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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  October 27, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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today at 5pm, catalonia declares independence. the catalonian parliament celebrates but spain's government in madrid votes to impose direct rule on the region. translation: spain is a serious country, a great nation and we are not prepared to allow some people to liquidate our constitution. i'm live in barcelona on this, this country's greatest constitutional crisis since the attempted coup of 1981. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm: the cyber attack which crippled much of the nhs in may could have been prevented with basic security, says an investigation. files about the assassination ofjfk are released but some are held back, at the request of the cia and fbi. what is it?
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and at 5:45pm we'll talk about andy serkis's new film breathe, about a man paralysed by polio in the film review. our top story: the catalonian parliament in barcelona has voted for independence from spain. in a ballot boycotted by the anti—separatist opposition, there were 70 votes in favour and ten against. crowds outside cheered. and in madrid, the senate has backed government proposals to sack the catalan administration and to take control. my colleague tim willcox is in barcelona. 26 days after the referendum and
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after weeks of turmoil, mass demonstrations and political chaos, the ultimate provocation for madrid, a ballot here in the catalan parliament and a vote for independence. catalonia in the satirists' eyes now at separate sovereign state. just after that boat, the madrid senate voted to invoke article 155, imposing direct rule from madrid. we are now in great political uncertainty. i will madrid respond and when? this report by andy murder. just before the vote in the catalan parliament, 50 of its members walked out in protest. then came the time for those left behind to vote. 0ne of the first was carles puigdemont,
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leader of the independence movement. the result was never in doubt but the votes were counted and announced. 70 in favour, ten against and two blank. the catalan anthem was sung inside the assembly. and then take up outside by thousands of pro—independent supporters. then take up outside by thousands of pro-independent supporters. it's taking a stand, to begin with it's only words but then we will defend the separation. it's better, a catalan republic, than spain. just a few hours later in another parliament, another vote. this was the spanish senate voting overwhelmingly in favour of article 155 imposing direct rule on catalonia. translation: spain is a
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serious country, a great nation and we're not prepared to allow some people to liquidate our constitution, our cohabitation, the rules that have served for the last 40 rules that have served for the last a0 yea rs rules that have served for the last a0 years to turn spain into one of the most democratic in the world.- the most democratic in the world.- the catalan parliament members brandished sticks as a symbolic representation of their power but the message was not confrontational. citizens of catalonia, there are coming times where we will have to be compromised to keep this country with peace. in barcelona the streets are full of pro—independent supporters but around half the population doesn't support a breakaway. catalonia is divided against itself and against spain. spain's constitutional court has
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already started proceedings in light of article one 55. already two cata la n of article one 55. already two catalan nationalist leaders are being held injail in madrid, being questioned for sedation, the same charge applying to the head of the local catalan police force. what will that mean for carles puigdemont, the catalan president? he will be stripped of his position here and his cabinet. will he be arrested? how will the catalan separatists respond? arrested? how will the catalan separatists respond ? i've arrested? how will the catalan separatists respond? i've been talking to sarah rainsford in madrid about what might happen next. mr rajoy said it would include initially dissolving the catalan parliament and also removing the key political figures inside catalonia from their posts and them being replaced by figures here in madrid, so massive steps being taken by madrid, utterly unprecedented and what happens next is absolutely key and the way mr rajoy was speaking
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as we heard after that vote, he is very aware that this is an extremely delicate situation. he said twice that there needed to be calm in spain as this moved forward. he said he was returning spain to legality, which is a phrase they keep using here. he said it was absolutely necessary measure to take and that spaniards should stay calm as his government move forward to implement it. but how this is implemented will be extremely complex and will face significant resistance from where you are, tim. sarah rainsford in madrid. wejust add some pictures in the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, holding a crisis cabinet meeting in madrid, discussing the way forward, a very different mood
