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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 25, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello it's wednesday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm tina daheley in for victoria, welcome to the programme. cyber stalking — which can be anything from sending repeated unwanted texts, to leaving nasty messages on social media — is a growing problem, but victims and experts complain it's not always taken seriously by police, and conviction rates are low. could a new approach and app being trialled by bedfordshire police change that? the royal bank of scotland has already been slammed by the financial conduct authority over it handled of thousands of its business customers. now a group of small business owners tell this programme they have instructed lawyers to bring criminal proceedings against rbs — alleging the bank defrauded them and caused their businesses to fail. and should we treat women who kill their violent partners differently to other killers? we speak to the campaigners who are calling for a review of how women who murder after suffering domestic abuse are judged. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. also later in the programme we will be talking to the producer
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behind some of cinema's most iconic movies — including blade runner, the italian job and the deer hunter — about his career, the latest blade runner film and the culture in hollywood. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today, an inquiry into e—cigarettes has been announced by mps, amid concerns there are significant gaps in what is known about them. everything from their impact on human health to how their consumption affects the nhs and economy will be examined. our health correspondent, nick triggle, reports. the popularity of e—cigarettes has soared in recent years. nearly 3 million people in the uk now use them, according to the office for national statistics — a fourfold increase since 2012. this year they were even used in the annual stoptober campaign for the first time. despite this, they are not officially prescribed by the nhs. advisory body nice say patients should be told there is
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currently little evidence on the long—term benefits or harms of these products. the house of commons science and technology committee say there is a lack of clear guidelines about their use and it is causing confusion. it has now announced it is launching its own enquiry. we need to understand the long—term implications of a far greater number of people using e—cigarettes. it's great news that people are stopping smoking and shifting to e—cigarettes, but we need to understand more about the health consequences. the cross—party group of mps has asked anyone who wants to submit written evidence to make sure it reaches the committee by the 8th of december. and we'll be speaking to norman lamb, chair of the committee launching this inquiry, later in the programme. now a
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nowa summary now a summary of the rest of the news. more than half of all british women have suffered sexual harassment at work or their place of study, according to a survey by bbc radio 5 live. it found most of the women who'd experienced inappropriate behaviour didn't report it. the survey of 2,000 adults also found a fifth of men have been sexually harassed, as adina campbell reports. sarah killcoyne has seen and been on the receiving end of sexual harassment. her personal experiences started at school. a high school teacher, when i was 17, who assaulted me. and everybody knew. he later married a student just a year under me. sarah's is just one person's story. we heard from men and women who experienced all kinds of different harassments. more than half of women have experienced sexual harassment at work or in a place of study, according to a survey for bbc five live. around two thirds of men and women
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who had been harassed say they didn't report it to anyone. and more women than men said they were targeted by a boss or senior manager. in some cases there are blurred lines when it comes to sexual harassment. it can be anything from assault to unwanted obscene comments. it has led to a big online social media campaign using the hash tag #metoo. it dates back more than a decade. this is about individuals who are survivors of sexual violence, but it is also about a larger conversation about the systems in place. the survey for 5 live also found one in ten women who had been harassed left theirjob or place of study. an electrician from stirling who was facing three months in prison in dubai for public indecency has spoken of his relief at returning home to the uk.
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jamie harron was sentenced for touching a man's hip in a crowded bar, but freed after dubai's ruler intervened. catriona renton reports. back into the arms of his family. jamie harron‘s ordeal is finally over. he arrived in scotland to questions from waiting media. his reaction to being home? very good. very happy to be home. it's been a shambles from the word go. no organisation or nothing. i kept positive all the way through it, to be honest. because i still couldn't believe it had actually happened, for what it was that had actually gone on, even now when i'm home, i still can't believe it was three and a half months, four months. jamie harron had been on a two day stopover in dubai injuly. he said he had brushed against a man's hip in a crowded bar as he tried to steady himself to avoid spilling his drink. mr harron was also accused of drinking alcohol and making a rude gesture towards the businessman who made the complaint. although the complaint was withdrawn, prosecutors continued with the case. on sunday he was sentenced to three months in prison. a day later, though,
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following an intervention from the country's ruler, he was exonerated. he says he's lost his job as an electrician in afghanistan and said he has now spent all his savings on legal fees and expenses. i had a lot of savings because i had done six months in afghanistan before that. so it was £30,000? everything i've got now is away. but ijust need to move on, move forward from it. he told reporters he decided the next few days whether he would sue the man who made the complaint. but for now, with a cuddle from his mum, it's time to go home. the brexit secretary david davis will face scrutiny from mps shortly. mr davis will be questioned about developments in the european union divorce talks amid claims he has held up progress on crucial exit laws. follows concerns from eu leaders that there has not been enough
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movement to proceed to the next stage of talks. we will be live in the commons when we will listen to david davis taking questions from the brexit committee in a few minutes. a second us republican senator has delivered an attack on president trump, accusing him of damaging us politics. following bob corker, jeff fla ke politics. following bob corker, jeff flake criticised his behaviour and said he would not seek reselection. we must never meekly accept the daily sundering of our country, the personal attacks, the threats against principles, freedoms and institutions, the flagrant disregard for truth and decency, the reckless provocations, most often for the pettiest and most personal reasons. all new and refurbished schools in the uk should be fitted with sprinklers, fire chiefs have told the bbc. currently, sprinklers are mandatory in new school buildings in scotland and wales, but not in england and northern ireland. graham satchell reports.
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fire at rift house primary school in hartlepool. it happened on a sunday evening last may. i just saw smoke and then when i looked over my back garden fence, it was just fire. i think i was terrified. there are around 700 school fires a year in england. this one completely destroyed the nursing building. like the vast majority of schools, 95%, there was no sprinkler system here. fitting sprinklers in new and refurbished schools is now mandatory in scotland and wales, not so in england and northern ireland. last year, the department for education in england consulted on new draft guidance. it said, "building regulations don't require the installation of sprinklers so the guidance would no longer include an expectation that most new school buildings will be fitted with them". do you think grenfell has changed everything? absolutely. i think it will change everything and quite rightly so. dany cotton led the fire service
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response at grenfell tower. she says she was appalled when the draft guidance came out last year. i thought it was outrageous. ijust thought how can we play with children's lives like that? ijust do not understand why it wouldn't be made compulsory, and made a requirement to fit sprinklers in schools at a new—build stage and what i don't want to see is a very large school fire to be the thing that brings about that change. in the days following the fire at grenfell tower, the government's draft guidance was withdrawn. so the current guidance says this, "all new schools should have fire sprinklers installed, except in a few low risk schools". and yet, figures from the government's own schools building programme show that of the 260 schools built since 2014, only 7a have sprinklers, that's 28%. typically we don't always fit sprinklers in schools because there are other ways of making sure that schools are fire safe. andrew works for a construction company that builds new schools like this just finished library in london. with budgets tight, he says schools
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can be designed to be low fire risk with exit routes, fire doors and re—enforced walls. i think if there was more money involved in school buildings i'd be looking at the need for new school places around the country, the bits of the school estate which are in really poor condition rather than that sprinklers was the first call. pupils are safe in their schools today. back in hartlepool, the destroyed building has been cleared and plans are being made for its replacement. when this building is rebuilt, will it be fitted with sprinklers? having seen what fires can actually do to a school, without a shadow of a doubt it would be something that i would be considering for any future building work on a school site. in a statement the department for education in england told us, "the safety of children is our priority and where a risk assessment recommends sprinklers they must be installed". fire chiefs say that's not good enough and fitting sprinklers in new schools should now be mandatory in all parts of the uk. the social media giant twitter has
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announced new rules about how it displays political adverts. the move follows claims that the platform was used to try to influence last year's us presidential election. twitter‘s ads will now clearly show who funded them, how much was spent and which users are being targeted. lloyds banking group has seen its pre—tax profits more than double in the three months to september. the bank returned to private ownership in may, nine years after it was bailed out by the government at the height of the financial crisis. the chinese president xijinping has revealed his new senior leadership committee. the five new appointments were made to the politburo standing committee, china's most powerful body. the president has broken with tradition by not including an obvious successor, which has raised questions over how long mr xi intends to rule. that is a summary of the latest
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news. more at 9:30am. coming up, could a new approach change how cyberstalking is dealt with? do get in touch throughout the morning. use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. 0lly foster is with us this morning. lots of football last night, 0lly. a couple of scares for the big clubs and it doesn't get any better for crystal palace? it doesn't. they are bottom of the premier league. we had six league cup matches last night. fair to say that it cup matches last night. fair to say thatitis cup matches last night. fair to say that it is bottom of most clubs lists of priorities when it comes to looking at the whole season. alice have biggerfish to looking at the whole season. alice have bigger fish to fry. they were up have bigger fish to fry. they were up against the championship side bristol city. they lost 4—1. they took the lead as well. it is easy to gauge how serious the clubs take this competition by looking at how
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many changes they make from their last match in the league. palace made nine. 12 teams were playing last night. we added up all of the changes and 99, would you believe? do the maths, just over eight from each team ahead of the league cup matches. arsenal changed their entire team against norwich. they actually won. it only came after extra time when they needed their teenager to bail them out. he got his first goals for the club, the equaliser in the last couple of minutes to take it to extra time and then the winner. there were wins for bournemouth and leicester, a couple of other premier league teams going through. manchester united, remember, they are the league cup winners from last season. jesse lingard scored in the wembley final and he scored a couple last night at the liberty stadium as they beat swa nsea the liberty stadium as they beat swansea to move into the quarterfinals. it is the first time he has scored twice in a match, which i found surprising. jose mourinho's 400th game in english football as well. 13 years after he
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started making waves at chelsea. also last night, leaders manchester city needed penalties to get past the championship leaders wolves. city through, but the manager was not happy? no, talking about how much managers like this competition, obviously they are at the top of the premier league, going great guns in europe as well. in the last round, when they enter the condition, the called the cup a waste of energy. you can get into the europa league by winning it, but manchester city will probably get into the champions league anyway, so he let slip what he thought about it. he had something curious to say, yes, they are through, but why was he not happy? the ball. it is not the ball premier league teams use, because it is the league cup, it is the one the championship, league 1 and league 2 teams use. not around enough? a p pa re ntly teams use. not around enough? apparently it was too light and did
