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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 26, 2017 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. the terrifying texts from a 21—year—old woman found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack. as their wedding approached, she messaged her boyfriend, saying, i wa nted messaged her boyfriend, saying, i wanted to kill people for me. i have a list. he said, the day of the marriage i will kill them all. give me the list. her reply... you can't haveit me the list. her reply... you can't have it until you put a ring on it. lifting the taboo — a call to support workers with mental health issues. 300,000 people leave theirjobs each year. 11 people are arrested in one of britains‘ biggest operations against people smuggling. we have the spot with katherine downes and bad news for england in australia. terrible start to the ashes. they've lost the first two that one—day internationals of the series, the latest by 75 runs. we'll
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have a more detailed picture for you at about half past. in the weather, time to test our heating. it might be that time. temperatures only heading one way over the next few days, that is downwards. how cold will it get? i'll have the details before half—past. bloodhound is go! the supersonic car — designed to reach i,000mph — is tested in public for the first time. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the wife of a birmingham man who planned a terrorism attack in the city has been found guilty of helping his preparations by buying him the weapon he intended to use. madihah taheer, who's 21, had denied preparing an act of terrorism
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by assisting her husband ummariyat mirza earlier this year. mirza pleaded guilty to the plotting earlier this month. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. wrestled to the ground in an armed stop, a birmingham man setting out to kill. the suspect seized in a joint intelligence—led operation by mi5 and the west midlands counter—terrorism unit. a week after the westminster attack in march, ummariyat mirza wanted to rampage in his home city. now convicted along his wife, madihah taheer, who helped him, and his sister, zainab, who encouraged the planning via social media. mirza was obsessed with knives and replica guns, and he wanted to fight in syria. instead, he turned his attention to home. his pregnant wife bought him this combat knife on her credit card, and then he trained on this martial arts dummy. finally, he went to an outdoors shop to buy cord to create a hidden shoulder harness. mirza's attack plan wasn't fully formed when he was arrested,
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but he's admitted preparing an act of terrorism by researching targets including a synagogue and this raf careers office in the city. it's one of seven foiled plots so far this year. detectives say he couldn't have planned it without the loyal and loving support of his wife. i think it's sort of typical of the kinds of terrorist threat we're now seeing in the united kingdom — small groups of individuals, in this case family members, it could easily be friends, sharing very explicit extremist material, using apps downloaded from social media, inciting and encouraging each other to be able to carry out an attack, being inspired by other attacks they've seen in the united kingdom and abroad. taheer told her trial she'd become besotted at 17 with mirza, as she tried to escape her abusive father. she admitted she'd supported the self—styled islamic state group, claiming she had been brainwashed by her future husband. but prosecutors said her own words from social media gave her away. as their wedding approached,
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taheer messaged her boyfriend, saying, "i want you to kill people for me, i have a list." mirza said, "on the day of the marriage, i will kill them all, give me the list." her reply... "you can't have it until you put a ring on it." radicalisation experts say her conviction is symptomatic of the new role that some women now play. in this particular case, what we've seen is a woman who seems to be in control, she's confident, she's not someone who is going to stand there, she's actively encouraging. so, i think that needs to be borne in mind in terms of a shift in gender roles that's also occurring, but the fact is, it also challenges our notion of what a woman's role within these movements has to be when we look at it in a broader global context. the jury concluded madihah taheer was no naive young woman. she was her husband's willing partner in crime. she had wanted a hero like the painting she placed on her facebook profile, and she found him, and now they both face jail.
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with me is dina hamdy, a political analyst who has looked extensively at radicalisation and extremist ideology — and worked at the foreign office on the government's prevent strategy. pa rt part of the shock of this is when you see those texts he was very much egging him on. this isn't a passive female, the cliche of a passive female, the cliche of a passive female or thejihadi bride, which i find very reductive. there is a sense of empowerment, a strong find very reductive. there is a sense of empowerment, a strong woman who knows what she wants and is not only encouraging him, but having her own set of demands and directing him. that is the noteworthy and slightly worrying trend. you've used the word trends so we should expect this to become a more common problem or what? i think it's already a
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phenomenon, a noticeable occurrence, ever since isis took hold of the strongholds in syria. they have specifically focused on winning to recruit them to build the caliphate, so recruit them to build the caliphate, so to speak. they need mothers and daughters and partners, the breeders of the next generation of fighters. that's quite terrifying, i want to come to that in a moment. it was so weird that changed this? before that it was young men going out there... the larger perception amongst most people, it's primarily targeted at young men, disenfranchised a sense of grievance and whatnot. but increasingly, since syria, it has been specifically focused on winning with terrifying success i have to say. that word terrifying, used the word generational, this woman was pregnant at the time. there is a new generation growing up who know no
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other ideology. exactly, those recruited into the ideology, as we've seen with the white widow and her son, who was used to carry out attacks and carry a gun himself... yes, the idea is you are breeding this ideology into the next generation, a state with its own ideology, its own constitution. these are the future warriors. people watching you now, what do they look for? if we're going to have to be more vigilant than we've beenin have to be more vigilant than we've been in the past? there is a cliche even among some of the people looking at this. it is primarily targeted at man and the women play a subjugated secondary role, whereas we need to be aware this is a trend, andi we need to be aware this is a trend, and i use the word deliberately. women who have been recruited,
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research shows they have a sense of empowerment. empowerment from a religious perspective, not a western feminist perspective, i'm doing this because this is in—line with my religion and politics, so to speak. not wanting to spread fear, we should point out these two appeared in court after a very successful operation by mi5. that the remarkable aspect. 0nline radicalisation is notoriously difficult to catch before anything terrifying happens. the fact this couple was caught and tried and charged well before they carried out the attack is remarkable in itself. more should be done to focus on the phenomenon of online radicalisation in general, but also the discourse, narrative and ideology used to target young men and women. thank you. the uk faces a significant mental health challenge at work,
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according to a new report, commissioned by the government, which shows the scale of the issue affecting the nation's workforce. the thriving at work report found that more than 300,000 people leave theirjobs every year due to insufficient support for mental health problems. the nhs and the civil service will adopt the review‘s recommendations. rob sissons has this report. at this insurance company, they're proud of their record supporting workers. today's report recommends more places should be like this. aviva in sheffield said it has tried to change the way people think about mental health, training managers and encouraging openness. james tringham was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, something the firm was aware of when they took him on. i was terrified. i had to be coaxed in and the support team that were training me at that stage weren't sure if i would make it through, although they could see there was potential there. and work has a great benefit. it has a normalising effect.
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the government—ordered review, which covers the whole of the uk, suggests what is been held up as good practice has yet to catch on. it concludes poor mental health costs businesses £a2 billion a year in lost work days and low productivity. the cost to the uk economy is put even higher, at £99 billion. that takes in nhs costs of caring for people, the payment of benefits and lost taxes. employers generally have really got to grips with the idea of how you support the physical health of your staff, whether it's with adaptations or particular approaches to the health of your staff, but we haven't yet seen the same level of commitment towards the mental health of your staff. today's report, we are told, is a wake—up call to some businesses, whatever their size, across the uk. one of co—authors of the report has told me what really lies behind it is the need for a culture change in some organisations across the land to do more. that, of course, could be
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easier said than done. royal mail says it is convinced money spent on staff wellbeing does pay off. it's really important we look after their physical and their mental health. obviously, there is a cost associated with that, but it is a cost that we see as well worth spending. we rely really heavily on our people and protecting their healt, safety and wellbeing is really of the utmost importance to us. the prime minister, who commissioned the report, said it underlines the need for action. she is asking the nhs and the civil service to lead the way. some of the changes, creating support online and more training, will cost — easier perhaps for big firms to afford than small ones, of course. but the message of today's report is not all the changes will cost money. with me in the studio is louise stewart from the federation of small businesses. picking up the last point, it'll
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cost some money. this is the issue, particularly smaller businesses can't really afford to pay the weight huge organisations can. that's right, but when you look at it, if it costs £99 billion a year to the economy, which this report says, people are leaving the workforce because of mental health problems, if you are a small business you don't want people leaving the workforce, you want to encourage staff to say, so in many ways small businesses are better at tackling these issues because they are closer to the workforce if you like. bigger organisations including organisations like the bbc are introducing things like mental health first aid is. if you are a small perhaps family run business, your mental health first aid is about opening the conversation, checking in with staff. it's not that they don't do it, they do it in different ways. if you work for smaller business might not you find it harder knowing the impact it would have had to say, i might have a problem and need support? small
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businesses tackle it in different ways. small businesses are much more likely to employ those hard to reach in the community, those people with chronicle mental health illnesses or disabilities. we were lobbying the government on a national insurance holiday for those who help people back into work, something we'd like the chancellor to look at in the budget. they made a commitment in the conservative party manifesto. let's see that happen to encourage people suffering from long—term mental health illnesses back into work. does the buck stopped with government and they need to look at the entire picture, or is it with the entire picture, or is it with the businesses themselves who know better than anybody else how to run their business? this is something we all have to take responsibility for, the government needs to look at ways they can help, businesses need to ta ke they can help, businesses need to take responsibility. we also need to ta ke take responsibility. we also need to
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take responsibility. we also need to take responsibility. if you are self—employed there is no safety net so self—employed there is no safety net so how do you manage your own mental health? it's about networking, seeking support where you can, speaking out. we would welcome the government report today, the fsb had their own last month. we want to kick—start this conversation about mental health in the workplace. when you talk to other members of the federation what is the feeling about how they are dealing with this issue at the moment, do they feel much better and further one than the bigger corporations? they do, people are more flexible, even in our own office we have a winning group that ru ns office we have a winning group that runs a couple of times a week and we think it is a great use of time, if they want to take in the day and do that, because it is about their mental health, having conversations, walking meetings. people getting more physically active. it helps support mental health. thank you very much. i'm going to take you to space because on the international space station the pope is going to be talking, or is indeed talking
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now, to members of the international space station. there he is at the vatican. his audience is literally out of this world. he's giving an address to staff, arranged by the european space agency with the help of nasa. 0nly european space agency with the help of nasa. only the second papal court of nasa. only the second papal court of the international space station, the last being from pope benedict. we're about to cut to space, i think, hopefully. the whole thing is available to watch as it happens on the youtube channel. his talking in italian to members of the international space station. in the group is an italian, on his third mission. science and the spiritual don't a lwa ys science and the spiritual don't always mix, but that picture tells you that just for today they really do. astronauts have often spoken
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with religious reverence of the experiences they've had among the stars. i know it in italian but let's listen in... station, this is for a voice check. we thought we lost you for a while. speaks italian. studio: we'rejust
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studio: we're just going to studio: we'rejust going to hear what the response is to that. as you can see, there is a translation going on in space. as the pope awaits that response... speaks italian. studio: let's listen in. holy father, what surprised me is how approaching something from a different perspective can make something very familiar seem unrecognisable. that is rather special. there we are. for the
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second time ever in history, the pope talking to fellow humans in space. that's listen again... nuevo arcangel i'm working on something very close to me, i'll get focused on that and not realise i've rotated it around, then when i go to another module, when i approached it from a different side that i didn't expect, that place, it's kind of unsettling at first when i'm trying to understand where i am. speaks italian. so that's been very interesting. what has been very surprising to me that hasn't changed is that in this environment where we don't really need the concept of our and down, to get my bearings i still have two
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decide which direction to perceive as up in order to make sense of things. speaks italian. studio: there we are, it is as much the whole image that is amazing. there is the pope, even his tv stands looks ancient. the lighting is such that the contrast between the pope and the international space station illustrating the worlds apart that we are witnessing here is the pope talks to astronauts on the international space station. a remarkable few minutes i think you'll agree. you're watching
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afternoon live. the headlines: 21—year—old woman found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack in birmingham. lifting the two blue: a quarter of support workers have mental health issues, 300,000 people leavejobs workers have mental health issues, 300,000 people leave jobs each year. 11 people arrested in one of britain's biggest operations against people smuggling. coming up, bloodhound is go. the supersonic car designed to reach 1000 miles an hour is tested in public for the first time. australia have taken a four point lead in the women's ashes series with a commanding win over england in the second one—day international. the chairman of the football association greg clark says the national body has lost the trust of the public. james haskell has been left out of the england squad for next month's three autumn internationals at twickenham. more on all those stories at about half past two. see you then. the catalan government
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says its leader, carles puigdemont, has "suspended" a statement he was due to make this afternoon about the future of the region. there had been speculation that he would use the occasion either to declare independence from spain or to call new elections in the region. my colleague tim willcox is in barcelona. lots of speculation but nobody really seems to know. that's about right, simon. high political drama, attempted political brinkmanship. quite frankly chaos. carles puigdemont, the catalan president, was due to give a statement at one o'clock local time. that was delayed by an hour, then half an hour, now we think suspended. there is talk you might come to the catalan parliament to speak later on. the reports we were getting word that he would announce snap elections and he would announce snap elections and he would do that in a bid to try and avoid article 155 being voted by the
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senate in madrid tomorrow, which would impose direct rule. when he announced these snap elections, power started draining away from him here in catalonia. he needs the support from his coalition of two hardline parties. a semi—communist party and the erc. there have been reservations, it looks like carles puigdemont is probably finished politically. we're waiting to see what happens. the other problem we've got, it gets more confusing, is what will happen in madrid. mariano rajoy the spanish prime minister relies on the support of the socialist tso we and we believe they think if there are snap elections here they don't think article 155 direct rule should be imposed. members of the partido popular, rajoy‘s party, think they do. those are forgotten other people in catalonia who want to state part of spain. that is a big part of the argument here. as you can imagine,
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the hardline supporters of carles puigdemont are extremely disappointed he's not going to declare independence. there have been small demonstrations especially by stu d e nts been small demonstrations especially by students half a mile away from where i am now. as you say, this is a divided region, notjust a battle between separatists and madrid. it isa between separatists and madrid. it is a battle within the people of catalonia as well. the next important deadline, we keep having these different deadlines, but the next important one is ten o'clock tomorrow, when the senate in madrid will vote on whether to impose article 155, which is that direct rule from madrid. tim wilcox in barcelona, thank you very much. conspiracy theorists, experts have warned not to expect many revelations from the thousands of classified documents on the death of
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john f. kennedy. time has not dimmed america's fascination with the kennedys, a fairy tale family cursed by fate. newsreel: president kennedy has been assassinated. it's official now, the president is dead. more than half a century after his assassination in dallas, many americans still believe that jfk's killer, lee harvey oswald, was not acting alone. donald trump had his own conspiracy theory once that the father of his campaign rival senator ted cruz was somehow involved. what was he doing with lee harvey oswald. .. right. ..shortly before the death — before the shooting? it's horrible. crazy. donald trump alleges that my dad was involved in assassinating jfk... now, let's be clear, this is nuts! mr trump has come under pressure from congress to allow the latest batch of documents to be released. some relate to 0swald's mysterious trip to mexico, where he met cuban and soviet spies. but he himself was murdered before he could stand trial. he has been shot —
