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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 31, 2017 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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cracking down on problem gambling. the government considers drastic new measures. the maximum stake for fixed—odds betting terminals — which raked in more than a billion pounds last year — could drop to as little as £2. the industry says a £2 limit could lead to the closure of around half of all high—street betting shops. also this lunchtime... the uk police investigation into harvey weinstein widens — detectives are now looking at sexual assault allegations from seven women. up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in financial services in the uk after brexit according to the bank of england. the sacked catalan leader appears in brussels saying he's there for safety purposes and freedom — not to claim asylum. and for the show stopper? prue leith apologises after accidentally tweeting the winner's name ahead of tonight's great british bake 0ff. coming up in sport on bbc news, sir mo farah has cut ties with his american coach alberto salazar after six years. he's going to be based in the uk for his marathon career. good afternoon and welcome
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to the bbc news at one. they're called the crack cocaine of gambling — fixed—odds betting terminals on which you can currently gamble up to £100 every 20 seconds. they made almost £2 billion last year for the betting industry and hundreds of millions in tax for the treasury. but now the government is looking at limiting the amount that can be gambled at any one time to as little as £2 as part of a review of problem gambling. jim connolly reports. a few months ago, nathan would have struggled to walk past a bookmakers. his gambling problem started with fixed odds machines.
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he stopped betting with help from gamblers anonymous. i found myself suddenly with debts that i could not cover at all. i lost about £5,000 in 48 hours. you lose all sense of time around you. the moneyjust... the money becomes a number on a screen. you're desensitised to everything that is going on. gamblers anonymous was my last resort to save relationships. currently you can bet up to £100 a time on a fixed odds betting erminal. the government review suggests a much lower limit, ranging from £50 to £2, making these machines less attractive. we recognise that people are losing a lot of money on these machines. that they are creating some issues around harmful gambling which can have a great impact on other areas in society, including their families and their communities, so we want to make sure we are taking action. but labour isn't happy with the review, saying it could go much further. the government could have come to parliament today and said we are reducing the stake to £2.
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instead they have given in to industry lobbying, they have a 12 week review. the maximum stake could still be £50, which means there are going to be a lot more problem gamblers losing money in years to come. last year, £1.8 billion was made from these types of machines. bookmakers said thatjobs are at risk if the limit falls as low as £2. we estimate that half of shops in the uk would close, that's approximately 4,000 shops and potentially 20,000 jobs. at higher stake levels, maybe £20 or £30, we are looking at approximately 2,000 shops closing with 10,000 to 11,000 job losses. just like high streets up and down the country, this part of east london has more than its fair share of bookmakers. legally, shops like this one are restricted to having only four fixed odds machines in each shop and some critics say they are so profitable that some companies have multiple branches all in the same area. charities say it's the speed you can lose money on these machines that is the issue.
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the gambling industry has 12 weeks to respond before the government decides how low its final limit will be and, with bookies taking billions each year, the stakes have never been higher. jim connolly, bbc news. british police investigating the film producer harvey weinstein are now looking at sexual assault allegations from seven women. the incidents are alleged to have taken place between the early 1980s and 2015. the producer has unequivocally denied any allegations of non—consensual sex. our special correspondent lucy manning is here. what more can you tell us? well, the metropolitan police confirmed today they have expanded their investigation into harvey weinstein. it has a name now and they have allegations from seven women making 11 separate allegations. we have learned from the metropolitan police that four new women have come
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forward in the last couple of weeks to make allegations. 0ne forward in the last couple of weeks to make allegations. one of those women said that she was assaulted by him in the early 1980s. that was outside the uk and that has been passed to another police force. another woman said she had been assaulted in westminster in the mid—19 90s. the sixth woman said she had been assaulted outside the uk in 2012. and that she had been assaulted in the uk in 2013 and 2014. the seventh woman said she had been assaulted by him in 1994. the met are investigating separate allegations, but it is a bigger investigation than when they first started in october. so the investigation widens, has there been any response since then from harvey weinstein? his spokespeople have a lwa ys weinstein? his spokespeople have always been clear that he absolutely denies any allegations of nonconsensual sex. it is fair to make clear that these are just allegations at the moment. but the met allegations at the moment. but the m et ta kes allegations at the moment. but the met takes these allegations very
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seriously, and they are of course doing a proper investigation into this. unlike in the states, some of the allegations in america cannot be investigated because of the time that has elapsed since they are alleged to have happened. that isn't the case in the uk. what the met are saying is that no arrest has been made at this stage. theresa may's spokesman says it is right that michael fallon apologise for inappropriate behaviour towards a female journalist, but insisted that the prime minister has confidence in her government and ministers after allegations of sexual harassment in westminster. norman smith is in west minster. how seriously is down history taking these allegations? to some degree, they have waved away these allegations, saying that there is not going to be any cabinet office investigation into sir michael's conduct. there has not been a complaint by the journalist involved and sir michael has, they say, rightly apologised. the journalist,
