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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 28, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and mega munchetty. tensions rise after spain imposes direct rule on catalonia just hours after politicians there declare independence. as crowds celebrate, spain's prime minister sacks the region's leader and chief of police and calls snap elections. good morning. it's saturday the 28th of october. also this morning: punched in the face by a nurse who was cleared of misconduct. we'll hear from the family who say their severely autistic son was failed by the system designed to protect him. it makes you feel like the whole thing is a joke. people like my son
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i deemed worthless in society. —— are. ifeel like i deemed worthless in society. —— are. i feel like they are all being betrayed. nine crew members on a royal navy nuclear submarine have been dismissed after failing drugs tests. in sport, world champions again. could it be the year in which england become football world champions twice? the under—17s take on spain in their world cup final later today. and do not try this at home! i'll be testing my nerves as i have a close encounter with the british team gearing up for the bike trials world championship in china. and louise has the weather. good morning. it is a cloudy and windy saturday for some. gales in the far north. the best of any sunshine will be in the south and east. more details coming up throughout the morning. thank you! good morning. first, our main story. it's been a night of both celebration and protest in barcelona, after the catalonian
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parliament voted to declare independence from spain. the spanish government furiously retaliated, sacking catalonia's president and his entire cabinet and taking the region back under central control. prime minister mariano rajoy said his country could not stand by while part of its territory was stolen. andrew plant reports. the streets of barcelona, the capital of catalonia, with crowds celebrating through the night, after the regional government here declared its independence from spain. translation: every citizen is clear about the goal. the price we will pay is perhaps expensive. but we do things well here. we respect everybody and we do things well. this was the moment the government of catalonia decided to declare itself an independent state. 300
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miles away in madrid, the national government of spain was also voting to ta ke government of spain was also voting to take away catalonia's regional powers and sack its leader after refusing to recognise catalonia's independence. translation: nouri maliki starts with law. in order to return in traditional legitimacy and give a voice to all catalans, i have stopped their parliament to hold regional elections on the 31st of december. it is a confusing picture, even within catalonia itself. many people don't want to be separate from spain. the spanish government says it will now take back control. but how will that work? and what about the tens of thousands of catalonian people today who believe they are already living in a separate state, wine they would argue spain no longer has any power
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to control. —— one. andrew plant, bbc news. nine service personnel on a nuclear submarine have been discharged from the royal navy after testing positive for drugs. the ministry of defence confirmed the departures from hms vigilant, one of four submarines that carry the trident nuclear deterrent. kathryn stanczyszyn is here to tell us more. it is good to see you. what has happened? yes. good morning. the royal navy says it will no longer tolerate the news use of any kind of troops following the failure of drug tests from these nine submariners. allegedly, all night had taken cocaine while hms vigilant was in the us. it was getting work done. there were a lot of parties going on. drug testing was demanded before they went back on board. hms
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vigilant is an important part of the uk nuclear deterrent, one of four which carries trident missiles, armed with nuclear warheads. it is not the first time it has been in the news. earlier this month, the captain was relieved of his post following an inappropriate relationship with a female member of group. the royal navy says that has been under investigation. operational duties continue as usual. but this certainly adds to the controversy, which is deepening around one of the key navy vessels of the uk. thank you very much. good to talk to you. jeremy corbyn says a "warped and degrading culture" where the abuse of women is accepted and normalised is thriving in the corridors of power, including in westminster. in a speech this afternoon in the scottish highlands, the labour leader is expected to say any mp who is involved must be held accountable. his comments follow several newspaper reports of allegations of inapropriate conduct by unnamed mps. the prime minister, theresa may,
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has again called on companies to reveal the difference between what they pay male and female staff saying "sustained action" was needed to tackle the issue. companies with over 250 employees have to publish gender pay gap data from april 2018 and mrs may is urging smallerfirms to do the same. the latest figures show on average men are paid almost a fifth more than women. british overseas territories damaged by hurricanes could get access to official foreign aid in the future, under plans being considered by the world's richest nations. there was controversy last month when it emerged that some caribbean islands hit by hurricane irma were considered too rich to receive overseas help, as our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, reports. when british overseas territories like anguilla or the british virgin islands were hit last month, none of
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the assistance they got was from the £50 million eight budget from the uk. that is because they were considered too rich to qualify for assistance. these rules are laid down by the oecd nations. they are meeting in paris on monday. i have been told they will consider a proposal to allow them to qualify for aid if they suffer long—term economic shock. at the moment, there is no procedure to get back on the list of eligible recipients. a second option to allow countries hit by hurricanes a short—term waiver from the rules is not expected to get support. residents of a coastal town in east sussex were told to stay indoors last night and keep their doors and windows shut because of a noxious odour. emergency services said they were investigating complaints of a smell that was described as being like burning plastic.
