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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 27, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11pm: as catalonia pushes for independence, spain's prime minister calls on senators to approve direct rule over the region. i live in barcelona, where the cata la n i live in barcelona, where the catalan crisis is finally coming to a head. a minister blames north korea for the cyber attack which crippled parts of the nhs in may. open heart surgery appears to be safer in the afternoon, due to the working of the body clock. also, throwing more light on a shocking moment in american history — president trump declassifies 3000 documents related to the assassination ofjohn f kennedy, but keeps others secret. and england face a tough start against australia — as the rugby league world cup kicks off in melbourne. good morning.
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it's friday 27th october. i'm vicki young. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, has called on senators to approve direct rule over catalonia, amid an escalating crisis over the region's push for independence. the catalan parliament could respond by declaring independence. let's cross over live now to my colleague in barcelona. you join me live outside the catalan parliament, where after weeks of turmoil, demonstrations and chaos and anger, this catalan crisis finally looks to be coming to a
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head. in the last few minutes, ca rles head. in the last few minutes, carles puigdemont, the catalan president, arrived here at parliament. we understand one of the motions he put to a vote today is a declaration of independence, a declaration of independence, a declaration that catalonia will be a sovereign state, independent, they will notify the eu, and any think madrid two sides will be irrelevant because it will be outside catalan law. that flies in the face of what madrid believes to be the law and constitution. they believe the referendum held here on the ist of 0ctober where 43% of the turnout voted to leave spain is illegal. here is what mariano rajoy said to the senate an hour ago. translation might what would have been the answer in any country around us in a similar situation? what would most european countries do? what would for example france or
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germany do if one of their regions called an illegal referendum of independence or suspended its constitution or disobeyed the court rules, or didn't allow opposition as such? in my opinion, we have no other all tentative. the only thing we can and should do is to resort to the law in order to keep the law. the other key thing it he said is that breaking the law had consequences. when will this consequences. when will this consequences be imposed, sarah? very soon, it is possible, if the senators approved this plan from the government to impose direct rule over catalonia. then as soon as that is official, it would come into force. the question of course is when the government would actually move to impose those measures and whether it would begin to do that
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gradually and how far it might go. but certainly what it is asking the senate to approve here today is a plan, a proposal, and that would begin with the government here dissolving parliament and calling elections in catalonia. so the madrid government calling elections in catalonia. it would also mean the dismissal of the president, vice president and all his ministers in catalonia. his officers would then come under direct control of madrid, so come under direct control of madrid, so major steps that would follow once this is approved but as i say, it is not clear exactly when the government would move to take those steps. it is certainly looking now for the authority to do that when it deems necessary. but mariano rajoy, the prime minister, speaking here to the prime minister, speaking here to the senate, asking for the approval by the senators here, it was a very strong speech from a man who is known for sitting on the fence. he
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is not known at a tough talker but he was talking tough today and i think he wants to send a strong message. he said this was an extraordinary situation so these we re extraordinary situation so these were extraordinary measures. he said they were measures laid down in spanish law, in the constitution and he had no choice but to take these steps. he said he had been forced into this position. he denied there was a lack of will for dialogue here in madrid. he blamed that on the cata la n in madrid. he blamed that on the catalan authorities, saying all they wa nted catalan authorities, saying all they wanted was to push for independence and that that was an illegal move. rajoy said that is why the spanish government were being forced to take that step. he was applauded when he went into the senate. he has a majority there. so is there any question that the senate might vote against imposing article 155? i don't think so. the socialist party has broadly spoken in support of article 150 five. there is
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dispute about some of its measures, some of the points within that. particularly the question of whether the government here in madrid would ta ke the government here in madrid would take control of publicly controlled media in catalonia. catalan media has objected to that outside the senate here in madrid today. the socialist party has been trying to soften article 155 but broadly speaking, it does approve of this measure. i don't think there's any surprises expected. we are expecting the senate to approve that. the question then is a time frame for when those measures might be implemented. that in a sense is up in the air but mr rajoy has said he would move to dissolve the catalan parliament and he would call for elections there to happen as quickly as possible. they are supposed to ta ke as possible. they are supposed to take place within six months but he says he would move for that to happen as quickly as was physically possible. thank you, sarah in madrid. let's
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speak now to a prounion with spain campaignerand speak now to a prounion with spain campaigner and activist. we have spoken to you a lot in the last couple of weeks. do you worry about direct rule being imposed here and the reaction of the millions of people who want to leave spain? good morning. i do worry. actually, this follows the path. that it is a policy of the worse things get, the better for them. they have policy of the worse things get, the betterfor them. they have been trying for a very long time and now they are calling for mobilising to resist the authorities. so actually it is going to be taking to the streets and it is a very divided society. you will see in the next few days. we think it will go to the vote in the catalan parliament. maybe an hour or two or a day before it is dissolved. is there a risk that ca rles it is dissolved. is there a risk that carles puigdemont could lose this pot—macro? he has a majority of
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72 in this pot—macro? he has a majority of 72ina this pot—macro? he has a majority of 72 in a 135 seat assembly. the parliament is going to be dissolved. the government will actually be removed,. —— the parliament will not be dissolved. the prosecutor cannot accuse different mps of rebelling. but the irony is that if you are going to succeed, why should you ca re going to succeed, why should you care about what the spanish government will accuse you of? —— if you are going to cecede. it has been an ongoing game for a long time. do you expect big demonstrations here on the street and civil disobedience? there is no history of violence here but it will be tough for madrid to impose direct rule. there will be demonstrations. the
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nationalists are very organised. it isa nationalists are very organised. it is a weekend so people will come out onto the street. my personal opinion is that the government should do nothing about it, they should just let people demonstrate until things fall into place. but you, as somebody who wants to stay with madrid, you represent or speak for millions of people here as well. is there a sort of sign of relief that finally madrid is stepping up to the plate and taking action? there is no relief in all of this. nobody is happy that they have to take a hard decision. whenever any of us have to make this kind of decision, it is because there is no other solution. there is no relief. things needed to get done, but i am personally very sad today. but will it potentially
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fuelled the separatist cause?m might, it might not, but what will you do? everybody as dalit asks questions, but what you do when you reach this point? —— everybody asks questions. no matter what you do, everything will get worse. so that is the situation here. carles puigdemont has arrived in the last 20 minutes or so in parliament. let's see how the voting goes, how it goes in madrid here. we are following every turn of the story. that was reported in barcelona and we will be getting more from him throughout the day. some breaking news from the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, who has written to the prime minister about the plans for brexit, particularly the
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government's plans for a transition period wants the uk leads. nicola sturgeon is seeking urgent clarity from theresa may she's concerned in this letter. she says business needs to know what is happening and she has been concerned about comments this week from the prime minister in which she has said that a transition period could only be finalised once we knew about our future relationship. there has been a lot of concern this week at westminster to about how exactly these plans are going. the prime minister and the government had said they are confident they can agree this transition period in the first quarter of next year. they filled the eu is the same as them on all of this but nicola sturgeon says she's very concerned for business to know what is happening, seeking much clarity there, and she says chiefly as the uk government's negotiating position could result in a no deal scenario. we will be speaking to
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scotla nd scenario. we will be speaking to scotland correspondent in the next few minutes about all of that. nicola sturgeon seeking clarity from the british prime minister about a transition period after brexit. the security minister, ben wallace, has blamed north korea for the cyber attack which crippled parts of the nhs in may. the national audit office has found that the attack could have been blocked if basic it security measures had been in place, and it's called on the health service to develop a clear plan to confront future threats. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. it was an attack which froze computers around the world. but the nhs was among the organisations worst affected and the national audit office says it was ill—prepared. the report details the impact of the worst ever cyber attack on the health service. 81 health trusts across england were affected, a third of the total. it's thought over 19,000 appointments ended up being cancelled, including 139 potential cancer referrals. what planning there had been to deal with a cyber attackjust hadn't
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filtered down to the hospitals. some work had been done on a national cyber response plan in the nhs, but that hadn't been well communicated to all of those local bodies and in some cases organisations had to resort to telephone and paper and pen and apps such as whatsapp in terms of communicating with others. those hospitals which saw computers infected by the malicious software had ignored instructions to install a security patch which would have protected them. now the nhs says lessons have been learned. we have been getting our act together. we are getting our act together. we're putting funding in. we're putting education in. we're rolling out the programmes that were in place before this attack and we will continue to improve over time. there are more serious cyber attackers waiting to strike. hospital trusts are warning the government they may need to spend more money
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to strengthen their defences. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. since the report, the government has repeated its claim this morning that the attack is likely to have been launched from north korea. there are strong signs it came from north korea, and ourselves and the united states also agree with that. stay with us here on bbc newsroom live. at 11:30am i will be speaking toa live. at 11:30am i will be speaking to a former government cyber security official about how the nhs could improve their systems. the australian supreme court has ruled that the deputy prime minister
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must be disqualified as he held dual nationality with new zealand when he was elected. 0ur reporter is in sydney. barnabyjoyce says that he wasn't surprised by the high court's decision, and clearly when you look at what the seven judges have had to say, clearly ignorance is no defence. these seven members of the citizenship seven had all argued that they simply didn't know that they were citizens of another country at last year's election. but the judges have said, well, you should have known, certainly in the cases of five of those parliamentarians, barnaby joyce being one of them. he will now face a by—election. the political futures of the other four are uncertain. what is certain is that they won't be sitting in parliament until at least the next election. two other members of the upper house of the australian parliament have been cleared of any wrongdoing. their political careers will continue. but it's safe to say not only has the centre—right government