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from the celebrations, fireworks, chanting and cheering going on in the streets of barcelona behind me. i'm not sure we have pictures of that but those celebrations are expected to continue for several hours. remember that catalonia is not a unified country because it is divided, there are many millions of cata la ns divided, there are many millions of catalans who do not want independence, we have seen demonstrations by them as well as those pro—separatist demonstrations on the streets of barcelona and around the region in the past weeks. let's talk to one man who is representing a group that wants to stay pa rt representing a group that wants to stay part of spain. how do you feel? i feel better and tricks. that is a catastrophe for catalonia and spain. while this will affect the current
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relations with people, it is affecting the economy but also because of this, we are proud, the catalans, because of this, we are proud, the catala ns, about the because of this, we are proud, the catalans, about the new situation the problem having is about the rule of law and we hope the next days and weeks, this situation will change. what do you want mr rajoy to—do? weeks, this situation will change. what do you want mr rajoy to-do? mr rajoy is now working with all the other political parties and institutions to really help catalonia in the legality. we have a new situation, as you know in the united kingdom four times the autonomy in northern ireland was
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suspended but in spain this is the first time and we have not allowed for these cases. what about the millions of separatists? the 20,000 civil servants, the 17,000 local police, all those people who have ha rd police, all those people who have hard autonomy who perhaps will say go away, madrid, we will carry on as normal, we're independent? this attendance will not and that, no one is accepting this because it is outside the law. that is not the mood in parliament today. have you seen the people on the streets celebrating? yes, people will have to solve expectations and in the next few days demonstrations in the streets of barcelona, but no more, i
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hope the regional administration is working with all educations. hope the regional administration is working with all educationsm hope the regional administration is working with all educations. if it came to it, would you support mariano rajoy sending the army to impose rule? no, they do not need the army. thousands more national police? in catalonia we are proud about one specific war? the arrest of ca rles about one specific war? the arrest of carles puigdemont? we are likened with common sense and we will pass from this situation to another in which all will go under the war. thank you. —— under the law. that is the situation, so people celebrating
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for the time being on the streets, but we understand the catalan president carles puigdemont will signa president carles puigdemont will sign a new government post for this, the world's newest country, according to them. that decision taken here inside the catalan parliament on october the 27th, the birth of catalonia. back to you. tim willcox there in barcelona, an extraordinary 2a hours and we will keep an eye on that story here on bbc news and if there are further developments we will bring them to you. let's take a look at some of the other main stories tonight. a cyber attack which crippled parts of the nhs in may could have been prevented if basic it security measures had been in place, according to a report by the national audit office. it's concluded that the health service wasn't prepared for the wannacry attack, in which criminals froze nhs computers and demanded a ransom.
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the security minister ben wallace told the bbc this morning that the government believes a foreign state was behind the attack, and named north korea. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. it was an attack which froze computers around the world. but the nhs was among the organisations worst affected. and the national audit office says it was ill—prepared. it was the worst ever cyber attack on the nhs. 81 health trusts across england were affected, a third of the total. it's thought over 19,000 appointments ended up being cancelled, including 139 potential cancer referrals. what planning there had been to deal with the cyber attackjust hadn't filtered down to the hospitals. some work had been done on a national cyber response plan in the nhs, but that hadn't been well communicated to all of those local bodies. and in some cases, organisations had to resort to telephone and paper and pen and apps such as whatsapp
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in terms of communicating with others. this is the message that popped up on thousands of nhs computers demanding a ransom to unlock their files. but all of this could have been avoided. a month or so earlier, nhs digital had sent a message to hospitals instructing them to apply a security patch which would have stopped their computers from being infected with the ransomware. the nhs insists it is now putting things right. we have been getting our act together, we are getting our act together, we are putting funding in, we are putting education in. we are rolling out the programmes that were in place before this attack, and we will continue to improve over time. the government said it now believed that north korea was behind the wannacry ransomware and warned of the risk of further attacks. every week, we successfully defend against threats both from organised crime and indeed from sometimes hostile states abroad. and so, that is why the national cyber strategy was set up in 2016.