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julia hartley—brewer, has herself said that she does not regard herself as the victim of an assault after sir michael repeatedly put his hand on her knee at a conservative party dinner back in 2002, to which she responded by warning him she would punch him in the face if he continued. in her eyes, and i suspect in the eyes of many people are wes burns do, that incident does not share the same level of gravity and seriousness as some of the allegations now sweeping westminster. but you get a sense of the febrile atmosphere now in the wa ke the febrile atmosphere now in the wake of these claims, because the prime minister's spokesman in the last 20 minutes or so was asked whether the prime minister has confidence in sir michael fallon. that is a fairly routine, anodyne question for the prime minister's spokesman to be asked, and the usual a nswer spokesman to be asked, and the usual answer is yes, of course. that is not the answer that we got today. the spokesman said that the prime
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minister had confidence in all of her ministers getting on with their jobs, in other words, her ministers getting on with their jobs, in otherwords, a much her ministers getting on with their jobs, in other words, a much more general answer. this, at a time when the bbc has seen a list compiled, it is thought, by parliamentary researchers, listing 40 mps with claims made against them, unsubstantiated claims, made against them. you get the sense that this whole saga surrounding sexual harassment at westminster is very farfrom harassment at westminster is very far from over. catalonia's sacked president says he's gone to brussels to make his voice heard in the european union, not to claim asylum in belgium. carles puigdemont told a news conference he was not trying to escape justice, but wanted to be able to speak freely. he also said he would accept the result of snap catalonia elections in december called by spain's central government, when the region's autonomy was suspended. andy moore reports. the world's media waited expectantly for the first comments from the cata la n for the first comments from the catalan leader since he left his
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homeland. good morning. he said he would speak in several different languages to appeal as widely as possible to an international audience. he accused the spanish government of aggression against the cata la n government of aggression against the catalan people. translation: we are facing a state that only understands the reason of force and has decided to use violence, forcing us to abandon our political project. in answer to a question in english, he denied he would be claiming political asylum. iam not would be claiming political asylum. i am not here to plain asylum, this is not a belgian question. brussels is not a belgian question. brussels is the capital of europe. i am here in order to act with freedom and safety. even as he was speaking, spain's constitutional court declared the declaration of catalan
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independence null and void. another court was considering rebellion charges against him. the people of barcelona woke up to newspaper headlines this morning that their president was now in belgium. 0pinion president was now in belgium. opinion on that, as an independent itself, is divided. for me, said this man, it shows he lacks the courage of his own convictions. but this man said the more international spotlight the issue received, the better that was. 0utside issue received, the better that was. outside the headquarters of the cata la n outside the headquarters of the catalan government there was no sign ofa catalan government there was no sign of a tussle for power. the image of the exiled leader can still be seen in some of the officers. the local police were on duty outside. there are reports the national civil guard has raided the headquarters. there we re has raided the headquarters. there were wild celebrations in barcelona on friday, when the breakaway from spain was announced. but what for some was a dream of independence is
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110w some was a dream of independence is now further away than ever. let's speak to james reynolds in barcelona. what has been the reaction to his appearance this morning in brussels? by and large, people here have reinforced the division that already exists here in cata la n division that already exists here in catalan society. those pro—independence catalans, who already support carles puigdemont, say it was right for him to flee this area, to protect himself, and they will still listen to what he has to say. the anti—independence catalans, who has to say. the anti—independence catala ns, who do has to say. the anti—independence catalans, who do not support him, essentially want him to come back here to face justice, to face charges in spanish courts. really, the scale of the task facing him now is clear. he says he wants to be in brussels because he wants support from europe. bear in mind, all european leaders so far have lined up european leaders so far have lined up against him and in favour of madrid. he also said he wanted some kind of guaranteed of protection from the spanish government to allow him to return. the spanish
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government may simply say you have to come back, it is a matterfor the spanish courts, not for the political system. essentially, we don't know when it might be for ca rles don't know when it might be for carles puigdemont to return here to catalonia. up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in the uk's financial services sector if brexit negotiations fail to produce a trade deal with the european union. that's according to senior figures at the bank of england, who are said to have described the estimate as a reasonable scenario. but they are thought to be optimistic that negotiations will be successful. 0ur economics editor kamal ahmed is here. that is the first time a figure has been put on how big thejob that is the first time a figure has been put on how big the job losses could potentially be? i think that is right, more fodder for the brexit negotiations. the city of london would see no deal as the worst—case scenario, but the bank thinks that is not necessarily how things are going to turn out. a few comments this morning saying, well, a few bankers moving out of london, who cares? well, let's look