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lost its narrow, one—seat majority for now at least, it is very embarrassing for the administration of the prime minister, malcolm turnbull. headlines: as catalonia pushes for independence, spain's prime minister calls for senators to approve direct rule over the region. a minister blames north korea for the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs in may. and open heart surgery appears to be safer in the afternoon due to be working of our body clocks. and in sport. australia are showing why they are the world champions as the co—hosts put on an impressive first half performance against england in the opening match of the rugby league world cup. they are into the second half now in melbourne. australia are leading
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10-4. billy slater with their second cancelling out engalnd's early score. harry kane has been ruled out of tottenham's match with manchester united on saturday. the striker‘s picked up a hamstring strain. he scored twice against liverpool last weekend. and joe marler will be available for two of england's autumn internationals against australia and samoa, if selected. he had been ruled out, but his club side harlequins have successfully argued his ban for striking should start sooner. i'll be back with more on those stories. president trump has declassified almost 3000 documents related to the assassination ofjohn f. kennedy in 1963, but he decided to keep hundreds of other files secret, at least for the time being, at the request of security agencies. 0ne document reveals a british local newspaper, the cambridge news, received an anonymous call about some big news in the usjust minutes
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before president kennedy was assassinated. page after page. previously top—secret documents, many of them handwritten, from the investigation into the assassination ofjohn f kennedy. it was november 22, 1963 when lee harvey oswald shot the president as he was travelling in an open top limousine in dallas. newsreel: it appears as though something has happened in the motorcade group. the official investigation concluded that 0swald had acted alone. newsreel: president kennedy has been assassinated. it's official now. the president is dead. but more than 50 years later, many americans find it difficult to believe the official version of what happened. conspiracy theorists think information could have been withheld to avoid embarrassing government agencies. historians, journalists and legal scholars are now poring over the almost 3,000 documents just released, searching for clues to discrepancies in the original story or new facts to back it up. several hundred documents have been held back for further scrutiny. there will be a six—month review period after the cia
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and fbi expressed concerns about their content. it's a move that will only fuel the conspiracy theories. peter bowes, bbc news. more now on the breaking news that the first minister of scotland is seeking urgent clarity from the prime minister on the proposed transition arrangements as the uk leads the european union. report in glasgow. —— the uk leads the european union. she is calling for clarity as they want to make plans as soon as possible as britain back i’ow as soon as possible as britain back row three the european union. nicola sturgeon wants to discuss comments earlier this week suggesting that they could not be a transition deal
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between the uk and eu until there was a final deal between them. so the clarification that nicola sturgeon wants is that the prime minister will make a decision that there will be a deal on a transition by the end of this year, and perhaps as significantly as that, she says that in her view, it is the case that in her view, it is the case that no brexit is preferable to no deal or a bad deal. that no brexit is preferable to no deal ora bad deal. so that no brexit is preferable to no deal or a bad deal. so in other words, stating her case that she believes that scotland and the rest of the united kingdom should stay within the european union. if there is no deal, if there is a possibility of britain leaving the eu without a deal, or, as she puts it, a bad deal. nicola sturgeon pointing out that scotland did vote to stay in the eu. she also wants britain to stay in the customs union. she has been unhappy with the talks in her discussion with
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collea g u es talks in her discussion with colleagues at westminster about how much they are talking to the scottish government about what is going on. there have been feelings in scotland that those talks have been cosmetic. the uk government says it is consulting with devolved administrations but actually in terms of making policy or taking pa rt terms of making policy or taking part of the different needs of different parts of the uk, this hasn't happened. and there is this worried that when the palace comeback, if and when the powers comeback, if and when the powers come back to the united kingdom, —— when the powers come back, whether they will be devolved to the devolved nations in the way that nicola sturgeon thinks they should be. so there is a lot of disagreement between the first minister and the prime minister on a range of issues. the uk competition watchdog will investigate hotel websites to see if
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consumers are being misled by them. the investigation will examine issues such as hidden charges and discount claims. i am joined by a senior director of the competition and markets authority. thank you. many people watching this will have used these websites. 0ne watching this will have used these websites. one thing that strikes me is when you start looking, suddenly it tells you, there are 500 people looking at this room. is that one of the things you are looking at? exactly. 0ne concern is people are bombarded with those messages, so like you say, six people are looking at this sight. we don't know the basis of those claims. we want to look at this. we worry that people will be rushed into booking what might not be their best deal, under pressure. and can we be sure that these websites are offering the best
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deal? comparison sites are usually a great thing. but they need to provide clear and accurate information. that is what this investigation is about, to make sure they are doing that, not misleading consumers, and not breaking consumer law. can you shed on a dalit -- any light on how hotels and hostels are ranked? what people do not may be no is that commercial factors such as commission may come into rankings. that is not of interest to the consumer. they might choose the suggested hotel and not know it is influenced by commission, something not relevant to them. but they have chosen something better to suit
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their needs. are they all paying commission, and who are they paying it to? we have done an initial review of sites. we want to write out to all the sites and find out more about their practices, what they are doing, not doing it, what they are doing, not doing it, what they are doing, not doing it, what they are showing consumers, the basis for these practices, so we can see whether they are breaking consumer law. we want to hear from consumers. we have opened up a survey to ask what people's experiences of. and you think some of these may be going on, presumably, otherwise he would not be launching this investigation. 0ver be launching this investigation. over the last few months we have added a number of complaints, from consumers and also the sector. we have done our initial review of sights which has led us to have these concerns. we are opening this investigation. there is a lot of interest because, like you said,
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actually this resonates with people. it makes them feel actually maybe it hasn't been the best experience and we wa nt hasn't been the best experience and we want to make sure it is. but you do think they are a force for good generally? yes. we want to make sure they really are a force for good and we wa nt they really are a force for good and we want to make sure the information is clear and accurate and consumers get the best deal. thank you very much. thousands of children across england are not getting the mental health service they need. the care quality commission's damning report found that services are too fragmented and difficult to access. 0ur correspondent has more. alice battled anorexia throughout her teenage years. she waited around six months for a mental health assessment and to get specialist treatment, she was told she'd have to travel 100 miles from her home. she's concerned some young people are still waiting too long. we're talking about young people with mental health problems that are so distressed with their own minds that they don't even know how they're going to get through the day
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and to then turn around to them and ask them to wait, you know, six, 12, 18 months for the help that they desperately need is incredibly distressing. the care quality commission report suggests 39% of specialist community services need improving. it warns services are too fragmented and a more joined—up approach is needed. the report highlights evidence that one in four children who needed care were unable to access it. the commission warns children's lives may be being put at risk because of the failings. suicide is one of the leading causes of death in young people. what we do know is that waiting a long time, or not being able to access a service when you need it, inherently increases the risk. alice welcomes the government's promised to invest an extra £1.11 billion into children's mental health services over the next four years. the care quality commission has revealed the scale of the problems. its next piece of work
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will be to come up with some detailed solutions. rob sissons, bbc news. french scientists say patients who have heart surgery in the afternoon are have heart surgery in the afternoon a re less have heart surgery in the afternoon are less likely to suffer complications. their research published in the lancet medical journal argues that the body clock makes the heart stronger in the afternoon than the morning, and more able to withstand the rigours of surgery. 0ur guest is an expert in the human body clock and joins us from cambridge. can you explain why the body may be able to cope with heart surgery in the afternoon that the morning? it is not terribly surprised. there are decades of research we have a rated on a basic research, saying every single cell of the body has its own
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approximately 24—hour timing mechanism. and how that is manifest depends on the different cell types. so in the brain, neurons are more active during the day, anticipating wa kefulness active during the day, anticipating wakefulness and behaviour, whereas they tend to anticipate sleep at night. similarly, in the heart, the cells, the cardiomyopathy is, anticipate being more active in the afternoon. this is why we see improved performance from athletes in the mid to late afternoon. it is not entirely surprising then that the best activity of the heart is normally observed in the afternoon and that it is better able to tolerate surgical intervention then. and the research factored in that it is not the surgeon performing at a different level in the afternoon to the morning? that is an excellent
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question. in my opinion, having read the paper, they did not really adequately correct for that possibility. it is possible that a different level of performance from the surgical team could have contributed to the difference in outcomes, yes. the significance of this, presumably if you are somebody who is about to face had surgery, you might be pretty alarmed if you get giving your appointment and it is for the morning. it is not practicalfor is for the morning. it is not practical for the is for the morning. it is not practicalfor the nhs is for the morning. it is not practical for the nhs to shift all had surgery to the afternoon. absolutely not. and it is important to stress that there is no reason for concern at the moment. this is a single cohort study from a single hospital in france, and overall we are only talking about two or four surgeons in each case, depending on which aspects of the clinical trial you are looking at. so certainly, if i was going for an aortic valve
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replacement, at this particular hospital in france, i would be wanting to be seen in the afternoon, but that does not mean we can generalise all hospitals, and we certainly cannot generalise to all surgeries at the moment. the second thing to point out is there is a broad distribution of kroner type amongst the population, and by that imean amongst the population, and by that i mean whether you are a morning person or a night person or somewhere in the middle. what would be quite feasible would be to understand what biological time somebody‘s body is at compare it to the real—time of night or day and scheduled their surgery for an appropriate time, rather than saying eve ryo ne appropriate time, rather than saying everyone should be done in the afternoon. i must stress that only should we consider doing this if this clinical trial stands up to being reproduced in other centres. now the weather. thank you. we have