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all sorts of things in the air. here he is. it is unacceptable to play with the ball. it is not a serious ball for a professional game. it is not acceptable for the high level of the competition. the players were complaining, they were talking about? the players complained, they didn't play football. unfortunately for you, because it was magnificent players. i assure you, all of them say, what is that? what is that? it is a ball, pep guardiola. they will have to play with it again in the next round. interesting, so, a light ball. staying with football, a really nice story has emerged from last weekend to do with huddersfield? yes, huddersfield, newly promoted, they beat the mighty manchester united, jose mourinho's first defeat of the season, 2—1 to them. adam banner who
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is five went to the match with his dad, he found £5 on the floor, his dad, he found £5 on the floor, his dad said to him, don't keep what is not ours so he wrote a letter to one of the club directors and aaron moy was one of the scorers and he said he wanted him to keep the £5 because he wanted him to keep the £5 because he played very well and scored. a p pa re ntly he played very well and scored. apparently aaron moy now wants to meet the little boy and say thank you, probably give him the fiver back, i would you, probably give him the fiver back, iwould have you, probably give him the fiver back, i would have thought. the most remarkable thing, tina, who write letters these days? i've never seen anything like it. that's a lovely story. 0llie, thank you very much. in the next half hour, the brexit secretary will sit down in front of senior mps and face questions about progress in negotiations with the eu. david davies is giving evidence to the brexit committee — amid complaints from eu leaders that there simply isn't enough forward motion for them
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to move on to trade talks. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in westminster for us now. what can we expect to happen today? for bands of brexit related select committees, today is christmas. first we have david davis and then we have kissed armour being quizzed later on. there will then be a hearing on customs relations after brexit this afternoon as well. it sta rts brexit this afternoon as well. it starts with david davis and the key question is, he needs to make the next move to move the deadlocked brea kfast next move to move the deadlocked breakfast —— brexit talks on? yesterday, donald tusk said it was all down to the uk to move this forward. there is obviously a big stopping point about money. the eu wa nts stopping point about money. the eu wants the uk to be much clearer about the amount of money they are prepared to put on the table before they will discuss trade. i imagine that will be one of the key issues david davis will be grilled by mps. i think he is speaking now. we would seek to i think he is speaking now. we would seekto maintain
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i think he is speaking now. we would seek to maintain them. i think i told you last time there have already been a considerable number of discussions with them, the existing ones, to look at grandfathering anyway, in any event. all the big ones, grandfathering anyway, in any event. allthe big ones, i grandfathering anyway, in any event. all the big ones, i think, grandfathering anyway, in any event. allthe big ones, ithink, have said, and this is second down from liam fox, of course, is that they are interested in doing that. some wa nt are interested in doing that. some want to improve them but that will ta ke want to improve them but that will take time. there are also the comments form by minister shinzo abe about the future economic partnership with japan. they want that to continue with us and from justin trudeau, the canadian arrangement would continue with us as well. but would it be us asking those countries, can we carry on on this basis or would it be the eu saying, we are asking for britain to be allowed to continue to access these deals, because that is an important distinction? it could be either or both and that is what my caveat comes down to. it depends on
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the guidelines given to the commission by the council. 0k. what happened to the members see the common fisheries policy during this time? would we still be bound by it? again, that is a negotiating issue. the problem is they would be quota setting during that period, so we have to have a resolution to that. we have not come to a policy conclusion. you haven't come to a conclusion. you haven't come to a conclusion. fine. would we accept the jurisdiction conclusion. fine. would we accept thejurisdiction of conclusion. fine. would we accept the jurisdiction of the ecj? certainly initially. their phase is settling period we say in limitation period. by the end of it, we want to be under alternative administration but we need to talk to the commission about that. by the end of it, you mean at the end of the limitation period? it, you mean at the end of the limitation period ? you it, you mean at the end of the limitation period? you would then move on to the new arrangement which may have a new court representing
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both parties? if you think length of the implementation period, the eu has been quite clear... michel barnier has been clear but we haven't heard from the council yet. the point about the next two and a half months is that the council will come to its conclusions and the commission will draw from them. but i thought, secretary of state, you say we haven't heard from the council, but i thought the council was quite clear in its negotiating guidelines it gave to michel barnier. in the first round, are you talking about? that any period of transition... they haven't given an implementation period guidance yet. the final one will be in december. right, so things like the open skies agreement, membership of the aviation authority, or of those things would continue to operate as
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now? i would expect so. you would expect so. that is extremely helpful. access to the schengen information system, which is vital to our security? i would expect all security and home affairs issues to continue. one very specific question. do you know yet what fees would be charged to eu students starting courses in september 2019? would they be home students or overseas students? we have at every turn treated them as home for purposes of the setting and for loans, so we treat them as home so farandl loans, so we treat them as home so far and i wouldn't see that would change in 2019. thereafter, it might. that would be very helpful for universities because they have deepened their prospectuses next spring. ironically, and forgive me ifi
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spring. ironically, and forgive me if i have said it before, it was one of the miracles of the best august that we got the treasury and the department for education to agree to change those things very rapidly first thing and thereafter. change those things very rapidly first thing and thereafterlj change those things very rapidly first thing and thereafter. i am sure further miracles will be required before this process is over. can i turn to the timing of all of this? because the prime minister seemed to suggest recently that agreeing the deep and comprehensive partnership will in some way have to happen before the implementation period is agreed. some way have to happen before the implementation period is agreedm that indeed the case? yes, what we are aiming for is the conclusion of negotiations on all fronts on the grounds that not everything is agreed by the end of march 2019. so in effect, that is the case. so, yes, in principle, but she said in
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the chamber is correct. follow the question on and i will take it from there. the prime minister appeared to suggest that deep and competence partnership would have to come before the agreement of the implementation period and this led to some comment and consternation, because i think all of us had assumed it was the other way round. you get the transition implementation period first and then you get... i am at risk of misleading you, so let me get it exactly right. what we are intending to do is get the form of the implementation period agreed quickly in december, but we want to conclude the overall negotiation, whatever the overall negotiation, whatever the outcome might be, by the end of march 2019. right. there are a numberof march 2019. right. there are a number of reasons for that. one of
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them is, what is the implementation period taking you towards? are we going from where we are now to a free—trade agreement? are we going from where we are now to what you might call a bare—bones agreement which is a wto plus agreement? you need to know where you are going. right, so you would agree and giving what you have just said, when the chancellor gave evidence recently to the treasury select committee, described transitional agreement as a wasting asset, very valuable now, but by next summer its value to everybody would diminish significantly. he is right. there are three reasons, it's not an entirely wasted asset, there are three reasons for the instrumentation period. number one, not in order of importance, number one, in orderto not in order of importance, number
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one, in order to give the uk government longer to put changes in place. we think we can get all the critical ones in place by march 2019 but it would give us longer and make it more reliable. secondly and critically, give european countries time to put in place any structures they need to put in place, whether thatis they need to put in place, whether that is new customs arrangements, new data exchange arrangements, whatever. and thirdly, and this is the point that the chancellor is making, to give businesses time after the decision is made on what the final outcome will be in order to make any subsequent changes to their own dispositions. the most obvious example, american banks who are the most sensitive to these things, would not have to make a decision on worst—case outcome is it worth today. they would know broadly what it would be before they need to move. that is the bit that is a wasting asset. the longer they have oi'i wasting asset. the longer they have on that, the more they will feel
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they have deep move before knowing they have deep move before knowing the outcome. that is why the select committee observed we thought there would need to be transitional arrangements. may i say, i don't mean to be critical, you said in the chamber at one point that she welcomed the foreign statement because it showed we were taking the limitation period seriously. the notion of an implement asian period was aired in the lancaster house speech as well. —— the notion of the limitation period was aired in the lancaster house speech as well. indeed it was. you have said you think an agreement can be made by march 2019. do you really think everything can be done in12 really think everything can be done in 12 months? yes. the arguments
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against, i will lay them again, but the arguments against tend to be that other free—trade agreements are very different from ours. we start with identical regulatory arrangements, we start with an existing virtually 600 billion euro trade exchange and all the vested interests that go with that and the arrangements that go with that. we aim toa arrangements that go with that. we aim to a comprehensive free—trade agreement which would be tariff free. the customs agreement that would follow on from that if we achieved that would be one whose primary aim depending on some of the other components would be on rules of origin, on identifying and determining whether rules of origin required it. the bits of the agreement which are more regulatory
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and more complex tend to be those which don't fall within the free—trade arrangement directly. issues like aviation service agreements. issues like data exchange. issues like recognition of driving licences. those sorts of things. now, that's a very broad range of issues and we would have to have a significant number of simultaneous negotiations going on on them that they are effectively independent. they are not interdependent. these things become problematic when you have got to do one before you can do another. the brexit secretary david davis taking questions from the brexit committee there. that is likely to go on for some time. we can go to ben wright who is still with us and who has been watching. anything significant in what we have heard so far, then? yes, i think, in what we have heard so far, then? yes, ithink, tina. they were rattling through interesting areas
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there. focusing very much on the question of what the transition period might look like. these are the two years or so that will follow britain's departure from the eu in march 2019 and we know the government is looking for a standstill agreement which keeps things pretty much as they are at the moment although we would be out of the eu. david davis was pressed on what britain was asking for in that deal and he could see that throughout that period, the european court ofjustice judgments may still apply to the uk. he said we might still be members of the common fisheries policy, he hoped that the open skies agreement would remain in place to keep planes taking off from the uk and going to europe in the same way that they do at the moment. they are looking for continuity bond that transition agreement although as david davies conceded, it is up to the eu to decide really how they think that transition period might work by merrily and they are waiting for details from the eu which they hope will come under samba on that.