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some people complained of stinging eyes and feeling sick. the incident happened close to a beach that was hit by a toxic haze in august, although police said they do not believe they are linked. you might remember that. england could round off a year of success for its junior sides by winning the fifa under—17's world cup this afternoon. england face spain in the final which is being held in kolkata in india. rahul tandon is outside the salt lake stadium for us this morning. iimagine it i imagine it is getting very exciting over there. a chance to win! absolutely. what a great day this could be for english football. here in kolkata, everybody is desperate to get a ticket. the two stars of the england team at the moment will hopefully bring home the trophy. the coach has been talking about... remember, they lost to spain in the euros. that was in
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penalties. i hope that does not happen. the coach is hopeful they will do well after they dismantle the favourites, brazil, in the semi—final in front of 60,000 people on wednesday the big he would like them to have more opportunities. england will have huge support because everybody watches the favourite exporter of the country, the premiership. expect to see a lot of manchester united tops. we hope that they can bring it home. in the next few years, we hope they are playing in the premiership for some of the top teams of england and this could be the team that eventually brings the big world cup home to the uk. coverage of the final begins on bbc two at 3:20. there have been a number
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of astrological events to witness over the years, the oval office in the white house has played host to a number of high—profile dignitaries from around the world. yesterday, president trump's guests were not only young but also a little spooky. halloween came early to washington when the children of the white house press core gathered round the commander—in—chief. along with witches, princesses, gouls there was a batman, a darth vader and a princes leia. mr trump who has what could be considered a love hate relationship with the media joked that he couldn't believe "the media produced such beautiful children." i bet that was fun. that is actually quite funny. i would have looked in the drawers. you are known for poking around like that. that does not surprise me at all. the papers briefly. the weather soon. we heard this story earlier about the hms
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vigilant. nine sailors have been kicked off the vessel for drug offences. and the captain earlier was kicked off for inappropriate relationships. and what is happening in spain. some papers are looking at what that might mean for us as well. they are saying in the express that the eu was plunged into crisis last night. many people will be talking about that in brussels today. night. many people will be talking about that in brussels todaym night. many people will be talking about that in brussels today. it is on many front pages. a crisis in spain and catalonia. that is in the guardian. direct rule from spain. also, spain on the brink on the times. there is a feeling at the moment of what happens next after two weeks of this referendum? we can talk about it soon. good morning. what do you make of it? good
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morning. today we saw the prime minister asserting control, but how easily can he take control over a region that obviously, or at least half of those who voted, want independence? that is the million dollar question. one of the important things the spanish government did yesterday was to call new elections for the to do first of december in catalonia. that puts the ball back in their court. —— 21st of. will they participate in those elections? if they do, those imposed from madrid, it is kind of like saying, actually, we are not an independent state. that is an independent state. that is an independent move on behalf of madrid. when madrid takes control of the institutions of catalonia, like london taking control of the scottish parliament and imposing direct rule, when that starts happening, the real question is what will be the scale of civil
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disobedience? half of the catalan population, how will they respond to it? we don't know. what are the mecca —— mechanisms? it could be devastating. we have already seen the spanish prime minister sacked the spanish prime minister sacked the chief of police. yes. what happens next? how will staff react to having a new chief? absolutely. just with the chief and other civil servants who work for the local government in catalonia, it has enormous ramifications. tens of thousands of people now have a changed top brass. someone they don't consider legitimate. will they obey instructions from new authorities? that is one of the issues that we do not know how it
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will play out. because the spanish government also issued a decree warning civil servants that if they do not obey the new authorities, they will be subject to immediate disciplinary action. tension is escalating all the time. disciplinary action. tension is escalating all the timelj disciplinary action. tension is escalating all the time. i suppose it is easy for us to understand london against holyrood. but this region has enjoyed a lot of autonomy recently compared to scotland before devolution. they are used to independence. how does this change... for someone who lives in the region, how does this change now that spain has imposed direct rule? profoundly because these institutions were imposed on catalonia after the long dictation ship of franco after 40 years, they are profoundly attached to their own
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regional government, it is important and it represents who they are. for madrid to take direct control of these institutions has major impacts. will anything change day to day? not for merry people, it doesn't matter ina sense for merry people, it doesn't matter in a sense who is the chief of police —— for merry people. but if you work in those institutions it has major institutions dasha for ordinary people. do you feel they are legitimate and you want to pay those new instructions from the new authority from madrid? —— for ordinary people. but it's the reaction to those new changes? that's where we are, we don't know how ordinary catalans en masse are going to respond and in particular the tens of thousands of civil servants working for the authorities. will they abe the new rules and orders coming down to them from the new authorities —— obey. you will be sticking with us through the programmes i thanks very much or