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patchy fognini still affected parts of north—west england, but for many of north—west england, but for many of us it is glorious out there this is just of us it is glorious out there this isjust one of of us it is glorious out there this is just one of the many scenes we have had from our weather watchers of those blue sky, there will be little change into this afternoon, a bit more after breeze affecting the far north of scotland but with light winds feeling pleasant when that sun comes out. temperatures about 11 or 12 in northern area, up to 15 in the south, just a bit chillier than the last couple of day, overnight tonight, we will see more cloud rolling into northern and western areas, clear skies down to the south—east. it will be chilly to ta ke south—east. it will be chilly to take us into saturday morning. a windy day in the northern half of the uk, specially to the north east, and that is where we will have some sunshine because north east england, eastern scotland and central and south—east areas of england, further north—west staying cloudy, maximum
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temperatures tomorrow about 13—16. see you in a this is bbc news — our latest headlines. spain's prime minister calls on senators to approve direct rule over catalonia — while calls for independence continue in the region. an independent investigation has found that the cyber attack which crippled parts of the nhs in may could have been prevented — if "basic" security measures had been in place. new research suggests open heart surgery is safer in the afternoon because of the body's internal clock. the report suggests that hearts are stronger in the afternoon, so better able to withstand surgery. president trump has realised some 3000 files relating to the assassination ofjohn f kennedy — while others remain classified. scottish first minister nicola sturgeon is seeking "urgent clarity" from the prime minister on the proposed transition arrangements as the uk leaves the eu. john
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as the uk leaves the eu. has the latest sport. australia have been showing why they are the world's best in the opening match of the rugby league world cup — the co—hosts leading england midway through the second half in the tournament opener in melbourne. it was a great start by england, they scored first, through jermaine mcgillvary. but they were soon pegged back as australia's pressure told. sam baurjess has gone off with an injury. sam baurjess has gone off with an injury. these two sides, two of the pre tournament favourites to be contesting the final in brisbane on the second december. scotland, wales and ireland also competing. wales get their tournament under way against co—hosts papua new guinea tomorrow. they got a warm welcome on arrival in the capital port morseby, but can expect something very different on the pitch. scotland face new zealand in their opening match. they are three of 1a teams
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competing, spread out over six weeks of action. and if you want to catch the closing stages, there's live coverage over on bbc two and commentary on bbc radio 5live sports extra. the rugby union world cup is two years away — england head coach eddiejones selecting several new faces in his squad for the autumn internationals next month with that in mind. after being left out, propjoe marler is now available for selection for two of the three matches after his club successfully argued his ban for striking should start sooner than a disciplinary panel had initially ruled. so asjones prepares his team, he could recall marler for matches with australia and samoa, the first of those on the 18th. tottenham striker harry kane will miss tomorrow's premier league game at manchester united with a hamstring injury. kane scored twice as spurs beat liverpool 4—1 on sunday, but he had to be substituted late
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in the game, and now manager mauricio pochettino says he's been diagnosed with a minor hamstring strain. kane the leading premier league goal—scorer this season with eight goals. all eyes on the prinicpality stadium in cardiff this weekend — known for hosting rugby more than boxing. not this weekend, as anthonyjoshua looks to successfully defend his ibf and wba world titles against the stand—in challenger carlos ta kam. the pairfaced off in the welsh capital yesterday. joshua was due to face the bulgarian kubrat pulev, but he had to withdraw, because of injury. it'll be the briton's first contest since defeating wladimir klitschko, at wembley in april. the mind set of a fighter has to be leave that where it was, move on to the next opportunity. if i am living
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off past wins i might as well give up. because boxing is unforgive, i can't say i won the last one. because boxing is unforgive, i can't say i won the last one. more than 100,000 people are expected to attend the wales rally gb over the weekend. the event got under way last night, with organisers putting increased interest down to new more powerful cars and the success of drivers. they include northern ireland's kris meeke, who won the last round of the world rally ing,i ing, ican't ing, i can't say i won the last one. they have tried to recapture the 1980, for sure i think that lifts the interest. now we have quite a few drivers at the top level, from this area, a local guy from wales, craig green from ireland. there is a
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few fa ns craig green from ireland. there is a few fans out there who are willing us few fans out there who are willing uso few fans out there who are willing us o on, it is great to see the event well supported. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. more now on one of main stories this morning and an investigation has found that a cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs in may could have been prevented if "basic it security measures" had been in place. the national audit office said the health service was not prepared for the wannacry attack in which criminals froze nhs computers and demanded a ransom. it calls on the nhs to develop a clear plan to deal with future threats. brian lord joins us now from bristol. he's managing director of cyber—security company pgi and used to be deputy director of intelligence and cyber operations at gchq. thank you forjoining us to discuss this, this report sounds pretty critical of the nhs, do you think they had done enough to possibly prevent this? i certainly think they could have probably done more to, more to prevent it. i don't think it
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a zero sum gain, i don't think it is an issue there would have been effect or there would. i think there are three area, first of all, yes, the report is absolutely right, there were quite clearly some really basic it security measures, that should have been in place, that weren't. there is really no excuse for that. i think the other angle which is slightly more, slightly more open to debate is the magnitude of the attack, it has just as much to do with how the organisation reacted, as opposed to some the technological issues so a lot the action systems that were taken down that didn't need to be and there was know effective governance of how to deal with an attack of this type. this that is a governance security measure and the third element is of course, organisations not just like the nhs are so dependent on technology now, that there always
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seemed to be a neglect about how much time, effort and investment is put in to maintain those critical dependencies, that is also an issue thatis dependencies, that is also an issue that is at fault there and that is an issue of strategic investment, as opposed to technological fail, so i think the failings run across a number of issues ant just think the failings run across a number of issues antjust round it security and aren't just number of issues antjust round it security and aren'tjust nhs specific. the way that the attack happened, how it managed to get into the system, was that something that should have been foreseen, how did it happen? well, i think what happened was it was basically an almalaga macing of publicly available malware almalaga macing of publicly available malwa re and almalaga macing of publicly available malware and exploits. it wasn't sophisticated. if i can put it in real world experience, it is the equivalent of having a key to every door, opening the door, putting a hand grenade in and closing the door. it had an about to spread across networks and networks
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that are very wide and complex, they are susceptible to this, that is why the nhs and other large organisations were affected. and going back to the original point you made, this of course is all part of a wider attempt by malicious actors to work out how do you disable large organisations, who are spread across multiple sites. what do you make of the claim by the security minister who says believes and the government believes north korea was responsible for this? i think he probably has access to more information than i have but it is a sound conclusion it has been no secret that north korea and other state, so notjust north korea, north korea and other states have been working out how does one develop capability that creates a disruptive effect on an adversary which can be applied earlier on in the state on state tension process.
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most cyber attacks can be described, those in the public mind as an act of war taking down critical national infrastructure, if you with work out a which of disrupting large corporate organisations or public service provision and creating disruption, that can be applied in state on state conflict earlier on in the process, this is the area we probably need to worry about most. 0k. thank you very much. 0ur correspondentjoe black is in ills britain for us, can you tell us what has been happening in court this morning? yes. many people remember this was the crash which took place on southbound carriageway of the m1 in buckinghamshire near newport pagnell on 26th august, the bank holiday weekend. it happened in
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the early hours, hours, it was involving a minibus and two hgv, sadly as you mentioned there, eight people lost their lives, six men and two women. four people were also seriously injured, and among that four was a five—year—old girl, who was seriously injured and sadly she also lost her mother and father in that crash. not only was there loss of life and the people who suggestion stained the injuries but it caused so much disruption and the motorway was closed for several hours while the police and the emergency services attended the scene. in court today, the two drivers of both lorries involved in the crash have been here, standing side by side in the dock, it's the first time they have been standing side by side, they have been attending previous court cases in the early process, the early legal process of this case, but this is the first time they have been here together. so a polish national is
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charged with death by dangerous driving, eight counts of that charge, he pleaded not guilty. he is also charged with serious injury by dangerous driving. he pleaded not guilty to those charges. this second driver david wagstaff is also charged with eight counts of death by dangerous driving. he pleaded not guilty to that, but he pleaded not guilty to that, but he pleaded guilty to careless driving. he also faces charges. four charges of serious injury by dangerous driving. he pleaded not guilty but did again please guilty to careless driving, the prosecution didn't accept those pleas and both drivers will face the trial next year in february. apologies for the slight problems where the sound on the line there. as the global threat of antibiotic resistance continues to grow, steps are being taken to reduce the unnecessary use of these vital drugs —
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both by people and in animals. later this morning, the department for environment, food and rural affairs will publish a report showing sales of antibiotics for use in animals in the uk have fallen to their lowest level since records began in 1993. fiona lamdin has more on the progress that's been made. cats hill farm in west wiltshire, a cow creche for 350 calves. we change the teats on the machines every morning and every evening. we take them out and clean them and put them in a pot of disinfectant solution. and just as you'd expect with a child's nursery, with so many young calves living in one barn, bugs are rife here. this process has really dropped antibiotic usage by about 50% across the calf group in here. it's just stopping the spread of disease through the teats, with all the calves coming in all the time drinking and spreading germs. jo's not unique, but her farming is progressive. taking steps to ensure her animals don't get ill. but when it gets cold, smaller calves like this one are much more prone to getting
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poorly, and so they end up on antibiotics. so now, they're keeping them warm so they stay healthy in the first place. and just in case that wasn't enough, on the outside she has even installed blinds. we get a lot of ground level draught so we need to keep that away from the calves, because itjust causes environmental stress for them and chills them down and can lead to pneumonia, and therefore, antibiotic use. antibiotics on this farm are now only used when an animal is very ill. three years ago, when we would have had batches of calves come in, they would have all been on antibiotic treatment, now we're just treating on case by case. so this week i have only got two animals on antibiotics. last week, it was only six. and over in somerset, bristol university is researching the global impact antibiotics have on livestock. sheep, cattle, pigs, poultry, any livestock, any animal for that matter is susceptible to disease just like we are.