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0swald has been shot. the 1992 law which ordered some fbi case files to be kept secret was intended to quell growing speculation. even now, parts of the evidence will be redacted. those who are expecting to see a bombshell about the assassination are likely to be very disappointed. it's time to do this so that everybody can believe that all the records that are in the hands of the federal government are released. what might have been, had kennedy survived, is still the subject of a national debate that will never be settled. it's unlikely that these documents will end the equally passionate obsession with his death. jane 0'brien, bbc news, washington. what do you think we're going to
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get? anyone's guess, we expect around 3000 items that have never been seen before to be released. an item could be a photo, letter, could bea item could be a photo, letter, could be a report. it could be anything in that sense. in addition to that, these other 30,000 documents have been partially released before but in part redacted. people seen these including judges and congressmen involved in previous inquiries so there is no proof, for example, of a second shooter, the grassy knoll theory, there is no evidence of that. it really will centre on the role, perhaps, of the cia and fbi, not so much in the assassination, but what did they know about lee harvey oswald beforehand ? but what did they know about lee harvey oswald beforehand? this trip to mexico city in the weeks before, who did he meet, who did he see? was
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the cu ban embassy who did he meet, who did he see? was the cuban embassy bugged? were there records of what the cia knew 0swald had said to the cubans, for example? also afterwards, the cover—up. not a cover—up in terms of conspiracy, but perhaps in terms of covering up incompetence, the fact 0swald had been tracked by the intelligence service and the potential criticism they could have faced for not having prevented the assassination. bear in mind, 0swald was a former marine, he wasn't a crank in terms of a threat to the president's life, because he could shoot straight. and fast. the difficulty is anybody with a conspiracy theory will still keep the theory going because they've been going for decades. it's a national past time, i mean, it's something that if you look at the polling right from the 60s, write to this day, it has reduced, but the
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polling still has a majority of americans, 60%, who believe they've never been told the whole truth about what happened to jfk. never been told the whole truth about what happened tojfk. this is something baked into the american dna, that there is more to it than meets the eye. the release of documents, i don't think that'll change that, do you? can't possibly comment but i think you are probably right. good to talk to you. let's have a look at the weather. ben rich is here. the picture tells a story, which i suppose is the point of putting it there. pretty miserable. you seen through my plan. it's pretty grisly out there today. it's mild, something that will change over the next few days. what we've had is a lesson in where our air is coming from making a big difference to how things feel. the south—westerly winds wafting all the way across the atlantic, picking up warm air, a lot of moisture giving cloud and rain. but earlier this
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week we got to 20 degrees. can you guess what happens next? the blue bit is going to come down. almost as if we rehearsed it, which we didn't. oh look! for the weekend this is exactly what's going to happen, the blue colour is down from the north. the wind all the way from the arctic. it's going to bring a much colder feel to our weather. in northern areas may be just 8 degrees, time to notch up the central heating, break out the big coats for the first time. what's going on? a lot of cloud around as we've discussed. that cloud is producing outbreaks of rain across the central areas. particularly draped across northern england. as we go through the rest of today, we'll finally push this weather front that has been with us all week, you'll remember is talking about it wriggling around, we push it away to the south. that brings in the north—westerly. eventually northerly winds, bringing us colder air. through the rest of the
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afternoon, here is our band of rain, not a huge amount on it but moving slowly. a pretty soggy day for a few. through the night will push that frontal system south, at the same time peeling cloud away from the map. we'll see clear spells developing, allowing it to turn quite chilly. in the far south where we keep the cloud, 12 or 13 degrees, but the further north you get, even centre of manchester, 6 degrees. if you live in the countryside, you could be down to freezing and see a touch of frost. tomorrow a chilly start, the odd for the patch, but a beautiful day. blue skies and sunshine. the odd shower clipping into the far north where there will be strong winds. gales for the far north of scotland. maybe the odd shower into east anglia but clutching at straws, it will essentially be fine. temperatures notching down. 12—15d at best. through friday night bit of a change, any more cloud from the north—west. misty and murky over
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some of the hills. we'll see spot of drizzle as well. saturday will generally be a cloudy day with rain to the north—west. the eagle eyed will have noticed we've pushed the winds back to westerlies, strong breeze on saturday. westerly winds mean temperatures maybe nudge up a little bit. it's only temporary because if you get into sunday and monday we pick up those northerly winds. northern areas seven, 8 degrees, could even be wintry showers across the northern isles of scotland, it's that time of year. even further south, don't rest on your laurels, nine in birmingham, 12 in plymouth, below parfor this your laurels, nine in birmingham, 12 in plymouth, below par for this time of year. more weather coming up but thatis of year. more weather coming up but that is all for me for now. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: a 21—year—old woman has been found guilty of helping her husband for a knife terror attack by buying the weapon he was going to use. 300,00 people a year leave theirjobs because of mental health issues.
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theresa may says, "we need to take action". 11 people are arrested in uk's biggest ever crackdown on people smuggling. raids across the uk and europe targeted organised crime gangs. police have clashed with opposition supporters as kenyans begin voting ina rerun supporters as kenyans begin voting in a rerun of their presidential election. in opposition protester has died from a gunshot wound. sport now on afternoon live with kat downes. when i rang you earlier, you are watching the tennis. when i rang you earlier, you are watching the tennislj when i rang you earlier, you are watching the tennis. i was enjoying venus williams in the wta and tour finals in singapore. venous won that one, beating the wimbledon title lee champion to go through to the semifinals. another big line coming out of that tournament is that martina hingis has said she's going to retire at the end of the tournament at the age of 37, 18 grand slam titles to her name. in a
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moment, will be talking about the by moment, will be talking about the rugby union autumn internationals coming up, starting on the 11th of november, england announcing their squad, and the rugby league world cup squad, and the rugby league world cu p starts squad, and the rugby league world cup starts tomorrow. the problem that you are dealing with now is the rather bad news coming from australia. yes, terrible for england's women. australia have won two out of two matches in women's ashes against england after a 75—run victory in the second of three one—day internationals. after being put into bat, the aussies scored 296—6 in their 50 overs. captain rachael haynes top scoring, with 89 not—out offjust 56 balls. england's target was revised to 285 from 46 overs after a brief rain shower in coffs harbour. in the end, they fell way short, being bowled out for 209. australia lead the series 4—0. the chairman of the football association — greg clarke — says the national body has "lost the trust of the public". at an fa council meeting at wembley, he described last week's parliamentary hearing
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into allegations of discrimination by the former england women's manager as "a very damaging episode for the organisation" and promised a "top to bottom" cultural review of the national football centre at st george's park. team gb boxer muhammed ali is facing a long ban for testing positive for a steroid. the positive test happened in april, but ali — who won silver at last year's european championships — has been provisionally suspended since may. gb boxing says it's the first time that a member of the gb boxing squad has tested positive for a banned substance. rugby union now, and james haskell has been left out of a 3k man england squad for next month's three internationals at twickenham. the wasps back row, who has 75 england caps, started the season with a hand injury and has been replaced by exeter‘s sam simmonds, who receives his first call—up. but england's head coach says there is a future for haskell and northampton's tom wood, who was also left out. they are both good players, those
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probably a bit off their form, either through injury or other reasons, but we know that, if they regain theirform, reasons, but we know that, if they regain their form, they'll be back in contention. we've got 3a players in the squad, ten unavailable through various injuries, so the competition is very intense. england's rugby league players will use their 2016 four nations disappointment as motivation to win the world cup. that's according to assistant coach denis betts. england failed to reach the final of the four nations last year after being beaten by australia, who they face in the world cup opener in melbourne tomorrow. we haven't beaten australia since the 70s twice in a competition, so we got to look at the fact, you want to wina we got to look at the fact, you want to win a competition, you've probably got to beat australia twice. we need to get the final and this is a game we want to win.
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and you can watch full live coverage of england's opening match on bbc two from 9 o'clock tomorrow morning. karolina pliskova has been beaten in straight sets by jelena 0stapenko at the wta finals in singapore. pliskova is already through to the semifinals, and will be joined venus wiliams, who beat wimbledon champion garbine mugaruza. former world number one martina hingis is reportedly set to announce her retirement from tennis. reports in french media and on twitter say hingis will announce she is leaving the game at the end of the current wta finals in singapore, where she is playing doubles with partner yung jan—chan. the pair are the current doubles world number one pairing, and the swiss star has won five singles grand slams and 13 doubles grand slams in her career. 0ne one of the great tennis reportedly bowing out and we will have contention from her in the next hour orso, iam
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contention from her in the next hour or so, i am sure. a rocket—powered car — which is expected to challenge the world land—speed record — has been getting its first public outing this afternoon in cornwall. the arrow—shaped bloodhound, which is designed to travel at 1,000 miles per hour, is being tested at the relatively sedate speed of about 200 miles per hour on the runway at cornwall airport in newquay. rebecca morelle is there. it looks amazing, it sounds amazing, and how does it travel? it's pretty exciting seeing it, although it did go exciting seeing it, although it did 9° by exciting seeing it, although it did go by quite quickly. 200 mph! this thing is designed to collect 1000 mph, so it isjust a thing is designed to collect 1000 mph, so it is just a fraction of that speed, but it was very impressive. this project has been ten yea rs impressive. this project has been ten years in the making. designing the car, building the car, and now really this is the first phase of testing. it's a chance to see how the steering is working, the suspension systems and most importantly how the engine is
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performing. this project has been something the team here have been working on for a very long time. they are telling us the back story, and here is robert hall. from behind the blast doors that once protected a cold war fighter, the car powered by one of today's jet engines. this is a journey that began on an october day nine years ago, a journey which has reached one of its most important milestones. this is complex technology. a 7.5 tonne vehicle that will generate six times more power than an entire formula 1 grid and cover a mile in 3.6 seconds. a car which sprang from the genius of ron ayers, now 85, who had already worked on two successful land speed record attempts. nobody has been anywhere like this before. i mean, if we breakthe1,000mph, that will be 31% faster than we went last time, which is massive. in bloodhound's cockpit today, the fighter pilot who already holds the land speed record.
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travelling at 200mph down the 1.5 mile runway, he will have no room for error. i will select idle at 130mph. the car will then keep accelerating to 200mph as the engine starts to wind down. i need to put the brakes on. so, as we are accelerating to 150, 170, the brakes are already starting to heat up. so, as we get to 200, i am hitting between a0 and 50 bar of brake pressure. the brake temperatures are coming up through 300 centigrade and they are starting to bite and starting to slow the car down. there are other complications. this is a working airport and the two high speed runs must take place in between scheduled arrivals and departures. moast air traffic controllers thrive on the idea of spinning lots of plates and solving lots of problems and being under pressure, but whilst being under pressure, obviously operating efficiently and calmly. that is how this has worked. the quest for land speed records stretches back across the decades.
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today takes another car designer one step closer to his vision. i'm proud that we have got this far but, of course, i will really start getting proud when it really starts breaking records. and what i really want to do is make a nice loud supersonic bang that will reverberate around the world. today's trials are a major step forward, but the bloodhound team are already looking ahead to higher and higher speeds, leading to that record attempt on the sandy plains of south africa. the thing about this car, nobody has ever built anything that has driven on land at 1000 mph before. let me ta ke on land at 1000 mph before. let me take you on a tour. we start off here, with the nose cone.
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temperatures at the nose, when it will be travelling at 1000 mph, it's going to be incredibly hot, over 100 celsius, but the key thing is not to getair celsius, but the key thing is not to get air underneath the car, because that will lift it and want it. it needs today on the ground. here, we have the tyres. for the trial today, at the sedate speed of 200 mph, we have rubber tyres, but that isn't going to work at 1000 mph, they'd be destroyed. so they will be using an aluminium alloy to get to this speed. here, we have the canopy, and the driver, andy breen, who sits in there. he sits as you do in a sports car, with your legs in front of you, the steering wheel is specially moulded for his hands. we are getting to the real bit, the engine. this engine and ej 200, is usually used on eurofighter typhoons jets. it's attached to aircraft. this is
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the thing that gets the car going to a few hundred miles per hour. below it, there is a bit that is missing at the moment, and this is vital. it's the rocket was a rocket that normally get things into space, one of those is being designed to get on this car, and that will get the car travelling at 1000 mph, hopefully. they haven't got anything like this before, so the engineering challenges behind this, those are the questions they have been asking 200 mph isn't that fast, but it gives you a chance to seek out the car is performing, and the engine is working, how the steering is working, how the steering is working, have a jet engine is performing. this has given them a chance to pour over what the car is doing, which will give them a helping hand in being up to extrapolate up to these enormous speeds. because nobody has done this before, what do they expect to be the effect on the person behind the wheel? presumably, any slight movement of
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the steering wheel will have a profound effect. that's right. it's not a case, it is going to go in a straight line when it travels really quickly, but it isn'tjust a case of holding the steering wheel and sitting there. faster you go, the more the car moves, and it will be crossing the speed of sound, so there will be shock waves. the air in front won't move out of the way fast will be a bumpy ride. andy green is an raf fighter pilot so, if you have anybody in the hot seat, you have anybody in the hot seat, you want somebody like that. he was the guy who drove the car 20 years ago that broke the land speed record, travelling at 763 mph. he has done that once for the 1000 mph isa has done that once for the 1000 mph is a bit faster, but i think it's in safe hands! thank you, rebecca. more than half a century after the assassination that shocked the world, most of the remaining files on the death ofjohn f kennedy are to be released today. conspiracy theories have spawned hundreds of books,
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films and websites. but experts have warned not to expect many revelations from the thousands of classified documents. dr larry sabato is a professor of politics at the university of virginia. he is also the author of the kennedy half century — a book exploring the influencejfk has had overfive decades on the media, the general public, and especially on each of his nine presidential successors. what is it about this particular story, the assassination ofjfk that has been so talked about, discussed over so has been so talked about, discussed over so long, with conspiracy theories still abounding ? over so long, with conspiracy theories still abounding7m over so long, with conspiracy theories still abounding? it was the crime of the century. at least, as of 1963. second, unfortunately, the investigation that followed was not as thorough as it should have been and, asa as thorough as it should have been and, as a result, people have never been completely convinced that the
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truth has come out in full. do you think that the warren commission got it wrong? i'm in a minority, but i personally believe that lee harvey 0swald was the sole shooter. i should tell you that that doesn't mean that anyone else —— that nobody else was involved in any way or that he wasn't encouraged to do it or that he didn't tell people he was going to do it and they were not interested in passing that information on. that may have particularly happened during 0swald's trip seven weeks before the assassination to mexico city for six days. he met key officials, including spies, in both the cuban and soviet embassies. do you think we will ever know the truth? larry, i think we may have some trouble with the line. no, that's a pretty bad sign! i want to come back to that. we will return to larry later on. moving onto the headlines. you
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are watching afternoon live. we will be talking to charlotte with the business news in a moment as well. we will try and return to larry sa bato we will try and return to larry sabato on the assassination ofjfk. a 21—year—old woman is found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack in birmingham. lifting the taboo — a call to support workers with mental health issues. 300,000 people leave theirjobs each year. 11 people are arrested in one of britains‘ biggest operations against people smuggling. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. bt is to reduce costs for customers who only have a landline by almost a0%. it comes after a review by regulator 0fcom, which said customers with landlines only had been getting poor value for money compared to those with bundle packages. it will take effect from april. uk car production fell last month after a fall in demand in the home market for new cars.
