the cloud, we could see a few patches of mist and fog. the cloud could be thick enough to produce a few outbreaks of rain, but gun a fairly mild night to come. overnight lows of 12 and 14 #18$. come. overnight lows of 12 and 14 #18s. celsius. it will be dry as we move through the day with brighter intervals developing. the best chance of seeing any of those the further south you are with highs of 18 celsius. friday, a cloudy start to begin worthwhile a few outbreaks of rain and drizzle, but it will brighten up again as we move into the afternoon. sunny spells developing, but feeling a touch fresher. temperatures back down to average for the time of year. a maximum of 14 celsius. and it will stay fresher as we move into the
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weekend. that's it for now. until thenks you can keep up—to—date with everything online and on our website. that's it from us for now. good morning. you're watching breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. an enquiry is launched into e—cigarettes amid concern that not enough is known about the impact on the 3 million people who use them. mps will look at their value in helping people to stop smoking, and there effect on users' help —— health. good morning. you are watching brea kfast good morning. you are watching breakfast on the 25th of october. fire chiefs call for a sprinkler
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systems to be fitted in new and refurbished schools in england as brea kfast learns refurbished schools in england as breakfast learns they are being left out in the majority of cases. how can we play with children's lives like that? i don't want to see a very large school fire be the thing that brings about that change. the man who faced three months in jail after being found guilty of public indecency in dubai, arrives home in glasgow. later we will find outjust how fast the uk economy has been growing. i'm here to find out what that means for interest rates and the chancellor's budget. morning. crystal palace continued to crumble. bristol city humiliate them in the efl cup. no such problems for manchester united. jesse lingard sends them through to the quarterfinals. and carol has the weather. good morning. we have some spectacular lights behind us to mark the end of
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diwali. overnight rain in the north. cloud will break up and foremost todayit cloud will break up and foremost today it will be sunny and miles. more in 15 minutes. thank you. an enquiry into e—cigarettes has been announced by mps, amid concerns there are significant gaps in what we actually know about them. everything from their impact on human health to how their consumption affects the nhs and the economy will be examined. here is nick trigell. the popularity of e—cigarettes has soared in recent years. nearly three million people in the uk now use them, according to the office for national statistics — a fourfold increase since 2012. this year they were even used in the annual stoptober campaign for the first time. despite this, they are not officially prescribed by the nhs. advisory body nice say patients should be told there is currently little evidence on the long—term benefits or harms of these products.
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the house of commons science and technology committee say there is a lack of clear guidelines about their use and it is causing confusion. it has now announced it is launching its own enquiry. we need to understand the long—term implications of a far greater number of people using e—cigarettes. it's great news that people are stopping smoking and shifting to e—cigarettes, but we need to understand more about the health consequences. the cross—party group of mps has asked anyone who wants to submit written evidence to make sure it reaches the committee by the 8th of december. the national fire chiefs council has told this programme it wants to see all schools fitted with sprinkler systems. new schools in scotland and wales must have sprinklers, but they are not mandatory in england or northern ireland. london fire chief dany cotton accused the government of playing with children's lives by not making them compulsory. there are around 700 fires at schools in england
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every year. an electrician from stirling who was facing three months in prison in dubai for public indecency, has spoken of his relief at returning home to the uk. jamie harron had been sentenced for touching a man's hip in a public bar. he was freed after dubai's ruler intervened. katrina renton reports. back into the arms of his family. jamie harron's ordeal is finally over. he arrived in scotland to questions from waiting media. his reaction to being home? very good. very happy to be home. it's been a shambles from the word go. i kept positive all the way through it. i still couldn't believe it and actually happened. even now when i'm home i still can't believe it. he had been on a two—day stopover in dubai injuly. he said he brushed against a man's hip in a crowded bar as he tried to steady himself to avoid spilling his drink. he was also accused of drinking
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alcohol and making a rude gesture towards the businessman who made the complaint. although the complaint was withdrawn, prosecutors continued with the case. on sunday he was sentenced to three months in prison. a day later, following an intervention from the country's ruler, he was exonerated. he has lost hisjob as an electrician in afghanistan, and has now spent all his savings on legal fees and expenses. i had a lot of savings because i had done six months in afghanistan before that. so it was £30,000? i just so it was £30,000? ijust need to move on. he told reporters he would decide in the next few days whether he would sue the man who made the complaint. but for now, with a cuddle from his mum, it is time to go home. two republican senators have accused president trump of damaging us politics and the country's standing abroad.
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the president's spokesperson said mr trump was more popular with the voters than either bob corker orjeff flake. both senators say they will stand down. we must never meekly accept the daily sundering of our country, the personal attacks, the threats against principles, freedoms and institutions, the flagrant disregard for truth and decency, the reckless provocations, most often for the pettiest and most personal reasons. later this morning we find out how much the uk economy has grown in the three months to september. this is the last time we will find out how it is doing before next month's budget. coletta is in leamington spa at a cardboard box factory. very noisy? yes. good morning. this cardboard
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box factory is probably the answer toa box factory is probably the answer to a few ever wondered where all the cardboard comes from that ends up in your recycling bins at home. everything we get these days comes in cardboard, particularly from retailers. all of these cardboard boxes will be winging their way across the uk. online retailers, different suppliers, supermarkets. it isa different suppliers, supermarkets. it is a good sign of what is happening in the economy in general. retailers are doing pretty well. but what we are expecting to hear today is the widerfigure what we are expecting to hear today is the wider figure for the uk economy. they are saying that most economists are predicting 0.3% growth for the third quarter of this year. that is the same as the second quarter. it is some growth but not very much. and certainly not as big asa very much. and certainly not as big as a couple of crucial people are hoping for. the chancellor and the governor of the bank of england.