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we've put {1.9 billion of investment. but hospitals say strengthening cyber security will be expensive. they may be seeking more money to shore up their expenses. with me is professor keith mcneil, chief clinical information officer at nhs england. you saw him briefly in that report. do you accept the fundamental findings that this could have been prevented ? findings that this could have been prevented? there are many things we can do across the system day in day out, it is a very complex organisation, there are many things we we re organisation, there are many things we were doing, we take patient security very seriously and clearly there are things we could have done that would have improved the
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situation but to put this in perspective, the nhs is a big organisation so when you look from the top down, our national infrastructure was well protected and if you look at the vast majority, the device —— the virus didn't affect us, only a small proportion was affected. that is little comfort to someone who had an appointment cancelled. little comfort to someone who had an appointment cancelledlj little comfort to someone who had an appointment cancelled. i agree, i am appointment cancelled. i agree, i am a clinician so any disruption of delivery of care is unacceptable at any level. how are things different today? if there was another attack on monday, with the nhs respond differently? the nhs in terms a response, we have very sophisticated plans around any emergency situation. we build in resilience at all levels and we have been over
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those plans now with reference to what a cyber attack might look like and that can come in any number of forms so we have scenarios around that and this book plans, but what is important is that there is heightened awareness of the possibility and what the consequences can be at all levels. is there that heightened level now, whether a big hospital or a small gp surgery? has training gone out to people? there was a training plan and our cyber security platform being rolled out before this so there is training, it is about individuals in many cases, notjust technology, so a training plan was being rolled out prior to this. we spoke to someone today who was involved with this thing at gchq who said it is notjust the technical problem that is the starting point
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but how individuals respond to it and if there is no proper plan that eve ryo ne and if there is no proper plan that everyone understands, he made the point that some things were shot down that didn't need to be shot down that didn't need to be shot down and that is dreadful for the nhs if it means someone doesn't get the appointment, so is it the response that would be different? some would be different because of something is being done, we have to remember there is a relative risk so people will always do what they need to do to mitigate the things in front of them, so shutting things down at the time was the best thing to do and then as we rolled out the response by the nhs it was good in terms of this scale and what had happened and in terms of minimisation of disruption, so people will respond how they feel best. should there be protocols? it's not just how best. should there be protocols? it's notjust how they best. should there be protocols? it's not just how they feel. there
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are it's not just how they feel. there a re protocols it's not just how they feel. there are protocols around this sort of thing and it is ourjob to extend those pretty cold to everyone, but this is one of 100 priorities that eve ryo ne this is one of 100 priorities that everyone faces every day when dealing with complex patient care. professor keith mcneill, thank you. this is bbc news at 5pm. the headlines: the catalonian parliament votes to declare independence from spain — in response, the spanish senate approves madrid's proposals to take control of the region. a cyber attack on the nhs could have been prevented and according to the government, it came from north korea. and president trump has released some — but not all — of the files on the assassination ofjfk. in sport, first practice is under way ahead of the mexican grand prix.