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they are hoping to get the broad outline of that transition agreement agreed early in the new year, which is something uk businesses are desperate to know, but he does also think that the entire agreement, the future trade agreement between the eu and the uk, can be done by the time britain leads the eu in march 2019. i think there are many in brussels and here who doubt that, but david davis definitely sees this transition agreement as being part of the broader discussion of where the trade relationship between the two is heading long term. i think this will be a very interesting session in the commons this morning. there is another brexit story doing the rounds involving universities and a letter? a tory mp, chris heaton—harris, has written to universities, asking them to give him details of who in their departments is teaching brexit,
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european affairs, and asking for links to the courses that they are teaching, the syllabus. the latter emerged yesterday and there was quite a lot of consternation from academics, certainly, who ridiculed him on twitter. lord patten, chris patten, the chairman, head of oxford university, was incandescent and said that it was leninist idiocy from chris heaton—harris. today, the universities minister came out to spain what was going on. mrjohnston said it was not a wise letter to send, and strongly defended university freedom. it is right that chris, who is a super cerebral member of parliament was acting as an mp, ratherthan member of parliament was acting as an mp, rather than a government minister or a representative of the government. and he has a very long—standing interest in european affairs, the history of european
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thought. i have spoken to him and he was suing inquiries of his own that may, in time, leads to a book on these questions. it was more of an academic inquiry, rather than an attempt to constrain the freedom that academics rightly hold. so, saying that it was the actions of an mp simply curious about how brexit was being taught. i think it did cause a real row yesterday. now, jo johnson hoping that he has hosed that down by saying that he didn't think it should have been sent, but you should see it in a context of academic inquiry. we will see if thatis academic inquiry. we will see if that is enough to kill the match off. still to come, a new approach being trialled by bedfordshire police to tackle the growing problem of cyberstalking. we have had exclusive access to find out how it will work. asp all business owners tell this
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programme they have instructed lawyers to bring criminal proceedings against rbs, alleging the bagged afforded —— the bank defrauded them. lets get the latest news. the brexit secretary david davis will face scrutiny from mps shortly. mr davis will be questioned about developments in the european union divorce talks amid claims he has held up progress on crucial exit laws. follows concerns from eu leaders that there has not been enough movement to proceed to the next aid of talks. we want to conclude the overall negotiation, whatever the outcome may be. we want to do that by the end of march 2019. there are a number of reasons for that. one of them is, what are you implement in, what is the limitation period? —— what is the limitation period? —— what is the implementation period. is it going from where we are now to
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a free trade agreement, to a bare—bones agreement, wto plus agreements on the fundamentals like aviation? we need to know where we go. mps are beginning an inquiry into e—cigarettes, amid concerns there are significant gaps in what is known about them and how they are regulated. the science and technology committee will cut effectiveness in stopping smoking and impact on health. nearly 3 million people in the uk now vape regularly, four times more than 2012. more than half of all british women have suffered sexual harassment at work or their place of study, according to a survey by bbc radio 5 live. nearly 70% of those questioned said they had not reported it. the survey of 2000 adults also found a fifth of men have been sexually harassed. an electrician from stirling who was facing three months in prison in dubai for public indecency has spoken of his relief at returning home to the uk. jamie harron was sentenced for touching a man's hip in a crowded bar, but freed after dubai's ruler intervened.
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let's get the sport now. the premier league's bottom club crystal palace were beaten by championship side bristol city in the league cup. arsenal needed extra time to get past norwich, manchester city beat championship leaders wolves on penalties. manchester united, the cup holders, are through to the quarterfinals after beating swansea 2—0. jesse lingaard scored twice. leicester and bournemouth also reached the last 8 last night. there were three matches in the scottish premiership last night. hibs the only winners. 1—0 in the edinburgh derby against hearts. simon murray the goalscorer. british cycling says the "door is open" for former sprinter jess varnish to return to the sport. she made allegations of bullying and sexual discrimination. he was found
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to have used sexist language. and england's women cricketers are getting ready for the second match in their ashes series against australia which gets under way early tomorrow morning our time. they narrowly lost their first match. we will hear from the england cricketers after ten. new economic growth figures are just out — and they'll have a significant impact on the bank of england decision on interest rates which we're expecting next week. let's talk to our economics correspondent andy verity — he's got the latest. can you explain these figures and what impact they might have on interest rates and the pound? the first headline is that we have 0.4% growth in the first quarter of the year. that is more than most economists were expecting. we were expecting it would be 0.3%. that is positive. if you look at the gross domestic product per head, dividing
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everything we produce in the whole economy by the number of people in it, it has grown by 0.3%. that is good news, it means that the amount we each produce is growing and that employers might be able to pay a wage that goes up faster than inflation, at least in future. it is all upbeat signs. it makes it more likely that the bank of england is going to raise interest rates back to the 0.5% level next month. remember, that is still an emergency level. it is the lowest level in 300 yea rs. level. it is the lowest level in 300 years. but it does mean for the first time in more than a decade that we are likely to get a rise in interest rates. interesting dimension is to this, although services have done well, computer games were selling well, if you look at production it was up, that is mining and the oil industry. but construction, the sad story there. that is in recession. we have had two quarters of economic shrinkage in construction. that does not bode well for the future of the construction sector. and the increase in cyberstalking, which can be anything from sending too many texts,
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to leaving nasty messages on your social media pages. for some people, it takes 100 different pieces of that type of stalking before they'll even consider going to the police. and when they get there, their problem isn't always taken seriously. well, bedfordshire police and the national centre for cyberstalking research are putting together a three step programme to help victims from when they go to report their experience, right through to rehabilitating the offender. 0ur reporter chi chi izundu's been looking into this. and we just have to warn you that there is some language in the film which some viewers might find offensive. i met my ex through a friend of a friend. he was known as being quite a successful, happy, funny kind of guy, who people seemed to like. this is helen. it's not her real name or real voice. but her story is very true. the relationship for the first year was really good. we had lots of fun.
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he met my family. and everything appeared as if it was going really well. and then slowly things started to deteriorate and there was sort of, now i look back, subtle signs that actually all wasn't as well as it first appeared. "to create fear, distress and disrupt the daily activities of another person" — that is stalking. 0fficial home office stats are quite sketchy. that's because most people don't actually go and report it. and when it comes to online stalking, the numbers are even smaller. less than 10% go to the police. the national stalking helpline say so far this year they have responded to more than 2500 calls and e—mails from victims. come christmas, they are expecting that number to have doubled. i suppose one of the most prevalent sources of stalking is when a relationship breaks down. there was some research recently that said that about 80% of people after break—ups still check into your account through a friend's
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account, even if they have been blocked on facebook, to see what you are up to. it was horrific. it was the only way i could describe it. so from then on, for the next few weeks, i was receiving calls, e—mails, texts, nonstop. one day there was a57 text messages. so these text messages were absolutely vile in nature, very abusive. he called me a slag. how dare i end this? nobody would want me. the next message would be begging for me to take him back, to give him a chance. these phone calls, texts, e—mails, went on and on. i didn't respond to any of them. so then he started texting and e—mailing and calling my family. it then progressed onto he posted on social media, sort of like a lonely hearts column. but it was about me. it was very vulgar in nature.
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in them he advertised that i had sexually transmitted infections, which was untrue. he advertised the fact i had hiv, which was untrue. dr emma short is the director for the national centre for cyberstalking research at the university of bedfordshire. she says stalkers are using sophisticated methods like hacking computers and phones to get information on their victims. itjust doesn't stop. it's about the fact itjust doesn't stop. and even if the content of those messages is quite banal, it's just an attempt to have a relationship or to meet you, or to get more information about you. it's very intimidating when people just don't see the stop signs. people told me he'd actually screenshot some of the things he'd done and send it to me. almost like a trophy — "look what i've done." because even though i'd blocked him on my phone, i wasn't sure how to block him on e—mail. that was the time i decided i needed to go to the police.