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have a look at how the economy has been faring over the past couple of yea rs. we have been faring over the past couple of years. we have seen growth but not as much as the bank of england had been predicting and hoping for. that is why we are watching this figure later. it is the final figure before the chancellor makes his budget announcement later this month. in november, should i say. that is a crucialfigure for him. november, should i say. that is a crucial figure for him. if the economy is below that 0.3% figure, it means the chancellor has got less money to spend. and potentially that means more taxes for the rest of us. thank you. that reminds me of a job i used to have. rememberfloppy disks? vaguely. i used to work on a floppy disk factory. i had to put them in piles of ten. they came down a co nveyor them in piles of ten. they came down a conveyor belt. i was always capped and ten. social media joined twitter has announced new rules about how it
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displays political adverts. this is after criticism that the service was used to try to influence last year's presidential election in the us. twitter ads were now clearly show who funded them, how much was spent and which users are being targeted. more than half of all british women have encountered sexual harassment at work or at their place of study, according to a survey by bbc five live. nearly 70% of those questioned said they hadn't reported. the survey of 2000 adults also found a fifth of men had been sexually harassed. adina campbell has more. sarah has seen and been on the receiving end of sexual harassment. her personal experiences started at school. a high school teacher, when i was 17, who assaulted me. and everybody knew. he later married a student just a year under me. sarah's is just one story. we heard from men and women
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who experienced all kinds of different harassments. more than half of women have experienced sexual harassment at work or in a place of study, according to a survey for bbc five live. around two thirds of men and women say they didn't report it to anyone. and more women than men said they were targeted by a boss or senior manager. in some cases there are blurred lines when it comes to sexual harassment. it can be anything from assault to unwanted obscene comments. it has led to a big online social media campaign using the hash tag metoo. it dates back more than a decade. this is about individuals who are survivors of sexual violence, but it is also about a larger conversation about the systems in place. the survey also found one in ten women who had been harassed left theirjob or place of study. a third of drivers receive
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a penalty notice every year, according to the rac foundation. they say 12 million are issued every year, the equivalent of one every 2.5 seconds. is two thirds of those are parking tickets. labour leaderjeremy corbyn is going to swap the dispatch box for gogglebox when he appears in a celebrity special next week. mr corbyn will feature in the hit tv programme to raise money for a stand up to cancer. it is not yet known which shows will be dissected by the labour leader, who is not expected to be found at home. —— filmed at home. you might be planning a holiday this morning outside at the gloom. a leading travel guide has announced the number one place in the world to visit is belfast city and the causeway coast on northern ireland. lonely planet said belfast was full of hip neighbourhoods,
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while the coast was described as a side of timeless beauty and high—grade distractions like golf, whiskey and rocks. if you have ever seen the film up, these pictures may seem strangely familiar. tom morgan from bristol reached heights of 2500 metres when he was suspended from 100 helium balloons. he was strapped to a camping chair. he covered nearly 16 miles from his basejust outsidejohannesburg in south africa. the 38—year—old spent two days with his friends inflating balloons. he said it was unbelievably cool. the way to get down is gently release one balloon at a time and you are slowly sent back to earth. a wonderful way to travel. thank you
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for your comments about e—cigarettes. we are talking about this because there is an investigation... the government is going to do an investigation. to get to the bottom of the effects of e—cigarettes. lots of people i've talked about how they have helped them to stop smoking. there are around a quarter of a million people on probation in england and wales. the chief inspector of probation has told panorama she has grave concerns about the system as it currently run. joining us is paul senior, chair of the probation institute, and dean marshall, whose son was killed by a man who missed probation. good morning. —— madine marshall. paul, when you talk to people who work in this sector, what sort of stories are you hearing? you hear a
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lot of issues from the staff about being overworked, tamara lies, a lot of sickness, a lot of people leaving because it's not longer the job of sickness, a lot of people leaving because it's not longer thejob they we re because it's not longer thejob they were in before. a lot of pressure to deliver on particular targets. are these recent changes? they were implemented in 2014, so they are only three years old. a major change involves supervision of people released from prison after 12 months. that was a major innovation. bringing 50,000 new offenders under supervision by probation. bringing 50,000 new offenders under supervision by probationlj bringing 50,000 new offenders under supervision by probation. i want to speak to nadine about what happened to your son. when did you realise that actually the man who had attacked him was under probation? connor was attacked and murdered in
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march 20 15. connor was attacked and murdered in march 2015. it wasn't until august 2015 that we had a letter, a standard letters sent from the probation service, letting us no that the offender that had been charged was under probation for two separate orders. when you heard of that, what was your response? we didn't hear it initially. it was in this letter. it took us a long time to speak to anybody. it was just devastation. it took us back to march. we thought we had had all the facts from the sentence and trial. it wasjust horrific facts from the sentence and trial. it was just horrific to learn that he was known and that the whole case was a shambolic state. we do know that the killer missed eight probation appointments. the company has said serious further offences
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found that is offence was not linked to conor‘s murder. found that is offence was not linked to conor's murder. what is your response? that is the standard reply. the murder was preventable in our opinion because of the age missed appointments. whether it was eight or six, they argue over how many it was. had the processes been followed that are written down, those processes within the system, he would not have the opportunity to be in porthcawl. he would have been in breach much sooner, but that wasn't the case because of lack of paperwork, lack of offender management. paul senior, what would you say to that? one victim, any victim is a victim too many. that is the first point. the public protection daout dwris
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are taken seriously, but because of the pressure people are under and the pressure people are under and the changes that have taken place, it could become more difficult to ensure that those duties are carried out fully. i don't know, i can't comment on the individual case because i have not seen the files. you could also, of course, carry out your duties bureaucratically and ensure that you have the required numberof ensure that you have the required number of visits, but still problems can occur these are unpredictable problems. the government says prisoners are now supervised. is that actually happening in practise? no. certainly the notion that all people released from custody should be supervised is a good one. it was welcomed. but the inspectorate reports have indicate that had that pa rt reports have indicate that had that part in particular, is not working particularly well. i heard nadine say no to that question. nadine, what did you want to add? just that
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the system is over worked. it's not fit for purpose. in theory the ideas are fairly straightforward, but actually in practise, it's not happening because of a multitude of reasons and the moj is choosing not to see its own evidence. just to pick up that point about the number of visits being missed. at what point should alarm bells be ringing? well, if there are more than i think, it's two unacceptable misses then things should be picked up at that point... should be. if the risk is increased they should be transferred through to the high risk service which is the national probation service, but you have got to be able to identify that risk first before you can do any of that. but public protection has always beena but public protection has always
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been a prime duty of the probation service. nadine, i saw you shaking your head there, go on. i'm exasperated, because public protection is supposedly a priority, but their own facts and figures don't show that. it is a system that's not workable because of a multitude of reasons and at the end of it, there are families like my own and hundreds of others that are having to live this living nightmare, but the risk isn't stat uk. thank you very much for talking to us. we refer to the ministry of justice statement, they say public protection its top priority and whilst probation needs to work better, it was right to reform the system. you can you can understand the frustration of the families. there is more on one bbc one tonight
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on panorama. carol is out and about in cambridge. good morning, carol. you can see the weather vane. it is breezy. look at that beautiful picture. that tree is cut out of felt. two designers made it. one from india and one from london. they came together and came up with that design. that's the national tree of india and we are here because, and this is here to, celebrate the end of diwali and also mark the 70th anniversary of indian independence. now, there will be a big event taking place here in the botanic gardens this evening. there will be music, there will be dancing, there will be lantern creating as well, you can cut out lanterns from different shapes which will be good fun and the weather should be kind as well, but what's happening with the weather this morning is we have had a lot of rain overnight, courtesy of a weather front in the
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north of the country. it's sinking south and it is taking a lot of cloud with it, but that will break and for most of us, it's going to be and for most of us, it's going to be a sunny day and it's going to be a mild day. it's a mild start to the day already. in london and cambridge, it is 15 celsius. in cardiff, it is not far off that. in manchester it is 11 or 12 celsius. in belfast and edinburgh, it's ten celsius. if we start the forecast in scotland, we have got showers in the north and the west. some of those heavy and possibly thundery as well. the cloud continuing to break up and some sunshine coming through. it's the same for northern england. after the same for northern england. after the overnight rain, things brightening up as we go through the morning with sunshine. the midlands brightening up too, but for east anglia, heading down the south midlands and southern counties, this by 9am is where we will have the weather front so we will have cloud around and the cloud in the south—west of england could stick around for much of the day. moving into wales, we will have cloud left in the south. but the rest of wales brightening up nicely with sunshine
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coming through. and for northern ireland, currently we have got a few showers in the north and the north coast, and we will have a few left by 9am, but they will be starting to fade. for much of northern ireland we are looking at sunny spells. so through the course of the day, blustery winds across the north of the country. the showers persisting in the north and the west, but they are showers. as we go through the day, more sunshine coming through. asa day, more sunshine coming through. as a result temperatures rising accordingly. temperatures above average in the south. we are looking ata average in the south. we are looking at a range from 15 to 20 celsius. the average in london is 14 celsius. in the north, temperatures will be around average or maybe a degree or so above. as we head through the evening and overnight, a weather front comes back and takes another swipe at us. so it will bring rain in across wales and the midlands and carry on northwards and bring the rain into northern england. in the south under clearer skies, we will see fog form particularly in the south—east where it could be dense and in the north we continue with showers this the north and the north—west. and here too, if we have
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got any clear spells, it will be chilly. so we start off on that note tomorrow with our narrow band of cloud and rain across england and wales. to the north of that, we are looking at sunshine and showers. the wind changes direction to more of a north—westerly. to south of the band of rain, there will be a bit of cloud around. again, we will see that slowly break as we go through the course of the day and bright spells developing. so temperatures down just spells developing. so temperatures downjust a spells developing. so temperatures down just a notch ahead of the weather front, but feeling fresher behind it. for friday, we do see the change in the wind direction. so it will come in from the west or the north—west. a chillier direction. so in the north and eastern parts of the uk, you will notice the difference, but for many of us, it will be a dry and bright day with sunny spells and showers as well. but into the weekend, dan and lou, it changes. by sunday, we'll have a northerly wind. it's going to feel much cooler than it has done and it's going to do in the next couple of days. thank you very much. we will see you with the beautiful lights in half an hour. let's take a look at
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this morning's papers. raez super rich hacked in bermuda data leak is their main story. this is the picture, cambridge will replace white authors with black authors following demands led by the student union women's officer. this is a story in the times. brexit lecturers, university chiefs are accusing a conservative whip of idiotic lennonism and censorship after he asked for the names of academics teaching courses about brexit and the content of the courses. a fellow tory mp appearing to endorse it. lots of newspapers talking about that. their picture is a winning picture of the king's troop, royal artillery in this yea r‘s troop, royal artillery in this year's british army photographic competition. drivers used as £1
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billion cash cow. this is a £12 million penalty notices are handed over every year. that's equivalent of one every two—and—a—half seconds. the sun have a story about bruno from strictly. i have got to tell you about this story in the telegraph. a womb taken out of mother to treat baby before birth. look at this picture. it seems like something out of a film, doesn't it? they have been able to operate on the womb inside a mother's body in the womb inside a mother's body in the past, but what they have done is ground—breaking technology. so the baby inside this womb had spina bifida and they have removed the womb, it is still attached and they shine a light from the womb and they are able to operate on the baby, before the baby is born to correct problems with the baby at the time. it looks like, like you say, an out of this world picture. and here are the mum and dad. the baby has not been born, but they hope the operation has been successful.