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using antibiotics to boost growth was banned by the eu over a decade ago. so farmers are now only using them to either treat or prevent disease. it's really important that we use less antibiotics, because wherever we use antibiotics, bacteria can become resistant and those bacteria might cause disease, either in animals or people. but it's notjust down to the agricultural world. here in the uk, it's us humans which are consuming well over half of all antibiotics. compared with just 37% used to treat animals. today, though, the spotlight is firmly on the farming community and the message is clear — with no new antibiotics being developed, less really is best. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first,
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the headlines on bbc newsroom live. as catalonia pushes for independence — spain's prime minister calls on senators to approve direct rule over the region. nicola sturgeon writes to the prime minister to tell her that no brexit is better than no deal. hello, in the business news in morning. hello, in the business news in morning. have you been mislead by a hotel booking site? the uk's competition watchdog says they will look into clarity, accuracy and presentation of information. 70% of people who shop around for accommodation use hotel booking sites. the investigation will examine hidden charges, search results, and discount claims. royal bank of scotland has said it is "on track" after seeing a £392m profit for the july—to—september period. it's only the second time in almost ten years that the bank has turned a profit for three quarters in a row. but they can't be sure a full—year profit, because of penalties that may arise from a dispute with the us
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department ofjustice over claims claims that rbs mis—sold mortgage bonds leading up to the 2008 banking crisis. tech giants amazon and google's parent alphabet have posted a surge in sales over the last three months. shares in alphabetjumped after the company reported sales up 24%. amazon sales are up 34% and analysts now estimate that this year amazon will be responsible for almost half of everything sold online. iag, the owner of ba, saw its shares fall today despite posting a rise in profits of 22.5%. it's been a difficult few months, with it failures and cabin crew strikes, extreme weather and the impact of terrorism on tourism — but compared to last year, shares still remain up 55%, as budget airlines like air berlin and monarch fail, so what is iag getting right? alex macheras is an aviation analyst.
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thank you forjoining us on the programme. given all the challenges they have faced, how have they managed to still post rising profits? good morning, well, these are strong results from the iag group and they are the parent company owner of british airways here in the uk, spanish airlines and ireland's national carrier, what they have done well is through this consolidation, they have enabled and outlined a strategy clear for each airline to serve a purpose to work towards profit. they have done that well. there is no middle ground uncertainty as to what airline is doing where. that is what hit airlines and iag have benefitted from their insolvency and bankruptcy like. how have they benefitted from the failure of other airlines? in the failure of other airlines? in the last month alone, we have had
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the last month alone, we have had the insolvency and monarch tern administration, we have an italian airline on the verge of bankruptcy and almost gone air berlin. with that comes the flow of passenger traffic but it shows investors that iag are doing something right. they are year on year returning to profit and boosting that and if they are able to survive, in the european aviation climate, then it begs the question what are they doing right? it is through that consolidated model they have established being based in spain. they have been explosioned to other external factor, terrorism, extreme weather but on the whole they are doing very well. if the profits are up they are doing well, why is the share price down? it tends to fluctuate. in the last month alone it tend into increase. it is 5%. at the moment aviation in europe isn't at its
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best. they are widely unrelated. alit 258ia's problems are separate to air berlin and monarch have been on financial difficulty for year, they can't be connected. it cites an image that european aviation is uncertain but on the whole it is doing 0k. thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for your time. in other business news. more of us are declaring ourselves insolvent, according to figures from the office for national statistics. they say more than 25,000 individuals were declared insolvent in england and wales in the three months to the end of september — that includes bankruptcies, debt relief orders and individual voluntary arrangements which have reached a record high. more compliance issues forjapanese companies — following a similar revelation by nissan, subaru has said it too has failed to follow proper inspection procedures for vehicles destined for the domestic market for more than 30 years. and bye bye buy — it's the end of an era for the hing kong stock exchange as the trading floor closes after 31 years of buy and sell. once the floor was home to more than a thousand traders — recentlyjust a handful used it
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as electronic and internet trading changed the industry irrevocably. let's look at the markets. we have the all 0rdinaries, because a court has ruled that the deputy pm, barnabyjoyce, and four other politicians were wrongly elected because they held dual citizenship — strips the government of its one seat majority. alia's problems are separate to air berlin and monarch have been on financial difficulty for year, they can't be connected. it cites an image that european aviation is uncertain but on the whole it is doing 0k. thank you very much for your time. i will be back with more in the afternoon. bye. we have some breaking news coming from the un rights mission, who have been on a trip to bangladesh. now,
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they have been reporting on accounts from a hen afters who they say their accou nts from a hen afters who they say their accounts point to consistent pattern of action, resulting in gross human rights violations affected hundreds of thousands of people. the un rights mission goes on to say the death toll from the myanmar army so—called clearance operations, they said the death toll is unknown but it may turn out to be extremely high. the winner of the royal institute of british architects' most prestigious award — the stirling prize — will be announced next tuesday. the nominations to become britain's best new building 2017 include a new college campus in glasgow, a london housing development and a photographer's studio. today, we take a look at hastings pier which has been redeveloped after it was almost completely destroyed by fire in 2010. the trust wanted to reconstruct the
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pier, but everybody knew it could not be a copy of what it was, no sense in trying to reconstruct it as a 19th century pier. that has gone, with the fire. so there was an opportunity to reuse, reinvent the pier and give it a new future. 0ne one of the things that makes this project special is the lack of buildings. you expect a private pier covered in stuff, for which you will
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charge money, instead you have a free space, and no buildings. when talking with population of hastings, it has to be all things to all people. what made it special was actually the fact we were able to make simplya actually the fact we were able to make simply a platform for events and experience, and for temporary structures. it's a privilege to be able to be on the pier, it was so nearly lost, my daughter was six when it first closed. she was ten when it first closed. she was ten when it first closed. she was ten when it burned down, now she is 17. this is a project for the future generation, and i am so proud we did it as generation, and i am so proud we did itasa generation, and i am so proud we did it as a town, as a community, and that it it as a town, as a community, and thatitis it as a town, as a community, and that it is in community ownership now and it will be forever. and you can see all the nominated buildings on the bbc arts website and find out who is the winner, live on the news channel next tuesday between 8.30 and 9 o'clock. time for the weather now with simon. good morning, we have had a chilly
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start this morning, temperatures down into fairly low single figures but with clear skies has meant we have lovely sunshine out there at the moment. this is the scene in shropshire. more blue skies there in buckinghamshire, but it hasn't been like this everywhere. in fact outside the studios here in salford we have had a pea super. that is live shot now. it is still misty out there at moment. if you have mist and fog it will continue to clear away and as you can see for many of us, it is dry, with sunshine. now across scotland, this afternoon, there will be a bit more a breeze affecting the far north and west, and a bit chillier compared to yesterday. temperatures about ten or 11 but good spells of sunshine for many. lots of sunshine for northern ireland and northern parts of england. any mist and fog across north—west areas tending to clear. the same goes for the midland, you will notice in the south—east it will notice in the south—east it will be chillier compared to yesterday, temperatures the about 1k
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or 15 degrees this afternoon. compare this to the 18 we have had. through tonight the higher parish which is giving us the fine, dry, settled day, that will drift and allow a strengthening wind, with it cloud, rain in western scotland. with clearer spells down to the south—east, turning chilly on saturday morning. a chilly start. we will have some sunshine towards the's of any higher ground, so east wales, the midlands, southern and eastern areas, elsewhere it will be cloudiment some spots of rain and a... top temperatures about 14—16 celsius, an then it is as we go into sunday when for some of us it will get colder, you can see the cold air the blues oozing south warted across
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many northern and eastern areas. while you have a bit of cloud here temperatures will be about 13 or 1a, but noticeably colder towards the northern around iron area, temperatures at best in newcastle about nine celsius with a brisk northerly wind. 0n about nine celsius with a brisk northerly wind. on sunday morning, the clocks go back by one hour, that means you get to enjoy another hour in bed, unless you have you small kids like me when you're not. bye. and the this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 12: as catalonia pushes for independence, spain's prime minister calls on senators to approve direct rule over the region. this is scene live from the catalan regional parliament in barcelona, to do this.