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that. you're welcome. time to find out about the weather. —— programme. thanks very much for that. looks lovely, but a tricky one today, might not suit everyone, strong winds will be the story and feeling chilly for some as we go through the weekend and we could see gales in the north. let's put a bit of detail on it. the best of the weather certainly down into the south—west, a chilly start with a bit of patchy fog but thicker cloud further north and that's where the winds will pick up into the far north of scotland, but they will become extensive in scotland, northern ireland and northern england through the afternoon. the cloud is thick enough for some persistent light rain in western scotla nd persistent light rain in western scotland for much of the day. through the middle part of the day, winds are likely to pick up to 50 mph gusts across exposed coasts and through the higher ground of the pennines, maybe 60 mph. if you're
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thinking of walking through the day, worth bearing in mind, that rain will be fairly persistent to the north—west of the peaks. further south and east we should see a slightly quieter day, breezy but not the strong winds and a bit more sunshine. into the afternoon, sheltered eastern areas should cds and warmth if you get some sunshine, we could see 16 or 17 but the winds will temper the feel of things, especially in the north. those gusts will become more of a feature into the night and they will swing round to more of a northerly. a weak weather front will sink steadily south, taking cloud and drizzly rain with it, lingering perhaps in the far south—west but here in two sunday morning we will keep double digits, but further north, a chilly start, a touch of frost likely for the start of sunday. on sunday, the northerly winds kicked in. not as strong as today but it will feel noticeably colder —— kick in. a better day in terms of sunshine, a scattering of showers down the east
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coast perhaps being a nuisance but temperatures will come down and it's going to feel colder, perhaps with the exception of the farce at west, here we cling onto that milder air. the high pressure continues to build on sunday night. —— far south—west. worth bearing in mind if you are a gardener, the wind will clear, temperatures falling ahead of the arrival of another warm front in the north—west. a chilly start on monday morning, towns and cities centres, there's the potential for temperatures to fall around the freezing mark, maybejust below first thing on monday so it could be oui’ first thing on monday so it could be our first real significant chilly start of the autumn season and our first widespread frost. take note, you two. frost, the word has been mentioned. thanks very much, see you later. there has been a bit, my layers are piling on. i like it, the change of seasons, oh, christmas is coming! she doesn't like christmas!
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not true, itjust doesn't need to come so not true, itjust doesn't need to come so soon! however you can build up come so soon! however you can build up to it! we'll bring you the headlines at 6:30am. time now for this week's film review with james king and jane hill. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through the cinema releases this week is james king. good to see you. you too. what have you been watching? there is some romance amongst the ruins in the italian love story call me by your name, an awards contender, that one. the god of thunder goes down under. there is a distinctly antipodean feel to marvel‘s latest, thor: ragnarok. claire foy and andrew garfield battle the odds in breathe, there will be tears...
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let's start with call me by your name. i feel like i've seen the trailer for this ten times, do the producers think it's an awards contender? we are heading to awards season, so you will hear the same titles over and over again over the next few months. i do think this is one of those. the director is luca guadagnino, arguably the most stylish and chic director at the moment. i am love, starring tilda swinton is a recommendation if you've never seen it. written by james ivory, formerly of merchant ivory fame. it's a love story set in the early eighties in northern italy over one summer. it is about a 17—year—old boy called elio. elio's father is an academic and he invites from america, a student, an intern to help him overfor the summer. elio falls in love with the intern. we have timothee chalamet, a real rising star, as elio,
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and armie hammer as the intern. here we are. thank you so much. my goodness, you are bigger than your picture! i couldn't get all of me in the picture! it's very nice to meet you. elio! you must be exhausted... elio, oliver, oliver, elio. you must be exhausted! come, come. should i take your things to your room? my room...
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follow him... it is set in the 1980s... in italy, his mother was french which is why he also spoke french. language is an important part of the film. it's about this young boy finding out who he is, his own personality and finding his own language. that's why there are a lot of different languages going on in the film. i just loved it. it looks gorgeous, it's mainly set in lombardia and lake garda, and it looks fantastic. it's a young love story, a coming—of—age story. it's about the grey areas. it not one of those cliched movie love stories where everything seems neat. it's about the complexities of it and growing up. that's what resonated with me. perhaps it meanders a little but it's about a teenager on their summer holidays which is when you meander. i certainly remember meandering a lot! got a lot of time on your hands in those days...