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the figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders show a 14% drop in demand in the uk market. total car production for september was down 4%. barclays has announced third quarter pre—tax profits are up by 31% to £1.1 billion, but its investment banking profits are down. the bank said it's been a difficult quarter for its markets business, and it's having an impact on its share price. always some excitement that uk car production, because uk car industry is do rather well, but they fall? 6500 fewer ca rs, is do rather well, but they fall? 6500 fewer cars, a in demand by 1a cents. this is from the society of motor manufacturers and traders. we have seen uncertainty related brexit, so input from consumers and businesses that they are delaying these big—ticket purchase items,
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which is why, in the uk, we have seen which is why, in the uk, we have seena which is why, in the uk, we have seen a decline of 14%. that will bring concern in some areas. i want to go to america, because we have got results from twitter. they are expecting a profit for the first time since going public for years ago. big news. they really owe donald trump. you tweet, don't you, simon? what i'm sorry, i'll change that now! samira hussain is at the new york stock exchange. this is quite unprecedented, a predicted profit? just to answer how much this has to do with donald trump, and we are talking a lot more about twitter these days, given that the commander—in—chief uses the service a lot. it's actually been a big boost for them. how much news there is out there these days. and
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just how people are starting to consume that. it isn'tjust hard news. when you look at football teams, american football teams, baseball teams, a lot of people follow them on twitter, which is gaining a bit more user engagement and of course, that is the difficulty. yes, it is great that twitter has increased the number of users, but it is the daily activity of those users that is proving to be a bit ofa of those users that is proving to be a bit of a point of concern. 0verall, they turned a profit, and that's great news for them. it doesn't really change the market for them though. it's quite competitive for social media companies, the likes of facebook macro, instagram, and video content in social media tends to do quite well, and twitter never quite cracked that, did they? no, but there was a lot of expectation placed on twitter when it started trading behind me at the new york stock exchange. a lot of investors want to be at the head of
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the next big social media thing. now that you see how well placed —— how well twitter is doing, every other social media company that starts trading as the pressure of trying to be the next facebook, so twitter has started to be facing that pressure, and snapchat, another company that are undera and snapchat, another company that are under a lot of interest, because people feel they want to be on the cutting edge, the first people to really get to that new facebook. thank you forjoining us. we'll move on, to the markets. yes, some news from the ecb. the leader is saying he will cut back the huge stimulus programme, cutting asset purchases from 60 billion euros per month to 30 from january. we are looking at european markets. the ftse is doing well against the euro,
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but the markets are slightly steadier in europe. barrett develop some of the biggest fall going ex dividend. just seeing a fall in prices. . what does ex dividend means? let's turned to the events of 1963, the assassination ofjohn f. kennedy and more documents are scheduled to be released this afternoon in america. we were talking to doctor larry sabato of the professor of politics at the genie university, and he is back. i asked whether you will ever know the truth behind this assassination. yes, as you know, i was starting to discuss the cia and we we re was starting to discuss the cia and we were disconnected, so it's another part of the conspiracy, i'm sure you recognise that. i'm kidding, of course. i think, sure you recognise that. i'm kidding, of course. ithink, if sure you recognise that. i'm kidding, of course. i think, if you are looking long—term, we will never
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find any document that would point us find any document that would point us in the direction of anyone but lee harvey oswald. that may be because lee harvey oswald was the only assassin, and it may also because key documents were probably destroyed in the 60s, and particularly the 19705, when congress particularly the 19705, when congre55 took up and the warren commission 5topped, congre55 took up and the warren commission stopped, and congress tried to do a more thorough job, but people were not very cooperative, even though they had subpoenaed power. even if we find out about lee harvey oswald, part of this whole assassination thing is lee harvey 05wald's murdered by jack assassination thing is lee harvey 05wald's murdered byjack ruby, who later died from cancer. so many loose ends. there were a lot of loose ends. there were a lot of loose ends. there were a lot of loose ends. just to pick up on one of them, jack ruby, he was considered a hero at the time, he was inundated with telegrams congratulating him for killing lee harvey oswald. he is actually one of the great villains of this horrible event. had he not shot lee harvey
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05wald, we would have gotten to the key question, which was, what was 05wald's motive? it still isn't clear and it doesn't make sense to most people who knew 05wald. we will never know because he was killed about 48 hours after the assassination of president kennedy. what he did say was, i am acad c. —— iam acad what he did say was, i am acad c. —— i am acad c. there was too much evidence suggesting that 05wald was at least a key player in the assassination, if he was not the sole assassin. of course, for many people, it's the film, which makes this so real. the way that film itself was handled, many conspiracy theorists point to that as well, because do we really know how many shots were fired and in what period of time? books are still written about this. people argue about it daily. there is a large conspiracy community in the us and around the
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world. no, we don't. even people who believe 05wald was a sole assassin still talk about how many seconds it took, was three or four shots as tremarco i don't know that we will ever get to the bottom of all of this. i can tell you this much, we are starting to focus on other films. hardly anybody knows about the nix film, a motion picture about the nix film, a motion picture about the assassination from the opposite side of the grassy knole, and it is quite revealing. what in particular will refocus on when the documents,, lee harvey oswald in the months before? i'm going to look to see what the fbi and cia really knew about lee harvey oswald. they knew more and they dropped the ball. this is only to criticise the agencies in the early 19605. we should have had a bead on lee harvey oswald and the
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secret services should have known about him. they could only have known from the fbi and cia, and neither agency ever told them. the greatest tragedy, of course, was the loss of a young president who, at the time, promised so much. yes, and just consider, for example, there is a lot of evidence to suggest that kennedy would have withdrawn our troops from vietnam had he been re—elected. look at what happened instead withjohnson. re—elected. look at what happened instead with johnson. imagine re—elected. look at what happened instead withjohnson. imagine if vietnam disaster hadn't occurred. we would be a different world. thank you for your time. the headlines are coming up. first, a look at the weather. temperatures are only heading in one direction over the next few days, and that is down. today it's been fairly mild again, quite murky earlier on for some in the south, a bit brighterfurther earlier on for some in the south, a bit brighter further north, but still with a fair amount of cloud. if you look at the satellite picture
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from earlier, you can see there was cloud in many areas, thick cloud towards the south, slightly thinner and brighter conditions in the north. the thick cloud is associated with this weather front which, over the next few days, is going to dive away to the south, opening the floodgates to a north—westerly wind. look at the isobars, coming away from the arctic, and that is going to bring in some cold air in our direction. back to today, and we have a band of cloud and some outbreaks of rain, which is going to sink southwards during this evening and overnight, clearing all but the far south of england. where we hold on to the cloud, it will be relatively mild overnight but, further north, as the skies clear, there could be fog patches and, for northern england, northern ireland and scotland, touch of frost looks likely even in towns and cities, well down interest in single digits. tomorrow, after a chilly start, we're looking at a decent day for
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the one or two showers in the far north with gales possibly in the northern isles and maybe the odd shower in eastern england, but generally a lot of sunshine and temperatures a few notches down at 11 to 15. on friday night, the winds will continue to be fairly brisk in the north, with more cloud and rain pushing in from the north—west as well. the rain mostly focuses across the hills in the west and it will be quite misty and murky. quite a lot of cloud further south, a bit of brightness, 1a to 16 degrees. moving out of saturday and into sunday, thatis out of saturday and into sunday, that is when things will really start to feel very chilly indeed. by this stage, with low pressure of drifting to the east of us, pressure to the west, the wind is coming straight from the north, so watch what happens to temperatures, especially in the north. single digits on sunday and monday and there could even be wintry showers in the far north of scotland. further south, temperatures dipping away, no better than 11 or 12 by the
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start of next week. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm: a 21—year—old woman found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack, urged him to kill people for her. she's not someone who's going to stand there, but she is actively encouraging. sol stand there, but she is actively encouraging. so i think that needs to be borne in mind in terms of a shift. lifting the taboo — a call to support workers with mental health issues... 300,000 people leave theirjobs each year. 11 people are arrested in one of britains‘ biggest operations against people smuggling. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — hugh. —— with capped. disappointment in australia? yes, for the women's ashes team. some breaking news in the last few minutes, rangers have sacked pedro caixinha, who'd only beenin
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sacked pedro caixinha, who'd only been in the manager '5 sacked pedro caixinha, who'd only been in the manager ‘sjob sacked pedro caixinha, who'd only been in the manager '5 job since march. more on that at about half past three. and ben rich has the weather. temperatures only heading in one direction through the next few days, that is downwards. how chilly will it get? join me for all the details later on. also coming up... bloodhound isco. .. is though. the car designed to is though. the ca reach .. is though. the car designed to reach 1000 mph is tested in public for the first time. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. the wife of a birmingham man who planned a terrorism attack in the city has been found guilty of helping his preparations by buying him the weapon he intended to use. madihah taheer, who's 21, had denied preparing an act of terrorism by assisting her husband
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ummariyat mirza earlier this year. mirza pleaded guilty to the plotting earlier this month. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. wrestled to the ground in an armed stop, a birmingham man setting out to kill. the suspect seized in a joint intelligence—led operation by m15 and the west midlands counter—terrorism unit. a week after the westminster attack in march, ummariyat mirza wanted to rampage in his home city. now convicted along his wife, madihah taheer, who helped him, and his sister, zainab, who encouraged the planning via social media. mirza was obsessed with knives and replica guns, and he wanted to fight in syria. instead, he turned his attention to home. his pregnant wife bought him this combat knife on her credit card, and then he trained on this martial arts dummy. finally, he went to an outdoors shop to buy cord to create a hidden shoulder harness.