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nicola sturgeon writes to the prime minister to tell her no brexit is better than no deal. also, throwing more light on a shocking moment in american history — president trump declassifies 3000 documents related to the assassination ofjohn f kennedy, but keeps others secret. to show that a cambridge newspaper received a mr recall about big news in america before jfk received a mr recall about big news in america beforejfk was assassinated. and england lose their opening game as the rugby league world cup. good afternoon.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, has called on senators to approve direct rule over catalonia, amid an escalating crisis over the region's push for independence. the catalan parliament could respond by declaring independence. let's cross over live now to my colleague in barcelona. 26 days after the illegal referendum, according to madrid, and this catalan crisis is finally, it seems, coming to a head. there have been weeks of demonstrations, turmoil, brinkmanship between madrid and barcelona, but now the catalan parliament, perhaps for the last time ina parliament, perhaps for the last time in a long time, is meeting, and we are expecting a date to be taking
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place in the next few hours, where independence will be declared. the motion is for a false offering state, independence from the rest —— a full, sovereign state, independence from the rest of spain and telling the rest of the world that catalonia is the world's newest state. the spanish prime minister has been addressing the senate in madrid. he has a majority there. a few hours ago he said that ignoring the law had consequences. this is pa rt the law had consequences. this is part of what he had a few —— what he had to say. translation: what would have been the answer in any country around us in a similar situation? what would most european countries do? what would, for example, france or germany do, if one of their regions called an illegal referendum of independence, or suspended its constitution, or disobeyed the court rules, or didn't allow opposition as such? in my opinion, we have no other alternative. the only thing we can
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and should do is to resort to the law in order to keep the law. 0utside outside the parliament area here, there are crowds of people who believe that now, finally, independence will be declared. they are the hard—line separatists, who have been driving his whole campaign with carles puigdemont, but there is also a significant number of people in this region who don't want to lead spain. let's go to madrid now and speak to our reporterjust to see when that vote in the senate is expected and what happens next. yes, the vote here is expected mid afternoon. that could slip slightly but it will take place and the expectation here is that the government's plan to implement
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article 155 of the constitution, direct rule from here in madrid over catalonia, will be approved. the governing party has a majority here in the senate and it has the support of the socialists as well. so we are expecting the move to be approved. what that means in terms of when it's implemented, or when the government begins to implement that, we are not quite sure but we have heard a very strong statement of intent by mariano rajoy, the prime minister here, not known as a man who is prone to strong speeches, he did make one today. he said that the referendum in catalonia had been an illegal one and he said this was a step that was absolutely critical to return law and legality to spain as a whole. beginning there in catalu nya. a whole. beginning there in catalunya. he said this was a return to democracy, a return to the rule of law. he said he had been forced
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to this by separatist actions in catalonia. there were threatening spain's image, they were threatening the economy here and there was no alternative. we expect the... a strong message from the prime minister here in madrid. let's speak to a driving force in the separatist movement, a lecturer at the university here. you tweeted yesterday when you thought that ca rles yesterday when you thought that carles puigdemont was going to call elections, you said, fraud. yesterday the day when catalonia votes for independence? yesterday the day when catalonia votes for independence ?|j yesterday the day when catalonia votes for independence? i expect so andi votes for independence? i expect so and i think most people here, and thousands of people flocking into barcelona from most parts of catalonia also are expecting so. 700 local mayors have been walking into this building as well. so this will
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bea this building as well. so this will be a big vote in front of the whole world, even though it will be shortly? well, we don't know whether it will be short lived. according to madrid. according to madrid. how this new republic can manage to survive more than a few others, if it manages that more than a few days, i think that there's a —— some countries in europe will have to ta ke countries in europe will have to take some position. which ones? if i had an idea i would not be able to tell anybody. so madrid, we understand, will invoke article 155, it will pass by the senate. what happens here on the streets? will there be mass demonstrations? that is up to madrid. if madrid takes an aggressive stance, the new republic will have to resist, but that... what do you mean by resist? will have to resist, but that... what do you mean by resist7m depends how progressive madrid becomes. if the spanish police take
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an aggressive stance like they did in october the 1st, then we might have to resist like we had to resist on october the 1st, and that is up to madrid and the rest of europe also to witness what the catalans are able to resist. thank you very much. so that is the situation as it is at the moment outside the catalan parliament. we expect a vote here but we also expect that vote in madrid. we will keep you up—to—date with both sides of the story. thank you. an investigation into the cyber attack that brought down parts of the nhs in may has found that it could have been prevented if basic security measures had been in place. the national audit office says that the health service wasn't prepared for the attack, which saw criminals freeze computers and demand a ransom. it calls on the nhs to develop a clear plan to deal with future threats, here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. it was an attack which froze computers around the world. but the nhs was among the organisations worst affected
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and the national audit office says it was ill—prepared. the report details the impact of the worst ever cyber attack on the health service. 81 health trusts across england were affected, a third of the total. it's thought over 19,000 appointments ended up being cancelled, including 139 potential cancer referrals. what planning there had been to deal with a cyber attackjust hadn't filtered down to the hospitals. some work had been done on a national cyber response plan in the nhs, but that hadn't been well communicated to all of those local bodies and in some cases organisations had to resort to telephone and paper and pen and apps such as whatsapp in terms of communicating with others. those hospitals which saw computers infected by the malicious software had ignored instructions to install a security patch which would have protected them.
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now the nhs says lessons have been learned. we have been getting our act together. we are getting our act together. we're putting funding in. we're putting education in. we're rolling out the programmes that were in place before this attack and we will continue to improve over time. there are more serious cyber attackers waiting to strike. hospital trusts are warning the government they may need to spend more money to strengthen their defences. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. the first minister of scotland is seeking "urgent clarity" from the prime minister on the proposed transition arrangements as the uk leaves the eu. nicola sturgeon says that business needs to know what's happening, adding that ministers' comments have "undermined" intentions. in the letter sent to theresa may, ms sturgeon also says "i am increasingly concerned by the possibility your negotiations may result in a "no deal" scenario. 0ur political correspondent
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nick eardley can bring us more details now from westminster. good to talk to you. what is nicola sturgeon to being here? she obviously makes the point that scotla nd obviously makes the point that scotland voted to remain in the european union. she has not been happy with the negotiations all the chat between westminster and her administration. it is not a secret that nicola sturgeon completely disagrees on brexit. but this is about something quite specific, what happens after we formally leave the european union at the end of march 200019. the uk government has indicated it wants this transition
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or implementation period of two yea rs or implementation period of two years while things stay largely the same. “— years while things stay largely the same. —— when things stay largely the same. but some in the uk government have suggested that that intimidation period went happen u nless intimidation period went happen unless there is an agreement with dell and if for —— and agreement before march 2019 about what the deal might look like. that is what nicola sturgeon has written the letter about today, saying she wants clarity and a transition period of at least two years where everybody gets ready for new rules, and secondly that the transition period is not conditional on anything, is not conditional on a final agreement being agreed. that is because some also think that that transition period could be used to iron out any difficulties that have come up in
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negotiations. nicola sturgeon is also worried about no deal happening, there being no agreement with the eu about our future relationship. she concludes that no brexit is better than no deal. that may not be an option for her but when it comes to no deal, we have had a lot of wranglings this week about exactly the power that mps will have if it comes to that, if we end up in a situation in 18 months' time when there is no deal on the table and where mps in westminster, including snp mps will or not be able to block that scenario. yes, there was concern over the road as well that mps won't get their say if these talks fall apart, they won't be able to tell the government to get back to the negotiating table and to try some thing else in order to avert no deal. that is one of the things being fought over with the withdrawal bill, which comes back to parliament mid—november. there are some conservative, labour, snp mps and others who want something
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written into statute that says if there is no deal then things go back to the negotiating table and the government cannotjust to the negotiating table and the government cannot just walk away. as for nicola sturgeon and theresa may, the talks between the scottish and uk governments on this have not been productive, have not always lead to much agreement. i think we are starting to see some agreement mayor on what the withdrawal bill should look like, what it would be a cce pta ble look like, what it would be acceptable to devolve to governments. we expect decisions soon and the issues that nicola sturgeon is raising today will be discussed there. australia's government has lost its majority in the lower parliament after it was ruled that the deputy prime minister was not allowed to be an mp as he held dual citizenship with new zealand during the
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election, which was not allowed under the constitution. he has since renounced his new zealand citizenship. in the end, ignorance could not save all of australia's citizenship seven. they said that they did not know at the time of the election last year that they were dual nationals with new zealand citizenship. but it has been ruled that they are not eligible to sit in parliament. the deputy prime minister barnaby joyce parliament. the deputy prime minister barnabyjoyce has lost his seat and that has lost the government its majority. he will now face a by—election in november, which he is expected to win. politics is a tough game. you dedicate so much to it. you take the hits. now i will make sure that i don't cry in my beer. it is an
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embarrassment for the government but the fallout could be far worse than just a red face. laws that mrjoyce helped to pass as australia's agriculture minister could be challenged in the courts. despite losing his deputy, the prime minister says he will soldier on. the decision of the court today is clearly not the outcome we were hoping for, but the business of government goes on. i can be caught for its very timely consideration of these enormously complex battle. and it's clarification of the meaning and the operation of section 44 of the constitution as it relates to citizenship. these provisions are unlikely to be altered any time soon, even though they seem outdated in sucha soon, even though they seem outdated in such a multicultural country. academics believe that change isn't necessary. they insist australia's dual citizenship crisis could have been avoided had little part is vetted their candidates. downing street has described
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allegations of sexual harassment and abuse at westminster as deeply concerning. it was responding to claims in the sun newspaper that female researchers and mps' aides we re female researchers and mps' aides were using a message app to share information about claims of abuse. 0ur correspondent is in westminster. what has been the reaction? the prime minister's spokeswoman was asked about the story in the sun newspaper this morning, which claims that there is a what's up messaging fred that exists, a conversation going on between people working in parliament, members of staff working for mps is administration. —— whatsapp. and on that group they are alleged to be sharing information about behaviour of some mps. we have not seen the messages, it is pure
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allegations. but the prime minister said that any reports of sexual harassment is deeply concerning. she said over and over again that any allegations if they were made will be taken seriously but they cannot pre—empt allegations before they come to light. so a stronger general statement towards the prime minister's feeling on allegations of sexual harassment. she says she would take very seriously if allegations were actually to come forward. the headlines: as catalonia pushes for independence, spain's prime minister calls for senators to approve direct rule over the region. nicola sturgeon writes to the prime minister to her tell her no brexit is better than no deal. a minister blames north korea for the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs in may. now this board. —— the sport.