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technology is an extraordinary thing. fire chiefs in england have told this programme they are calling for all new and refurbished schools to be fitted with sprinklers a policy that's already mandatory in scotland and wales. breakfast has learnt that just 5% of all schools in england and wales currently have them. brea kfast‘s graham satchell has this report. fire at rift house primary school in hartlepool. it happened on a sunday evening last may. i just saw smoke and then when i looked over my back garden fence, it was just fire. i think i was terrified. there are around 700 school fires a year in england. this one completely destroyed the nursing building. like the vast majority of schools, 95%, there was no sprinkler system here. fitting sprinklers in new and refurbished schools mandatory in scotland and wales, not so in england and northern ireland. last year, the department for education in england consulted on new draft guidance. it said, "building regulations don't require the installation of sprinklers so the guidance would no longer include
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an expectation that most new school buildings will be fitted with them". do you think grenfell has changed everything? absolutely. i think it will change everything and quite rightly so. dany cotton led the fire service response at grenfell tower. she says she was appalled when the draft guidance came out last year. i thought it was outrageous. ijust thought how can we play with children's lives like that? ijust do not understand why it wouldn't be made compulsory, and made a requirement to fit sprinklers in schools at a new—build stage and what i don't want to see is a very large school fire to be the thing that brings about that change. in the days following the fire at grenfell tower, the government's draft guidance was withdrawn. so the current guidance says this, "all new schools should have fire sprinklers installed, except in a few low risk schools". and yet, figures from the government's own schools building programme show that of the 260 schools built since 2014, only 74 have sprinklers, that's 28%.
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typically we don't always fit sprinklers in schools because there are other ways of making sure that schools are fire safe. andrew works for a construction company that builds new schools like this just finished library in london. with budgets tight, he says schools can be designed to be low fire risk with exit routes, fire doors and reence forced walls. fire doors and re—enforced walls. i think if there was more money involved in school buildings i'd be looking at the need for new school places around the country, the bits of the school estate which are in really poor condition rather than that sprinklers was the first call. pupils are safe in their schools today. back in hartlepool, the destroyed building has been cleared and plans are being made for its replacement. when this building is rebuilt, will it be fitted with sprinklers? having seen what fires can actually do to a school, without a shadow of a doubt it would be something that i would be considering for any future building work on a school site.
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in a statement the department for education in england told us, "the safety of children is our priority and where a risk assessment recommends sprinklers they must be installed". fire chiefs say that's not good enough and fitting sprinklers in new schools should now be mandatory in all parts of the uk. cliff says, "it is a waste of money. while schools are occupied, they are able to evacuate." ian says, "all schools should be fitted with sprinklers across the whole of the uk." we'll be discussing those findings a little later with one of the mps shaping government policy on the subject. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter.
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a public consultation into the planned third runway at heathrow has been re—opened because of new evidence. the department for transport has published updated analysis on noise and air quality and says the capital's airports will hit full capacity six years sooner than expected. the government says the case for building a third runway is "as strong as ever" but anti—expansion campaigners claim it's ,, security measures brought in over the past year have made the capital better prepared for a terror attack according to the mayor. he says two—thirds of the recommendations made in a report a year ago have been met, such as having more armed officers and increased security on the thames. work still needed includes installing more permanent barriers and bollards in public places. historians are trying to save a victorian gasholder in london's east end from being demolished. this wrought iron structure in poplar is thought to be the last of its kind, and campaigners want to stop historians are trying to save a victorian gasholder in london's east end from being demolished.
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this wrought iron structure in poplar is thought to be the last of its kind, and campaigners want to stop it being dismantled to make way for new homes. flo spent a decade on a housing estate in stepney, but it has been in yorkshire for the past three yea rs. after a row in yorkshire for the past three years. after a row over ownership, she is being unveiled back home in tower hamlets later. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning on the overground, there is no service between stratford and canonbury, due to a signal failure at hackney wick. a trespasser is causing delays in and out of paddington. and in catford there are temporary traffic lights on the south circular near to laleham road for water works. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. yesterday we recorded 20 celsius in
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cue gardens. today is not looking too cool. it will start uf cloudy, but will brighten up with sunny spells. the cloud could be thick enough to produce rain or drizzle, but good spells of sunshine developing as we move into the afternoon. highs of around 18 celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, the cloud will return though. that cloud coming in from the south—west. where there are a few breaks in the cloud we could see a few patches of mist and fog forming. it the cloud could be thick enough to produce outbreaks of rain, but again, a fairly mild night to come. overnight lows of 12 and 14 celsius. fairly grey and cloudy start to the day tomorrow. we could see a few showery outbreaks of rain first thing. it will be dry as we move throughout day with brighter intervals developing. highs of 18 celsius. as we move into friday, a fairly cloudy start to begin with, with a few outbreaks of rain and drizzle, but it will brighten up again as we move into the afternoon. sunny spells, but feeling fresher.
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temperatures back down to average for the time of year. a maximum of 14 celsius. and it will stay fresher as we move into the weekend. that's all for now. we will be back in half an hour. good morning. you're watching breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. now a summary of the main news. mps are beginning an enquiry into e—cigarettes, looking at regulations on the use and their effect on human health. the committee will also look into whether it does actually help people stop smoking. nearly 3 million people in the uk now use the devices regularly. speaking earlier, professorjohn britton, director of uk centre for tobacco and alcohol studies, said further research was needed. what we do need to know is whether these products carry any long—term
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hazard that is avoidable. i welcome the new enquiry because it is an opportunity to set in place the kinds of observational systems we need to pick up any health problems early rather than late. the national fire chiefs council has said it wants to see all schools fitted with sprinkler systems. new schools in scotland and wales must have sprinklers, but they are not mandatory in england or northern ireland. london fire brigade commissioner dany cotton accused the government are playing with children's lives by not making them compulsory. there are around 700 fires at schools in england every year. a man from stirling who had been facing three months injail in dubai has returned to the uk. jamie harron was freed after a personal intervention by the emirates ruler. he was accused of touching a man's hip in a bar. two us republican senators have accused president trump of damaging us politics. the president's spokesperson said mr trump was more popular than either bob corker orjeff flake.