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mirza's attack plan wasn't fully formed when he was arrested, but he's admitted preparing an act of terrorism by researching targets including a synagogue and this raf careers office in the city. it's one of seven foiled plots so far this year. detectives say he couldn't have planned it without the loyal and loving support of his wife. i think it's sort of typical of the kinds of terrorist threat we're now seeing in the united kingdom — small groups of individuals, in this case family members, it could easily be friends, sharing very explicit extremist material, using apps downloaded from social media, inciting and encouraging each other to be able to carry out an attack, being inspired by other attacks they've seen in the united kingdom and abroad. taheer told her trial she'd become besotted at 17 with mirza, as she tried to escape her abusive father. she admitted she'd supported the self—styled islamic state group, claiming she had been brainwashed
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by her future husband. but prosecutors said her own words from social media gave her away. as their wedding approached, taheer messaged her boyfriend, saying, "i want you to kill people for me, i have a list." mirza said, "on the day of the marriage, i will kill them all, give me the list." her reply... radicalisation experts say her conviction is symptomatic of the new role that some women now play. in this particular case, what we've seen is a woman who seems to be in control, she's confident, she's not someone who is going to stand there, she's actively encouraging. so, i think that needs to be borne in mind in terms of a shift in gender roles that's also occurring, but the fact is, it also challenges our notion of what a woman's role within these movements has to be when we look at it in a broader global context. the jury concluded madihah taheer was no naive young woman. she was her husband's
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willing partner in crime. she had wanted a hero like the painting she placed on her facebook profile, and she found him, and now they both face jail. earlier i spoke to the political analyst, dina hamdy — who worked on the government's prevent programme at the foreign office. she explained to me why this case is so unique. there is a sense of empowerment, this is a strong woman who knows what she wants, and is really not only encouraging him, but having her own set of demands and directing him. and that's the noteworthy and the slightly worrying trend. you've used the word trend, so we should expect this to become a more common problem? i think it's already a phenomenon. a noticeable occurrence, let's put it that way, ever since isis took hold of their stronghold in serbia. they have specifically
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focused on women to recruit them, to build the caliphate, so to speak. they need mothers and daughters and partners and you know like the breeders of the next generation of fighters. that's quite terrifying, i wa nt to fighters. that's quite terrifying, i want to come to that in just a moment. it was syria, was it that change this? before that it was young men going out there... is, the larger perception amongst most people you would ask is that it is primarily targeted at young men, disenfranchised with a sense of grievance and what's not. but increasingly, since syria, it has been specifically focused on women with terrifying success, i have to say. that would terrifying, you used the word generational. this particular woman was pregnant at the time of this, there is a new generation growing up who know no other ideology. exactly. those recruited into the ideology, as we've seen with the white widow for example, and herson, who
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we've seen with the white widow for example, and her son, who was used to carry out attacks and carry a gun on himself. yes, the idea is your breeding this ideology, building a state with its own ideology, with its own constitution, and these are the future warriors. people watching you now... i mean, what do they look for? if we're going to have to be more vigilant that we have been in the past for this of thing.|j more vigilant that we have been in the past for this of thing. i think there is a cliche even among some of there is a cliche even among some of the people who are looking at this. it is targeted at primarily men and the women play a subjugated sort of secondary role, we need to be aware that this is a trend, and i use the word deliberately, women who have been recruited, research shows they have a sense of empowerment. and empowerment from religious perspective, not a western feminist
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perspective, not a western feminist perspective, and i'm doing this because it's in line with my religion and politics, so to speak. not wanting to spread fear, we should point out these two appeared in court after a very successful operation by m15 and security forces. yes, that is the remarkable aspect, online radicalisation is notoriously difficult to apprehend before anything terrifying happens. the fact that this couple was caught and tried and charged well before they carried out the attack is remarkable in itself. more should be done to focus on the phenomenon of online radicalisation in general and the discourse of the ideology used to target young men and, specifically, women. a woman has told the jury in winchester that she blacked out as she fell 4000 feet to the ground after her parachute failed to open. the husband emile cilliers is on trial for attempting to murder her by sabotaging her parachute as well
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as causing a gas leak at her home. our correspondent andy moore is at winchester crown court. a description of the terrifying moment. that's right, this was a police video played to the jury. it was recorded, an interview with victoria cilliers, done three weeks after this very serious accident in which she nearly died. she received very serious injuries. you can see her in the video, sitting in the police interview with crutches by her side. she described thisjump police interview with crutches by her side. she described this jump at nether raven airfield. —— nether are fun. she says the parachute failed to open properly, it was twisted, wrap it around, she knew something was wrong and thought it was a packing issue, which happens one in 750 jumps. she cut away the main parachute and her reserve event deployed. she realised there was a problem with that one, too, again, it was twisted, not right, she said
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she couldn't control it. she says she couldn't control it. she says she was kicking her whole body to try to untwist it. then she said it went blank. she said she did remember brief snapshots. 0ne went blank. she said she did remember brief snapshots. one of those was on the ground with people looking over her, she says a friend of hers, a doctor, was one person looking over her. she says she also remembered briefly waking up in a helicopter, being told it was about to land. she also spoke about how thejump to land. she also spoke about how the jump happened on to land. she also spoke about how thejump happened on a sunday. she was due to jump the day before but it was cancelled because of bad weather. the prosecution alleged on match day her husband took her parachute into a toilet cubicle and sabotaged it at that stage. she was asked what she remembered about that and said her daughter wanted to go to the toilet, her husband had her parachute on her shoulder and went into the cubicle with it. for a few minutes. that's what we've heard.
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her evidence about the job itself. we're continuing to hear that police video of that evidence. victoria cilliers is expected to give evidence herself over the next few days. her husband, emile cilliers, denies these two counts of attempted murder. the trial continues. thank you very much, andy moore. around 300,000 people leave theirjobs every year in the uk because of insufficient support for mental health problems — that's the finding of a government—commissioned review. it says the impact of mental illness is estimated to cost the uk economy up to £99bn each year. the government has said two of the country's largest employers, the nhs and the civil service, will adopt the review‘s recommendations. our health correspondent rob sissons has this report. at this insurance company, they're proud of their record supporting workers. today's report recommends more places should be like this. aviva in sheffield said it has tried to change the way people think
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about mental health, training managers and encouraging openness. james tringham was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, something the firm was aware of when they took him on. i was terrified. i had to be coaxed in and the support team that were training me at that stage weren't sure if i would make it through, although they could see there was potential there. and work has a great benefit. it has a normalising effect. the government—ordered review, which covers the whole of the uk, suggests what is been held up as good practice has yet to catch on. it concludes poor mental health costs businesses £42 billion a year in lost work days and low productivity. the cost to the uk economy is put even higher, at £99 billion. that takes in nhs costs of caring for people, the payment of benefits and lost taxes. employers generally have really got to grips with the idea of how you support the physical health of your staff, whether it's
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with adaptations or particular approaches to the health of your staff, but we haven't yet seen the same level of commitment towards the mental health of your staff. today's report, we are told, is a wake—up call to some businesses, whatever their size, across the uk. one of co—authors of the report has told me what really lies behind it is the need for a culture change in some organisations across the land to do more. that, of course, could be easier said than done. royal mail says it is convinced money spent on staff wellbeing does pay off. it's really important we look after their physical and their mental health. obviously, there is a cost associated with that, but it is a cost that we see as well worth spending. we rely really heavily on our people and protecting their healt, safety and wellbeing is really of the utmost importance to us. the prime minister, who commissioned the report, said it underlines
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the need for action. she is asking the nhs and the civil service to lead the way. some of the changes, creating support online and more training, will cost — easier perhaps for big firms to afford than small ones, of course. but the message of today's report is not all the changes will cost money. the catalan government says its leader, carles puigdemont, has "suspended" a statement he was due to make this afternoon about the future of the region. there had been speculation that he would use the occasion either to declare independence from spain or to call new elections in the region. earlier we heard from tim willcox who's in barcelona on the latest developments there. a political drama, attempted political brinkmanship and, quite frankly, chaos. as you say, carles puigdemont the catalan president was due to give a statement at one o'clock local time. that was then delayed by an hour. then half an
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hour. now we think suspended. there is some dorky might come to the cata la n is some dorky might come to the catalan parliament and speak later on. all of the reports we were getting was that he was going to announce snap elections and do that ina bid announce snap elections and do that in a bid to try and avoid article 155 being voted by the senate in madrid tomorrow, which would impose direct rule. when he announced these snap elections power started draining away from him here in catalonia. he needs the support in his coalition of two hardline parties, coup, semi—communists, and the erc. there has been reservations there. it looks like mr which demand is finished politically. we're waiting to see what happens. —— ca rles waiting to see what happens. —— carles puigdemont is finished. mariano rajoy the spanish foreign minister relies on the support of the socialist psoe and they, we believe, if there are snap elections they don't think article 155 snap rule should be imposed. members of
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partido popular mr rajoy‘s party think they are. it's a bit of a mess. the people often forgotten our people in catalonia who wants to stay pa rt people in catalonia who wants to stay part of spain. that's a big pa rt stay part of spain. that's a big part of this argument here. but as you can imagine, the hardline supporters of carles puigdemont are extremely disappointed that he's not going to declare independence, and they have already been small demonstrations, especially with students, about half a mile away from where i am now. as you say, simon, this is a divided region. it's not just simon, this is a divided region. it's notjust a battle between the separatists and madrid, it is a battle within the people of catalonia as well. i think the next important deadline, we keep having these different deadlines, the next important one is ten o'clock tomorrow when the senate in madrid will vote on whether to impose article 155, which is that direct rule from madrid. you're watching
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afternoon live, the headlines: 21—year—old woman found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack in birmingham. lifting that are blue, a call support workers with mental health issues, 300,000 people leave theirjobs each year. 11 people arrested in one of britain's biggest operations against people smuggling. in a moment, 2000 railway bridges a year are hit by oversized lorries, we'll find out what can be done to stop it happening. in sport in the last half—hour, rangers have sacked manager pedro caixinha after the clu b manager pedro caixinha after the club slipped to fourth in the scottish premiership. he'd been on thejob since march. scottish premiership. he'd been on the job since march. australia have taken a 4—point lead in the women's ashes series with a commanding win over england in the second one—day international. the chairman of the football association, greg clark, says the national body has lost the trust of the public. i'll have more on all of those stories at around 3:30pm. a major police and home office operation against people—smugglers has been carried out overnight. 11 arrests were made in the uk and a further 15 in europe.
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the raids in london, birmingham and gateshead targeted a gang which used secret compartments in vehicles to smuggle people across europe and into britain. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. it was sam, the moment when police officers launched a series of raids across europe — targeting a suspected people smuggling gang. immigration! stand clear! in london. birmingham. and gateshead. as well as the raids here in britain, 15 people were arrested in bulgaria and belgium. in the raids, immigration enforcement are targeting a group of men suspected of smuggling people into britain using hidden compartments in vehicles.
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the gang specialised in concealing people in vans and trucks. what we have is families, we have had young children, it is quite upsetting to see the photographs of how these people are held within vehicles. they're specifically built hides in vehicles and they can spend a number of days in those locations before they're recovered. as part of uk operation, two men were arrested in birmingham, two in gateshead and seven in london. many of those arrested were afghans, as were many of the people they're accused of smuggling. although there were people from pakistan and vietnam too. the international part of operation was co—ordinated be a by a task force. this has been done by a wide group over a period of time to get to the point to have the success with these arrests.
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despite close to a hundred prosecutions for people smuggling each year, it is still a multimillion pound criminal industry. a new study from network rail says oversized lorries are hitting rail bridge is five times a day, causing hours of delays. the railways of almost 2000 bridge strikes every year, costing the taxpayer £23 million in damage and delays. to examine this more is ross easton from network rail. it's one of those things where you see a picture of a lorry under a bridge and you sort of laugh, but this is not a laughing matter. absolutely not, it cost the taxpayer £23 million every year, it is a huge problem, we're seeing around ten bridge strikes every single day. in the run—up to christmas. bridge strikes every single day. in the run-up to christmas. you are
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smiling as well. i mention the christmas word, that's why, it's not even halloween yet. i saw this and thought this is a sat nav, is it? you would think so, but ultimately the responsibility is with the driver. we conducted a survey which found 43% of drivers don't know the height of their vehicle, a staggering statistic when you think of it. looking at pictures from dash cam. you would think the driver of these lorries might spot there is a bridge ahead of them and might be a little low for them. it's clearly signposted, as you see from the footage, you've got luminous yellow and large... i don't want to see this. yes. it may be suitable because he had something on the back ofa because he had something on the back of a lorry. how does that happen? quite, that is the question. we've been scratching our heads on this one at network rail. the majority of drivers are professional drivers and
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know the height of their vehicle and get out and check, a staggering 43%, still a huge number, don't check this in advance. taking that additional step can save a huge amount of hassle. it costs £23 million every year to the taxpayer, but also varies two hours of delays every time, on average, a bridge is struck by a lorry. the advice is, lorries don't limbo. quite a lot of damage caused to bridges that take days to repair. absolutely, we have to send engineers out to inspect, we work with the police, local authorities, to make sure the signage is up there. we need to stop trains running across the bridges when a lorry strike them, for safety reasons. drivers should plan their route, presumably. 5096 of drivers don't look at that. plan ahead and ta ke don't look at that. plan ahead and take into account don't look at that. plan ahead and ta ke into accou nt low don't look at that. plan ahead and take into account low bridges. good to see you. we're going to show you theresa may, the prime minister. she
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is going to be discussing the issue of mental health in the workplace. downing street commissioning a report suggesting 300,000 people a year leave their jobs as report suggesting 300,000 people a year leave theirjobs as a result of mental health issues. the government already announcing the nhs and civil service will introduce a set of common—sense standards to provide support for anyone with a mental health condition and help them to stay in work. forgive the camera shots, these are picturesjust coming in from the prime minister. as pa rt of coming in from the prime minister. as part of the government's commitment to tackle the injustice of mental illness, theresa may commission this review of mental health. it found 300,000 people a year leaving jobs each year due to mental illness. that costs employers up mental illness. that costs employers up to £43 billion annually. she has been confirming energy england and
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the civil service are two of the country's largest employers, who will abide by the recommendations of the report. those are the pictures we're just getting. we understand she did actually, she is to give an interview about this, and we'll bring you that when it comes. a relaxed prime minister. more than half a century after the assassination that shocked the world, most of the remaining files on the death ofjohn f kennedy are to be released today. conspiracy theories have spawned hundreds of books, films and web sites. but experts have warned not to expect many revelations from the thousands of classified documents. jane 0'brien reports from washington. time has not dimmed america's fascination with the kennedys, a fairy tale family cursed by fate. newsreel: president kennedy has been assassinated. it's official now, the president is dead. more than half a century after his assassination in dallas, many americans still believe that jfk's killer, lee harvey oswald, was not acting alone. donald trump had his own conspiracy
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theory once that the father of his campaign rival senator ted cruz was somehow involved. what was he doing with lee harvey oswald. .. right. ..shortly before the death — before the shooting? it's horrible. crazy. donald trump alleges that my dad was involved in assassinating jfk... now, let's be clear, this is nuts! mr trump has come under pressure from congress to allow the latest batch of documents to be released. some relate to 05wald's mysterious trip to mexico, where he met cuban and soviet spies. but he himself was murdered before he could stand trial. he has been shot — 05wald has been shot. the 1992 law which ordered some fbi case files to be kept secret was intended to quell growing speculation. even now, parts of the evidence will be redacted. those who are expecting to see a bombshell about the assassination
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are likely to be very disappointed. it's time to do this so that everybody can believe that all the records that are in the hands of the federal government are released. what might have been, had kennedy survived, is still the subject of a national debate that will never be settled. it's unlikely that these documents will end the equally passionate obsession with his death. jane 0'brien, bbc news, washington. the pope has been speaking to six astronauts onboard the international space station. speaks italian. the conversation struck a philosophical note, with the pope asking the astronauts what they considered to be man's place in the universe. italian astronaut paolo nespoli, admitted that despite the bird's eye view of earth he remained "perplexed", while american mark vande hei said seeing the planet from space made him "realise how fragile we are".