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exactly! there's a real sense of waiting for things to happen. set in the 1980s before the internet and mobile phones. you are in the dark as to what is happening. you really get that sense. i thought it was beautiful. wonderful, it certainly looks beautiful. yeah. does thor look beautiful? it actually does. it looks very stylish. it's the third chris hemsworth thor outing. it's stand alone. there is more comedy in this one, even though the subtitle, ragnarok, relates to the destruction of thor's homeland, quite a bleak premise. it's a very funny film. two reasons for that. the success of the guardians of the galaxy franchise, another marvel comic book franchise, cheeky and funny. it seems that thor has been given a guardians of the galaxy makeover.
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secondly, i mentioned at the top about the down under thing. the director is a guy called taika waititi who has had a lot of success in new zealand with his comedy dramas. he did the hunt for the wilder people and what we do in the shadows. he brings a lovely, deadpan, antipodean sensibility to the whole thing, as well as casting cate blanchett and carl levin in there, and of course chris hemsworth. i love the comedy of it. it's really funny and marks it as different from the others. there isn't much depth to it or threat to it, but you will laugh a lot. that's what people are really picking up on. and there's a lot to be said for that. absolutely. the final selection for this week is breathe. based on the true story of robin cavendish. a man in the late 50s, he was 28 years old. he was disabled by polio and this is the story of how he chose to live as full a life as possible, often
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using quite unconventional methods, and how he was supported by his wife, diana, throughout. directed by andy serkis, a directing debut for him, and claire foy and andrew garfield star in this. let's have a look. how do you feel? much better. diana, what happens if there is a power cut? you are working with a hand pump. it's a nifty bit of kit... look who's here! oh, look. there you go. ooh. look, jonathan. it's daddy. hello, jonathan. hello, dear boy.
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a proper tear—jerker? absolutely, not so much tugging on the heartstrings as yanking on them! you will blub. there are some funny moments but for me, mainly in the second half of the film. it was the funnier moments, or the more peculiar moments that really resonated. sometimes it is a little by the book and predictable, and inevitably, it will be compared to the theory of everything, the movie about steven hawking from a few years ago. maybe it doesn't have the charisma of that. but behind the camera we know andy serkis is a great actor and clearly he's a very good director. from now on after this we will see him directing as much as acting. he has a very confident style. that's a really interesting development. superb actor, he is a fantastically versatile actor. it is striking that he has chosen something that's a real tear—jerker as his first film?
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he said he read the script. it's actually his production partner — it's the story of his parents. his production partner is jonathan cavendish, but when andy serkis read the script he said it was the most emotional thing he had ever read, he had to make it, and it is an emotional watch. let's go onto something completely different — our film of the week. my goodness, i loved death of stalin. right, let's talk about it, then. isn't itjust clever satire? what i love about it, so much, was i watched it and laughed. so, a couple of weeks ago when i saw it. and in the fortnight since, what has really stayed with me is how chilling the whole thing is. i absolutely agree. of course it's an absurd situation these people find themselves in after the death of stalin in 1953 but then you see the backstabbing and the desperate clamouring around to hold onto some sort of power. and the things people will do which affect millions of their citizens in russia.
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it's chilling. and he never lets you forget that people were taken out of their bedss in the middle of the night and thrown into prison, or worse. it's important that that has to be in the film but it's done cleverly. you laugh at the ridiculousness of it but then you go, hang on, there's a dark side to this, which is classic satire. you can see there are five great people in the poster behind you but it's an ensemble cast. they are all fantastic but simon russell beale really stood out for me. he plays beria, the head of security in the secret police. a chilling performance. he's great but they all are great in it. yes, aren't they? fantastic. and a quick thought on the dvd, for anyone who doesn't want to head out? my cousin rachel, based on the daphne du maurier thriller set in victorian era, cornwall. sam claflin stars — he suspects his cousin rachel has killed a mutual relative. but the only problem is, as well as suspecting her, he is also falling in love with rachel, he's also seduced by her. he's in an odd position.