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both senators say they will stand down. later this morning we find out how much the uk economy has grown in the three months to september. this is the last time we will find out how it is doing before next month's budget. today's figure is important because the number will play heavily into the number will play heavily into the deliberations next week on whether to raise interest rates. a third of drivers receive a penalty notice every year, according to the rac foundation. they say 12 million are issued every year, the equivalent of one every 2.5 seconds. two thirds of those are parking tickets. a million are for speeding or going through red traffic light. carol at the weather from cambridge. and right now, holly has the sport. have we found the squirrel? we have
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found the squirrel. it is very important. the squirrel will not be in the studio. we do have pictures of said squirrel. don't get too excited. we are going to be talking to crystal palace first. beaten 4—1 by championship side bristol city last night. roy hodgson will be picking up night. roy hodgson will be picking up the pieces after palace capitulated against bristol city. manchester city needed a penalty shoot out to get past wolves. no such problems for manchester united, who eased past swansea 2—0. a goal in either half byjesse lingard. let's look of the rest of the results from last night. after manchester city needed
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penalties to beat wolves, manager p9p penalties to beat wolves, manager pep guardiola said he had an issue with the ball. that ball is not a serious poll for the professional game. the ball is not acceptable to the high level of competition. did all the players complain? i don't play football. u nfortu nately for complain? i don't play football. unfortunately for you, because i was a magnificent player! but i assure you, all of them say, what is that? there were three games in the scottish premiership last night, but just one goal between them. it came in the edinburgh derby. simon murray scoring in the opening three minutes to give hibs victory. scotland's women made it two wins out of two in their world cup qualifying campaign, beating albania 5—0 in paisley. wales drew 0—0 in russia. the 2015 world snooker champion stuart bingham will miss the uk championship and the masters after
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he was banned for six months for breaching betting rules. just over half of the ban will be suspended if he complies with the recommended treatment for his gambling issues and if he commits no further rule breaches, bingham is also ordered to pay £20,000 in costs, but still has the option to appeal. he is due to miss two of the sport's top three tournaments. it is a serious case because it undermines the integrity of the sport if you have players playing within it who are betting on matches they are involved in. we saw it as a serious case. we don't have an actual benchmark. we thought the longer ban was more appropriate. we do accept the ban. british cycling says the door is open for a former sprinterjess varnish to return to the sport. she was dropped from the british squad 18 months ago after failing to qualify for the rio olympics. she made allegations of bullying and sexual discrimination
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against former coach shane sutton. although he was cleared of bullying, he quit after being found to have used sexist language. british cycling chief executive julie harrington said jess varnish would be welcomed back if she is fast enough. serena williams has been a fixture at the end of season wta tour finals for a number of years. but in her absence, the singapore crowd had sister venus williams to keep them entertained. she recorded herfirst win of the tournament yesterday. after defeat in her opener, the seven time grand slam winner beat french open champion jelena ostapenko in three hard —fought sets. third seed karolina pliskova beat garbine muguruza, to reach the semi—finals. here is the squirrel. we have been talking about him all morning. a sneaky little squirrel gave the groundsman a bit of a ron arad the
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etihad stadium before manchester city's match against wolves. they tried to trap them with the brush. he wasjust tried to trap them with the brush. he was just too fast. they then tried a broom. one member of staff actually managed to picking up. it looks like he is singing! it looks like he is singing! it is hilarious. it was so funny watching him run around. there is something wonderfully entertaining when there is an animal ona entertaining when there is an animal on a pitch. he was released unharmed. what would you do if you found a £5 note. --? note. ——? you are meant to hand back in. would you ever give it to a footballer? they have probably got enough, i would idea. that is what a young huddersfield fan did on saturday when he found £5
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at thejohn fan did on saturday when he found £5 at the john smith's fan did on saturday when he found £5 at thejohn smith's stadium. he sent at thejohn smith's stadium. he sent a note to aaron mooy as a reward for his performance against manchester united. and in this letter he wrote that aaron mooy could keep the letter —— money because he played very well and scored. that is lovely. the little lad had felt he couldn't keep the money himself because it wasn't his andy gaveit himself because it wasn't his andy gave it to aaron mooy. that is a lovely story. more than half of british women have experienced sexual harassment at work or their place of study, according to a bbc five live survey. the figure comes in the wake of the harvey weinstein scandal which has started a global conversation about inappropriate behaviour and sparked a social media campaign. emily warburton adams and zoe stempeljoin
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me. emily, tell us about your experience? what happened ?|j me. emily, tell us about your experience? what happened? i was 16. i got caught in a vulnerable situation i wasn't expecting going for a job interview, which led to things that were extremely uncomfortable. i wasn't expecting. i left feeling dirty and not knowing how the process would have happened, not knowing what was right or wrong. and very confused in myself and how to go about talking about it. it was through talking with a friend and it being fed through to a teacher, then my parents went to the police about it. i was able to feeljustified that it wasn't right what happened. zoe, the survey says more than half of all british women have experienced some kind of sexual harassment either in the workplace
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ora harassment either in the workplace or a place of study. are you surprised by that? and not particularly surprised by that. i think in the study what i'm a little more surprised by is perhaps the incredible reluctance that people have to speak up about it, or to pursue it. ithink have to speak up about it, or to pursue it. i think that figure tallies with personal anecdotes of friends, what i have observed. that figure doesn't shock me. and the issue of how it is dealt with. figure doesn't shock me. and the issue of how it is dealt withm also says many men reporting this kind of thing. we have this campaign. how do we change things?” think it is a really interesting and tricky question and we are all wrestling with it. i think on one hand highlighting the ubiquity of theissue hand highlighting the ubiquity of the issue has been a very positive side of the campaign. i am a little
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concerned that some of the actual grey areas that actually need to be teased out are actually getting submerged in this, almost like a hurricane. we need a combination of the average, i suppose, and the emphasis on ubiquity. we also need to do some serious thinking. it's not enough just to do a hash tag. emily, you talked about the difficulty of speaking out. do you think the social media campaign can help other people to say what has happened to them?” help other people to say what has happened to them? i think it definitely can. social media is very powerful. it has given people a voice and an ability to feel part of a community and are supported, and that you aren't alone. and in that sense people have no confidence that more confidence to speak out whereas before they may not have done, or have had the security that enabled them to do so, that i had. at the same time! them to do so, that i had. at the same time i do think there are other measures that need to be taken and
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things put in place in terms of preventing this going further, creating awareness more. do you think this question of whether or not you will be believed is changing? i think so. not you will be believed is changing? ithink so. sexual harassment is seen on such a large sector now. there is a severity and a bit. and there is the area where there is a fine line between what is right and wrong. i think people are becoming more aware and able to speak about the whole spectrum and what they feel comfortable with and what they feel comfortable with and what upsets them. let's talk about that grey line. zoe, you talked about grey areas. the grey line between right and wrong. one person may feel completely differently to another person? exactly. that is why we need to avoid a situation where everybody thinks everything that is slightly off needs to be reported,
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needs to be pursued to the full extent of what is available. what is so tricky about this is that it is so tricky about this is that it is so context dependent. human nature is complicated. for one woman something is going to be water off a duck's. we need to think seriously about definitions. we need to tease out some of these grey areas because, as i say, just having a blanket term that everything is terrible simply doesn't fit the reality. we need to be careful before we say, that is as bad as that. we need to look into it. it is context dependent. it is interesting but workplaces can do. you say it is context dependent. do you think they should be perhaps different systems put in place, or is that taking things too far? i think some rethinking of
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guidelines. i think on one hand we need to think hard about definitions and need to be clear because there is confusion, but on the other hand i think i'd like to think that when we really stop and think, perpetrators vles victims know when a line has been crossed. so a perpetrator should know when he really made someone feel uncomfortable. if they really stop and think, they do know that. we need some potential frameworks to be clear so people feel more confident, but we also need people to be like come on, i know that i have crossed a line here and that will help. victims feel like they are not being insane. that's what is good about campaigns like this. it is questioning people as such, to questioning people as such, to question their behaviour and think about what is appropriate and not and people to feel more confident in airing when they aren't happy with something earlier on rather than it
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getting too far down the line. emily, if people find themselves in that uncomfortable situation, a dangerous situation, have you got any advice? i think that, i mean from my point, from where i stood, i was not in the position where, you know, i was strong enough or i was too young to speak out and feel like i was able to. i think now people should have the confidence in doing so and there is a big, large importance around speaking out, letting people know if you're untomorrow fortable and that happening earlier on. thank you very much forjoining us. let's get the latest weather from carol who's at cambridge university botanic garden this morning. she has moved indoors. we have come indoors inside the
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glasshouse of the botanic gardens at cambridge. we are here because there isa cambridge. we are here because there is a fabulous festival of light marking the end of diwali and we are sticking with the indian theme. you can see these beautiful flowers, plants, take a step backwards and focus on this one here this. is an indian clock vine. it is found in the tropical area of the south and birds are attracted by the bright colours. if you look inside, there is the pollen. what the bird would do it would come along and stick its head in and get pollen on top of its head in and get pollen on top of its head and push in there to getjuice. can you see the nectar coming out? that's very sweet nectar that the birds, of course, like. iwouldn't recommend doing this at home, but you might recognise the plant. you may have something similar. it is a relative of black eyed susan. sticking with the indian theme, you can see behind me, this lovely mural. it's nice and toasty inside.