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lewis hamilton could wrap up his fourth world title on sunday. defeat for england in their opening match of the rugby world cup, beaten by the co—hosts australia in melbourne. and tottenham will be without harry kane for tomorrow's match with manchester united. he has a hamstring injury. iwill manchester united. he has a hamstring injury. i will have more on those stories just after 5:30pm. a man arrested as part of an investigation into the far—right group national action has been charged with preparing to murder the labour mp rosie cooper. the 22—year—old man, who can't be named for legal reasons, is one of six men charged with being members of the organisation, which was banned last year. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford was in court. all six men appeared together in the dock. they were christopher lythgoe from warrington, matthew hankinson from newton—le—willows, andrew clarke from prescot, michael trubini from warrington, garron helm from seaforth, and a 22—year—old man who can't be
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named for legal reasons. they were all told they'd been charged with being members of national action, a banned neo—nazi group. the allegations are that they'd remained members of national action from the day it was banned on december 16th last year, until the day they were arrested, meeting regularly in a gym and a pub. the alleged leader, christopher lythgoe, is also accused of encouraging murder. in fact, giving permission for murder. the man he is accused of encouraging is that 22—year—old who can't be named for legal reasons. he's been charged with preparing a terrorist act by buying a machete in preparation for murdering the lancashire west mp rosie cooper. he's also separately charged with making threats to kill a female detective. all six men were told by the chief magistrate emma arbuthnot that they would remain in custody until their next appearance which would be at the central criminal court,
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the old bailey, next friday. some of the other stories making bbc news at 5pm: two lorry drivers are to stand trial charged with causing a crash on the m1 that left eight people dead. rizard mazerack, who's 31, and 53—year—old david wagstaff each pleaded not guilty at aylesbury crown court to eight counts of causing death by dangerous driving. scotland's first minister is seeking "urgent clarity" from theresa may on the proposed transition arrangements for brexit. nicola sturgeon has sent a letter to the prime minister saying proposals for a two—year implementation period have been "seriously undermined". the government says it's "confident of agreeing the general terms of the implementation period soon". the uk's most senior civil servant, sirjeremy heywood, has been treated for cancer. the cabinet secretary was diagnosed injune, and a statement from the cabinet office said his treatment "went well". the statement added that sirjeremy
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remains "totally focused" on his duties as head of the civil service. downing street has said any allegations of sexual harassment and abuse at westminster are "deeply concerning". it was responding to claims reported by the sun newspaper. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in westminster. explain a little bit more about what's going on. we don't think complaints have been made and no mps have been named but the sun newspaper has run a story claiming that a number of researchers and age, female researchers at westminster have been sharing information on the whatsapp messaging service, setting up a group to share information about
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alleged sleazy inappropriate behaviour of mps. we don't know if this group exists or not that the prime minister's spokeswoman was asked about it this morning and said any allegations of sexual harassment are serious, they would be concerned about any such allegations and the spokeswoman for the prime minister urged anyone with any information to go to the authorities, impressing on people working in parliament that if they have any concerns they must report them, so number 10 have engaged on this story and so have the house of commons authorities, saying in some ways they are limited about what they can do this because so many people are employed by mps are employed directly by parliamentarians, but pointing out the rays at 2a hour hotline that people can call if they have any concerns. historians, journalists and conspiracy theorists have begun poring over thousands of newly—declassified files relating
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to the assassination of presidentjohn f kennedy. but president trump has decided to keep hundreds of other files secret, at least for the time being, at the request of security agencies. jon donnison reports. dallas, november the 22nd, 1963. newsreel: it appears as though something has happened in the motorcade route, something i repeat has happened in the motorcade route... a day that shocked america and the world, and became the holy grail for conspiracy theorists. newsreel: president kennedy has been assassinated. the official version of events is that the gunman, lee harvey oswald, acted alone. newsreel: after the shots were fired, he happened to look up at about the fifth or sixth floor of the texas book depository. he said he saw the rifle being pulled back in. but more than half a century on, polls show most americans still don't believe that to be true. were the cia involved? the russians, the cubans or the mafia ? analysts are now poring over almost 3,000 government documents released from the national archive.