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we never really know whether she did it or not. you are kept guessing by the film. the rachel of the title is played by rachel weisz and just keeps her cards close to her chest throughout. it's a subtle performance and you are really kept guessing. excellent. james, it's good to see you. thank you for being with us. that's all from us for this week. enjoy your cinema—going. goodbye! hello. this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and naga munchetty. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: it's been a night of both celebration and protest in barcelona after the catalonian parliament voted to declare independence from spain. the spanish government furiously retaliated, sacking catalonia's president and his entire cabinet and taking the region back under central control. prime minister mariano rajoy said his country could not stand by while part of its territory was stolen. nine service personnel on a nuclear
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submarine have been discharged from the royal navy after testing positive for drugs. the ministry of defence confirmed the departures from hms vigilant, one of four submarines that carry the trident nuclear deterrent. it is alleged they took cocaine while docked. jeremy corbyn says a "warped and degrading culture" where the abuse of women is accepted and normalised is thriving in the corridors of power, including in westminster. in a speech this afternoon in the scottish highlands, the labour leader is expected to say any mp who is involved must be held accountable. his comments follow several newspaper allegations of inapropriate conduct by unnamed mps. it's been reported the first charges have been filed in the investigation into alleged meddling
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by russia in last year's american presidential election. a former head of the fbi, robert mueller, is leading the inquiry. it hasn't been revealed who has been charged, but us media claim at least one person will be taken in to custody on monday. british overseas territories damaged by hurricanes could get access to official foreign aid in the future under plans being considered by the world's richest nations. there was controversy last month when it emerged that some caribbean islands hit by hurricane irma were considered too rich to receive overseas help. but new rules from the organisation for economic cooperation and development would allow countries to requalify for aid if they suffer long—term damage. the number of people regularly working night shifts in britain has increased by 260,000 in the past five years, according to new analysis from the tuc. it says the late—night workforce has now reached over three million and is most common in security, manufacturing, and healthcare sectors. three out of five night workers are men. residents of a coastal town
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in east sussex were told to stay inside last night and keep their doors and windows shut because of a noxious odour. emergency services said they were investigating complaints of a smell that was described as being like burning plastic. some people complained of stinging eyes and feeling sick. the incident happened close to a beach that was hit by a toxic haze in august, although sussex police says it doesn't believe the two events are linked. the prime minister, theresa may, has called again on companies to reveal the difference between what they pay male and female staff saying "sustained action" was needed to tackle the issue. companies with over 250 employees have to publish gender pay gap data from april 2018 and mrs may is urging smallerfirms to do the same. the latest figures show that, on average, men are paid almost a fifth more than women. and now it is time for some sport.
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good morning. we are excited. england at youth level is like fa ntasy football! england at youth level is like fantasy football! they are so good! so, 2022 world cup? there is the premier league, which does not give young english players enough opportunities to develop their game. that is the problem england has to address. but they could win today! . this could be the year in which england become football world champions twice. the under—17 team will try to follow the under—20s who won their world cup in june. the match be the biggest of their young lives with more than 66,000 in the stands in the indian city of kolkata but this england team have shown they can handle pressure. striker, reean brewster, has been their star, scoring seven goals in the tournament so far including
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a hattrick in the semi—final against brazil. we believe in ourselves. it is more like adrenaline before the game rather than nerves. we believe in how we play. we are confident in our style of play. english players up against spain later today. this lunch—time, second—place manchester united take on tottenham, who are only behind them on goal difference. spurs have won four in a row in the league, but will be without harry kane, who's scored 17 times this season for club and country. kane has a minor hamstring strain so isn't being risked. sheffield united have gone top of the championship, at least for this morning, after they beat yorkshire rivals leeds 2—1 in front of 34,000 at elland road. substitute, david brooks, who's only 20, got the winner they deserved in the last ten minutes, and the blades, who's entire squad is made up of british and irish players, are one point clear of wolves,
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who play qpr this afternoon. lewis hamilton is aiming to become world champion for a fourth time at the mexican grand prix this weekend. if he finishes fifth or better on sunday, the title is his no matter what happens to his closest rival sebastian vettel. red bull's daniel ricciardo went faster than hamilton in a closely contested second practice last night. vettel was fourth fastest as the ferrari driver clings to his fading title hopes. if vettel is second in the race, hamilton needs only ninth to clinch the championship. if the ferrari driver finishes anywhere else, hamilton takes the crown regardless. now the world heavyweight champion, anthonyjoshua, says he has no ego, and feels like the challenger, as he prepares to defend his titles against stand—in opponent, carlos takam in cardiff tonight. joshua was due to face the bulgarian kubrat pulev, but he withdrew, because of injury. alex gulrajarnee, is in cardiff. the greatest year in the boxing
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career of anthonyjoshua continues. a household name now, he is known outside the ring as well as in aid thanks to one night in april. —— in it. he confirmed his status as one of the biggest draws. his victory over wladimir klitschko had it all. but that famous win is left to history, for now. i never does not last forever. everything has a beginning and an end. while i am doing it, i have to remain focused. i stay hungry and focused on myjob andi i stay hungry and focused on myjob and i will try to stay on top as long as possible. that journey continues in cardiff. the principality stadium is getting ready to welcome him and 70,000 fans. there is no denying being the heavyweight champion of the world is big business. only winning will keep