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it's toasty outside this morning as well. outside in cambridge the temperature is 15 celsius. for many of us, this morning, we have got a weather front sinking south. it has produced a lot of rain in the north of the country overnight, but it continues to sink south it is a weakening feature. later it will break and it will be a sunny and also a mild day. so if we look at the forecast at 9am start starting off in scotland. we have showers in the north and the westment some will be heavy. you might hear the odd rumble of thunder, but that's the exception rather than the rule. and for most we are looking at the cloud breaking and the sun coming out. for northern england, it is a similar story. again the cloud continuing to break. sunny spells coming through and the same can be said across the north midlands. as we move into east anglia and the south midlands and southern counties, by 9am, this is where our weather front will be, so we will have more cloud to start the day and it could hang the south—west
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of england for much of the day. for wales, south wales seeing the cloud early on, but it will brighten up for you. and we are looking at some sunshine coming through as well. for northern ireland, well, again, we are looking at some sunshine as we go through the course of the day. the showers that we have and we will have for a wee while yet across the north coast tending to fade. so, talking of through the day, we carry on with the showers in the north and the north—west. blustery winds as well, but for most, it will be dry and sunny and temperature wise, it will be mild. particularly across parts of england and wales where we are looking at a range of 17 celsius to 20 celsius in london. the average in london at this stage in october is 14 celsius. across the north of the country, we are looking at temperatures around about average or just above for this stage in october. now as we head through the evening and overnight, our weather front evening and overnight, our weather fro nt ta kes evening and overnight, our weather front takes another swipe at us as it moves north. to the south, especially the south east under clear skies, we are looking at fog patches forming. some of which could
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be dense and we continue with the showers this the north and the north—west. but in the north of the country, where we have got clearance in the sky, it will feel chilly tonight with temperatures tumbling into single figures. so tomorrow, we start off with that narrow band of cloud and rain across parts of england and wales. to the north of it, we are looking at sunshine and showers. again, quite breezy, but the wind changing direction to a north—westerly. ahead of the weather front, we are looking at a fair bit of cloud and again, it will brighten up. then on friday for all of us, the wind changes direction, so it will feel fresher and again we are looking at bright spells, sunshine and showers, lou and dan, by sunday, we will have a brisk northerly wind so it will feel cooler than it is currently is doing. later today we'll get the lastest figures on economic growth before the chancellor finalises his budget. so we've sent colletta to a box factory in
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lemington spa this morning. look at that pile. yes, lots and lots of cardboard around me. no shortage of cardboard here this morning and all of these boxes will be winging their way right across the uk. it is a good indicator of what is happening generally in the retail sector in particular because you will see have every time you go to the supermarket everything we buy comes in boxes and everything that's delivered to your house that you buy online comes in boxes. so when these quys online comes in boxes. so when these guys are busy, which they are quite busy at the moment particularly this year, that's a good sign for the general economy. i'm joined by jason. jason is chair of a local business organisation and you run your own business in the west midlands. jason, how have things been looking for you and your company, particularly over the last year? we are in the food business.
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east end foods is one of the main ethnic food ingredient manufacturers in the uk. what we are finding since the referendum last year is growth is more difficult to come by. we are still growing, but it seems a little harder, a little tougher in the market. i suppose that's true of a lot of businesses that you are talking to, that you're meeting, every entrepreneur wants to work hard, but it's harder to get orders, is it? i think because the growth figures have been fairly steady and the economy has not been growing as fa st the economy has not been growing as fast as it used to a few years ago, it is becoming more tough to come by that growth that we are looking for. henrietta is with us. that sounds like a henrietta is with us. that sounds likeafamiliar henrietta is with us. that sounds like a familiar picture. so we have got growth over the last year. what are you predicting for the figure today that shows the third quarter of this year? we are expecting the gdp numberto come of this year? we are expecting the gdp number to come in at 0.3% and that's consistent with the last two quarters, not a big number, but in
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positive territory. if we look at the driving factors, here in the uk, services is 80% of that number and it includes retail. now, consumers in the uk are starting to get squeezed, we have got inflation moving up to 3% and wages not keeping pace with that. the other side of this is the business ingredient and we are seeing a lot of businesses sit on the sideline and not invest, presumably because they are looking for some indication as to what the brexit outcome looks like. dan and louise, there will be two people watching this number closely later on today and that's the governor of the bank of england making the decision about interest rates next week and the chancellor as he plans his budget for next month because if the economy is growing a little faster than 0.3 percent, he gets more taxes. if it's growing less than that, then he doesn't get as much back in taxes and that's not good news for him. thank you very much. it looks beautiful, doesn't it, a beach in hawaii's
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capital, honolulu. but it's just become the first major city in the us to ban people from using their mobile phones while crossing the road. first time offenders could face fines of between £11 and £26 and those who do it repeatedly might have to pay £75. we've been asking you whether it's an idea that should come to the uk. i think out of habit too many people do it. i think a lot of people would end up getting a fine and not be happy about it! i think people would just walk away unless the police were in force and to be honest, it seems a trivial thing to be you know getting the police to do. it wouldn't work. it just wouldn't work. some man man over there has come up with some stupid ideas! i think it is a good idea because it isa pain i think it is a good idea because it is a pain when you're in the car and
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there is people in front of you and they don't seem to know what's going on. it's probably a good idea i would have thought. i was doing itjust then, scrolling through and looking at my music. i don't think you would be able to man it. how would they enforce it? we will be talking about that later. you're watching breakfast from the bbc. still to come for you this morning... shirley. it's never too early... strictly's new head judge will be here to talk all things strictly hosmt she thinks might be one of the favourites. yes and what's it like replacing len. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. a public consultation into the planned third runway at heathrow has been re—opened
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because of new evidence. the department for transport has published updated analysis on noise and air quality but says the case for building a third runway is "as strong as ever" — anti—expansion campaigners claim it's "unconvincing". security measures brought in over the past year have made the capital better prepared for a terror attack according to the mayor. he says two—thirds of the recommendations made in a report a year ago have been met, such as having more armed officers and increased security on the thames. work still needed includes installing more permanent barriers and bollards in public places. historians are trying to save a victorian gasholder in london's east end from being demolished. this wrought iron structure in poplar is thought to be the last of its kind, and campaigners want to stop it being dismantled to make way for new homes. a huge, bronze, henry moore statue has been returned to london from yorkshire.