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there is nothing really of a bombshell there than understanding that bureaucrats in 1960 operated probably much like bureaucrats do today. it's easier to think of a conspiracy when really it's our own far more mundane failings that result in these tragedies. there is some fuel, though, for the conspiracy theorists, and even a british angle. an fbi memo tells of how a local newspaper in cambridge received an anonymous phone call 25 minutes before the assassination, warning to expect some big news out of america. and what of the some would say convenient murder of lee harvey oswald, who shot by nightclub ownerjack ruby? the new documents reveal the fbi had warned dallas police about death threats towards oswald. in downtown dallas today, a whole industry has been built around the mystery surrounding president kennedy's death. president trump, who indulged some of the conspiracy theories himself, in the end decided to hold back some
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of the most sensitive files, at least for now. and whether they're eventually released or not, the speculation over one of the defining events of the 20th century is unlikely to end. as you heard, a british angle has emerged in relation to this story with a local newspaper in cambridge a p pa re ntly with a local newspaper in cambridge apparently receiving a tip—off about the shooting. chris elliott is a senior reporter at the cambridge news and we can speak to him now from their newsroom. thanks for being with us. explain what staff at the cambridge news think happened. we have known about this for quite a long time, since
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the 19705 when it was revealed that one of our reporters may have taken an anonymous call saying something big wa5 an anonymous call saying something big was going to happen and that we rang the american embassy in london we would be told more. we have never established whether the call was made or which reporter may have made it but one document released today i5 it but one document released today is in relation to that and says the fbi and the cia worked a work that i call may have been made to the cambridge news about half an hour before the assassination of the president. we don't know whether this call was made that the document we have seen today includes reference to a senior reporter, a person not named, and also the fact that the reporter wa5 person not named, and also the fact that the reporter was not a security ri5k, that the reporter was not a security risk, which seems to indicate there may be some substance to this. why i5 may be some substance to this. why is it not clear whether it actually
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happened? if a is it not clear whether it actually happened ? if a journalist is it not clear whether it actually happened? if a journalist in that newsroom happened? if a journalist in that new5room took the call, surely eve ryo ne new5room took the call, surely everyone would be talking about it than that information would travel down through the generations. that's the great puzzle. we're going back to the 19605 and many of our staff at the time were getting on a bit a nyway at the time were getting on a bit anyway so i don't think many are left alive. we don't know quite a reporter who took this call did not discuss it with staff, he seems to have made a phone call to cambridge police and told them, which is how the information filtered out through mi5 to the information filtered out through m15 to the the information filtered out through mi5 to the cia. the information filtered out through mis to the cia. we the information filtered out through m15 to the cia. we don't have any positive idea of what happened on that day. aren't there journalists in your newsroom today who still try to dig around on the storage and try to dig around on the storage and try to figure out whether this did happen? yes, we have a team of people who have been looking at this and it's always been a mystery. we
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hope maybe some m15 documents may name the person and hopefully put some more flesh on the bones but at the moment it's still a mystery for us. chris elliott, thank you for joining us. just an update regarding catalonia, an extraordinary day in spain, that is the scene in barcelona. we had the parliament there are declaring independence within the last couple of hours. were getting reaction from lots of european countries about this, worth bringing you what the prime minister's official spokesperson at number 10 is saying, but the uk will not recognise the unilateral declaration of independence by the catalan parliament, it was declared illegal by the spanish courts, we continue to wa nt by the spanish courts, we continue to want to see the rule of law
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upheld and spanish in a tea preserved, so that is the official reaction from number 10. that sort of response echoing comments from germany and other european countries. we will keep an eye on that. the cabinet in madrid is meeting at the moment and thousands of people on the streets in barcelona so we will keep an eye on that. it's half past five, let's have a look at the weather now because it is nearly the weekend! we've just about made it, is nearly the weekend! we'vejust about made it, i'm pleased about that. good evening. a mixed weekend ahead, sometimes it will be bright and chilly, but other times cloudy and fairly mild. today, you can see that it was a day of plenty of sunshine. some fog first thing, clearing away quickly. things looking different by tomorrow. as we go through tonight, you will see more cloud spreading in from the