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in there. carlos takam wants to be the first man to get the better of him. joshua has different ideas. he has been at championship level before and is here again. you keep on knocking and knocking and sooner 01’ on knocking and knocking and sooner or later you will get in. ijust have to boot him back out. but he a lwa ys have to boot him back out. but he always remains open for his fans. in his own words, a man of the people, a lwa ys his own words, a man of the people, always finding time to give something back. i do it because that is who i am. and ifight because thatis is who i am. and ifight because that is what i do. i know how to separate what i do, thejob, the belt, it does not represent me. it goes out. my coach goes out. all i haveis goes out. my coach goes out. all i have is my gum protector and my gloves. that is what i am focused on. and he will, as he always does, with a smile on his face. bbc news, cardiff. england captain, joe root, thinks australia have underestimated his side ahead of the ashes. root and his team fly out today but their preparations have been undermined by all—rounder
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ben stokes' arrest outside a bristol nightclub. stokes is still waiting to hear if he'll be charged and won't travel but root thinks others can fill his place. it isa it is a great opportunity for someone it is a great opportunity for someone else to it is a great opportunity for someone else to come it is a great opportunity for someone else to come in. he is a fine player. but there is a squad of players that is more than capable of going over there and doing something special. we spoke about it quite a lot in the last week. if you don't believe it, if you don't believe you can go over and win, there is no point getting on the plane. exeter chiefs are top of rugby union's premiership this morning after they came back from the long trip to sale sharks with a 10—6 victory. the decisive moment of the match came when lachie turner burst through to score the only try just after the break. second place saracens play london irish later. seven games, seven wins, for glasgow in the pro 14, and they took a bonus point last night against southern kings. the warriors ran in seven tries in a 43—13 victory.
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elsewhere, there were wins for ospreys and connacht. when it comes to cycling, it's not always about speed. and for the british team gearing up for the bike trials world championship in china, it's more about skill, precision and getting over higher and higher obstacles. i've been to cambridgeshire to see them in action. they look more like kangaroos rather than cyclists, but these are some of the top bike trial competitors of the top bike trial competitors of the uk. it is the ultimate obstacle course for bicycles. that is how it started in the late 70s. you can get your bicycle over anything. no matter what is in your path. just using pedal power. matter what is in your path. just using pedal powerlj matter what is in your path. just using pedal power. i would relate to it to rerunning, climbing, you look for the hardest thing to get over and get over it. there is no limit
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to what you can do. it is like foot ball to what you can do. it is like football is limited byjust scoring. this is like higher, bigger, faster. it boomed after the stars of this bbc programme, junior kickstart. they used pushbikes to refine cycling skills. some needed it. it ta kes cycling skills. some needed it. it takes months of practice daily to get these heights. but you can learn the basics at as young as three. this is where it all starts. you have to go around the tones. it is weird. the first thing you notice is there is no saddle. i keep wanting to sit down. it is quite strange. when you are bouncing it is like you are on a trampoline, but, like me you are not. going over rocks and things is hard, but you cannot sit down. i feel like i am using every muscle in my upper body and my back.
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ina muscle in my upper body and my back. in a competition you can put a foot down five times as a maximum. but it costs you a penalty each time. down five times as a maximum. but it costs you a penalty each timem uses all different parts of the body, for the core, the arms, the legs. you see some of the young guys that have been practising, the guys and girls, they are strong. it is very, very good for fitness. you can literally start very simple, get a flat piece of floor with a white line. you can learn the basics nice and safe like that. then you can do everything is. what a feeling up on one wheel! you can let go now. i don't know how long i can hold it for. i will leave it to the rest of the british team to show what they can do against the best writers on the planet in the world championships in china. —— riders. and while i could not get over the
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obstacles here, i could be one in another part of the routine. please do not try this at home. these are highly skilled riders, and this is why i was holding my breath. that was so close to your nose! it was right there. but it did not touch! it shows how good they are. they are incredible. and it is not as hard to get into as you would think. it ta kes get into as you would think. it takes months and months to get on one wheel, but then they are way. do not do that on your own at home, though. taking the seat off of your bike. those are special bicycles. one thing you never realise is how much strength you need and all over fitness as well. he would spend four or five days in the gym and six days on the bike. it is about all of that
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strength to get balance and poise. they make it look so easy. that is why i am always impressed. and then you did it, and it looks really hard. no offence. middle-aged, ajob on the sofa. but it is good fun, no matter the level. there is still a sense of achievement. thank you. the spanish prime minister imposes racked rule over catalonia in response to its declaration of independence. —— direct. nine pretty servicemen have been thrown off a british submarine after doing drugs. this morning as we were getting into
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the office it was chilly after a ridiculously warm day yesterday, what's going on? all i know is there are more layers going on. that's the trick. carol has always said that's the trick. carol says the trick is layers. that's obvious, isn't it? not always! let's talk to a professional about the weather to find out what's going on. only my second broadcast and i've been told off, somebody told me off 20 minutes ago for us using the f and the c—word at 6:20am on saturday morning, frost and christmas! plenty of frost over the next couple of days, turning chilly but for today, a blustery and chilly affair, the cold air kicks in on sunday. the strength of the wind isn't going to make it feel pleasant at all, a lot of cloud in the north with high pressure dominating in the