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victims of harassment and stalking in england and wales are being left at risk... ..because of failings by police and prosecutors. later on we are going to hear from one woman who was stalked over a period of five years. in that time she made more than 125 complaints to the police, who did little. back injuly, police and prosecutors in england and wales were heavily criticised by the inspectorate of constabulary and the crown prosecution service inspectorate. a report found too many investigations were poorly run and failed to give victims legal protection, leaving them at risk. when i first went to the police, initially they were quite responsive, and they looked at the information i gave them and agreed it wasn't acceptable. and they said they were going to speak to him. now for me in that position, them going to speak to him wasn't the best thing. but i was glad they
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were doing something. not once was stalking mentioned to me. not even though all of these phone calls and approaching family members and friends were still going on. plus the social media postings. plus him driving past my work, driving past my house. even when i was with one of the police officers he was repeatedly driving past my house, and stalking was never mentioned to me. so he received a caution and he breached his condition by again posting things on social media. he tried to communicate with me directly. it was at this point when i was going back to the police repeatedly, i felt i wasn't really listened to. i was getting comments from the police officer such as, "well, he is from a nice family, can't you ignore the facebook stuff? ask your friends not to show it to you any more." and advising me not to use social media. that was the response i got from the police. there were times and i was ringing the nonemergency line to report things that were happening. sometimes i would have to wait up to two weeks, in some cases usually around five to seven days, for an appointment. "not acceptable" —
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that is how this report described experiences like helen's, even when it came to going to the police. victim blaming and the number of prosecutions were all criticised. but dr short is working with bedfordshire police on a three step programme to try and change this. firstly, front line officers will get a risk assessment at the first point of a complaint. secondly, helping victims record abuse via a special app. and thirdly, tackling the behaviour itself. other forces will be watching with interest. one of the things that we think is a necessary gap to fill at the moment is a quick response from people who are not it advanced. to understand when someone reports a case, what constitutes a higher risk than others. and it's very hard. if you aren't online yourself, but also if you're listening to a phone call with someone who perhaps isn't communicating the level, they are just communicating the content, it's very hard to assess. emma and her team have written specific questions with front line officers to determine the level of risk a stalker could potentially pose to evict them. on average it takes about three
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months before somebody will go to the police, roughly. and they tend to put up with about a hundred bits of behaviour — so, a hundred texts, a hundred e—mails, a hundred approaches. so that first trip to the police station, where you actually report this comment is crucial, because the response you get from the police officers, if that is negative, or they trivialise it, you may not go back again. some cases have often been described as murder in slow motion. professionals often talk about stalking as the only crime a victim has to collect their own evidence. dr short and her team are hoping this special app can help with that. when i, as the victim, get the app, can you explain how it works? ok, so once you get the app... victims deemed as media risk will have to get a special login code before they are given access to the app, and they will only get that a front line officers think they should. evidence is things
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like phone calls, screen shots, videos, sound recordings. it also captures the meta data, so the information of coding behind the messages — websites, videos — and that all can be used to help police track down the offender. and we can start recording the screen and they can navigate away from the app. we are going to be recording everything that is happening on the screen. so if we open another app, we're going to be capturing this. stop record. there we go. there is a screenshot. we have now attached that to our package. once you've got it all, you can make notes to say how this particular evidence has affected us. then you can upload it. so if the phone is lost, stolen or tampered with, that data is preserved, the evidence is preserved. each piece of evidence gathered goes directly to a police database, so officers can build up the severity of the case. this is someone who is putting time and investment and hours into causing and distress. at that point you are looking
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at someone who has become fixated. and that is the highest end of risk. i can't even go into our local town or supermarket, because he is well known where we live and people like him. but when i walked into the supermarket a few weeks after it happened, i noticed people who were looking at me, making comments. i knew these were people who knew him. that was really, really tough to live through. but the problem about securing convictions still remains. for detective inspector chris beresford, it isn't just about the punishment. it is also about treating the behaviour. the third piece of work is a restorative justice space outcome, so that we can deal with the offenders for cyberstalking and harassing, and we can address why they are committing crimes, try to get to bottom of them understanding the actual massive impact their crimes have on their victims. and thatjob could fall to dr frank farnham, a consultant forensic psychiatrist, who is part of the uk's only stalking
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rehabilitation centre. whether rehabilitation is possible though, is a different matter. there are some individuals who are so entrenched and ingrained in their behaviour, they will not make a change. and you have to accept the fact it's going to be a group that will not want to engage in treatment at all. but this is a behaviour that the offenders reoffend at such a high rate, that even if you make a small change in the reoffending rate, that would be quite a lot of offending that you would be changing. it made me feel like i was worthless. i'm sort of a very strong, independent, bubbly sort of person. i try to see the best of everything. that situation was the hardest thing i've ever had to go through, and i was very angry at him. i was determined i was going to get through it. after 10, we'll be speaking to a victim of cyberstalking and a police and crime commissioner who wants to change her force's response to stalking victims. a group of small business owners
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have exclusively told this programme they have instructed barristers to bring criminal proceedings against rbs — alleging the bank defrauded them and caused their businesses to fail. the financial conduct authority is already considering whether it can take action against rbs after it published a summary of its report on the bank's controversial global restructuring group. the group was found to have "widespread" mistreatment of customers with the fca report identifying that 92% of viable businesses handled by grg suffered "inappropriate action". rbs said it has acknowledged failings and has apologised for its mistakes. in recent days, the royal bank of scotland's past treatment of its small and medium—sized business customers has come under fresh scrutiny. so what's it all about? well, back in 2014, the businessman and former government adviser, lawrence tomlinson, alleged that the bank had deliberately wrecked small businesses to make profit, prompting a review by the regulator of the financial conduct authority. on monday, an interim report published by the fca did identify a number of failings by the bank, such as interest charges being raised inappropriately, and unnecessary fees being added. the report said that 92% of potentially viable businesses faced instances of inappropriate treatment by the
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global restructuring group, the division of rbs that dealt with struggling firms. it also said that rbs had failed to handle customer complaints fairly, and failed to support businesses in a way that made industry standards. the unit was said to have been insensitive, dismissive and sometimes unduly aggressive towards struggling business owners. but rbs said that some of the most serious allegations against the bank were not upheld by the regulator, and that the way the bank operator has been completely changed since the alleged mistreatment took place. the bank has put aside £400 million to compensate small businesses, but the fca has warned rbs may face further action. with many small businesses still awaiting compensation payments, the bank is still very far from being in the clear. the financial conduct authority has said it might take further action over the way the royal bank of
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scotla nd over the way the royal bank of scotland mistreated some small business customers. but does that go far enough? some of those small business customers have exclusively told this programme may have addressed lawyers. let's talk now to neil mitchell. he's leading the group of business owners who've been affected by the global restructuring group. also bill esterson, labour's shadow business minister who has called for a judge—led inquiry, and clive may — his bricklaying business went into liquidation as a result of grg. brill, you have been pretty clear that you want to judge that enquiry into this. how wide-ranging should it be? people lost their businesses, family life was torn apart and in some cases, people took their lives, some cases, people took their lives, so we have to get to the bottom of what happened. we have got to establish the whole truth and back can only happen with the judge leading quietly. i have also got people coming to meet from other
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banks who have experienced similar unacceptable inappropriate treatment and that is why a judge needs to look at this filly, so that we can repair the damage and move on so that trust can be re—established between smaller businesses and the banks. look, you quoted the report. something in the full report, the bbc have already reported, this was pa rt bbc have already reported, this was part ofan bbc have already reported, this was part of an intended, co—ordinated strategy and management really, if they didn't know, they certainly should have known what was going on and what we have seen so far is a good step forward. we need to see the full report and it will only be with a fulljudge led enquiry that we will get to the bottom of this, and this culture of inappropriate treatment, of putting profit first ahead of the lives and livelihoods of business people up and down the land. the royal bank of scotland have apologised, they have set aside £440 million that have already given
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at £100 billion whether compensation. you don't think that goes far enough? no, because -- £100 million worth of compensation. you don't think that goes far enough? no, because people wantjustice, confirmation of what was done to them. the report talks about distressed businesses being taken into this group but we have to look at why these businesses were distressed. i know of businesses where their overdraft facilities we re where their overdraft facilities were stopped overnight, they couldn't repay it and that is why they became distressed and went into they became distressed and went into the global restructuring group in the global restructuring group in the first place. we have got to get the first place. we have got to get the whole thing out there, clean up what happened in the past and make sure it cannot carry on, because i have also got people telling us it is still going on today at more than one bank. we have got to get to the bottom of it and i think a judge is the only way of doing that. where do you stand on criminal proceedings? the police are already looking at this. i think that is highly
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significant. significant, but what do you think in terms of criminal proceedings? i think when there is an investigation going on, it is inappropriate for me to comment further but i think it shows that things are happening. we have got a police investigation, lawyers being instructed and i think that is part of building a full picture of what happened. i think it is about whether it is appropriate to go down that route because there are questions around motive, was there a native or was it poor management? are we talking about dishonesty or mismanagement? the report has said this was part of a co—ordinated strategy and that tells me and i think it tells everyone there is a need to get this out in the open with full disclosure. do you think,
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as you have said, many people's lives have been ruined, people have taken their own lives, do you think individuals involved should be held accountable? absolutely and that is why the full truth has to come out. we have got to establish exactly what happened beyond any reasonable doubt will stop at the moment, we've got partial disclosure with this interim report. the full report needs to come out as well. the interim report's author has called for the full report to be published. that has got to happen, too. so this isn't just a truth that has got to happen, too. so this isn'tjust a truth seeking exercise? criminal investigations would be necessary as well. that isn't for me to say. before we have a clear picture, we can't move forward, we can't access finance properly in this country. john mcdonald talked about maybe using rbs as a way to
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set upa about maybe using rbs as a way to set up a network of regional development banks, using our national investment bank model and maybe that's what needs to come out of this, but that is further down the line, that is one option. the reality is that this has all got to come out because what has happened to thousands and thousands of people and businesses is just to thousands and thousands of people and businesses isjust plain to thousands and thousands of people and businesses is just plain wrong and businesses is just plain wrong and it has got to be sorted out. ok, i want to bring you kneel next. you represent a lot of people you have been affected by this. can you tell us been affected by this. can you tell us what you are planning in terms of legal action? we are planning to raise a private criminal prosecution on the basis that there has been a failure of the state to investigate. we learned last week that police in scotla nd we learned last week that police in scotland are investigating a number of cases. rbs are trying to minimise it, saying it is only one. it is a number. iam it, saying it is only one. it is a number. i am also aware that police forces in belfast, manchester and north wales are looking into cases.