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north, increasingly strong winds too. it's turning misty and murky with spots of drizzle in the northwest. it will turn chilly with a touch of frost but increasingly mild in the north—west. tomorrow, this cloud rolls in from the north—westerly wind. northern ireland, north—west england, north wales is very cloudy, misty, murky and drizzly. there will be some brightness, warm at 16 degrees, but blustery winds. dry to the south—east. not as much sunshine as today. sunday has more sunshine, 9 degrees in aberdeen, wintry showers though in the far north. this is bbc news — the headlines. the parliament of catalonia declares independence from spain — in response, the spanish senate has approved imposing direct
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rule from madrid. britain has said that it will not recognise the move. the cyber attack which crippled much of the nhs in may could have been prevented with basic security, says an investigation. files about the assassination ofjfk are released — but some are held back, at the request of the cia and fbi. what is it? i'm going to have a baby. and in 15 minutes, we'll talk about andy serkis's new film ‘breathe', about a man paralysed by polio, in the film review. that's after the sports news... katherine downes is at the bbc sport centre. it was always going to be a tough start to the world cup for england — against australia who are the best in the world, on their home turf. the 18 points to four defeat
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shouldn't affect england's chances of qualifying for the latter stages of the tournament. katie gornall reports. for england, this is about as tough as it gets. australia, like the all blacks, have an air of the unbreakable about them. ten times that a world cup they've been the last standing. we rise as one. england are trying to deliver a new script, with a revamped squad they had reason to be optimistic. jermaine mcgilvray got the first try. the hosts were stirred into action. england tried to plug the gaps. eventually this effort punched three. australia had the lead and momentum. england know all about how dangerous billy slater can be but stopping him is another matter. a bigger blow was landed just before half—time. sam burgess is england's talisman. he is unlikely to return
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before the quarterfinals. without him, england were chasing the game. josh dougan's interception five minutes before time put the match beyond reach. england expect to improve but will face a tougher route through the tournament. the hope is their world cup doesn't start and end with the same result. anthony joshua has weighed in at the heaviest he has ever been for a professionalfight, at 18 stone and two pounds, for his world heavyweight title bout in cardiff tomorrow. joshua is trying to defend his ibf and wba world titles against the stand—in challenger carlos ta ka m. joshua was due to face the bulgarian kubrat pulev, but he had to withdraw, because of injury. his opponent weighed in lighter at 16 stone 11 and a half pounds. tottenham striker harry kane will miss tomorrow's premier league match with manchester united with a hamstring injury. kane scored twice as spurs beat liverpool a—1 last sunday, but had to be substituted late in the game. manager mauricio pochettino called it a minor strain, enough though to keep
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the premier league's leading goal—scorer out as second placed united face third placed spurs. as test captainjoe root prepares for the start of the ashes series without all rounder ben stokes, he insists senior players will behave themselves whilst away on tour. stokes is staying at home — he won't travel out with the squad after an incident outside a bristol nightclub. ido i do not think there is a drinking culture in cricket, in our side. we will address the issue as a side and ensure that situations like this do not happen again. of course, nobody wa nts not happen again. of course, nobody wants that. but we are grown men and we know how to behave and we will make sure that we conduct ourselves well on the tour. it is disappointing that then isn't going to be with us but we are a strong squad and it gives the other guys
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the opportunity to stand up, put their stamp on test cricket, coming to the team and do something special and strengthen the depth of our squad when he is ready to come back and play. first practise of the mexican grand prix has just finished with lewis hamilton's mercedes team mate valtteri bottas topping the time sheets hamilton was almost half a second adrift in second place. but the briton doesn't have to come out on top this weekend to become world champion for the fourth time. a fifth place finish would see him end the season on top no matter what his closest rival sebastian vettal does. the german has struggled so far in mexico city, managing only fifth. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. i will have more for you in sportsday in the next hour, that is at 6:30pm. let's remind you of the
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latest situation in spain. this is what is happening in barcelona tonight. you get a sense from that one camera angle of the number of people on the streets, i've been looking for a number police in terms of how many are on the streets but sizeable crowds, all following on from the catalan parliament, declaring independence. number 10, along with a number of other european countries, say they will not recognise that decision, that vote, number 10 effectively echoing what we are hearing from paris, berlin and what is interesting, some comments from the scottish government as well with their response. unsurprisingly saying they understand and respect the position of the catalan government while spain has the right to oppose independence, the people of catalonia should have the