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old flo spent her first three decades on a housing estate in stepney but has been at a sculpture park in yorkshire for the past twenty years. after a row over ownership, she's being unveiled back home in tower hamlets later. we have got just we have gotjust some problems on the over ground. no service between stratford and canon bury. on the trains, a trespasser on the track near acton is causing delays up to half an hour in and out of paddington. in catford there are temporary lights on the south circular for waterworks. now the weather. good morning. temperatures above average for what we would expect to see for the time of year. yesterday we recorded 20 celsius in kew gardens. today, is not looking too cool either. we will start off cloudy for a time, but brightening up cloudy for a time, but brightening up with sunny spells. that cloud
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could be thick enough to produce rain and drizzle this morning. some good spell of sunshine developing as we move into the afternoon. light winds and highs of 18 celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, the cloud will return. the cloud coming in from the south—west. where there are a few brea ks south—west. where there are a few breaks in the cloud, we could see a few patches of mist and fog forming and the cloud could be thick enough to produce a few outbreaks of rain. overnight lows of 12 and 14 #18s. grey and cloudy start to the day tomorrow. we could see a few showery outbreaks of rain first thing. it will be dry as we move through the day with brighter intervals developing. the best chance of seeing any of those, the further south you are with highs of 18 celsius. friday, a fairly cloudy start to begin worthwhile a few outbreaks of rain and drizzle, but it will brighten up as we move into the afternoon. sunny spells developing but feeling fresher. temperatures back down to average for the time of year. a maximum of 14 celsius. and it will stay fresher as we move into the weekend.
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that's all for now. i will be back in halfan that's all for now. i will be back in half an hour's time. until then, there is more online at the usual address and on bbc radio london. hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. an inquiry is launched into e—cigarettes, amid concern that not enough is known about their impact on the 3 million people who use them. mps will look at their value in helping people stop smoking and their effect on users' health. good morning. it's wednesday 25th october. also this morning... fire chiefs call for sprinkler systems to be fitted in all new and refurbished schools in england as breakfast learns they are being left out in the majority of cases. the man who faced three months in jail after being found guilty of public indecency in dubai arrives home in glasgow.
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the morning everyone. i am here to find out exactly what impact the growth in the uk economy is having. we will find out what impact it will have on interest rates and on the chancellor's budget next month. in sport, hodgson's palace continue to crumble. bristol city humiliate roy's boys to reach the last eight of the efl cup. no such problems for manchester united though, jesse lingard's double sends them through to the quarter finals. and carol has the weather from cambridge. good morning from inside the botanic gardens in cambridge. the festival of light is taking place tonight. will it stay dry? it should. we have a weather front crossing the uk, bringing a band of cloud. that will break and many will have a sunny sunny and mild day.
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more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. an inquiry into e—cigarettes has been announced by mps, amid concerns there are significant gaps in what we know about them. everything from their impact on human health to how their consumption affects the nhs and economy will be examined. here's our health correspondent, nick triggle. the popularity of e—cigarettes has soared in recent years. nearly 3 million people in the uk now use them, according to the office for national statistics — a fourfold increase since 2012. this year they were even used in the annual stoptober campaign for the first time. despite this, they are not officially prescribed by the nhs. advisory body nice say patients should be told there is currently little evidence on the long—term benefits or harms of these products. the house of commons science and technology committee say there is a lack of clear guidelines about their use and it is
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causing confusion. it has now announced it is launching its own enquiry. we need to understand the long—term implications of a far greater number of people using e—cigarettes. it's great news that people are stopping smoking and shifting to e—cigarettes, but we need to understand more about the health consequences. the cross—party group of mps has asked anyone who wants to submit written evidence to make sure it reaches the committee by the 8th of december. i'm just going to read some of those responses. people have been getting in touch. i was a heavy smoker, says malcolm, and in 2015! was diagnosed with renal cancer. i immediately stopped smoking and i started vaping. ifeel stopped smoking and i started vaping. i feel better in health and my pockets. gill says she switched three years ago because she was getting chest infections and since switching she has not had another cigarette. jim says every time he tries to convert to e—cigarettes
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they have given him a bad chest. hundreds of people getting in touch with their experiences of switching to e—cigarettes and what they think of the investigation into the long—term health benefits. we will talk about that more later. the national fire chiefs council has told bbc breakfast it wants to see all schools to be fitted with sprinkler systems. new schools in scotland and wales must have sprinklers but they're not mandatory in england or northern ireland. the london fire brigade commissioner dany cotton accused the government of playing with children's lives by not making them compulsory. there are around 700 fires at schools in england every year. an electrician from stirling who was facing three months in prison in dubai for public indecency has spoken of his relief at returning home to the uk. jamie harron had been sentenced for touching a man's hip in a crowded bar. he was freed after dubai's ruler intervened on his behalf, as catriona renton reports. back into the arms of his family. jamie harron's ordeal is finally over. he arrived in scotland to questions from waiting media.
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his reaction to being home? very good. very happy to be home. it's been a shambles from the word go. no organisation or nothing. i kept positive all the way through it, to be honest. because i still couldn't believe it had actually happened, for what was that had actually gone on, even now when i'm home still can't believe it, three and a half months, four months. jamie harron had been on a two day stopover in dubai injuly. he said he had brushed against a man's hip in a crowded bar as he tried to steady himself to avoid spilling his drink. mr harron was also accused of drinking alcohol and making a rude gesture towards the businessman who made the complaint. although the complaint was withdrawn, prosecutors continued with the case. on sunday he was sentenced to three months in prison. a day later, though, following an intervention from the country's ruler, he was exonerated. he said he's lost his job as an electrician in afghanistan and said he has now spent all his savings on legal fees and expenses.
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i had a lot of savings because i had done six months in afghanistan before that. so it was £30,000? everything i've got now is away. but ijust needto move on, move forward from it. he told reporters he decided the next few days whether he would sue the man who made the complaint. but for now, with a cuddle from his mum, it's time to go home. two us republican senators have delivered fierce attacks on president trump, accusing him of damaging us politics. following the lead of bob corker, jeff fla ke following the lead of bob corker, jeff flake from arizona criticised the president's undignified behaviour and said he would not seek re—election. we must never meekly accept the daily sundering of our country, the personal attacks, the threats against principles, freedoms and institutions, the flagrant disregard for truth and decency, the reckless provocations, most often for the pettiest and most personal reasons. later this morning we'll find out
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how much the uk's economy has grown in the three months to september. it isa it is a significant announcement. it's the last time we'll find out how the economy is doing before next month's budget. iam here i am here because this is a pretty good indicator of what is happening in the wider economy. you can see behind me this is where they are making a lot of cardboard boxes. they are flying around everywhere. there was a lot of machinery brought m, there was a lot of machinery brought in, which means they can make more. they are growing and delivering more cardboard boxes right across the retail sector. they are not growing as fast as last year. that is a picture we are seeing right across the economy at the moment. in terms of the figure we are expecting later this morning, most economists are
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predicting around 0.3% growth. that is the same as the second quarter of this year, which is some growth but not as much as the bank of england we re not as much as the bank of england were hoping. it puts us at the bottom of the list of eu countries in terms of growth. so, some difficulties in terms of trying to up difficulties in terms of trying to up that level at the moment. when you look at how the uk economy has been doing over the last couple of yea rs, been doing over the last couple of years, you can see we have kind of been losing our va—va—voom, still growing but not as courteous people hoped for. that will cause two people a headache. one is the chancellor. it is his budget next month. if the economy is not growing, individuals and companies are not paying as much tax which means he has less to spend. it also means he has less to spend. it also means the governor of the bank of england is less likely to up interest rates if the economy is still slow. so, two people are going to be watching very carefully, but every business across the country will be doing the same. we will be
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finding out about that figure later on this morning. the social media giant twitter has announced new rules about how it displays political adverts. it's after criticism its service was used to try and influence last year's us presidential election. twitter‘s ads will now clearly show who funded them, how much was spent and which users are being targeted. more than half of all british women have experienced sexual harassment at work or at their place of study, according to a survey by bbc radio 5 live. it found most of the women who had experienced inappropriate behaviour didn't report it. the survey of 2,000 adults also found a fifth of men have been sexually harassed, as adina campbell reports. sarah has seen and been on the receiving end of sexual harassment. her personal experiences started at school. a high school teacher, when i was 17, who assaulted me. and everybody knew. he later married a student just a year under me.