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neither police force, the city of london police or the met police in the london bubble are investigating any cases at all. we believe this is any cases at all. we believe this is a failure of the state to investigate rbs so we are now launching a private criminal prosecution with 11 case examples and we will be presenting that to a magistrate very shortly. rbs has admitted fault, they have set aside money to compensate people, to compensate victims. what more do you wa nt compensate victims. what more do you want for yourself and others affected ? want for yourself and others affected? i want to see, as bill says, a judge led enquiry or even evil and wider public enquiry. we need to have evil regulators report published —— we need to have the full regulators report published so that thousands and thousands of british businesses, their families and their employees can see justice done, and then we need compensation
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and it's not £300 million. this is a multi—billion pound problem and that is why the bank are trying to minimise it. all right, i need to try to bring in clive. live, you ran a successful bricklaying business. tell us what happened to you. back in 2010, the bank decided we were in a sector they weren't interested in so a sector they weren't interested in so they decided in my case to use a government scheme, the enterprise finance guarantee scheme, to repay off a large portion their debt, which was originally designed to safeguard jobs in the downturn. in the background, they were planning on cutting our overdraft further so our overdraft was cut from 245,000, which had never been breached, down to 20,000. now, the davis government scheme was drawn down, we were put into rbs's distressed part of the bank, so we were a viable business that were artificially distressed by
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rbs. what do you want to happen? well, what i want to happen is that people, you touched on it, is it incompetence or dishonesty? back in december last year we discovered that in the case of global restructuring group west register, the property group of rbs, inflow charts, in e—mails and in registration, and in particular in a manual in 2011, they were instructing all staff upon seizure ofsme instructing all staff upon seizure of s m e assets, they would send out a victory e—mail. now consider the victory you now and then consider the family that contacted me and said that their loved one killed himself, sorry... that's ok, take your time. leading two daughters, five and seven, because they were absolutely gutted to find out that
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when their loved one was taking their life, rbs worth sending out victory e—mails. sorry about this. no, take your time. victory e—mails. sorry about this. no, take yourtime. it's victory e—mails. sorry about this. no, take your time. it's a difficult thing to talk about and we appreciate you taking the time. given how upsetting it is for you to talk about this for yourself and for others you have heard of, what do you want to happen?” others you have heard of, what do you want to happen? i want to see individuals brought to account. you want to happen? i want to see individuals brought to accountm my particular case... we can't name individuals here, ijust need to say that. i won't name anyone, but the bank had to clarify in my case that there were no assets available. i was told to delete assets from an asset and liability statement and later on they told me i was asked to do that because it was inherited by my wife is due to the death of one of her relatives. nobody had died. now is that incompetence of is they are inventing deaths in
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people's family. if i could touch upon the ceo of the fca, andrew bailey, when this was brought to his attention, his response was perhaps your file got mixed up with somebody else's. he is not here to defend himself, so we are not going to go down that route. ijust want himself, so we are not going to go down that route. i just want to know, have you managed to rebuild your life? are you in business at the moment? rebuilding it very slowly, we managed to pick ourselves off the ground. that is what smes in the uk do. they are the driving factor of the economy. you dust yourself off. but this experience for the last five years, nearly six years, has taken its toll. how do you rebuild a business? incidentally, in my case, i left school with no qualifications. ended up school with no qualifications. ended up building a business and having 100 people turning over £35
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million. how do you rebuild that at this time of your life? difficult, i know, difficult to speak about this when it is obviously still very distressing for you. we appreciate you coming on. now it is time to get the latest weather update. good morning. for many it has been a lovely start to the day. we have had a decent sunrise. pretty decent weather watcher photos being sent in as well. lovely blue skies in cheshire. the far south—east of england, still holding on a bit of cloud around. this is dorset at the moment. that cloud across the south and east will tend to disappear. even here you will get some sunshine. fair weather cloud developing into the afternoon, across the far north of scotland is to be quite breezy with some showers coming in towards the west of scotland. towards eastern scotland, through southern areas, largely dry and bright. temperatures of 12 or 13 degrees. sunny spells for northern ireland and through much of england
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and wales during this afternoon. a fine afternoon for most of us. temperatures potentially up to 19 or maybe 20 degrees in the south—east, way above the average for the time of year. in the south—west of england you will notice a bit more cloud starting to move back in. we still have this weather front situated across southern areas which will move further northwards tonight. that will bring outbreaks of rain across wales, into the midlands, keeping temperatures in double figures. further north across scotland, temperatures potentially down into single figures. so, thursday, for scotland and northern ireland, dry for most with some sunshine. a few showers in the north—west. for england and wales, it will be a cloudy day compared to today and there will be light and patchy rain affecting the likes of lancashire, towards humberside, and further south, despite the cloud, there could be a few breaks to give us there could be a few breaks to give usa there could be a few breaks to give us a bit of sunshine. again, pretty one. by friday, that weather front will be moving back southwards
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again. as it does so, it will bring chilly conditions for many on friday. it will take the cloud with it. we return to some sunny spells on friday. again, not too bad. temperatures in northern areas, 11 or 12 degrees, going down by a few degrees in the south—east, 15 celsius on friday. that is about the average. hello it's wednesday, it's just after 10 o'clock, tina daheley in for victoria. cyber stalking is a growing — and distressing — problem. but victims and experts say it's not always taken seriously as a crime. could a new approach and app being trialled by bedfordshire police change that? we've had exclusive access to find out how it will work. we are also talking to somebody that experienced cyberstalking for two yea rs. and the prison sentences handed down to women who kill their partners after years of domestic abuse. we speak to campaigners who want a review of how these defendants are treated by the law and by the courts. and the man behind cinematic
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masterpieces such as blade runner and the italian job, masterpieces such as blade runner and the italianjob, we will be speaking to legendary producer michael deeley, who said he stumbled into the film business more or less by accident. good morning. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. the brexit secretary has said he believes a tariff free trade deal with the reached with the european union before march 2019. david davis is being questioned by mps about the progress of negotiations after concerns from eu leaders that there has not been enough progress to start talking about trade at all. he was pressed by hilary benn on whether he thought negotiations would be completed by the deadline for britain to leave. i believe your words were that i believe we can get
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a free trade and customs negotiation concluded in the period, before march 2019. do you think that can be donein march 2019. do you think that can be done in 12 months? yes. the arguments against, i will lay them out again, they can be based on the free trade agreements which are very different from ours. the uk economy picked up speed unexpectedly in the last three months to september. this has increased expectations of an interest rate rise in the next month. gross domestic product rose by 0.4% compared with 0.3% in each of the first two quarters of the year, according to latest figures from the office of national statistics. the services industry was the main factor behind the rise as well as a was the main factor behind the rise as well asajump was the main factor behind the rise as well as a jump in car production. some small businesses have exquisitely told this programme they have instructed lawyers to bring criminal proceedings against the royal bank of scotland, alleging the bank caused them to fail. the bank
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was heavily criticised this week by a city watchdog, the financial conduct authority, over its handling of thousands of business customers. rbs's global restructuring group was found to have engaged in widespread mistreatment of customers in some areas. more than half of all british women have suffered sexual harassment at work or their place of study, according to a survey by bbc radio 5 live. nellie 70% of those questioned said they had not reported it. the survey of 2,000 adults also found a fifth of men have been sexually harassed. the social media giant twitter has announced new rules about how it displays political adverts. the move follows claims that the platform was used to try to influence last year's us presidential election. twitter‘s ads will now clearly show who funded them, how much was spent and which users are being targeted. that is a summary of the latest abc news. should women who kill abuses be
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given different sentences to other killers? you can get in touch throughout the morning. if you text, you will be charged a standard network rate. now the sport. crystal palace were the big losers in the legaue cup last night, the premier league's bottom club went down 41 to championship side bristol city. leicester and bournemouth also made it through to the quarter finals as did manchester united who are the league cup holders. they beat swansea 2—0 at the liberty stadium. jesse lingaard scored twice, the first time he's done that for united. it was jose mourinho's 400th game in english football, his first was in 2014 with chelsea. arsenal had a scare, they only beat norwich 2—1 after extra time. teenager eddie nketiah came off the bench and scored both their goals. the premier league leaders
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manchester city needed penalties to beat the championship leaders wolves. pepe guardiola had previously called the league cup a waste of energy. last night he had a go at the ball that they have to play with in the league cup. apparently it's too light. it is not acceptable to play with that ball in this professional game. it is not acceptable to that level. the players complained? all of the players complained, i could not play football, unfortunately for you, because i am a magnificent player! they all say, what is that? a couple more matches with that ball tonight. spurs against west ham, everton had to chelsea. coming up, international football. england are the under 20s world champions, the under 19s european champions. and england take on brazil in the semi finals of the under 17's world cup at 12.30 this afternoon.