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opportunity to determine their own future, repeated calls for dialogue we re future, repeated calls for dialogue were refused. they go on to say that the eu has a political and moral responsibility to support dialogue and identify how the situation can be resolved peacefully and democratically. reaction coming in all the time from various european countries. i should say the spanish government in madrid, meanwhile, as you can see is holding an emergency cabinet meeting. we think it is still going on, it has been going on for 30 minutes or so. an emergency meeting happening in madrid, we will see what emerges from that. we are keeping an eye on everything in madrid and barcelona, we will keep you up—to—date with that story. back here... ajury has heard how the husband of a woman, who was seriously injured ina parachutejump, showed little interest in her, as she recovered in hospital. emile cilliers is suspected of tampering with victoria cilliers'
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parachute which malfunctioned, during a jump at an airfield in wiltshire in 2015. he denies the charges. from winchester crown court, duncan kennedy reports. victoria cilliers stepped out of her carand victoria cilliers stepped out of her car and went straight into court, ready to relive the day of the parachute accident. she satjust across from her husband, emile cilliers, who is accused of trying to sabotage her parachute in an attempt to kill her. today, she watched an interview she gave to the police she gave to the police three weeks after the accident. she said... the accident happened in april 20 15th here at the deva raven airbase in wiltshire. victoria cilliers says
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first her main chute failed to open and then she had problems with her reserve chute. she said she tried to deal with the situation, she said it was spinning like a centrifuge and used her whole body. she couldn't work out why she couldn't gain control. she was asked what the chances were a main and reserved parachute failing, and she replied one in a million. thejury have failing, and she replied one in a million. the jury have already seen this demonstration video to see if it was possible to tamper with a parachute in a cubicle at the airbase within five minutes, including removing two nylon ties called slinks. in court, victoria cilliers said... when asked if she thought the whole incident surrounding thejob thought the whole incident surrounding the job was an accident,
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she said... victoria cilliers said she said... victoria cilliers said she suffered several injuries in the incident. her husband emile cilliers denies two counts of attempted murder. she will be back in court tomorrow. duncan kennedy, bbc news, at winchester crown court. inspectors concluded that services are too difficult to access. alice battled anorexia through her teenage yea rs. battled anorexia through her teenage years. she waited about six months for a mental health assessment. and, to get specialist treatment she was told she would have to travel 100 miles her home. she is concerned some young people are still too long. the reality is, these are people under the age of 18 and it is
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heavily frustrating that they've got to wait in situations of deep distress, them and their families. the care quality mission report says... it warns that services are too fragmented and a joined—up approach is needed. the point highlights evidence that one in four children who needed care were unable to access it. the commission warns children's lives may be being put at risk. suicide is one of the leading cause of death in young people. what we know is that waiting a long time, or not being able to access a service when you need it, inherently increases the risk. we set up a plan for investment, in which we are investing heavily in different parts of mental health services with a special focus on children. we aim to change this situation. the prime minister, seen here visiting a school to highlight the need for young people's mental well—being to be given more priority.
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she's pledged to ensure that care for mental health problems always reaches the same standard as that of physical health. doctor golding is a child psychiatrist and says it can be damaging for children to have to wait a long time. i think it's a national scandal that our young people don't get the help they need. we have large numbers of young people in mental health distress, and as a humane society we should be offering them the help they need. we aren't doing that adequately at the moment. alice knows the government says they will invest £1.a billion for children's mental health over the next four years. one wonders, will it be enough? this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the catalonian parliament votes to declare independence from spain — in response, the spanish senate approves madrid's proposals to take control of the region. a cyber attack on the nhs could have been prevented, and according to a government
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source, it came from an overseas source, it came from an overseas source, probably north korea —— a member of the government. and president trump has released some — but not all — of the files on the assassination ofjfk. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. across the board, it's across the board, its green. this is how the footsie closed the day. let's see what's coming up in sportsday. .. good evening. first practice has been taking place in mexico, the first chance to see how lewis hamilton gets on on the track where he could claim his fourth f1 world title. we look back on a tough openerfor england title. we look back on a tough opener for england in the title. we look back on a tough openerfor england in the rugby league world cup, beaten by the hosts and defending champions. defeat doesn't mean that they cannot
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still qualify for the later stages of the tournament. we look ahead to

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