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sarah's is just one story. we heard from men and women who experienced all kinds of different harassments. more than half of women have experienced sexual harassment at work or in a place of study, according to a survey for bbc five live. around two thirds of men and women say they didn't report it to anyone. and more women than men said they were targeted by a boss or senior manager. in some cases there are blurred lines when it comes to sexual harassment. it can be anything from assault to unwanted obscene comments. it has led to a big online social media campaign using the hash tag #metoo. it dates back more than a decade. this is about individuals who are survivors of sexual violence, but it is also about a larger conversation about the systems in place. the survey also found one in ten women who had been harassed left theirjob or place of study.
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a third of drivers receive a penalty notice every year, according to the rac foundation. it says 12 million are issued every year, which is the equivalent of one every 2.5 seconds. two thirds are parking tickets, and a million are for speeding or going through red traffic lights. do you fancy seeing some dude floating around johannesburg with balloons? tom morgan from bristol reached heights of 2,500 metres whilst suspended from 100 helium balloons strapped to a camping chair. just like the movie up. he covered nearly 16 miles from his basejust outside johannesburg in south africa. the 38 year old and his team spent two days inflating balloons ahead of the flight, which he described as unbelievably cool. just look at the views. after a rapid ascent he returned to earth by gradually cutting the balloons loose.
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iimagine i imagine that would be a beautiful way of coming back down to earth. you are watching breakfast. fire chiefs in england have told this programme they are calling for all new and refurbished schools to be fitted with sprinklers a policy that's already mandatory in scotland and wales. breakfast has also learntjust 5% of all schools in england and wales currently have sprinklers. the department for education told us that 74 out of the 260 schools in england that have been rebuilt or renovated have them, despite their own guidance saying they should have sprinklers installed except in a few low risk cases. we can speak now to sir david amess, chair of the all party parliamentary group on fire safety. thank you so much for discussing this, we have had a lot of comments from our viewers already. can you explain why it is mandatory in scotla nd explain why it is mandatory in scotland and wales but not england
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and northern ireland? well, for whatever reason, those advising ministers think that the sprinklers are unnecessary. as far as my committee is concerned, if we had been listened to the grenfell tower disaster would not have happened. if we are listened to now, i will not be asked to go on your programme to comment on a fire breaking out in a school. it is crazy that new school buildings go ahead without it being mandatory for them to have sprinklers. sprinklers save lives and they make the property much more safe. you cannot put any price on the life of a child. it is interesting, when you look at the figures and the way things have changed in recent years, the national fire chief's council says the proportion of new schools built with sprinters has dropped from around 70% a decade ago to just a third last year. what is behind that drop? is this a cost—cutting exercise, a regulation change? obviously, i and exercise, a regulation change? obviously, iand my
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exercise, a regulation change? obviously, i and my colleagues go straight onto the cost element and challenge the two departments, education and local government and community on that fact. they say it is the evidence. they think there have not been any disasters in schools in terms of fires and lives being lost. but for goodness' sake, we never thought that grenfell would happen. i know that there will be a disaster in one of our schools and i don't think any local authority that comes to tender should award the building of the new school without first making sure that all of the companies install sprinklers in the new building. i also think, as far as building bulletin 100 is concerned, we should notjust rely on recommendations, we should make it mandatory. after proper risk assessment is made, look at fitting sprinters retrospectively in all of our schools. interesting that you make that point, there is a
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difference between grenfell and schools, grenfell is a residential building. quitea schools, grenfell is a residential building. quite a few viewers have been making this point. cliff says it isa been making this point. cliff says it is a waste of money, while schools are occupied everybody is awake and perfectly able to extinguish a fire and evacuate. when unoccupied, any loss will be collateral damage. nobody lives in a school and when occupied it is not a high risk fire environment.“ school and when occupied it is not a high risk fire environment. if only i could be so confident. i do not accept that analysis. as far as i'm concerned, you only have to look at schools where we have people with learning difficulties, in wheelchairs, on zimmer frames, learning difficulties, in wheelchairs, on zimmerframes, they are not going to be a pity get out of buildings quickly. we were told the grenfell tower disaster could never happen. every bit of common sense tells me that we could face a disaster in one of our schools. it makes sense in this day and age to spend a little bit more money, invest in our school buildings and
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make it absolutely mandatory that we have sprinklers installed in every new school building, and look at our school buildings retrospectively. our committee are not going to shut up our committee are not going to shut up on this issue until we are listened to. we should have been listened to. we should have been listened to. we should have been listened to after grenfell and i am going to make sure we are listened to as far as new school buildings are concerned and the installation of sprinklers. i hope we are never replaying this interview after a tragedy in years to come. i am sure everybody watching the hope that as well. is there a different issue though between older buildings and newer buildings where designers and architects go out of their way to build a low risk building in terms of the risk of fire? surely that is something that can be looked at instead of the sprinkler system, if you can build a building at low risk of fire without sprinklers, that is a good thing, isn't it? absolutely. i accept that point and the enquiry
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is going on at the moment with regards to the report on fire regulations. i am regards to the report on fire regulations. iam not regards to the report on fire regulations. i am not suggesting that sprinklers are the be all and end all of everything. it is a combination of things. emergency exits, a properfire drill, access to emergency points were used to leave the building. all these things matter, building materials, but! will say again, if you have sprinklers, lives are not lost and buildings are not damaged. it's all very well for people to say, david, there is an insurance policy. it will be paid for. we were told g re nfell tower could will be paid for. we were told grenfell tower could never happen and it did happen. we are now being told schools are not occupied all the time, and that is not true because they are let out in evenings and on the weekend to community groups, we are told there could never be a disaster in our schools and common sense tells me that is not the case. we cannot afford to
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ta ke not the case. we cannot afford to take the chance when all the evidence points to the fact that sprinklers would stop one life being lost and if i was a parent of a school —— of a child, i would say we cannot put any amount of money on the life of a child. david, do you feel like you are banging your head against a brick wall on this one? do you think the law will change?” think after the grenfell tower enquiry has taken place, i think undoubtedly the law will change. i would be very, very surprised if my collea g u es would be very, very surprised if my colleagues in the department for education and the department of local government and communities don't shift on this one. throughout time, governments have changed political complexion and it is the advice that ministers seem to have been given that i think is wrong and i think as a result of the groenefeld enquiry, while it now might not be exactly the same issue, in essence, it is all about fires destroying people's lives. i am an
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optimist and i think the law will change and i and my colleagues as parliamentarians are going to make sure that the law changes. david lingmerth, thank you very much. chair of the all—party group on fire safety. please do let us know what you think on that. it's 8.18 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. mps are to launch an enquiry into e cigarettes after concerns were raised about their effects on the health of the uk's three million vapers. a man from stirling, who faced three months imprisonment in dubai, has returned to the uk after the emirate's ruler overturned his sentence. let's get the latest weather from carol who's at cambridge university botanic garden this morning. it is absolutely beautiful. good morning. good morning, both, good morning. good morning, both, good morning to you. we are at the botanic gardens in cambridge,