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we start with rugby. australia have been showing why they are the world's best in the opening match of the rugby league world cup after beating england in melbourne. england had made the perfect start, jermaine mcgillvary with openig the scoring for the visitors. but they were pegged back by australia who scored two tries to lead 10—4 at half time, and they got their third late on in the second half to cap an 184 win. "18-4. this shoulddn't affect england's chances of reaching the knockout stages, but they're up and running. some concern though for sam burgess, who was taken off with a knee injury in this match.
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a bit rusty still. disappointing. we are not pleased with the loss but we can takea are not pleased with the loss but we can take a lot from it. i thought it was a little bit patchy. in certain areas of the field we made too many areas of the field we made too many areas and a lot of defending off the back of that... and we lost some in the first half. —— we lost sam. the rugby union world cup is two years away. england head coach eddiejones selecting several new faces in his squad for the autumn internationals next month with that in mind. after being left out of the initial squad, propjoe marler is now available for selection for two of the three matches after his club succesfully argued his ban for striking should start sooner than a disciplinary panel had initially ruled. so asjones prepares his team, he could recall marler for matches with australia and samoa,
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the first of those on the 18th. tottenham striker harry kane will miss tomorrow's premier league game at manchester united with a hamstring injury. kane scored twice as spurs beat liverpool 4—1 on sunday, but he had to be substituted late in the game, and now manager mauricio pochettino says he's been diagnosed with a minor hamstring strain. it means he will miss the match. kane the leading premier league goal—scorer this season with eight goals. players are not machines, and it's so difficult to cope with international duty, playing every three days, yes. i think it is like it because it is not a big problem, it's only a small issue, but he's not going to play tomorrow. both spurs and manchester united are
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at the top end of the table at the moment this season. that's all the sport for now. french scientists say patients who have heart surgery in the afternoon are less likely to suffer complications. their research published in the lancet medical journal argues that the body clock makes the heart stronger in the afternoon than the morning, and more able to withstand the rigours of surgery. with me now is an associate medical director at the british heart foundation. this is intriguing stuff, that the heart is stronger in the afternoon. some people may have heard before about heart attacks more being likely in the morning. is there evidence to suggest this is true? there is. this is a very plausible study that shows that if you operate on someone... the sort of surgery we are talking about is heart valve surgery which means people have to go on a bypass. that puts the hard muscle —— the muscles
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of the heart at risk. if we can work out what is going on at a genetic and molecular level, that may offer surgeons the prospect of developing drugs, which could protect the heart during this bypass surgery. but it could be different for different people. if we're talking about body clock, that is going to be different for some people, who sleep at a different time, do different things... how can the medical community get to the bottom of that? mis—you are right. people do differ. and some of the deflation is -- if we can understand the basic genetic and molecular mechanisms which will be the same for some people, that will make sure that when you take
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someone's vegetation, put it on a bypass machine to enable the surgery to happen, the damage that will occur can be reduced. so people who have operations in the afternoon might even benefit. so whilst there are better prospects in the afternoon that the morning, they may be able to offer these cardio protection to all patients. i have to say that is a little way off, but this provides a scientific hypothesis that we can perceive through further research.“ hypothesis that we can perceive through further research. if someone is sitting there today watching all of this and they have their appointment on a morning, they would be concerned. ifi appointment on a morning, they would be concerned. if i was a gp, i would say, if you have a severe heart of problem, whatever time of day you have that surgery, i would go ahead and have the surgery, because you are at risk of many other things because of the street is putting on
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the heart, poor circulation and all the heart, poor circulation and all the rest of it. —— because of the strain. you should not worry too much about what time of day you having the surgery, you just need your surgery. cardiology says, having the surgery, you just need yoursurgery. cardiology says, go ahead. would be practicalfor the nhs to try to be scheduled operations to be in the afternoon? it is possible. you could reschedule if you put your mind to it but the evidence is not strong enough yet. thank you. the uk competition watchdog will investigate booking websites to see if consumers are being misled by them. the investigation will examine issues such as hidden charges and search results and discount claims. i am joined by a senior director of the competition and markets authority. people are being bombarded by those
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messages. so you will see, but three hours ago, or, six people looking at this site. we don't know the basis of these claims. we are worried that people might be rushed into booking what may not be the best deal for them and a full impression about the availability of the room. and can we be certain that the sites are offering the best deal? comparison cites generally very good. they are useful to save people and money. but they need to provide clear and accurate information. that is what this investigation is about. can you shed any light on how hotels are ranked, because they are given an order, which again may lead a customer to decide to put one over another? what customers may not know is that the ranking, or
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recommendations or the top picks, maybe influenced not only by the search criteria they have put in, about price or room availability, but also about commercial factors such as commission. that is not of interest to consumers but what they might do is hotel for them, thinking, great, that is the one that suits my needs because i put in that suits my needs because i put in that search criteria, and actually not know that it has been influenced by commission, something that does not concern them. some people may not concern them. some people may not even know that commission is being paid. is that the case with all these cases? that is exactly why we opened this investigation. we have done an initial review and we are writing out to all the sites to find out about their practices, what they are doing, what they are not doing, what they are showing consumers, so that we can establish whether they are misleading consumers. we want to hear from
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consumers. we want to hear from consumers. we want to hear from consumers. we have opened up a survey today to ask what people's experiences are of these sites. presumably you think something must be going on, otherwise he wouldn't be going on, otherwise he wouldn't be launching this investigation. we have covered a number of complaints from consumers and the sector. we had in our initial review which has led is to have these concerns. we are opening the investigation now. we have already had quite a lot today. there is a lot of interest because actually, this resonates with people. it sort of them deal, actually, maybe it hasn't been the best experience, and we want to make sure it is. but he do think they are a force for good generally?” sure it is. but he do think they are a force for good generally? i think that comparison sites are a force for good. wejust that comparison sites are a force for good. we just want to make sure consumers get the best deal from them. two lorry drivers will stand trial over a crash on the m1 that left eight people dead in august. it happened near milton keynes in the early hours of the morning. the
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driver and seven passengers of a minibus were killed and four others seriously injured. a polish national denies causing death by dangerous driving and drink—driving. a driver from stoke also denies causing death by dangerous driving but admitted charges —— lesser charges of dangerous driving. breaking news, response from the government on the letter to them from nicola sturgeon, first minister of scotland, saying she wanted immediate clarity from the government about a transition deal after brexit. the response from a uk government spokesperson, saying the prime minister was clear in her speech in florence that we want a time—limited implementation period to carry out the practical changes necessary as an move to our new partnership with you. our proposal foran partnership with you. our proposal for an implementation period is very similarto for an implementation period is very similar to what the eu set out in their april guidelines, so we are confident of agreeing the general
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terms the implementation period soon. now the weather. thank you. you don't need me to tell you it was a chilly start in many places this morning. but we are starting to see some sunshine, a beautiful day out there. 0ne sunshine, a beautiful day out there. one or two file patches across some areas. the fog has burned off and we areas. the fog has burned off and we are seeing some sunshine through the afternoon. more cloud, though, into the northern isles, with strong wind. as we go through tonight, the cloudier, windier weather will sink its way into scotland and northern england. could be quite misty and murky here. but in the south east it will be quite chilly through the night with a touch of frost in places. tomorrow, a very different today, more cloud pushing its way in from the west. murky with hill fog
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in scotland and northern england. to the east of scotland and the pennines, gusty wind but spells of sunshine. some sunny spells. all change on sunday. it will be brighter, there will be some sunshine. by this stage, it will feel quite a lot colder. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines. spain's prime minister calls on senators to approve direct rule over catalonia — while calls for independence continue in the region. scottish first minister nicola sturgeon is seeking "urgent clarity" from the prime minister on the proposed transition arrangements as the uk leaves the eu. an independent investigation has found that the cyber attack while crippled parts of the nhs in may could have been prevented — if "basic" security measures had been in place. new research suggests open heart surgery is safer in the afternoon because of the body's internal clock. the report suggests that hearts are stronger in the afternoon, so better able to withstand surgery. president trump has realised some 3000 files relating
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to the assassination ofjohn f kennedy — while others remain classified. let's get more now on the investigation into the cyber attack that brought down parts of the nhs in may. a government report found that it could have been prevented if basic security measures had been in place. professor peter sommer is an expert in cyber security. the report is pretty critical about parts of the nhs, what more do you think they could have done to prevent this? one has to recognise the difficult challenge that ceos of trusts face, they are short of money, they are faced with long waits in a&e, complaints from people who say that they turn up for operation, and then are told come