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the international space station is a great example of international collaboration, as you can see by the crew members that we have up here from various countries and the work we do every day, we're talking to the different control centres around the different control centres around the world. we have the united states, canada, japan, russia, and the nine countries from europe. what ifind very the nine countries from europe. what i find very interesting is the individuals that make up this collaboration. it is our diversity that makes us stronger. a remarkable shot of the pope in that bathroom in the vatican and a big telly, talking to people in space. —— pope in that their room. a cloudy and inspiring day with misty, murky conditions. it's been fairly mild. through the evening and into that, this cloud sitting around
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the southern half of the country will be peeled away to reveal clear skies and it'll turn into quite a chilly night. not in the far south, here temperatures are still in double digits. the further north you come the lower temperatures get, evenin come the lower temperatures get, even in the centre of glasgow, manchester, five, six, 7 degrees. a touch of frost for northern areas to ta ke touch of frost for northern areas to take us into tomorrow morning. perhaps fog patches as well. tomorrow, beautiful day, plenty of sunshine around, blustery wind in the far north, gills for the northern isles. maybe the odd shower clipping down into east anglia. generally speaking, a fine day. temperatures down a couple of notches, 11—15d. as we head into the weekend, temperatures will continue to tumble. it will be a fair amount of dry weather around. that's all from me for now. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a 21—year old woman has been found guilty of helping her husband prepare for a knife terror attack by buying the weapon he was going to use. 300,000 people a year leave theirjobs because of mental health issues, at a cost of billions
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of pounds to the economy. theresa may says "we need to take action". 11 people have been arrested in uk's biggest ever crack down on people smuggling. raids across the uk and europe targeted organised crime gangs. police have clashed with opposition supporters as kenyans begin voting in a re—run of their presidential election — an opposition protester has died from a gunshot wound. and this bloodhound... is hoping to break the world land speed record and be the first supersonic to reach 1,000mph. time for the latest sport, you've been watching the tennis, i know, kat? and reflecting on one of the careers of my sporting heroes, martina hingis has announced her retirement from tennis, after the tournament she plays in singapore
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she will step away from the game and i remember at the age of 16, she was world number one. it seems unthinkable in the world of women's tennis today, dominated by venus williams. the wta finals are ongoing in singapore at the moment. i'll bring you a round—up of that later. we will also talk about the women's ashes, in the autumn rugby league and the world cup, england play australia in melbourne. it doesn't get tougher! but starting with breaking news, rangers are needing a new manager? in the last half hour, rangers have sacked their manager pedro casheenia —— in the last half an hour, rangers have sacked their manager pedro caixinha, afterjust seven months in charge. he won 14 of his 26 games in charge and had said he was determined to hold on to hisjob. rangers are fourth in the scottish premiership — eight points behind the leaders
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celtic. former world number one martina hingis has announced her retirement from tennis. she's said she'd like to go out at the peak of her career, following 25 grand slam titles, including winning the mixed doubles at wimbledon with jamie murray this summer. she'll retire after the current wta finals in singapore, where she is playing doubles with partner yung jan—chan — the pair are the world number one pairing in doubles. australia have won two out of two matches in women's ashes against england after a 75 run victory in the second of three one day internationals. after being put into bat the aussies scored 296 for six in their 50 overs... captain rachael haynes top scoring with 89 not out offjust 56 balls. england's target was revised to 285 from 46 overs after a brief rain shower in coffs harbour, and in the end they fell way short... being bowled out for 209. australia lead the series four points to nil. the chairman of the football association — greg clarke — says the national body has "lost the trust of the public". at an fa council meeting at wembley, he described last week's parliamentary hearing —
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into allegations of discrimination by the former england women's manager — as "a very damaging episode for the organisation" and promised a "top to bottom" cultural review of the national football centre at st george's park. team gb boxer muhammed ali is facing a long ban for testing positive for a steroid. the positive test happened in april — but ali — who won silver at last year's european championships — has been provisionally suspended since may. gb boxing says it's the first time that a member of the gb boxing squad has tested positive for a banned substance. rugby union now, and james haskell has been left out of a 34 man england squad for next month's three internationals at twickenham. the wasps back—row, who has 75 england caps, started the season with a hand injury and has been replaced by exeter‘s sam simmonds, who receives his first call—up. but england's head coach says there is a future for haskell and northampton's tom wood, who was also left out. they are both good players. both
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probably a little off form, either through injury or other reasons. but we've spoken. they know that if they regain the form, they'll be back in contention. we have ten unavailable through injury or suspension. the competition for spots is very intense. meanwhile, ireland have just named their squad for the autumn internationals. simon zebo has been dropped just days after it was announced he was leaving ireland to play in france next season. connacht centre bundee aki — who has recently qualified on residency — is included in the 38—man squad. more information on the bbc sport website on that. england's rugby league players will use their 2016 four nations disappointment as motivation to win the world cup. that's according to assistant coach denis betts. england failed to reach the final of the four nations last year after being beaten by australia, who they face in the world cup opener in melbourne tomorrow.
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we haven't beaten australia since the 19705 twice in a competition. so, you've got to look at the fact that if you want to beat the competition you have to go to australia twice but this is the game we wa nt australia twice but this is the game we want to win. and you can watch full live coverage of england's opening match on bbc two from nine o'clock tomorrow morning. denis betts emphasising what a test they have tomorrow, beating australia and maybe having to beat them again later in the tournament! studio: no need to laugh! it could happen... martina hingis, she has announced her retirement, has it she done that before? she's done it three times before, this is the third time she's done it. maybe she will do a sir steve redgrave again and get back but at the age of 37, after a ll and get back but at the age of 37, after all she's achieved, 25 grand slam titles to her name, she has
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said she doesn't think it can get better. i think this is probably the last we will hear of her saying that but given her past record, who knows? was she 16 at number one all by you? she was! -- all were you? kat, thank you. huge crowds have lined the streets of bangkok to mark the funeral ceremony of the late king bhumibol who died in october last year aged 88. hundreds of thousands of mourners wearing black watched the funeral procession — buildings on the route were draped in yellow marigolds. 0ur correspondentjonathan head sent this report from bangkok. strict laws there mean he is restricted in what he can say. monarchy matters in thailand more than in most countries. so, their kings get a lavish sendoff. king bhumibol reigned for 71 years. he shaped modern thailand and restore the monarchy to godlike status. no expense or effort was spared in this intricately choreographed procession taking an or ornate royal
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fern from the palace to the cremation site. it was moved at a snails pace in a 14 tonne chariot dating back to the 18th—century. those to get close to the procession went down in the traditional thai gesture of different. tens of thousands more who had come were kept at a distance, unable to seek. many of these people have been waiting overnight for a chance to say goodbye to their king. king bhumibol was a powerful political figure who anchored a conservatives social order in thailand, often worked with military governments, and you cannot doubt the intense emotional bond that he established with ordinary thais. that's what you're seeing here. they call him simply father. from birth they've been told they owe their country's stability and prosperity to him. it is a profound sense of loss. it is very difficult to express
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in words, because it means that is he really going away? is the king really going away? we have been preparing for this for a year already, and now today is the day, and it's very hard to accept. there are dissenting views on thailand's monarchy which can't be heard here. but under the strict guidance of an ultra—royalist military government, this funeral will help to ensure that the monarchy in this country remains centre stage. jonathan head, bbc news, bangkok. a rocket—powered car — which is expected to challenge the world land—speed record — has been getting its first public outing this afternoon in cornwall. the arrow—shaped bloodhound, which is designed to travel at 1000 miles per hour, is being tested at the relatively sedate speed of about 200 miles an hour on the runway at cornwall airport in newquay. rebecca morelle is there for us this afternoon. it's pretty exciting seeing it.
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although it whizzed by quite quickly. at 200 miles an hour. it's designed to go at 1000 mph, a fraction of the speed that it will eventually go out. a very impressive sight, the project has been ten yea rs sight, the project has been ten years in the making. designing the car, building the car, and really, this is the first phase of testing for it. a chance to see the steering and suspension, and most importantly, the engine. it has been something the team have been working on for a long time, robert hall has the back story. from behind the blast doors that once protected a cold war fighter, the car powered by one of today's jet engines.
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this is a journey that began on an october day nine years ago, a journey which has reached one of its most important milestones. this is complex technology. a 7.5 tonne vehicle that will generate six times more power than an entire formula 1 grid and cover a mile in 3.6 seconds. a car which sprang from the genius of ron ayers, now 85, who had already worked on two successful land speed record attempts. nobody has been anywhere like this before. i mean, if we breakthe1,000mph, that will be 31% faster than we went last time, which is massive. in bloodhound's cockpit today, the fighter pilot who already holds the land speed record. travelling at 200mph down the 1.5 mile runway, he will have no room for error. i will select idle at 130mph. the car will then keep accelerating to 200mph as the engine starts to wind down. i need to put the brakes on. so as we are accelerating to 150, 170, the brakes are already starting to heat up.
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so, as we get to 200, i am hitting between 40 and 50 bar of brake pressure. the brake temperatures are coming up through 300 centigrade and they are starting to bite and starting to slow the car down. there are other complications. this is a working airport and the two high speed runs must take place in between scheduled arrivals and departures. moast air traffic controllers thrive on the idea of spinning lots of plates and solving lots of problems and being under pressure, but whilst being under pressure, obviously operating efficiently and calmly. that is how this has worked. the quest for land speed records stretches back across the decades. today takes another car designer one step closer to his vision. i'm proud that we have got this far, but of course, i will really start getting proud when it really starts breaking records. and what i really want to do is make a nice loud supersonic bangs that will reverberate around the world. today's trials are a major step forward, but the bloodhound team
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are already looking ahead to higher and higher speeds, leading to that record attempt on the sandy plains of south africa. their thing about this car, nobody has ever built anything that has driven on land at 1000 mph before. it's been incredible. we start off here with the nose cone. temperatures at the nose, when it travels at 1000 mph, they will be incredibly hot. 0ver100 degrees. but the key thing is to not have air going under the car. it will lift it up and launch it, this needs to stay on the ground which is important. here, the tyres. for the trial today, at a relatively sedate 200 miles an hour, it has
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rubber tyres, they will be utterly destroyed at 1000 miles an hour. they have an aluminium alloy to get to these high speeds. the canopy, and the driver, andy green, it sits in there. you can see it as you do ina in there. you can see it as you do in a sports car, with your legs in front of you. the steering wheel is specially moulded for andy green's hands. here, the engine. this engine, a ej200, it's usually used on typhoonjets engine, a ej200, it's usually used on typhoon jets and is attached to aircraft. it gets the car going to a few hundred miles an hour. but below, a piece is missing. the rocket is missing. a rocket normally gets to propel things into space but this is being designed for the car, to get it travelling at over 1000 miles an hour. they haven't built anything like this before, the
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engineering challenges behind it, the test today, 200 miles an hour is not fast but you can see how the steering is working, the braking is working, how the suspension engine is working and how the jet engine is performing. so, it's really given them the chance to pore over what them the chance to pore over what the car is doing. and, that will help them to extrapolate these enormous speeds of 1000 miles an hour. because nobody has done this before, what do they expect the effect to be behind the wheel? any slight movement and there could be a profound effect? that is right, it will go ina profound effect? that is right, it will go in a straight line when it travels, really quickly. but it isn't just a travels, really quickly. but it isn'tjust a case of holding the steering wheel and sitting there, the faster you go the faster the car moves and it will be breaking the speed of sound. the air in front of it will not move out the way fast enough. it's going to be a bumpy
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ride for the pilots. andy green is an raf fighter pilot so if you have anyone in the hot seat, it's somebody like that. he was the guy who drove the car 20 years ago who break the land speed record, travelling at 763 miles an hour. he's done that once. 1000 miles an hour is a bit faster but i think it is in safe hands! rebecca morrell there. in a moment, we've got the business news. first, the headlines... a 21—year—old woman is found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack in birmingham. lifting the taboo — a call to support workers with mental health issues, 300,000 people leave theirjobs each year. 11 people are arrested in one of britains‘ biggest operations against people smuggling. here are your business headlines on afternoon live... bt is to reduce costs for customers who only
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have a landline by almost 40%. it comes after a review by regulator 0fcom — which said customers with landlines—only had been getting poor value for money. it will take effect from april. uk car production fell last month — after a fall in demand in the home market for new cars. the figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders show a 14% drop in demand in the uk market. total car production for september was down 4%. barclays has announced third quarter pre—tax profits are up by 31% to £1.1bn — but its investment banking profits are down. the bank said its been a difficult quarter for its markets business. and its having an impact on its share price. so the game of bridge — is having a difficult time being recognised as a sport? the card game is having some
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trouble. sport england rejected theircampaign to be trouble. sport england rejected their campaign to be recognised as a sport. there are some benefits to being recognised as a sport as there are tax breaks on vat and you get access to lottery funding. they've been denied all that, they took it to appeal to the european court of justice, they rejected their application today. they are not having a great time. joining us is the england bridge union vice—chairman. well ian payn is the english bridge union's vice chairman and hejoins me now. it is defined, sport, as being a physical activity. is that right? that was based on an act in parliament in 1987 when the country was preparing for war. since then, we've come a long way in appreciating that well—being isn't just about physical well—being but mental well—being too. and, what you
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can do to prod your mental faculties into life. that's just as important as what you do to keep your body in trim. the european court ofjustice appeared to agree to an extent. their definitions when it comes to sport are slightly wider. but they've rejected your application? you can hardly blame a panel of judges on a court for interpreting the law that is written before them, despite persuasive advocacy from our lawyer, they decided that the law, as written, precludes bridge as being considered a sport. that this is antique and asinine is not the judge's vault, the fault lies with the people who have no interest in changing the laws. what happens now? are you desperate to be recognised asa are you desperate to be recognised as a sport? we were never desperate. we are self—sufficient but there are
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benefits, and mainly they are getting bridge and other minor sports being recognised in schools and the community as an equivalent community, to running around on the football pitch. consequently it would mean more get involved in the community. those of us who were not necessarily terribly sporting when we we re necessarily terribly sporting when we were younger will not get left in the playground any more. they will have their own activities and they will be just as important and valid as running around and hitting things with sticks. does your campaign stop now? after these rejections?“ you've read the rolling, i assume you've read the rolling, i assume you have, the last paragraph actually says that there is no justification, as far as the judges can see, in considering it as a sport, for the reasons you rightly mention. but, it does say that there are cultural reasons as to why vat may be considered exempt from vat,
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and i've already began discussions with our lawyer as to whether we should be pursuing this, and how. the show isn't quite over. in pain from the english bridge union, thank you forjoining us. time for a look at the markets... we were talking before about news from the european central bank digest in the markets at the moment about tapering the stimulus programme. quantitative easing has been a big programme in the ecb, now they are looking to wind it back. the markets are reacting quite well across europe. that's all in positive territory. that's all in positive territory. that makes no sense at all... the euro is down... ok, all right... but if they say that monetary support is being pulled back, the markets will go uh oh... this was anticipated, we thought it would be on the cards...