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south—west at the moment so that's where we will see the best of any sunshine but the winds will be gusting to gale force wind so if you area gusting to gale force wind so if you are a hill walker, take a note, by the middle of the afternoon we could see 50 mph gusts with persistent light rain. further east in eastern scotla nd light rain. further east in eastern scotland under shelter we could see 16 so not all doom and gloom. winds could gust to 50 mph in the peaks and pennines but with a bit more shelter and sunshine, not too bad, 16 or 17 shelter and sunshine, not too bad, 16 or17 in shelter and sunshine, not too bad, 16 or 17 in the south—east corner. the best of the drier brighter weather in central and southern parts of england and wales. the westerly wind driving in more cloud along western facing coast and persistent light rain out of scotla nd persistent light rain out of scotland and northern ireland sinking steadily south. the winds increasing through the night, cloudy and dry vereen england and wales but milder um ten to 12. further north, cold air kicking in, a chilly start for scotland. as we go into sunday,
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the winds will turn northerly, lighter in nature compare the two today and we will see more sunshine coming through. always the risk of a few scattered showers along the east coast, a decent day but noticeably colder —— compare the two today. four or five degrees down on what we have seen for some —— compare the two today. overnight the clear skies will have an influence so a chilly start on monday morning. in rural spots we could see lows just below freezing zoe widespread frost and likely on monday morning. this area of high pressure is staying with us for one day at least # widespread frost. with the winds bawling light and the clear skies, those temperatures likely to fall away on sunday night —— so widespread frost. a chilly start on monday morning, but generally speaking we will start to see the weather improving and the
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cloud and rain arrives, bringing milder weather but unfortunately it will bring wetter and windier weather, so feeling milder by the end of monday afternoon. i'm still reeling. about the f—word and the c—word? frost and christmas? iamso and the c—word? frost and christmas? i am so naughty, i did it again! we'll bring you the latest headlines at 7am. time now for the latest technology news in this week's click. going into space has long been the dream of many a sci—fi fan and for one bbc presenter that dream is about to come true. in a world first for the broadcast industry, spencer kelly, who fronts the bbc technology programme click, has been accepted by nasa to visit and report
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from the international space station. during his stay on board, he'll present several episodes of click. kelly, who says he has always harboured ambitions to leave planet earth, will test how the latest technology performs in zero gravity. he says he's looking forward to the months of training ahead of him. that's not... that's not true. i'm so sorry. that shouldn't be on the autocue. it's my christmas fantasy list. it's fake news! we are fighting the fake news. it's fake, phoney. fake. the fake media tried to stop... everyone's using the term these days. the problem is, it now seems to mean anything from actual lies to something you simply don't agree with. and the tech world is anguishing over how to sort fact from fiction, from opinion, from satire, from highly skewed and misleading headlines. and as a result, fact checking organisations are now working to counter the fake news effect. the first draft coalition operates
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around the world and in germany it's working alongside journalists from a group to help improve online transparency. in the run—up to the recent election here, they published a daily newsletter, investigating the most popular stories on social media, suspected of being false or highly misleading. you look at an incident in a video, but then when you're trying to get verification you're looking largely away from the main incident and into the background. is what's being claimed in the captioned description in this video what is actually being seen in the video? one which showed a couple of maybe not traditional northern europeans, a couple of dark skinned guys, waving their passports. this was claimed to be smug immigrants trampling all over german people's feelings. the tweets said they were insulting local germans and provoking them. using simple tools such as reverse image searches to verify the original sources of videos
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and in this case a facility called ‘watch frame by frame', the journalists were able to identify the street name. the thing that helped me is there is a police officer walking through the video, back here. after locating the police squad in question they were able to get an eyewitness account of what happened, notjust in front of the camera but also behind. actually we discovered that behind the camera there are like 100 people insulting these three to four guys in the first place. they were, if anything, just reacting. the problem is that anything can look believable when it's published online and there is an ongoing debate about whether the platforms on which the stories are published should be the ones to police them. making sure that quality content and qualityjournalism is on top
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is a big mission. so that's why we work very closely with fact checking organisations and media organisations around the world. just a couple of months ago we changed our ads policy around misleading news websites. wheoever ends up fighting the rising tide of fake news, one things for certain — ultimately we're going to need an automated fact—checking system. back in the uk, a stone's throw away from westminster, lies full fact. this is an organisation that first came to the public attention around the time of the eu referendum. these guys have some pretty interesting fact checking tools. in this session of prime minister's questions,
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the group is verifying claims using a mixture of manual and automated fact checking. using a combination of ai and machine learning, the algorithm will perform calculations and check facts with primary sources. eventually it could be used in a scenario such as this. there are 10,000 more training places available for nurses in the nhs, but the right honourable gentleman... yeah, see, that's not right. that's an ambition for 2020, but it's currently not true. how cool would it be to debunk claims like that on the spot? gdp is rising. it's kind of like shazam for facts. nurses are using food banks. the tool that i'm most excited about is the speech to text checking. so it's when somebody is talking live and it takes you in real time to the primary sources. so if a journalist is in a press conference or if they are interviewing someone, they can see straightaway if there's something that the person in front of them has said is true or false, which is particularly cool.