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marking the end, as are the botanic gardens, the end of diwali, the festival of light. you can see the beautiful ba nyan tree festival of light. you can see the beautiful banyan tree behind me that has been cut out of felt. we will see more about it later but i have been told it took five months to plan and two days to erect. special it is too. the weather is quite special for it is too. the weather is quite specialfor a it is too. the weather is quite special for a lot of us today because after the cloud clears, we will have a sunny day and also a mild one. many of us are seeing temperatures between 11 and 15 celsius, with the exception in aberdeenshire where it is significantly colder this morning. you will need to wrap up if you are heading out. here, too, the sun will come out. in scotland, showers in the north and north—west, some heavy, and it is blustery as well. looking at sunny spells developing. for northern england, rain last night, but brightening up quite nicely with sunshine coming through
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as it is into the south and midlands, with sun coming through. into the south west of england, there is more cloud this morning because that is where the weather frontiers and that could hang around for much of the day. south wales, a bit cloudy but it will brighten up for you, the rest of wales already starting to brighton and for northern ireland, showers on the north coast but you will find they will slowly start to die and you will slowly start to die and you will have a largely dry day with sunny spells. through the course of the day, the showers persist accompanied by blustery winds but for most of the day, it will be a fine day with dell spells at worst, sunny spells at best. temperature wise, across southern england and wales, we are abovegéiééi wise, across southern england and wales, we are abovefgiiiééi for wales, we are above average for the time of the year. looking at between 17 and 20 in london. the average for london is 14. across the north of the country, 11 to 13 is roughly the
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average orjust the country, 11 to 13 is roughly the average or just above. the country, 11 to 13 is roughly the average orjust above. tonight, the weather front takes another swipe at us, heading northwards, bringing rain across the midlands and northern england. beneath that, fog could form in clear skies, potentially dents in the south—east. we still have showers in the north and north—east of scotland tomorrow and north—east of scotland tomorrow and the wind will change direction, feeling fresher with a mix of bright spells, sunshine and showers. the same for the far north of england. we have still got the rain across parts of central england and wales and ahead of... the wind changes direction on friday to a westerly ora north—westerly, cooler and fresher, and feeling cooler and fresher, and feeling cooler and fresher particularly in the north and the east and we are looking at the date of writes about an sunshine and showers. by the time we get to sunday, we will have a northerly so
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we will field the draft, literally. while that is lovely to hear. those lights have been absolutely gorgeous. it was particularly beautiful at six o'clock this morning to see it behind you. beautiful at six o'clock this morning to see it behind youm really stood out then, didn't it, but even in daylight it is beautiful. different shades coming out, more pink than orange or yellow. if you missed that and you would like to see it, then it is available on the eye we are available on the eye player. do you know, i really know people who watch the programme back having recorded it. and it is not my mum. british explorer ben saunders is aiming to complete a world first — a solo, and unaided crossing of antarctica. you may remember he came on the sofa to tell us about how he's following in the footsteps of his friend henry worsley, who died making the attempt last year. brea kfast‘s tim muffett went to meet ben as he made his last minute preparations to finish the journey henry started. when you've trekked to the north and south pole, what next? the plan is to make a solo,
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completely unassisted and unsupported crossing of antarctica on foot. so i'm walking from one side to the south pole and then carrying on to the opposite side of antarctica. it's never been done before. no one has ever sort of walked under their own human motive power. the motivation for ben saunders is deeply felt. his friend henry worsley died last year attempting the same feat. henry had been to me a good friend for a long time. my initial reaction for a few weeks was that i didn't want anything more to do with antarctica ever again. itjust seemed too tragic. i started thinking perhaps the best way to honour the friendship and inspiration he gave me would be to finish the job for him. ben, this looks exhausting. tell us about the exercises you're having to do. this is a dead lift which uses almost your whole body. so it's a strong pulling movement, off the floor with a lot of weight. this is more than
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twice my body weight. and you have to kind of bulk up with excess fat to last you. yes, i put on since the summer, ten kilos, 22lbs, about a stone—and—a—half. some of that is muscle and some of that is deliberately fat. it must be very difficult knowing what happened to henry, that ben's going to attempt the same journey. ben has prepared well. it's hisjob. he spent 17 years doing this so ijust have to trust that he knows what he's doing and he'll look after himself. ben's last trip to the south pole saw him complete the route which captain robert falcon scott attempted before he died in 1912. but this time, ben will be going past the south pole and onwards, alone. we will be speaking to ben on breakfast over the course of his expedition, including on christmas day when he hopes to be near the south pole.
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very good luck to him. yes, and merry christmas. it's too early to say that. very early! now, we were talking about e—cigarettes and the text ban in honolulu where they will fine you if you cross the road on your mobile phone. so, we don't stop drivers using phones so don't stop picking —— don't start picking on pedestrians. i would not cross the road chatting on my phone, so why stop them. diane, it is against the law. michael says, iwas stop them. diane, it is against the law. michael says, i was taught to drive and told pedestrians don't pay attention, so what has changed? why
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can't drivers driver speed where they look for pedestrians. but michael, i have seen pedestrians crossing the road without looking. but you know in a shop, when you have got a buggy, i used to do this, and you just stop, but now i get annoyed with them. have you done that? i have never noticed that. ignore everything i havejust said. here are some news, weather and travel wherever you are. hello, good morning. we have another mild start to the day across southern and south—eastern areas of
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the uk. for many today it is going to bea the uk. for many today it is going to be a dry day with some good spells of sunshine. the warm for the milder areas towards the south—east of england, head of that cold front. further north and west, that is where we have got fresher air. still fairly pleasant, especially with some sunshine through the course of the day. some blustery showers affecting the west of scotland and evenin affecting the west of scotland and even in the south, after we have got that cloud and some patchy light rain moving south, things improving with some sunshine. later on you will notice a bit more clouded to south—west england. maximum temperatures, 1519 celsius in the south—east. elsewhere, temperatures of 13 or 14 degrees. this is the weather front. you of 13 or 14 degrees. this is the weatherfront. you notice it will move further north as we go through wednesday night and into thursday. that will introduce more cloud moving northwards. with it, i breaks of rain moving towards wales and the midlands. that is quite wet and patchy rain. overnight temperatures are still holding up in double figures for many, except the far
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north of scotland where it will be a little bit more chilly. thursday, a cloudy day for england and wales. still i breaks of rain, particularly across the far north of england. within that cloudier zone there will be sunny spells developing. still warm, especially when you get that sunshine. further north, across scotla nd sunshine. further north, across scotland and northern ireland, cooler. again, good spells of sunshine. going into friday, that weather front moves south again. that means that the cloud will move to the south, still some outbreaks of rain first thing on friday. that will generally clear away throughout the day. for many on friday, another dry day with some sunshine. temperatures where they should be for the time of year, even in the south, temperatures coming down for a couple of degrees. that is it for me. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and ben bland. the weed killer conundrum — eu health experts are due to vote on whether or not to extend the licence for glyphosate over
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concerns it may cause cancer. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 25th of october. the industry say it's harmless and necessary for farmers but opponents claim it's carcinogenic. also in the programme, china's communist party unveils its new top leadership with no obvious successor among them to president xi. we'll find out what it means for the economy.
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