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backin operation, and then are told come back in two months' time, and those seem to be immediate threat, and then, their computer people come along to the same ceo and said we had this urgent advice, we need to do something about it but it doesn't look as immediate as the people in the corridors waiting to be done. so it isa the corridors waiting to be done. so it is a difficult decision. i think we can say now with the benefit of hindsight, a lot of ceos took the wrong call, because one of the consequences of the malware was that people did sufferful how was easy was it for them to get social network this is this the kind of what the thing in did was toen crypt essential files, and the whole idea was they would demand ransom for it, one of the ways in which it was easy for the file, for the encrypting file to spread was a particular
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thing which had been developed by the national security agency, did backbench public, there were —— become public, there were patches available but it looks as though large numbers of nhs trusts simply didn't put them in. once the code had been designed and there are fragments of these codes available to hackers, if you know where to look, once they put everything together, in this particular insta nce together, in this particular instance it spread like wild fire, thatis instance it spread like wild fire, that is why we had the problem. what do you make of the government minister saying he believes that north korea was behind this?‘ number of people have said that. the government minister undoubtedly has been advised by gchq. i am in no position to contradict them. one has to say that attribution of attacks is one of the most difficult thing, you know, they have gone, it is code comparison, they looked at the code,
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we have seen code before like this which we think it is north korea, the trouble is hackers steal from each other you don't know what is going on. it could well be the case but let us inject a notion note of caution into it. what should the nhs do to stop this happening again s there little they can do? the boring advice is that there are some very very obvious things that you can do, they are listed on government websites, everybody in the business knows what you should be doing, it won't stop all the attacks but it will stop most of them, because most attacks use known methods so follow that threw, that is the first element. the second is have a good recovery posture, it took four or five days for most trusts to get back to normal. they did thank goodness have back up but they should have had a routine for recovering it quickly. 0ne should have had a routine for recovering it quickly. one thing that comes out it was poorly
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co—ordinated initially, sorry nationally, that is something that wouldn't cost any money, it requires thought and planning by the top people in the nhs. thank you for that. thank you for that. a project has helped more than 500 people since it was run years ago. it has staff in hospital in glasgow and edinburgh. it has staff in hospital in glasgow and edinburgh. chef, can you show me how to do the fishcakes today? callum hutchinson has changed. over the last nine months he has given up drink and drugs, and begun work as a trainee chef. back in january, things were very different. he was trapped in a lifestyle that revolved around gangs and territorial violence. i was coming home, i was under the influence, and i was outside my door, and i was stabbed nine times in the back and a hatchet was struck over my head and i was left for dead.
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my son was at my window and he seen the full thing. my son's seven years of age. and this was just another day in the life for me. that night, in accident & emergency at glasgow royal infirmary, callum was approached by two people who were not doctors the or nurses. they were navigators, part of a project to help people escape from violent lifestyles. i wanted to stop coming in and out of accident and emergency with knife wounds and other assaults to me. i wanted to stop going in and out of prison, but i didn't know how i could change that. they said they knew. they could help me. over the next nine months, callum's navigator, alan gilmore, helped him to stop drinking, find somewhere to live and get a job. it's been a remarkablejourney, i have to say, in such a short space of time for him to have changed so drastically, in a positive way. it's been inspiring.
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callum realised at the right time that this was a chance — perhaps the only one he would get — to turn his life round. there's no question the navigator scheme has saved lives here in glasgow, and also in edinburgh, but could it have wider benefits? dr christine goodall from a group called medics against violence, is a supporter of the navigator scheme. in terms of callum, he hasn't been back at the emergency department since he met the navigators. he is now in work, he has stopped drinking, and potentially the cost savings there are tens of thousands of pounds. and that is just one person. the navigator scheme may not grow quickly. the concern is that that could harm its effectiveness. but their hope is that eventually there could be small teams in every major emergency department in scotland. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow.
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let's get more on nearly 3,000 classified files on the assassination of presidentjohn f kennedy in 1963 being released. although some documents have been withheld at the request of government agencies. dallas, november 22nd 1963.m appears something has happened. something has happened in the motorcade route. a day that shocked america and the world and became the holy grailfor america and the world and became the holy grail for conspiracy theorists. president kennedy has been assassinated. it is official now, the president is dead. the official version of events is
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that the gunman lee harvey oswald, acted alone. after the shots were fired he happened to look up about the sixth floor of the texas book depository, he said he saw the rifle being pulled back in. polls show most americans still don't believe that to be true, were the cia involved, the russians or the mafia? analysts historians and journalists are poring over the latest batch of more than 2,000 government documents to be released from the national archive. but will there be any real revelations? there is nothing of a bombshell there, understanding that bureaucrats in 1960 operated probably much like they do today. it is easier to think of a conspiracy when it is our own must be dale failings that result in these tragedies. there is some fuel though, to the conspiracy theorist and even a british angle. a memo to the then director of the fbi tells of how a local newspaper in
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cambridge received anonymous phone call 25 minutes before the president was shot, warning to expect some big news out of the united states. and what of the somme would say convenient murderjust two days later of lee harvey oswald... shot and killed by a nightclub ownerjack ruby, the new document revealed the fbi warned dallas police about death threats towards lee harvey oswald. it is not justjfk's threats towards lee harvey oswald. it is notjustjfk's assassination, the files give more details on america's efforts to kill fidel castro, including cia plans to contaminate the then cuban leader's wet suit and planting exploding sea shells in the water where he went diving. in down town dallas today and across america, a whole industry has been built round the mysteries surrounding president kennedy's death. president trump, who has indulged some of the conspiracy
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theories himself decided to hold back some of the most sensitive files at least for now. and whether they are eventually released or not, the speculation over one of the defining events of the 20th century, is unlikely toent. —— end. joining me via webcam isjefferson morley, the editor of thejfk facts website, who has written several books about the assassination. thank you forjoining us this afternoon. you must know more than most about this. have these files told you anything you didn't know before? the files that president trump kept secret are much more important than the files he released. this was a bit of... the president said last week he was going to release all of the records, in fact he maintained secrecy over most of them. we probably only got 20% of
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what was supposed to be released yesterday, and by and large, it was not that interesting to people who know the assassination, typically when secrets are kept and governs are forced to disclose thing, they give you the garbage first, what we got yesterday was the garbage, the left overs. so what do you think the secret files might centre round, and how did president trump justify keeping those secret, who is it that doesn't want the files made public? mrtrump doesn't want the files made public? mr trump justified this which saying he had received national security argument from the cia and fbi. we have heard those arguments before, most invariably bogus, the idea that a 50—year—old document is going to pose any threat to us national security today, it doesn't, it doesn't pass the test of common—sense. what the agencies are trying to avoid is embarrassment. they have a lot of secrets to keep
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round the jfk they have a lot of secrets to keep round thejfk assassination, what they did was able to prevail on president trump to keep them for six months more. what about the british an, we have heard about a phone call that was made to a local newspaper, just beforejohn f made to a local newspaper, just before john f kennedy made to a local newspaper, just beforejohn f kennedy was killed, what do you make of that? by event, typically generate a lot of reports like this. unless there is some other corroborating information that somehow points, that supports the notion of advance knowledge out, the assassination, i don't really give it much credence at all. what is important in the records and what we didn't get yesterday are the cia and fbi records that relate to the surveillance and monitoring of lee harvey oswald before the assassination, that is the biggest secret that us government agencieses have to keep, and they continue to keep it. what do you think is behind that? is that he went to cuba, didn't he in
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the months before the assassination, is it that kind of thing you want to hear more about? he went to mexico city six weeks before thes a nairks i write about the facts of the case, i don't speculate about what might be true, i only say what is definitely true what is definitely true is that the cia... lee harvey 0swald from 1959 to 1963. this is in records than were declassified in the last five to ten years. it is really beyond dispute. what we don't know is what was the nature of that interest? and how does that relate to november 22nd? was the cia simply incompetent and didn't know that 0swald might attack the president? 0r 0swald might attack the president? or was the cia manipulating him, so that he would take the blame for a crime that somebody else committed. we really don't have a an answer to that question based on the evidence. there have been conspiracy theories
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about this that have gone on for decade, do you think that will continue until all the files have been released? thinki continue until all the files have been released? think i that when get all of the files we will have a significant new understanding of what caused the death of president kennedy. i am what caused the death of president kennedy. iam not what caused the death of president kennedy. i am not crazy about conspiracy theory, the concept of demeaning theories was conducted by temperature cia in the wake of the assassination to protect the official story and discredit people who criticised it. that discourse of you must be crazy if you criticise the official stories we continue to hear that. what this withholding tells u the fact that trump with held most of the records, the kennedy assassination is a live and sensitive issue for people at the top of the us government. that is not a theory, that is what is going on. fascinating stuff. thank you very much forjoining us. the headlines on bbc newsroom live.