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it's live on the bbc via the red button or the bbc website. british cycling says the "door is open" for former sprinter jess varnish to return to the sport. she was dropped from the british squad 18 months ago, after failing to qualify for the rio 0lympics. she then made allegations of bullying and sexual discrimination against former coach shane sutton. although he was cleared of bullying, he quit after being found to have used sexist language. her claims printed an independent report into the culture within british cycling that was highly critical of the organisation. england's women cricketers are getting ready for the second match in their ashes series against australia which gets underway early tomorrow morning our time. it is and must win, but they narrowly lost their first match of the series. they've got two more 50 over matches, including this one
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tomorrow morning. they have one test match before three twenty20 matches ina match before three twenty20 matches in a points—based series. england won on their last trip to australia in 2013—14, but were beaten at home in 2015. preparation was not ideal with having no warm up games and not able to get on grass so much. the same situation for the aussies as well. i think we showed the other day that we we re think we showed the other day that we were a little bit off the pace in terms of match readiness, the batters not getting big scores and a few errors in the field. hopefully the cobwebs have been swept away and we are ready to go tomorrow. that is all of the sport for now. i'll be back with the headlines later. now controversy has been brewing for some time about whether e—cigarettes are actually a good thing or really not. they do help many people to give up, but they've also been accused of re—normalising smoking for the younger generations. so, a cross—party group of mps has begun an inquiry, and that science and technology committee says there are "significant gaps" in what we know about e—cigarettes and how they're regulated. well norman lamb mp
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is the chairman of that committee and is leading the inquiry. we're alsojoined by professorjohn britton of nottingham university, who's the director of the uk centre for tobacco & alcohol studies, and louise ross who is the stop smoking service managerfor leicester. i want to come to you first, why are you launching this inquiry?” i want to come to you first, why are you launching this inquiry? i think ina way, you launching this inquiry? i think in a way, your introduction sums up the reasons. there are claims and counterclaims, a lot of myths out there. i think that gives an opportunity to get a clear view, based on the evidence, based on science, about what the risks are and also what are the opportunities are. we have a big ambition in this country, rightly so, to get people
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off smoking and to reduce smoking levels down to the minimum possible. i think e—cigarettes clearly play a role in that. there is a lot of evidence that it is significantly safer than smoking, but we also want to know what the long—term effects of vaping are. there is a thing called heat not burning, emerging onto the market which is arranged around heating tobacco to a high temperature rather than burning it, which also avoids the cancer risk. is that an interesting opportunity as well? this gives a chance to give as well? this gives a chance to give a definitive view to the public. i think that is really worthwhile. ok. are you not worried this might have the opposite impact and put people off using e—cigarettes to quit smoking? 0nly last month, nhs scotla nd smoking? 0nly last month, nhs scotland stated definitively that e—cigarettes are definitely less harmful than smoking.” e—cigarettes are definitely less harmful than smoking. i think if you
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follow the evidence, i am a very strong believer in evidence —based policy making. if you follow the evidence and are clear enough about that with people, i don't think you can go far wrong. 0ur that with people, i don't think you can go far wrong. our own sun has given up, he was a heavy smoker and he now vapes quite heavily, but i am delighted he has stopped smoking. we now have 2.9 million people vaping in this country, smoking rates are down to historic low level, about 15.5%. this is really significant progress but we can go a lot further. tobacco is still killing 79,000 people every year in england. so, there is a massive public health goal still to drive at. louise, i will bring you in next. it is a confusing picture. people have been using e—cigarettes for a while and there is a lot of disagreement about what the risks are, whether or not you should use them, can you smoke inside, outside, they are not available on prescription at the moment. where do you stand? well, in
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leicester city we were the first e—cigarette friendly stop smoking service. we discovered very early on, in 2014, that it really helps people to stop smoking, people who tried everything else. when they tried everything else. when they tried vaping, they said this has done it for me in a way that nothing else has been successful. we saw increased success rates in the first year, second and 30 as well, compared with traditional treatments we are big fans and confident it is much safer than smoking and that switching is the right thing to do. do you think that is clear that most people know it is safer than cigarettes? no, i don't think they do and a lot of the problems are caused by media stories that don't give an accurate picture. we know talking to people that they are very
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frightened by the myths that go around. you know, i'm sure, we have talked before on this programme in fa ct talked before on this programme in fact about the things people are scared of. the idea of popcorn and formaldehyde. but without combustion, these devices are much safer than smoking and it's much better to switch. where are the gaps in evidence? it seems worrying that people have been smoking them, i think it's something like 3 million people are using them in the uk but there are gaps in knowledge. where are the gaps in knowledge? the main gaps are in understanding how safe or otherwise the vapours the different products produced are. you have a range of products on the market, some of them producing nicotine in a carrier and little else, some solutions generating flavoured vapour and we do know that
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the more components that going into pe liquid, the greater the mix of toxins in their paper and it would be helpful to know where different products lie on that spectrum so that consumers can be guided to be less rather than be more hazardous ones. having said all that, i would reiterate what bob louise and norman lamb have said. these products are unquestionably less harmful than smoking. we need to capture that benefit for society. where we need to look carefully is at what we can do to make sure that hamas and happening that could be avoided by some simple controls or legislation or transparency over what is in the product at this stage. what do you think the most likely outcome of this enquiry will be?” think the most likely outcome of this enquiry will be? i think the enquiry will find that electronic cigarettes have contributed to a near doubling at the rate of decline
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in smoking in the united kingdom over the last three years, that they are not contributing to any significant uptake of smoking in young people, that the content of the vapour carries certain things that justify concern over the vapour carries certain things thatjustify concern over long—term health risks and perhaps need to be looked at and in some way controlled or reduced and i think the inclusion of heat not burn products is also a very important product because there isa very important product because there is a product category we know less about but it would appear from early day care that these products are slightly further up the risk spectrum from electronic cigarettes to to ba cco spectrum from electronic cigarettes to tobacco cigarettes. all the permission we have on those products today, almost all of it comes from the tobacco industry and u nfortu nately the tobacco industry and unfortunately none of that can be trusted. norman, i want unfortunately none of that can be trusted. norman, iwant to unfortunately none of that can be trusted. norman, i want to come to you again. if at the end of this enquiry we hear conclusive evidence that these are a positive tool and
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can bring down the numbers of people smoking dramatically, would you back public funding for e—cigarettes? well, let's follow the evidence. listening to louise talk about how herunit listening to louise talk about how her unit has been able to shift large numbers of people of smoking and onto e—cigarettes, this is saving lives. and if this is the case and if the evidence confirms this, then we should be able to follow that evidence in terms of public funding. i think also, as john has said, we also need to understand the evidence relating to heat not burn as well. it's an interesting new development. there are claims coming out ofjapan where it has been developed significantly that there is a higher transfer rate of people from smoking to heat not burn products but what is the independent evidence showing? that is what we have got to establish.
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this is a great opportunity to kill the myths and to get important public information out there to people which could literally save lives. louise, what do you hope will happen at the end of this enquiry?” would certainly like to see a lot of the myths cleared up, like the fact that they ping does not we normalise smoking. it normalises gaping, making it more normal to use and e—cigarettes. that is what i would like to see. i am not a great enthusiast for prescribed e—cigarettes because i believe they area e—cigarettes because i believe they are a consumer product and it is the diversity, you know, the different flavours, the looks of the devices that are so appealing to people. so our service would give a free sample asa our service would give a free sample as a starter to some people who couldn't afford to get started on a device they have bought themselves, but after that, they are happy to buy their own stuff. they were buying their cigarettes and they are happy to buy their own e—cigarettes as well. all right, thank you all
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very much indeed. you have been getting in touch on this story. anthony says e—cigarettes contain nicotine, that is why people use them. nicotine is one of the most addictive drugs known to man. that is why people smoke, whether it is ordinary cigarettes or e—cigarettes. they are addicted. nicotine is highly dangerous to have, affecting the heart and the dangers are the same whether from normal cigarettes or e—cigarettes. we have also had an e—mailfrom or e—cigarettes. we have also had an e—mail from an old or e—cigarettes. we have also had an e—mailfrom an old saying, the government wants to ban this product because they are losing revenue. still to come, we'll have the latest from the trial of an army fitness instructor who's accused of trying to kill his wife by sabotaging her parachute and causing a gas leak at home. bedfordshire police and the national centre for cyberstalking research are putting together a three—step programme to help victims from when they go to report their experience, right through to rehabilitating the offender. we bought you our reporter chi chi izundu's film a little
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earlier, here's a short extract. the relationship for the first year was really good. we had lots of fun. he met my family. and everything appeared as if it was going really well. and then slowly things started to deteriorate and he posted on social media, he advertised that i had sexually transmitted infections, which was untrue, he advertised that i had hiv, which was untrue. back injuly, the police were heavily criticised by the inspectorate of constabulary and the crown prosecution service is inspectorate, with a report finding
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too many cases were poorly run and failed to give victims legal protection, leaving them at risk.” was getting comments from the police officers like, he's run a nice family, can't you ignore the facebook stuff, ask your friends not to show it to you any more? advising me not to use social media. that was the advice i got from the police. about 80% of people after break—ups still check into your account, even if they have been blocked, to see what you are up to. not acceptable, thatis what you are up to. not acceptable, that is what was said, with victim blaming and the number of prosecutions criticised. but doctor short is working on a three step programme to try to change this. firstly, front line officers will get a risk assessment at the first stage of the complaint. secondly, helping victims record abuse with an
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app and thirdly, looking at risk. victims deemed as medium risk will have to get a special login code before they are given access to the app and they will only get that if front line officers think they should. so, evidence like phone calls, screenshots, videos, sound recordings... the app also catches the meta data so the information or coding behind the messages, websites and videos can all be used to help police track down the offender. and we can start recording the screen and then we can navigate away from the apple and we are recording everything on—screen. the apple and we are recording everything on-screen. once convicted, rehabilitation should also be about treatment of the behaviour, according to the police. we can address why they are committing the crimes, try to get to the bottom of understanding be massive impact their crimes have on their victims. the developments are still being trialled and it will
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ta ke still being trialled and it will take time to see whether this all helps victims of cyberstalking and increases conviction rates. now we can speak to alexis bowater who experienced being cyber—stalked for two years, rachel griffin from the suzy lamplugh trust which runs a national stalking helpline and katy bourne, the police and crime commissioner for sussex who is trying to improve her force's response and has herself experienced cyber stalking. alexis, i want to come to you first of all. can you tell us what happened to you ? of all. can you tell us what happened to you? so, i was either stalked over two yea rs happened to you? so, i was either stalked over two years during both of my pregnancies, so a period of extreme vulnerability for me. i was being persecuted by an unknown assailant, basically. when you say you were targeted, how where you targeted? so, i was you were targeted, how where you targeted? so, iwas working in you were targeted, how where you targeted? so, i was working in a newsroom at the time and threats
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we re newsroom at the time and threats were coming into the newsroom which we re were coming into the newsroom which were escalating in violence and threats of what was going to be done to me. it's quite difficult to talk about what the threats were at this time of the morning because they we re very time of the morning because they were very extreme, time of the morning because they were very extreme, but eventually the police did catch him and he was sent to prison, well, he was sentenced to four years and one month which at the time was the longest sentence for pure cyberstalking that had been handed down in this country. i know you can't go into the detail of what those messages were, but what form where they sent to you in? whether e—mails, texts, on social media? and how did it start? can you talk me through the journey of when it came to you contacting the police, at what point was that? ok, so this was ten yea rs what point was that? ok, so this was ten years ago, so it was all e—mail. these were the days when, you know,
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there weren't apple phones and the ipad hadn't been invented. but the impact of cyberstalking is the same, whatever method is used. it's an insidious, creeping crime which is really psychological. it makes you feel as if you are under threat the whole time and it makes the problem everybody is. you are almost instantaneously in a state of hyper vigilant andy king can attack is inevitable but you don't know where or when or who buy. so that is what happens for every single cyberstalking victim. they will all feel that. one of the problems obviously if that technology has come on and you and i and everybody else is really enjoying the way that we can now communicate with each other but you can't get away from cyberstalking any more. you know, your cyber stalker is in your
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pocket. it is not as if you can close the door on it, it's not as if you can run away from it. cyberstalking means that it's everywhere and if you don't know who it is who's doing it to you, it means it's everyone. were the police sympathetic when he first approached them? yes, so, i had been a broadcast journalist for a them? yes, so, i had been a broadcastjournalist for a long time. i was the main anchorfor a television programme at the time and this was the third stalker i had had. immediately be stalking behaviour began, we recognised it straightaway and i reported it instantaneously to the police. but it was obvious from early on that we we re it was obvious from early on that we were ina it was obvious from early on that we were in a targeting scenario. his m essa g es we re were in a targeting scenario. his messages were not friendly in any way whatsoever. they were threatening, they were menacing, they were vile and violent and they escalated in the type of threat that they made. ok, thank you for now. katie, alexis feels like she's had a
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good experience from the police but we also need to bear in mind that she has a public profile and is a broadcast journalist. she has a public profile and is a broadcastjournalist. we know that women in hastings who was stalked for ten years has talked about how they beat the response was that she got from officers. what are you doing to counter that?” got from officers. what are you doing to counter that? i have huge sympathy for what alexis has been through and i have similar experiences, nearly five years of cyberstalking which went into physical stalking as well, being filmed and so one so we had to go down a civil injunction route, so it's been quite serious. until you've been through it, everything she was saying absolutely rings true with me. if alexis was being really honest, she'd probably say the police response was pretty up and down. they are beginning to realise what this means to victims. but it's still very bitty and i think the
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police response nationally is problematic. certainly in sussex, i am really focused on harassment and stalking. we know from locally where i have funded veritas justice, stalking. we know from locally where i have funded veritasjustice, a stalking help agency locally for victims, they say that there is a huge amount of cyberstalking in some of their very dangerous cases as well. so where it starts on cyber, it transcends into life as well. but the police response is still problematic and i have a focus on that in sussex. rachel, you run a stalking helpline. we were talking about e—mail, that wasn't around in her time, but are you seeing an increase in cyberstalking because of prolific use of social media? yes, some research from last year showed the proportion of people, the proportion of victims of stalking whom were stalked solely online has about the la st stalked solely online has about the last ten years. it is a great
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proportion of what we are seeing. most people we talk to on the helpline are stalked by a range of different means. most of them are stalked by some kind of online means as well as off—line. stalked by some kind of online means as well as off-line. what needs to change when it comes to people's attitudes? like you said, we have heard from people that will wait until it is so bad and severe that they receive hundreds of messages, they receive hundreds of messages, they are clearly very distressed. if they are clearly very distressed. if they then have a bad experience when a co nta ct they then have a bad experience when a contact the police, it is not helpful for anybody? one of the first things we say to people on the national stalking helpline is that yes, this is stalking and you don't have to put up with it. many people will call and say, i'm not sure if it is something, and then they will list experience is very reminiscent of those described by alexis. as a society, we need to challenge that it is seen as a joke or flattering.