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thank you. more from you later on. have you heard of a sport with no gender? korfball is considered the only mixed—sex team ball sport in the world. this week, the bbc'5100 women has formed a group of experts to find ways to tackle sexism in brazilian football. this group of experts has gone to investigate if they can learn any lessons that can help them. julia carneiro was was there. we are we a re halfway we are halfway through the 100 winning challenge and it's all about tackling sexism in football. we are looking for examples from other sport, and are finding more out about korfball. this is a typical school '5 team in rio. what is striking is that the kids, the girls and the boys, play together, and not against each other. korfball was invented in the early 20th century and is considered a mixed gender ball game. so, the aim is to get kids playing together and use it
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here in the school to tackle stereotypes on what the girls do and what the boys do. i've spoken to the kids here, they already like it. the boys say they are proud to play with the girls and the girls feel that they have a role and can play to their strengths. everybody feels that they have their space. some experts are working on solutions to tackle sexism in football. they have joined in the game, playing with the kids, and trying to come up with good ideas to tackle sexism in football. they will present these ideas next saturday, when we have the grand finale of the 100 winning challenge here in rio. —— 100 women. the winner of the royal institute of british architects‘ most prestigious award — the stirling prize — will be announced next tuesday. the nominations to become britain's best new building 2017 include a new college campus in glasgow, a london housing development and a rejuvenated seaside pier on the south coast of england. today, we look at the british museum world conservation and exhibitions centre in london
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by rogers stirk harbour and partners. music the museum had a very complex master plan for the site. it was supplementing the front of house experience and offering conservation and science special exhibitions logistics and other things knocked over from being in the same compound as the work that's been available for 250 years. so what we did was spend a tremendous amount of time with the museum understanding their wants and needs to try and respond to this. essentially, we wanted to create a world conservation and exhibition centre for the whole of the museum campus. this is really a celebration of all the background work that maintains this collection. it also creates a fantastic vehicle within which those contributions can exist. the building is a state—of—the—art facility for conservation
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and scientific research. it has helped to bring all of those staff together, to work together, and it has also help us to design new laboratory facilities that help to preserve the collection, to better understand the collection and to communicate that to the wider public. i think what's unique about this building is that it's a strikingly modern building in a very sensitive conservation environment. for me personally, spending seven years at the british museum, by the end of the process, i felt like i work here, rather than at rogers stirk harbour and partners. and you can see all the nominated buildings on the bbc arts website and find out who is the winner of the riba stirling prize for architecture live on the bbc news channel next tuesday between 8.30 and 9pm. we will take you to catalonia, as
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protesters are gathering outside of the regional government building in barcelona. catalan protesters have been gathering since the announcement that the president of catalonia carles puigdemont is due to make a statement in three minutes time, at 5pm local time. the government plans to strip him and them of their powers. they are invoking article 155 of the spanish constitution, letting spain take control of regional finances and police. what does the catalan president thing? we will know that 4pm. that's all coming up. time for the weather with ben ridge. temperatures heading in one direction over the next few days and that is downwards. murky early for some in the south,
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brighterfurther north, early for some in the south, brighter further north, still with a fairamount of brighter further north, still with a fair amount of cloud. if you look at the satellite picture and how it was earlier today, cloud in many areas. thick in the south, thinner and brighter in the north. thick cloud is associated with this weather front, over the next few days it will dive away to the south, opening the floodgates to a north—westerly wind. these are the isobars coming in from the arctic, that will bring colder air in from the arctic, that will bring colderair in our in from the arctic, that will bring colder air in our direction. today, this band of cloud and outbreaks of rain will sink southwards through the evening and night. clearing all but the far south of england. where we hold onto cloud, it will be mild but further north, some fog patches and in northern ireland and scotland, a touch of frost is looking likely, even in towns and cities, well down into single digits. with a chilly start and the
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odd fog patch, some showers clipping into the far north, windy, some gales in the northern isles, the odd shower in the east of england. a lot of sunshine, temperatures a few notches down at 11—15d. 0n of sunshine, temperatures a few notches down at 11—15d. on friday night, the winds continue to be brisk in northern areas. more in the way of cloud and outbreaks of rain pushing in from the north—west. the rain is mostly focused on the hills in the west, misty and murky here. a lot of cloud further south, some brightness. 14—16d. moving out of saturday and into sunday, that's where things really start to feel very chilly indeed. at this stage, low— pressure very chilly indeed. at this stage, low—pressure drifting eastwards, high pressure to the west, wind comes straight down from the north. watch what happens to be temperatures in the north of the country. single digits on sunday and monday. sunwing three showers in the far north of scotland. further
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south, temperatures no better than 11 or 12 degrees by the beginning of next week. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today, at 16:00: a critical moment for spain — the catalan leader may be about to call a snap regional election, as the central governemnt prepares to return power to madrid. the terrifying text message from a 21—year—old woman found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack. stay clear! 11 people are arrested in one of britains‘ biggest operations against people smuggling. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. another day, another managerial departure, this time at rangers after the sacking of pedro caixinha after the sacking of pedro caixinha after seven months in charge. and ben has the weather. how low will the temperatures go?
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find out just before how low will the temperatures go? find outjust before half past. also coming up — bloodhound is go! we'll be speaking to the driver of the supersonic car capable of speeds up to 1,000mph. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. we start in spain, where a tense political drama is unfolding. at stake is the very integrity of the country. we are about to hear from the cata la n we are about to hear from the catalan president speaking in barcelona and we can go there now.
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day of chaos. demonstrations as i speak outside this building and in a plaza half a mile away as we wait to hear what catalan president carles puigdemont has to say. we can take you to a live picture of the president's residence in barcelona. to bring you up to speed, mr puigdemont was due to speak at one o'clock local time and the indications we were getting was that he was going to announce snap election is. that has changed. he is coming to the podium, let's listen he speaks spanish mr puigdemont is speaking in it
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catalan. we would get some translation. my spanish, look let alone my catalan, is not up to this. we understand the coalition of support he had who were about to leave him a couple of hours ago when it was thought he would announce a snap election, now happier with what he is going to announce. nobody knows, quite frankly, whether he will go for the declaration of independence. 0r whether he will call a snap election. what is certain is that carles puigdemont as a political figure is certain is that carles puigdemont as a politicalfigure is probably finished. because if he decides to call for snap elections, he will lose the support of his coalition, and he has said in fact that he does not want to carry on as a political
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leader and his aim in this entire crisis and invite for most of his life was to bring the region to independence. but i am now hearing that he has called a snap election. just getting confirmation of that. he says he has considered the possibility of calling elections, several people have asked me to do so or several people have asked me to do so or not. but now, yes, he has said, he is calling nsap elections. my said, he is calling nsap elections. my responsibility as president, you said, is to exhaust all options for dialogue. so in this day of brinkmanship and with several members of the supporting coalition parties who said that they would leave if he did this, mr puigdemont
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has called nsap elections. it should be conducted in a situation of normality committee says. that is crucial because as far as madrid is concerned and the party of mariano rajoy, they were not prepared to suspend article 155, the imposition of direct rule, unless mr puigdemont said that he was going to work within the constitution and the laws of the state. my task is to try honestly and faithfully, mr puigdemont, says, to avoid the impact of 155 which imposes direct rule which will probably be approved by the senate. this is an abusive step. i do not accept these measures. they are and just. so far, he has not said that he will be speaking and calling these elections within the spanish constitution. he is just criticising what he
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anticipates the decision, the vote of the senate in madrid tomorrow morning at 10am local time, will be. he is saying he has acted in accordance with his responsibilities. but he has not stepped back from that albeit temporary declaration of independence, following the referendum of october the 1st when his party and the separatists are saying that there was a 90% vote in support on a turnout of 43%. forgive me, there is confusion here, that has been here all day. i do not want to mislead anyone, but we are now hearing that may be he has not called, he is thinking of calling snap elections. bear with me. when you think local politics anywhere else in the world is, located,
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welcome to catalonia! i have once again not received an acceptable response from the popular party, says ca rles response from the popular party, says carles puigdemont. nobody can says carles puigdemont. nobody can say i haven't tried, but once again, we have encountered the deception. well, ca rles well, carles puigdemont has now left the podium and with me or two people who have been listening to the translation of that speech. and i think they are as confused as i am. you have been on a lot of the last few weeks and you both know carles puigdemont well and you wrote a
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book, the struggle for catalonia. it looked as if he was going to call snap elections, i am not sure if thatis snap elections, i am not sure if that is the case. i am not sure either but i do not think it is. what happens today will need a bit of time. essentially, he started the day prepared to call snap elections with an understanding that would mean his famous article 155 would not come into force. he did not get that clear promise. it is not tit—for—tat. as a result, he has pulled back and also after seeing several members of his own party withdrawal, seeing people out on the streets calling him a traitor. under huge pressure, he was hoping a gesture, what he thought was a big gesture, what he thought was a big gesture, early elections, would be met in madrid by another big gesture, to withdraw article 150 five. now it looks certain the
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senate will impose article 155 because they said, we might suspend article 155 if you're working within the spanish constitution and you will go back to law as madrid would see it. it is a madrid law and the people in catalonia, it is forcing him to say, ok, you must declare independence or at least consider the process. if not, you are a traitor for the people of catalonia, this is white we are getting all the demonstrations, it is broken about this decision, his own party. apologies to our viewers, we were taking the translation from writers, a news agency who first announced he called snap elections. but changed it to saying he had considered doing
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that but had not gone that far. rafael, he has not done a universal declaration of independence which those hundreds, maybe thousands of people close by criticising him for. i think he is in a cul—de—sac and he cannot do much. he is hoping to let madrid do the dirty deed and that is article 155. you can set the stage, declaring independence is almost meaningless. a day before the senate meets and bruce measures that not only make independence nor and void, but strip catalonia of the autonomy it has had for 40 years and sends mr puigdemont and his people into prison for rebellion probably. it is a manoeuvre that as we have seen over several weeks, it is delay, delay and putting the onus on madrid to step in force in a way that looks as if it is repression. is he
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getting any criticism ? as if it is repression. is he getting any criticism? we know from the hardliners. but the world, madrid, his supporters and the majority, significant number of people in this region who do not wa nt to people in this region who do not want to read madrid and want to stay unified, they have been led to these potential peaks the whole time. sort of decision and every single time, he has pulled back. not only the people here, the problem for me is that it people here, the problem for me is thatitis people here, the problem for me is that it is the spanish state. it is too centralised and the problem now, it wants to return to a centralised state and this is what it is becoming and the problem here is that mr puigdemont says, if you do not stop 155, we will... your critics would say this is very irresponsible politics and we can
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hear the crowds and the police helicopters outside. does one last thought, it is it going to come to parliament? according to catalan law and this parliament which may well be dissolved at ten o'clock tomorrow, if he is to declare independence, it needs to go through a boat or is that off the table?|j think he will come to parliament, but not to declare independence. he can do all sorts of things as we saw on october ten. i think he will come here to explain what he has just announced and to hopefully get his own coalition back together, this coalition which if few hours was basically imploding. thank you both. so that is the situation at the moment. apologies for the confusion. quite frankly, i don't think anyone still knows what is going on. it does mean that that statement by madrid from the senate tomorrow, if they say the imposition of article 155 goes ahead, we are in a
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different scenario as well. back to you. from barcelona, we will have more from their later on. the wife of a birmingham man who planned a terrorism attack in the city has been found guilty of helping his preparations by buying him the weapon he intended to use. madihah taheer, who's 21, had denied preparing an act of terrorism by assisting her husband, ummariyat mirza, earlier this year. mirza pleaded guilty to the plotting earlier this month. our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani, reports. wrestled to the ground in an armed stop, a birmingham man setting out to kill. the suspect seized in a joint intelligence—led operation by m15 and the west midlands counter—terrorism unit. a week after the westminster attack in march, ummar mirza wanted to rampage in his home city. now convicted along his wife, madihah taheer, who helped him, and his sister, zainab, who encouraged the planning
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via social media. mirza was obsessed with knives and replica guns, and he wanted to fight in syria. instead, he turned his attention to home. his pregnant wife bought him this combat knife on her credit card, and then he trained on this martial arts dummy. finally, he went to an outdoors shop to buy cord to create a hidden shoulder harness. mirza's attack plan wasn't fully formed when he was arrested, but he's admitted preparing an act of terrorism by researching targets including a synagogue and this raf careers office in the city. it's one of seven foiled plots so far this year. detectives say he couldn't have planned it without the loyal and loving support of his wife. i think it's sort of typical of the kinds of terrorist threat we're now seeing in the united kingdom — small groups of individuals, in this case family members, it could easily be friends, sharing very explicit extremist material, using apps downloaded from social media, inciting and encouraging each other to be able to carry out an attack, being inspired by other attacks they've seen in the united kingdom and abroad.