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i so want that. i so want that! have you used it in anger yet? i haven't used it in anger yet. all right. how ready is it? it's ready now, but it can only do one sentence at a time. do you think public figures will have to change the way they behave? there's no debate that can really happen without eventually hitting on numbers and the point at which you hit numbers it's important that they're correct and not being manipulated. that's the place we are starting from and the world we want to create. 12,000 creatives under one roof, all geared up to find out what's next from the outfit that literally invented photoshopping. the answer — a! as we've never known it before. take this image of denver, where an entire neighbourhood is expunged in a flash and replaced with something more aesthetically pleasing. instead of just trying to fill in the area with surrounding
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pixels, the software can now extract meaning from the image and make a smart substitute from its library of 100 million other pictures. a similar principle is at play here. the plaster now intelligently removed as the software can understand the protrusion in the middle of a person's face is a nose. and say you wanted to remove something or someone from a video. right now you could try it frame by painstaking frame. the chances are the result would look crude. but this demo is real. a research project we may well see in a future version of adobe's products. in this era of fake news, the implications of being able to easily fool your audience are of course potentially troublesome, but adobe is more interested in the creative potential of ai. we are trying to reimagine the entire creative process so you can create the way you want to. machines can see patterns and possibilities that we may not be able to see immediately. adobe says a! should allow creatives more time for artistic expression
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and to be creative rather than doing boring and repetitive tasks. they say the entire creative process should be way more efficient and ai could potentially even second—guess our next moves. the tech also understands 3d, so you don't have to be an artist to easily design and iterate. few people would argue that al is fantastic in terms of creating efficiencies in our work flows, but is there a danger that an over reliance on our machines instead of amplifying the creative process could eventually end up supplanting it? i actually don't think so. creatives are distracted by all of the things that take multiple steps, make them suddenly move out of a right brain mode into a sort of procedural left brain mode. i don't think a! takes anything away. i think it ends up being this muse at your elbow. and that's the prevailing view amongst creatives here, keen to embrace the possibilities
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offered up in an a! world. we're on our way to see a film, a movie, but not as we know it, in virtual reality. we're going to get run over. car honks i think this is 68a, not your standard cinema. haunted cinema downstairs. there's people down there wearing vr headsets. virtual reality film is super exciting, but right now you can only enjoy it in the comfort of your own home and it's not a social experience. we want to bring people together so they can enjoy vr with their friends, their family, their partner. where am i sitting? we reserved you a seat. oh, excellent. have we got any popcorn? back we go, up and over... oh, popcorn, excellent. is everyone ready to go?
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all: yeah! let's do it! showtime! scary suburbia. i'm looking down, i don't have any legs or anything, i'm not a person... i've been directed to look down the drain. oh my goodness me! that is it down the drain. i'm pennywise, the dancing clown! just left that scene. look behind you... we've got a collection of films five to ten minutes each and we're showing them back—to—back in a 40—minute montage. it's not the first vr cinema pop—up and none of the hardware the guys are using is cutting—edge either. but they have created a custom piece of software to link all the movie clips together and play them in sync across all the headsets via bluetooth so people can have that shared cinema experience of being shocked all at the same time. actually it was quite fun to bring
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a group of friends together. not that i have any here. you can go out and have a shared experience, another group is coming in right now? right now. 0k. masters of turnaround. we'd better be on our way. that's it for the short cut of click for this week. the full version is up on iplayer. don't forget we live on facebook and twitter throughout the week, @bbcclick is where you'll find us. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. hello. this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and naga munchetty. tensions rise after spain imposes direct rule on catalonia just hours after politicians there declare independence. as crowds celebrate, spain's prime minister sacks the region's leader and chief of police and calls snap elections. good morning.
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it's saturday the 28th of october. also this morning: we'll hear from the family who say their severely autistic son was failed by the system designed to protect him.
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