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it is not funny to talk about stalking someone on facebook, it can be an indicator of something very sinister. to add to that, alexis is in public life, as am i and many members of parliament, local councillors and so on. i have had women that our chief executives of companies in tears down the phone because they are not being listened to. this is really serious. and it is not just to. this is really serious. and it is notjust the police response which needs to be tightened up, it is everybody‘s issue. still to come, prison sentences handed down to women who kill their partners after years of domestic abuse. we speak to campaigners that wa nt abuse. we speak to campaigners that want a review of how these defendants are treated by the law and by the courts. and the man behind the cult classics. we speak to legendary producer michael deeley, who says he stumbled into the film business more or less by accident. time to get the latest news. the uk economy had higher than
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expected growth in the three months to september, increasing the chances ofa to september, increasing the chances of a rise in interest rates in november. gross domestic product rose by 0.4%, compared with 0.3% in each of the first two quarters of the year, according to figures from the year, according to figures from the office of national statistics. the financial markets are now indicating an 84% probability that rates will rise from the current record low of 0.25%. some small businesses have exclusively told this programme they have instructed lawyers to bring criminal proceedings against the royal bank of scotland, alleging the bank caused them to fail. the bank was heavily criticised this week by the city watchdog the financial conduct authority over its handling of thousands of business customers. rbs's global restructuring group was found to have engaged in widespread mistreatment of customers in some
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areas. the brexit secretary has said he believes a tariff free trade deal will be reached with the european union before march 2019. david davis was answering questions from mps on the brexit committee about the progress of negotiations with the progress of negotiations with the eu. european union leaders have expressed concern that has not been enough progress to start talking about trade. mps are beginning an inquiry into e—cigarettes amid concerns there are significant gaps in what is known about them and how they are regulated. the science and technology committee will look at their effectiveness in stopping smoking and their impact on health. nearly three million people in the uk now vape regularly — four times more than in 2012. an electrician from stirling — who was facing three months in prison in dubai for public indecency — has spoken of his relief at returning home to the uk. jamie harron was sentenced for touching a man's hip in a crowded bar, but freed after dubai's ruler intervened. that is a summary of the latest bbc
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news. lets get some sport. crystal palace were the big losers in the league cup last night. they were knocked out of the league cup by bristol city. arsenal needed extra time to get past norwich. manchester city beat championship leaders wolves on penalties. manchester united are the league cup holders. they beat swansea 2—0 at the liberty stadium. three matches in the scottish premiership. hibs were the only winners on the night. 1—0 against hearts. simon murray was the goal—scorer. british cycling says the "door is open" for former sprinter jess varnish to return to the sport. she was dropped from the british squad 18 months ago, after failing to qualify for the rio 0lympics. she then made allegations of bullying and sexual discrimination against former coach shane sutton.
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although he was cleared of bullying, he quit after being found to have used sexist language. england's women cricketers are getting ready for the second match in their ashes series against australia which gets underway early tomorrow morning our time. they narrowly lost their first match. that is all of the sport for now. i'll be backjust after 11 o'clock. street the wife of an army said finnis and structure —— fitness instructor accused of trying to kill her by sabotaging her parachute has testified in court. she suffered serious injuries from a 4000 foot fall in april 20 15. her parachute did not open. her husband, emile cilliers, denies charges of attempted murder. andy moore is following the case. as you said, victoria cilliers sustained serious injuries in that fall. she broke her leg, collarbone. she only survived because of her petite stature and the fact that she landed in a recently ploughed field. despite the
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injuries, she walked into the courtroom unaided, no support, no creatures. she was warned that she might be giving evidence for some hours, but she said she wished to remain standing. she started off by speaking about her love of pa rachuting. speaking about her love of parachuting. she said she was on a two week course with the army. 0nce she had jumped, she was hooked, she said and it became an obsession, an addiction not dissimilar to drugs. after that, every holiday, every weekend for 15 years, she was out pa rachuting. weekend for 15 years, she was out parachuting. it has been alleged in court that emile cilliers, her husband, was having two extramarital affairs and that he was trying to claim on his dead wife's insurance policy. she has been speaking in the last few minutes about that and she said by november 2014 she was asked about the state of their marriage and she said that cracks were starting to show and she had suspicions that he was having an
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affair. victoria cilliers has been giving evidence for about half an hour. she is expected to give evidence all day in court. this trial has been going for several weeks and it is expected to last several weeks longer. emile cilliers denies two counts of attempted murder. 25 years agojustice for women began a campaign to help women who kill their violent partners in self—defence. they campaigned to free sara thornton, kiranjit ahluwalia and amelia rossiter, three women had been convicted of murder whilst resisting male violence. all three successfully appealed their murder convictions and their cases resulted in changes to the law on provocation and a greater awareness of domestic violence. since then, justice for women have supported many more significant cases at the court of appeal. now, they say women who have fought back out of fear and desperation are still being unjustly convicted of the murder of their abusers. we can now speak to harriet wistrich, a solicitor who is acting
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for women currently imprisoned for killing their partners. she also set up thejustice for women campaign group. we can also speak to heather savage. baroness helena kennedy is a leading social justice baroness helena kennedy is a leading socialjustice barrister and baroness helena kennedy is a leading social justice barrister and has campaigned and a half of women who suffer the mystic violence. how much progress has been made? it has been 25 years since justice for progress has been made? it has been 25 years sincejustice for women has been established, where are we now? things seem to move forward and then they moved backwards again. in the 90s, when we first took up the campaigns, there were changes in the law as a result of the appeal court making changes, and there was a greater awareness. that seemed to result, for a while, in less convictions and in people understanding what might lead somebody in very unusual and extreme circumstances to kill somebody who had been their abuser. things go
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backwards again. we still have the same problems arising again and again, sometimes in different forms. now, 25 years on, we are still seeing women convicted of murder in circumstances where either they have killed really out of fear of serious violence or having been subjected to many years of coercive control, and the courts and the legal system still don't seem to be able to mitigate or understand the mitigation of those killings. therefore, those women are being convicted of murder where they should at least be convicted of manslaughter, which would mean they would not get an automatic life sentence. helena, good morning. is the problem here people's attitudes or the law itself is not going far enough? it is really a combination of both. you have to remember that the law was made for a very long time, and until now, there has been
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very few women in the senior levels of the law. it has been made by men. from a male perspective. it also doesn't quite work for women. that has certainly been true in the homicide cases where a battered woman has ended up killing her partner who has abused her for years. we're still working on trying to get the law to really embrace the ways in which women's lives might be different, and the responses to long—term violence might lead to taking an act of violence against an abuser. so, what happens is that suddenly there is a great upsurge. we think we have made the change and we get some change in law, but the older rolls back into place again. new generations become judges and they have not been trained in it or socialised to understand the issues. they have not had the kind of judicial training that i think is necessary, continuously, on these issues. what we find is that we move
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the bus along on women in the law and then we find that it actually goes back again. so we move forward and then go back. that is not to say that we have not seen incremental change over the last 25 years, we have. we have managed, with harriet and other women campaigning on these issues, but we still have a systemic problem inside the law and it is partly to do with the law itself, partly to do with the law itself, partly to do attitudes.” partly to do with the law itself, partly to do attitudes. i wanted to bring in heather savage. in 2014, herfriend bring in heather savage. in 2014, her friend was jailed bring in heather savage. in 2014, herfriend was jailed for bring in heather savage. in 2014, her friend was jailed for life after being convicted of murdering her partner. campaigners feel his history of domestic violence towards her wasn't taken into account at the trial. thank you forjoining us. can you tell us more about what happened with fareissia? the relationship between both of them was fine at first. they have children. a bit longer down the line it started to
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get worse, argument and fighting, between both of them. later, they found out he was supposed to have another child to somebody else. so more arguments occurred. it got worse. at this time, fareissia didn't want anyone to know about it, knee has her best friend, i knew. when you are in that situation, it was either i go and tell somebody and she loses my trust, because i know that she would have got back with him and it would have got worse, or stay there as a friend and let her confide in me. how devastating was it for you when she was convicted for 13 years and just 22 years old? i felt like there was pa rt of 22 years old? i felt like there was part of me missing because we had grown up part of me missing because we had grown up together, since the age of four, as best friends. we are practically like sisters. i still feel part of me is missing, because she is not here. how old are her
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children and how have they been since? four and five, and it is very difficult dealing with them, because both parents are not present at the moment, i both parents are not present at the moment, lam both parents are not present at the moment, i am classed as their aunt, ican care moment, i am classed as their aunt, i can care for them but not give them the love that they would get from their mother. do you speak to fareissia now, how is she? what did she say to you? she is ok. seeing her, i know she is not dealing with this. she claims she still loves him. ican this. she claims she still loves him. i can see there is no doubt about it that she still loves him. but it is still hurting her. i know for a fact that she is not the same person as she used to be because of it all. what types of stories did she tell you about how violent her partner was? there were times when she told me that... when i found out myself, basically, i had seen her