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as catalonia pushes for independence — spain's prime minister calls on senators to approve direct rule over the region. nicola sturgeon writes to the prime minister to tell her — "no brexit" is better than "no deal". a minister blames north korea for the cyber attack — which crippled parts of the nhs in may. as the global threat of antibiotic resistance continues to grow, steps are being taken to reduce the unnecessary use of these vital drugs — both by people and in animals. later this morning, the department for environment, food and rural affairs will publish a report showing sales of antibiotics for use in animals in the uk have fallen to their lowest level since records began in 1993. fiona lamdin has more on the progress that's been made. cats hill farm in west wiltshire, a cow creche for 350 calves.
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we change the teats on the machines every morning and every evening. we take them out and clean them and put them in a pot of disinfectant solution. and just as you'd expect with a child's nursery, with so many young calves living in one barn, bugs are rife here. this process has really dropped antibiotic usage by about 50% across the calf group in here. it's just stopping the spread of disease through the teats, with all the calves coming in all the time drinking and spreading germs. jo's not unique, but her farming is progressive. taking steps to ensure her animals don't get ill. but when it gets cold, smaller calves like this one are much more prone to getting poorly, and so they end up on antibiotics. so now, they're keeping them warm so they stay healthy in the first place. and just in case that wasn't enough, on the outside she has even installed blinds. we get a lot of ground level draught so we need to keep that
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away from the calves, because itjust causes environmental stress for them and chills them down and can lead to pneumonia, and therefore, antibiotic use. antibiotics on this farm are now only used when an animal is very ill. three years ago, when we would have had batches of calves come in, they would have all been on antibiotic treatment, now we're just treating on case by case. so this week i have only got two animals on antibiotics. last week, it was only six. and over in somerset, bristol university is researching the global impact antibiotics have on livestock. sheep, cattle, pigs, poultry, any livestock, any animal for that matter is susceptible to disease just like we are. using antibiotics to boost growth was banned by the eu over a decade ago. so farmers are now only using them to either treat or prevent disease. it's really important that we use less antibiotics, because wherever we use antibiotics, bacteria can become resistant and those bacteria might cause disease, either in animals or people.
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but it's notjust down to the agricultural world. here in the uk, it's us humans which are consuming well over half of all antibiotics. compared with just 37% used to treat animals. today, though, the spotlight is firmly on the farming community and the message is clear — with no new antibiotics being developed, less really is best. thousands of children across england are not getting the mental health support they need according to a review by government inspectors. the care quality commission's damning report found that services are too fragmented and difficult to access. alice battled anorexia throughout her teenage years. she waited around six months for a mental health assessment and to get specialist treatment, she was told she'd have to travel 100 miles from her home. she's concerned some young people are still waiting too long. we're talking about young people
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with mental health problems that are so distressed with their own minds that they don't even know how they're going to get through the day and to then turn around to them and ask them to wait, you know, six, 12, 18 months for the help that they desperately need is incredibly distressing. the care quality commission report suggests 39% of specialist community services need improving. it warns services are too fragmented and a more joined—up approach is needed. the report highlights evidence that one in four children who needed care were unable to access it. the commission warns children's lives may be being put at risk because of the failings. suicide is one of the leading causes of death in young people. what we do know is that waiting a long time, or not being able to access a service when you need it, inherently increases the risk. alice welcomes the government's promised to invest an extra £1.4 billion into children's mental health services over
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the next four years. the care quality commission has revealed the scale of the problems. its next piece of work will be to come up with some detailed solutions. rob sissons, bbc news. 0n the victoria derbyshire programme this morning, chloe tilley spoke to helena miles, who used mental health services for most of her teens, and to cathal morrow — whose eight—year—old son had to wait 18 months before he received treatment. three year ago he had a break down and the school were unbelievable. we pushed toed an assessment. we had the assessment which didn't really say anything at all and we were pushing and pushing and pushing and they drip fed us a bit but nothing very much in terms of service, then a year ago, very much in terms of service, then a yearago, he very much in terms of service, then a year ago, he was in hospitalfor a week, and the—cams doctors were in the hospital and they moved him up
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toa the hospital and they moved him up to a level three and from there, he has been having weekly therapy, i have been having services through them and stuff and it is excellent. but the delay, it was an insane delay. for you helen, you have accessed mental health services throughout your teen, did you struggle to get access to them?m took a while for them to kind of ta ke took a while for them to kind of take my mental health, not seriously but take it into serious consideration and it took until i was sectioned for me to get a diagnosis of post dramatic disorder. what impact does that have on you and you son? i didn't really have a teenage hood, it took a really long time for me to learn about myself and to learn about my mental health and to learn about my mental health andl and to learn about my mental health and i kind of feel like now i am catching up on being a teenager and being at university and getting to know myself a lot better, when i was
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teenager i felt like an empty shell. didn't feel like a real human being. why is there this delay? people will watch this saying an eight—year—old boy who needs help, a year—and—a—half of his life is is a hulme amount of time to wait. year—and—a—half of his life is is a hulme amount of time to waitm year—and—a—half of his life is is a hulme amount of time to wait. it is. it is very important we are looking at this very important issue today. now, one of the things we are is heard is that what happens is that you cannot fix things quickly, we know in orderfor you cannot fix things quickly, we know in order for children's needs to be met work has to start early on, one of the things we node do is build up people's resilience, the same way we are working on our physical health. less than 1% of the investment in health care has been in child and adolescent mental health. even though more money is coming in it is coming after a long period of underinvestment. not only are services very period of underinvestment. not only are services very small but there is not a workforce for us to recruit from. we need more people to working
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in young people's services and youth service, education and social care, what we also need is for people to be able to recognise when children really are struggling. that is once againa training really are struggling. that is once again a training and awareness programme. what is fantastic, because people are becoming aware, there is that drive out there, we know people are stepping forward. what we have seen in the past three yea rs, referrals to what we have seen in the past three years, referrals to child and adolescent mental health services have gone up. the government has committed 1.4 billion to child and mental adolescent service, things are moving in the right direction. the challenges we have had big amounts of money announced but in terms of that reaching the front line, there is many examples, including here in liverpool where we have seen cuts. the key service available to my constituents as a young person for this financial
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year, seeing cuts of over 40%. waits of just year, seeing cuts of over 40%. waits ofjust under six months to get an assessment. that doesn't help a young person to further them and support them with their mental health needs. in a moment it will be the news with jane hill. first the weather with ben. good afternoon, today may have got off ifa good afternoon, today may have got off if a chilly start in places but the compensation is that we have been soing a lot of sunshine. now tomorrow, will be a different day, it will be milder but it will be cloudier, and there will be a strong breeze for some, on sunday, we go back to brighter skies but at this stage it will feel quite a lot colder. back to the here and now, this is the picture today. we had a few fog patches which disappeared and a fair amount of sunshine which continues for the end of the day. 0vernight, we see changes in the north. it has been windy in the northern isles. and as the wind picks up we will see
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more cloud, drizzle, misty murky conditions too, down to the south—east where we keep the clear spell, that is where it will be chilly with a touch of frost, up to the north—west, much, much milder because all this cloud will be rolling in from the atlantic, a bit of mist and hill fog. 13 degrees there in glasgow. somewhere brighter towards aberdeen, northern ireland cloudy and murky. for north east england we will so brightness but the winds will become gusty through the winds will become gusty through the morning, maybe fine for east anglia and the south—east. some spells of sunshine, more cloud into wales and the south—west. it is the areas exposed to this westerly wind that will see a lot of cloud, mist and murk with hill fog. for north east england and eastern scotla nd for north east england and eastern scotland we will see sunny spells but winds gusts of up to 60mph. not great if you are travel organise
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hill walking —— walking. temperatures 13—16. that will change for the second half the weekend. cold air will dive down, all the way from the arctic, particularly making its presence felt in northern and eastern areas where there will be a keen wind. wintry showers into the northern irons. further south a fair amount of sunshine. 15 in plymouth just nine amount of sunshine. 15 in plymouthjust nine in aberdeen, eight in lerwick and we start the week on a chilly note. a touch of frost on monday morning. tuesday cloudier with rain. the crisis in spain deepens — madrid moves to impose direct rule on the region of catalonia. crowds gather in barcelona, as prime minister rajoy says he wants to restore stability to the area which could declare independence in a few hours time. in my opinion we have no other alternative. the only thing we can and should do is to resort to the law in order to keep the law. we'll have the latest from barcelona and madrid. also this lunchtime.
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the cyber attack which crippled parts of the nhs in may could have been prevented by basic security measures, according to an investigation. why it may be safer to have open heart surgery in the afternoon — new research suggests our body clock makes the heart stronger later in the day. thousands of files about the assassination ofjfk are released — but the us security services stop hundreds of others from being made public.
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