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taheer told her trial she'd become besotted at 17 with mirza, as she tried to escape her abusive father. she admitted she'd supported the self—styled islamic state group, claiming she had been brainwashed by her future husband. but prosecutors said her own words from social media gave her away. as their wedding approached, taheer messaged her boyfriend, saying, "i want you to kill people for me, i have a list." mirza said, "on the day of the marriage, i will kill them all, give me the list." her reply... "you can't have it until you put a ring on it." radicalisation experts say her conviction is symptomatic of the new role that some women now play. in this particular case, what we've seen is a woman who seems to be in control, she's confident, she's not someone who is going to stand there, she's actively encouraging. so, i think that needs to be borne in mind in terms of a shift in gender roles that's also
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occurring, but the fact is, it also challenges our notion of what a woman's role within these movements has to be when we look at it in a broader global context. the jury concluded madihah taheer was no naive young woman. she was her husband's willing partner in crime. she had wanted a hero like the painting she placed on her facebook profile, and she found him, and now they both face jail. the headlines this afternoon. crisis in catalonia, the president of the region defies expectations and does not call snap local elections. 21—year—old woman is found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack in birmingham. lifting a to b, a call to support workers with mental health workers, 300,000 people leave theirjobs each year. rangers zac blair manager after seven months in charge. —— rangers
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zac blair manager. they dropped the ball after their draw last night. martina hingis announces retirement from tennis after winning 25 grand slam titles. the grand slam finals in singapore will be held last tournament. the chairman of the fa rex clark says the national body has lost the trust of the public have the backhand link of racist remarks made. i will be back on those stories at half—past. a woman has told a jury in winchester that she blacked out as she fell 4,000 feet to the ground, after her parachute failed to open properly. her husband, army sergeant emile cilliers, is on trial for attempting to murder her by sabotaging her parachute, as well as causing a gas leak at their home in amesbury. our correspondent, andy moore, is at winchester crown court. she was describing that horrific moment when she realised the
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parachute had failed. that is right, not just the parachute had failed. that is right, notjust the main parachute, her reserve parachute as well. this was a police video shown to the jury. it was a video of an interview victoria cilliers gave three weeks after this incident in which he very nearly died and she only survived because she was very light in weight and she landed in ploughed. she described the moment she jumped landed in ploughed. she described the moment shejumped out landed in ploughed. she described the moment she jumped out of a plane out of 4,000 feet and her main chute did not open, it was twisted and accords were wrapped around, so she could it away and her reserve chute deployed and that also she said, something was not right with it and she could not control it, it was very twisted. she said she was kicking her body around trying to untangle it and then she says it went black. after that, she says she had snapshots, what she called snapshots of consciousness. she remembered seeing a friend of hers looking over her as she lay in the
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field presumably, a doctor, and there were other people around looking over her. she also had a brief snapshot of consciousness when she knew she was in a helicopter about the land. the police officer conducting the interview did asked victoria cilliers, what was the chance of that main parachute not opening? she said, about one in 750 that that happens. she was asked, what are the chances of both not deploying? she said that was about one ina deploying? she said that was about one in a million. she was also asked, you are a very experienced parachutist with 2600 asked, you are a very experienced pa rachutist with 2600 jumps asked, you are a very experienced parachutist with 2600 jumps to her name. could this have been an accident? she replied, i don't think it can be. can you think of any reason why somebody would want to do this? victoria said, no. as you say, her husband is accused of two counts of attempted murder and of sabotaging her parachute and of
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trying to kill her if few days earlier by tampering with the gas pipes. he denies both those charges. thank you very much. we will go live to newquay soon to talk to the pilot of the bloodhound. two successful runs in newquay and we will talk to both men here in about five minutes. so stay with us for that. a major police and home office operation against people—smugglers has been carried out overnight. 11 arrests were made in the uk and a further 15 in europe. the raids — in london, birmingham and gateshead — targeted a gang which used secret compartments in vehicles to smuggle people across europe and into britain. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports. it was sam, the moment when police
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officers launched a series of raids across europe — targeting a suspected people smuggling gang. immigration! stand clear! in west london. birmingham. and gateshead. as well as the raids here in britain, 15 people were arrested in bulgaria and belgium. in the raids, immigration enforcement are targeting a group of men suspected of smuggling people into britain using hidden compartments in vehicles. the gang specialised in concealing people in vans and trucks. what we have is families, we've had young children, it's quite upsetting to see the photographs of how these people
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are held within vehicles. they're specifically—built hides in vehicles and they can spend a number of days in those locations before they're recovered. as part of the uk operation, two men were arrested in birmingham, two in gateshead and seven in london. many of those arrested were afghans, as were many of the people they're accused of smuggling. although there were people from pakistan and vietnam too. the international part of the operation was co—ordinated by a task force as part of the eu. this has been done by a wide group over a period of time to get to the point to have the success with these arrests. despite close to a hundred prosecutions for people smuggling each year, it is still a multimillion—pound criminal industry. around 300,000 people leave theirjobs every year
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in the uk because of insufficient support for mental health problems — that's the finding of a government—commissioned review. it says the impact of mental illness is estimated to cost the uk economy up to £99 billion each year. the government has said two of the country's largest employers, the nhs and the civil service, will adopt the review‘s recommendations. our health correspondent, rob sissons, has this report. at this insurance company, they're proud of their record supporting workers. today's report recommends more places should be like this. aviva, in sheffield, said it has tried to change the way people think about mental health, training managers and encouraging openness. james tringham was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, something the firm was aware of when they took him on. i was terrified. i had to be coaxed in and the support team that were training me at that stage weren't sure if i would make it through, although they could see there was potential there. and work has a great benefit.
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it has a normalising effect. the government—ordered review, which covers the whole of the uk, suggests what's being held up as good practice has yet to catch on. it concludes poor mental health costs businesses £42 billion a year in lost work days and low productivity. the cost to the uk economy is put even higher, at £99 billion. that takes in nhs costs of caring for people, the payment of benefits and lost taxes. employers generally have really got to grips with the idea of how you support the physical health of your staff, whether it's with adaptations or particular approaches to the health of your staff, but we haven't yet seen the same level of commitment towards the mental health of your staff. today's report, we are told, is a wake—up call to some businesses, whatever their size, across the uk. one of the co—authors of the report has told me what really lies behind
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it is the need for a culture change in some organisations across the land to do more. that, of course, could be easier said than done. royal mail says it's convinced money spent on staff wellbeing does pay off. it's really important we look after their physical and their mental health. obviously, there is a cost associated with that, but it's a cost that we see as well worth spending. we rely really heavily on our people, and so protecting their health, safety and wellbeing is really of the utmost importance to us. the prime minister, who commissioned the report, said it underlines the need for action. she is asking the nhs and the civil service to lead the way. some of the changes — creating support online and more training — will cost. easier perhaps for big firms to afford than small ones, of course.
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but the message of today's report is not all the changes will cost money. theresa may has been speaking about this issue at a building site in norfolk, stressing the importance of employers taking seriously their employees mental well—being. employers taking seriously their employees mental well— being.|j employers taking seriously their employees mental well-being. i think the treatment of people with mental health problems as one of the injustices we need to do within society. for too long, injustices we need to do within society. fortoo long, people injustices we need to do within society. for too long, people have not been given the support and this issue has not been given the attention that it needs. what we see from the review is that this is not just something about what happens in the national health service, important though that is, it is about other environments as well and iam about other environments as well and i am pleased that the review has shown the importance of employers taking seriously the issue of mental health and mental well—being of their employees. when we see from their employees. when we see from their report that this costs tens of billions of pounds for companies, for our economy, and it is also important for individuals. 300,000 people a year lose theirjobs
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because of their mental health problems. we need to address this, government. with nhs england and the civil service, that will cover 2 million employees and we will ensure the support is there, i what other employees to do so as well. time for the weather now. that is the nearest we will get hallowe'en? you like to trawl your photographs? yes, you are finding that out. we have seen down and cloudy weather and mild weather. at this week, we have had south—westerly winds. coming from the tropics and bringing warm air. it got up to 20 degrees. but we have not seen much of a couple of things. i have not dug out my big winter coat. no, i have not seen your winter coat! central heating? is this the weekend where we might just? and we get an extra hour's
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sleep. yes, and you might want the heating because she might get cold. i remember those orange colours, were switching it round and through the weekend, we get into these blue collars, the air coming from a cold place, the arctic. and that is the top temperature in some spots, eight degrees and perhaps overnight frost. if it has not been cold enough yet this autumn... it has, but it is going to get worse! let's have the forecast. yes, turning colder is the big beam through the next days. but we have a lot of cloud today and that has been producing outbreaks of rain, patchy rain and drizzle quite widely across the southern half the british isles. brighterfurther north. the southern half the british isles. brighter further north. to the southern half the british isles. brighterfurther north. to introduce the cooler air, we will see this weather front wriggling around for quite this week. we initially pick up quite this week. we initially pick up north—westerly winds and northerly winds, and that brings the
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cold air in our direction. the rest of today, we see a lot of cloud across southern areas and rain and drizzle, but moving away to the south. we peel the cloud away from the map during the night to reveal clear spells and maybe fog patches. some of that cloud holding on across the far south, soap temperatures holding up, 11 in the channel islands and 12 in the farce of the west. further north, pretty chilly, five or six in the towns and cities, glasgow, manchester, close to freezing with a touch of frost tomorrow morning as well as fog patches. that leaves a beautiful day tomorrow with plenty of sunshine. windy in the far north with gales in the far north of scotland. is small chance of showers here and in the east anglia. basically a dry day but temperatures down to 12, 15 degrees. during friday night, turning colder in the south with a touch of frost.
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a change further north. the wind picks up and more cloud streams in. outbreaks of patchy rain in the hills in the north west, quite misty and murky. saturday, a north west and murky. saturday, a north west and south east split. a lot of cloud in the north west and drizzle, some spells of sunshine in the south east. temperatures lifting by a degree, but that does not last. we get into those northerly winds on sunday and monday and we could see wintry showers in scotland and temperatures in single figures at best. even further south, nine, ten, 11 degrees, a little below par, so finally feeling the chilly side of autumn for the first time really this year. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. confusion continues in spanish politics as the catalan president's stops short of calling for another election. the prospect of another
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vote had provoked a furious backlash from his left—wing allies, who want him to declare catalonia independent. a 21—year old woman has been found guilty of helping her husband prepare for a knife terror attack by buying the weapon he was going to use. 11 people have been arrested in uk's biggest ever crack down on people smuggling. raids across the uk and europe targeted organised crime gangs. 300,000 people a year leave theirjobs because of mental health issues, at a cost of billions of pounds to the economy. theresa may says "we need to take action". and this bloodhound... it's hoping to break the world land speed record and be the first supersonic to reach 1,000mph. we will be speaking to the pilot shortly... time for a look at one of the sport withjohn watson. a bit of tennis and a bit of cricket... a lot going on. the retirement of a notable player in the women's game. we have the announcement of the 34 man squad
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and plenty of comings and goings in football, as you mention. at rangers, there's a lot of speculation about who is next? another day and another managerial sacking, this time at rangers who have parted company with manager pedro caixinha afterjust seven months in charge. last nights draw with kilmarnock his last in charge. chris mclaughlin is in glasgow. he is outside the ibrox stadium. where did it go wrong for him? he hasn't been in charge long but it's a sad end for him? yes, and to be fair, it never really got going for pedro caixinha when he was appointed 230 days ago. some saw it as a progressive move, others saw it as a left—field appointment. he struggled last year and was then dumped out of europa league qualifying, and he was defeated in the betfred cup final by motherwell in the semifinals at the weekend. as you say, in the trawl to
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kilmarnock. no surprise that the rangers board met here this morning. pedro caixinha to training this morning and after that he said he was still the manager but then rangers announced a statement saying he was appointed in march this year but results have been disappointing and not commensurate with the level of investment made available. it is key because he brought in 11 players and spent £9 million over the summer, not a lot in the english premier league that is a lot of money in the premiership. rangers will have to write it off as a pretty expensive mistake. everything that has happened here financially in recent years, they can ill afford to make many more. absolutely. chris mclaughlin, live outside the ibrox stadium this afternoon, thank you very much. and sean dyche says the speculation linking him with the managerial vacancy at everton is "flattering" but says he isnt giving such stories any attention. the burnley manager is one of the frontrunners with bookmakers
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to replace ronald koeman who was sacked on monday. dyche who will celebrate his fifth year in charge of burnley next week has won them two promotions and kept them safe in the premier league last season. different links with different clubs have come around. you are flattered by the fact that what we do is recognised. it's other people's stories, and not mine. it's right that i get asked about it. it's another good club, i respect them but i'm also respectful of my situation here. former world number one martina hingis has announced her retirement from tennis. she's said she'd like to go out at the peak of her career, following 25 grand slam titles, including winning the mixed doubles at wimbledon with jamie murray this summer. she'll retire after the current wta finals in singapore, where she is playing doubles with partner yung jan—chan — the pair are the world number one pairing in doubles. james haskell is the notable omission from eddiejones's 34 man england squad named today ahead of next month's three internationals at twickenham.
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the wasps back—row, who has 75 england caps, started the season with a hand injury and has been replaced by exeter‘s sam simmonds, who receives his first call—up. but england's head coach says there is a future for haskell and northampton's tom wood, who was also left out. they are both good players, probably both a little off form, either through injury or other reasons. we have spoken, and they know that if they regain their form they will be backin they regain their form they will be back in contention. in the scrum, we have 34 players, ten unavailable through various injuries or suspensions. the competition for these spots is very intense. ireland have named their 38—man squad for the autumn internationals and simon zebo has been dropped — just days after it was announced he was leaving ireland to play in france next season. connacht centre bundee aki who has recently qualified on residency — is included.
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that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the bloodhound, designed to travel at 1000 miles an hour, is being tested at the relatively sedate speed of 200 mph at cornwall airport in newquay. we can speak to the driver of the bloodhound now, andy green. my first question is, how did it go? i don'tjust want the word " fast"! it go? i don'tjust want the word "fast"! i'm going to agree, we did not go fast today. it's a world land speed record and it is designed to reach 1000 miles an hour. slow speed testing, we only got to 200 miles an hour but with that small caveat, the most extraordinary vehicle performance. we are operating the car, its supersonic and designed to
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operate on a 12 mile track in south africa, and will be running it out like a africa, and will be running it out likea drag africa, and will be running it out like a drag car. we accelerate flat out, get a 200 miles an hour. we can do that in less than a mile. the car today made it look easy. breaks off, something like 350 metres later, the car is doing 200 miles an hour in eight seconds. that includes the jet engine warming up and then throttling back at 130 miles an hour. it accelerates as the engine winds down. i put my foot on the break to heat it up, it gets to 400 degrees before it begins to bite. i'm breaking quite hard even before we get to 200. at 200 miles an hour, the break spite. the car slows down, three quarters of a mile later, it's a slow speed, turning off the runway and we have to do it twice. you've probably seen footage of people watching and they were, having
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spoken to them afterwards, they looked at this huge five tonne truck sized car and as they were expecting it to rumble up the runway, it flashed past. what just it to rumble up the runway, it flashed past. whatjust happened? watch closely and we will do it again so you can watch closely and we will do it again so you can see watch closely and we will do it again so you can see at the second time... then we got the response. all of the people were fascinated, it's a unique opportunity to showcase great british engineering and technology, and to reach out to our real target audience. the ten—year—olds will be the scientists and engineers off tomorrow and can inspire them with the magic of the science and technology with the world's most extraordinary straight and racing car. i know that that's the dream, you and richard noble, the dream, you and richard noble, the project director. everybody will be familiar with that, what you described in that raf way that you do, it sounds absolutely terrifying. were you scared at all?”