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with a black eye. i said, how did you get that? she told me that the baby through the bottle at her. i said, a bottle is not going to make your high black like that. she changed her story that she hit it on the oven. i said, the open was too low. do you think that his history was taken into do you think that his history was ta ken into account do you think that his history was taken into account in court? no, i think the whole case, the whole trial, it wasn't taken into account. they never took the psychological report into account because she was going through a lot of trauma at the time. i want to get harriet to respond to what you are hearing. well, i am respond to what you are hearing. well, iam fareissia's
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respond to what you are hearing. well, i am fareissia's solicitor and we are working on an appeal to her case. what is interesting at this time with people talking out about sexual abuse and harassment, one of the things in fareissia's case and many other women i have worked with over the years is that the one thing they don't talk about is the sexual violence and sometimes that's the worst thing. and it was very, very serious and not only was she not able to talk about it, and it has taken a long time and working very closely with counselling and support to get her to feel confident to talk about it, but also that then shows how psychiatrically they are affected by the controlling and violent behaviour and how that then impacts on the way in which they respond to threats of violence, which is very, very relevant. until women are able to talk out —— to speak about and talk about those experiences and we say, no, then this is going to continue. this is a
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very good example. i want to get a final word in with palin because you got the law changed with regards to provocation. what do you want to happen next? i think one of them is about, judges discretion is very important and we have seen an erosion of the flexibility that judges have in what they can do with people convicted of serious offences like murderand people convicted of serious offences like murder and manslaughter. people convicted of serious offences like murderand manslaughter. murder carries a mandatory life sentence and the judge can say what the minimum can be. i think we should be revisiting that, with more flexibility forjudges in relation to how they can sentence when there isa to how they can sentence when there is a background like this. really, we have seen an escalation in sentences generally and it has hit on women, two, and sometimes when history is told, it is not having enough impact on the court and we
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should be revisiting this business of how women are being sentenced and thatis of how women are being sentenced and that is one of the serious issues here. iagree that is one of the serious issues here. i agree with harriet. women don't talk about the sexual nature of the abuse they experience. women have been silenced for too long about the way in which they are abused and we have to have the courts much more sensitive to the experience of women if we are going to see justice. thank you all very much forjoining us today. still to come, how reality tv star miley simpson hasjust come, how reality tv star miley simpson has just been found to fall foul of advertising standards with social media. michael deeley might not be a name you instantly recognise but when i say blade runner, the italianjob, the deer hunter, you'll realise that my next guest is a bit of legend in hollywood circles. he's produced some of the biggest film cult classics and worked with some of the biggest names in the business from robert de niro to david bowie. he also landed himself an oscar in the process.
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now he's got a book out about his amazing career and we'll be talking to him in a moment, but first let's watch a few of his cinematic masterpieces. it seems you feel our work is little benefit to the public. replica nts are like any other machine. they are either a benefit or a hazard. if they are a benefit, it's not my problem. hang on a minute, lads. i've got a great idea. 0k. michael deeley is with me now. very good to see you. what was it like watching your best bits back? always a by watching your best bits back? always a joy, really. you watching your best bits back? always ajoy, really. you have done watching your best bits back? always a joy, really. you have done so watching your best bits back? always ajoy, really. you have done so many things, you have produced these big hits, had a long career. highlights
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for you? oscar night. actually to getan for you? oscar night. actually to get an oscar is pretty nice. where is that 0scar? where is it in your house? it is at home, fairly high up ona house? it is at home, fairly high up on a shelf. i can see it, it is not particularly believable. hard to steal. when you think back to oscar night, how do you feel? well, it was quite a long time to wait because the best picture 0scar is the last one of the night. it is a nice way to spend the evening, i suppose, if you win. why did you decide to write a book about your career, your life? well, i was helping matthew field write his early book about the italianjob write his early book about the italian job and talking write his early book about the italianjob and talking a lot about
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things that had happened on different boobies and he said, you should write a book and i said, i can't write a book, i can't even type. —— things that had happened on different movies. for people who don't know, what does working in film involve for a producer? don't know, what does working in film involve for a producer7m involves a lot of things but is it synced way of putting it is that a producer causes a film to be made. how does that happen? you find the material, the cast, the director, the money and then you shoot it. you have produced classics like the italianjob. have produced classics like the italian job. when you have produced classics like the italianjob. when you are producing films, did you know it would go on to become the heat it is now, because at the time, it wasn't a big smash? no, that is perfectly true.
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it wasn't what it became. that applies to two of my pictures. when it came out, it was recognised as pretty amazing in a way, but really, like the world, and the deer hunter was another one at the time because it was a tough subject. and criticise that the time. oh, everything is criticised. why? that is the film you won the oscar bob. well, in that particular case, i was criticised before i even made it. firstly, as an englishman i couldn't know about vietnam, secondly, the americans didn't want to be reminded about vietnam. so, blade runner, we have blade runner because of you. what do you make of the new version if you have seen it or read the reviews or the fact it was even made
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in the first place in 2017? yes, i am not very fond of the calls. i had had it done to me before, they did one on the italianjob which i thought was dreadful. why? it didn't have any of the same spirit. it wasn't amusing. which was the away —— the way the italianjob started off. i haven't seen the new version off. i haven't seen the new version of blade runner but i'll get to see it eventually. it's funny because the italian job it eventually. it's funny because the italianjob setup for a sequel with the ending and it's one of the famous endings in film.” with the ending and it's one of the famous endings in film. i know, and that wasn't in the initial script. the film industry, you have been in it for a long time. it is in the spotlight now for all the wrong reasons, harvey weinstein. were you aware of the rumours? i never met
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him,i aware of the rumours? i never met him, i never worked for his company, so perhaps i am lucky in that respect. so no, i was not aware. there is now a director who has been holed up and pilloried for the same thing. clearly it is scandalous. again, naming any names aside from harvey weinstein who we are talking about, having had that long career and the idea of complicity and the casting couch, did you ever witness or hear about that type of thing going on about —— going on? absolutely not. i knew historically it was meant to have happened, back in the 20s, but certainly people weren't wasting their time doing those sort of things with the level of money that has to be spent on film, you don't fool around, you shouldn't feel around and i never thought anybody would. but there you 90, thought anybody would. but there you go, iam thought anybody would. but there you go, i am wrong. we should say that harvey weinstein has denied any and
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all accusations of nonconsensual sex. the reality tv star miley simpson has been found guilty of breaching advertising rules by plugging items on her social media platform. what do you make of all this, katie? i am surprised, to be honest. although this has hit the headlines, this has happened before. in fact, it has happened all the way back when were established celebrities were criticised back in 2012, so this is really not anything new. i just 2012, so this is really not anything new. ijust think 2012, so this is really not anything new. i just think there's more 2012, so this is really not anything new. ijust think there's more of it. when you say there is more of it, what do you mean? so, advertisers are looking for alternatives to ways of reaching consumers, predominantly because there is quite a lot of advertise mentalfatigue, as they
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there is quite a lot of advertise mental fatigue, as they say, so people are getting bored of advertising, so the use of celebrities and particularly social media and internet celebrities plus the use of those people who are deemed to have influence is increasing. so brands are going to influence celebrities and ask them to promote products. and do you think the celebrities, influencers, social media stuff, whatever you wa nt to social media stuff, whatever you want to call them, do you think they are aware and know what they are getting themselves into?” are aware and know what they are getting themselves into? i don't think they are. i think some of them are, some of them are very savvy and very smart and also some of them wish to be authentic, and so don't wa nt to wish to be authentic, and so don't want to be seen to be duping the consumer. 0thers want to be seen to be duping the consumer. others are probably very unaware and as the rise in what we call micro influences, so these are people with smaller followings but in nuclear —— in smaller specific
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areas, like make—up and beauty, maybe not mainstream influences. where do you think we will end up, because social media, part of the appeal, people who follow people aren't instagram and twitter, it's because they feel they are getting the authentic version of that person, it is all about authenticity, so if advertisers are finding more sophisticated ways of advertising, where do we end up? not ina good advertising, where do we end up? not in a good place unless we move back to transparency and it's very simple. brands need to make sure that influences need to be clear when they are promoting a good or a service. what do you think should happen next? in terms of cracking down, if you want to call it that. basically, more education across the board and more understanding of what the rules and tail and a little bit more discipline from the marketing professionals. ok, thank you very much indeed forjoining us on the
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programme today and thank you all for watching. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a great day. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11. the uk economy grew by 0.4 percent in the three months to september — making the chances of a rise in interest rates next week highly likely. the wife of an army fitness instructor accused of attempting to murder her by sabotaging her parachute takes the stand to give evidence in his trial. president trump faces blistering attack as a second republican senator accuses him of damaging us politics. the brexit secretary says he believes a tariff free trade deal with the european union will be reached before march 2019. also... the impact of e—cigarettes on our health. a cross party inquiry is launched to look into their impact on health and how they're regulated. and geordie shore star
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