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do, it sounds absolutely terrifying. were you scared at all? i would not criticise the raf approach to things, i'm lucky enough to have the world's best day job things, i'm lucky enough to have the world's best dayjob training fighters for the aria. i'm used to jet power, extraordinary acceleration, and i've got to be honest that i've also been surprised by how high performance and reliability vehicle has been. the eurofighter typhoon is one of the best high—performance opportunities. we have one of the rolls—royce engines, this car is accelerating 50% faster, exonerating at 1.5 g. i don't know what kind you'd write, i don't know what kind you'd write, i don't know what people have at home, if you have a car at home that does zero to 60 in two seconds, firstly, ido zero to 60 in two seconds, firstly, i do not know if i believe you! that's what this car behind us can do. remember it is five tonnes and not designed for high performance acceleration, it can do that by the by as we practice to go supersonic. this is the opportunity to say, here
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we are, 200 miles an hour, it's gone up we are, 200 miles an hour, it's gone up to that speed and slowed down again, twice today. ourfastest up to that speed and slowed down again, twice today. our fastest ever runs, the team is ready and the car is ready and we will go much faster next year. and very briefly, 200 miles an hour is one thing but 1000? is it totally different thing, surely? of course, we had to deal with a much higher performance, and the supersonic affects, the shock waves. . . the supersonic affects, the shock waves... and ultimately, getting beyond not just what any car waves... and ultimately, getting beyond notjust what any car has done, but 1000 miles beyond notjust what any car has done, but1000 miles an beyond notjust what any car has done, but 1000 miles an hour is faster than any jet fighter can go ata faster than any jet fighter can go at a ground level. the typhoon maxes out at 900 miles an hour, most aeroplanes do. we are trying to go even faster. for the first time in over 100 years, one of us has built a car that will go faster than any aeroplane. the last time that
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happened was 1913. the scale of the challenges that large. there's a huge amount to do but over the next two or three years, we will work car up two or three years, we will work car up through 1000 miles an hour, developing the structures, aerodynamics and control of the car and the rocket system that will help that engine go faster than anyjet, orany that engine go faster than anyjet, or any race car has ever been by 30%. it will be that exciting and streaming live video and data to a global audience as we do it. the car behind me isn'tjust another land speed record but an inspiration to a global generation. the young people who build and live in high—technology low—carbon world of the future. it's also the world's fastest outside broadcast studio. putting out live data and tv to the largest experimental audience in history. tens of billions of people sharing live data with us and doing live calculations with us, looking at what is happening there and then.
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that has never happened with any other race car, that opportunity is very exciting. andy, we are with you in spirit, if not in body! thank you. you're watching afternoon live. if you'd like to catch up with more of those news nationwide stories, let's go to amelia reynolds in norwich, with news of a talking robot... we will come back to you, and in bristol, robin markwell has a debate on the future of local news... we will bejoining him news... we will be joining him shortly but firstly, amelia, these robots, what is so special about them? this robot can talk it can interact and even tell if you are happy or sad, and memorise certain personality traits. this is why southend council, the first in the uk to buy one of these robots, they paid £17,000 by the way, because they think it will be a
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real help to enhance their social ca re real help to enhance their social care department. the robot will be working with people living with dementia, to help with things like memory sessions. southend council is the first in the uk to do this but pepper, the robot, is working around the world. i understand in belgium he is helping to guide patients around hospital departments, and in canada. he is greeting customers in a bank. and injapan, he is selling coffee machines. i didn't have the pleasure of meeting pepper today but my colleagues did. he had a chat with pepper and this is what pepper had to say... hello, my name is pepper. i work in the department of people. i am pepper. i work in the department of people. lam here pepper. i work in the department of people. i am here to talk about what i've learned about the amazing transformation programme that is happening in southend. is quite remarkable, what is the council
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hoping to do with robots like this? the council want, and they are stressing as you would expect, that they are not going to replace any members of staff. pepper is there to work alongside existing staff in social care, working with people who may have dementia, and perhaps with children with complex disabilities, pepper can play memory games, sensory games, and play videos, things like that, we spoke to the director of adult social care. she has really got quite a lot of high hopes for pepper in future. here is what she said. when he is more fully developed, we can do basic tasks in the home. he can answer the door, or answer the phone. he will be able to tell people knocking on the door, —— who is knocking on the door, prompt for medication, interact with people and detect emotions. we do not know
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if other councils around the country will follow suit but southend certainly believe that they will recoup that £17,000 before too long... it looks amazing. and in bristol, the future of local news, which is hugely important to so many people, that's one of the reasons we wanted to make this lot work. how did this debate come about? it came about because it is the 60th anniversary of bbc points west, the 50th anniversary of bbc local radio. it seemed an appropriate time to take a temperature check of the industry we work in, of local news. we gathered the great and the good from around the great and the good from around the west country, to talk through the west country, to talk through the key issues. we had journalists, editors, and students of the trade, thinking about things like the rise of fa ke thinking about things like the rise of fake news at the moment, with reference to the us election, talking about click bait, throwing up talking about click bait, throwing up the debate between what is public
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interest compared to what is interesting to the public. the rise of hyper local websites and publications, serving specific communities. and an issue that kept on coming up was the issue of diversity. the alp are and what we put in the papers on tv, doesn't reflect what the audience want us to see? that was a challenge which kept coming up and kept being levelled. the problem, the risk, is that we lag behind and the demographics of the country are changing. the point made about our workforce, we continue to address that. we are transforming the alp to reflect the population that you are serving. when that many of us started life as journalists in local newspapers, many of us have seen newspapers shut down. was that discussed? this is a local newspaper here. there was a telling moment when the host,
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jonathan dimbleby, we had an audience of news into restraint —— of news industry professionals, i think a quarter of the audience put their hands up, of 200 or so. it's an indicative point. in gloucestershire, two newspapers have gone from being daily to weekly. their circulation is about 8000 copies a day, a shadow of their former selves, when they were launched in the 19century. the news is changing fast because of the online revolution. in that debate, the editor of those gloucestershire papers on the panel made the claim that in 20 years' time, newspapers, the old printed word, would go the same way as the red telephone box and the old pound note. she thinks that actually, the direction of travel is all online, reaching a far bigger audience and a far younger one too. she said readers of the newspaper would be over 50, but for
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the online generation, it's 29. a lot of debate about what goes on online, and others were saying that their newsprint was in their blood. they wanted newspapers to hang around for a bit longer. that was the flavour of the debate. the highlights would go on the bbc website. i did my work experience at the bristol evening post, they talked about closing newspapers for yea rs talked about closing newspapers for years but we will keep our fingers crossed. fascinating to talk to you both —— we will keep our fingers crossed. if you want to catch up with more of those stories, go to the bbc iplayer and you can see full coverage of the story is covered by our newsrooms across the country. we have all of the business news in a moment that time for a look at the headlines... crisis in catalonia — the president of the region defies expectations and does not call snap
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local elections. a 21—year—old woman is found guilty of helping her husband prepare a terror knife attack in birmingham. lifting the taboo — a call to support workers with mental health issues, 300,000 people leave theirjobs each year. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. bt is to reduce costs for customers who only have a landline by almost 40%. it comes after a review by regulator 0fcom — which said customers with landlines—only had been getting poor value for money. it will take effect from april. uk car production fell last month — after a fall in demand in the home market for new cars. the figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders show a 14% drop in demand in the uk market. total car production for september was down 4%. barclays has announced third quarter pre—tax profits are up by 31% to £1.1bn — but its investment
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banking profits are down. the bank said its been a difficult quarter for its markets business. and its having an impact on its share price. so, financial stimulus, the ecb is beginning to wind things down? that's right. as you rightly pointed out earlier, the markets had a fairly muted reaction to the ecb announcement, it's been anticipated and that is the idea. we do not have and that is the idea. we do not have a huge reaction that the euro is down against the dollar. and looking at car production as well? yes, in the headlines, the demand for cars is down 40%, production is also down. that's partly owed to uncertainty over what brexit is going to look like. also, there's the push for better air pollution
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and green cars. the king at debenhams annual profits, on the face of it, it looks to be a shocking figure? webb at 44%. they say it is because business isn't doing very well. —— looking at debenhams annual profits. they are anticipating a tough christmas period. it isn't great for them at the moment. joining us... george godber is a fund manager with polar capital and hejoins me now. we were talking about this stimulus programme and the markets haven't reacted dramatically. they are holding up 0k, is that because it is too early to tell what the impact will be? really, it's what mario draghi wanted to do. he set out to ensure that when he began this programme at the beginning of the exit, everybody was on board. he began it when spanish government bonds were trading at 7% but now
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they are1.5%, bonds were trading at 7% but now they are 1.5%, even with all of the problems in spain and catalonia. it's been a successful programme, a gradual unwind rather than a dramatic one. and in car production, demand is down and the amount of ca rs demand is down and the amount of cars being produced in the market is down as well. there have been cause for concern over brexit in the car industry, is that a driver?” for concern over brexit in the car industry, is that a driver? i think it dominates all parts of the economy and will continue to do so. with cars specifically, there's a huge consumer shift. looking at oxford yesterday or last week, announcing they would ban all hydrocarbon vehicles, petrol and diesel, from two years away. with that as a backdrop it's unsurprising that as a backdrop it's unsurprising that consumers will probably be holding back on buying a new petrol or diesel car. and debenhams isn't looking great, as they have warned about the christmas period being
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competitive too? they are in a tough spot as a business model, trying to reinvent itself. they change the layout of the stores. they will be putting gyms in. they have other concessions inside of the stores to turn the business around. it's one year into a five—year turnaround programme but it's going to be a fight. wing thank you forjoining us. “— fight. wing thank you forjoining us. -- thank you forjoining us. and they look at the markets... ba rclays is and they look at the markets... barclays is down, they made a profit but it has come under expectations so but it has come under expectations so the share price hasn't done well. they lost less than they thought they were going to? they made less than they thought. it's been a long day! and the euro...? it has helped the ftse100 a bit, mining companies have done well today, they make up a big part of the ftse100. in mining company shares, that affects the ftse100 quite significantly.
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thank you very much. prince harry has warned of the dangers of social media for young people, as he met ambassadors for a mental health charity on a visit to denmark. the prince is on a two—day visit to copenhagen — the latest in a series of european trips made by the royal family. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell‘s report does contain some flash photography. he's 33 now and the working side to his life has settled into a rhythm. harry is now fully committed to royal duties, in britain and representing britain abroad. the burden of royal duty has shifted significantly to the younger generation, so in copenhagen it's harry representing his grandmother meeting denmark's queen margrethe, and then seeking to emphasise the importance of long—standing european links between britain and denmark. our two countries have an unbreakable. have an unbreakable bond, which is as strong now as it ever has been. there are also serious messages harry wants to convey. on mental health, for example. he spoke to one group about the dangers of social media.
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people are spending far too much time online, he said, causing mentalfatigue. but the impression is of a prince who's at ease and enjoying himself. this part of the equation is settled. harry's working life is pretty much sorted and he seems to be enjoying it, but of course that leaves the big question about his personal life. there is no doubt that his relationship with the american actress meghan markle is a serious one, they were seen together in toronto last month, but questions about a possible royal engagement are off the agenda among his officials. for now, the public face of harry is this — a working prince who seems noticeably content with the way his life is moving at the moment. that's it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five. huw edwards there. time for a look
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at the weather. good afternoon, temperatures are heading in one direction over the next few days... and that is downwards. today, it's been fairly mild again. quite murky early on for some in the south. a little brighter further north, early on for some in the south. a little brighterfurther north, still with a fair little brighterfurther north, still withafairamount little brighterfurther north, still with a fair amount of cloud. if you look at how the satellite picture was earlier today. you can see there's cloud in many areas. thicker towards the south, slightly thinner and with bright conditions in the north. thick cloud is associated with this weather front, diving south, opening the floodgates to a north—westerly wind. these are the isobars, covering all the way from the arctic. that will bring in some colder air the arctic. that will bring in some colderair in our the arctic. that will bring in some colder air in our direction. back to today, this band of cloud, and outbreaks of rain will sink southwards during the evening and night. clearing all but the far south of england. where we hold onto cloud, it's mild overnight and
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further north, as the skies clear, some fog patches and especially in northern england, northern ireland and scotland, a touch of frost is looking likely. even in towns and cities is well down into single digits. tomorrow, it's looking at a decent day. plenty of sunshine around. one ortwo decent day. plenty of sunshine around. one or two showers in the far north, where it will be windy. gales in the northern isles, maybe the odd shower in the east of england as well. a lots of sunshine and temperatures a few notches down, 11-15d. on and temperatures a few notches down, 11—15d. on friday night, the winds will be brisk, in northern areas, more in the way of cloud and outbreaks of rain coming in from the north—west as well. mostly focused across the hills and in the west, misty and murky here. a lot of cloud further south, some brightness, 14—16d. as
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we move out of saturday and into sunday, that is where things begin to feel chilly indeed. low pressure is drifting to the east of us, high pressure to the west, wind coming straight down from the north, temperatures in single digits on sunday and monday. some wintry showers in the far north of scotland and further south, it's tipping away, no more than 11 or 12 degrees by the start of next week. eye balls eyeballs today at 5pm, the husband and wife guilty of planning a terror attack in birmingham. the wife had bought a combat knife for the husband to use. she was found guilty today. experts say that case presents at new perspective.“ challenges what we think of our woman's role. the woman told bilic
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crown court she did not know what the knife was intended for. in barcelona, thousands demand independence from spain but the cata la n independence from spain but the catalan president refuses to call for new regional elections. 300,000 people leave theirjobs every year in the uk because of mental health issues. we will have the results
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