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at why this matters. we have a few figures coming up. what the financial services sector does for the uk, it is a huge value provider on economics. it raises every year £67 billion in tax. it obviously pays for hospitals for the police service, for education. we have a trade surplus in financial services with the rest of the world. £58 billion. that means it is good for oui’ billion. that means it is good for our balance of payments and for the uk economy. so, the 75,000 job losses that the band say could happen over 3—5 years, not necessarily would, but could happen, thatis necessarily would, but could happen, that is a full number of 1.1 million employed. so although 75,000 is large, that figure shows that london would still be the global financial centre for europe, even with these job losses. but certainly there does seem job losses. but certainly there does seem to be some rich pickings for other european union countries if we
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we re other european union countries if we were to leave the eu with no deal. the social networking site facebook says more than 100 million americans could have come into contact with russian—backed propaganda before and after last year's presidential election. twitter and google also say they were used to share divisive posts traced to russia. it comes as the white house insists that criminal charges brought against former aides to president trump show no evidence of collusion between his election campaign and russia. paul adams reports. it is almost a year since donald trump's stunning election win, a yearin trump's stunning election win, a year in which one nagging question will not go away. just how much did russia do to help? now, facebook may have come up with part of the answer. in testimony prepared for crucial congressional hearings, it says a vast quantities of misleading and divisive content which originated in russia were swirling around america before and after the
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election. it says 80,000 posts were published between june election. it says 80,000 posts were published betweenjune 2015 election. it says 80,000 posts were published between june 2015 and august last year. they were seen by 29 million americans directly. through likes and shares, the real figure could be as many as 126 million people. figures seized on by mr trump's defeated opponent. the former chairman paul manafort is one of two men accused of laundering money, burned while working for ukraine's former pro—moscow president. but it is the role of george papadopoulos which could prove more damaging. he has admitted lying to the fbi about his contacts with russian nationals. president trump is furious. in truth this morning, he says it is all fake news, as paul manafort‘s lawyer said, there was no collusion and events mentioned took place long before he came to the campaign. as for the lower—level volunteer named george, mr trump says he is a proven liar. the charges represent the opening salvo from robert mueller, the man leading the russia
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investigation. it is unlikely to be the last. sum up mr trump's supporters are urging him to sack mr muller and democrats are warning the president not to interfere. 0ur correspondent jane 0'brien is in washington. the president taking to twitter to continue to angrily make his case? yes, sophie i think that is a sign of just how worried yes, sophie i think that is a sign ofjust how worried the trump administration is by these charges, and this guilty plea from george papadopoulos, because and this guilty plea from george pa padopoulos, because he and this guilty plea from george papadopoulos, because he was working for the trump papadopoulos, because he was working forthe trump campaign, papadopoulos, because he was working for the trump campaign, when he was actively seeking meetings with russia officials, to gain dirt on mr trump's opponent hillary clinton. and then lying about it to the fbi which of course what he is in trouble for, this is getting closer and closer to the administration, paul manfort's charges have to do with money—laundering and for failing to register as a foreign representative of a foreign entity,
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those, mr trump representative of a foreign entity, those, mrtrump can representative of a foreign entity, those, mr trump can distance himself from up to a point, but george papadopoulos is much more troubling, which i is i think why we are seeing angry treats trying to discredit him asa angry treats trying to discredit him as a proven liar and saying he was a low level volu nteer, as a proven liar and saying he was a low level volunteer, he was in fact, a foreign policy adviser to the trump campaign, and mr trump knew him personally, describing him at one point as an excellent person. so, ithink one point as an excellent person. so, i think is an indication that the trump administration is getting very worried about the direction this inquiry is taking. thank you. our top story this lunchtime. cracking down on problem gambling — the government considers drastic new measures to reduce the maximum stake for fixed—odds betting terminals. and coming up. a morning of tennis for the duchess of cambridge, on her first solo public engagements since she announced she is expecting her third child. coming up in sport in the next 15 minutes on bbc news. england's cricketers have come
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through their first ashes training session after arrived in australia. they are in perth for their first tour match next weekend. there are around 500,000 farmers in the uk, producing 60% of the food we eat. and while many aspects of the brexit negotiations remain unclear, we do know that the decision to leave the eu is likely to trigger the most significant changes to uk agricultural policy since the 1970s. so what might this mean forfood production, and for the consumer? sarah dickins has been to carmarthenshire to take a look at how the dairy industry might be affected. every afternoon and morning this herd of 350 dairy cows head for the milking par low. their quality milk
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goes into large—scale cheese production. but this family expects its costs to go but this family expects its costs to 9° up but this family expects its costs to go up after brexit, and for prices to rise in the shops. the cost of importing feed to feed these cows is going to go up, the cost of labour to milk the cows is going to go up. if the costs aren't covered we can't keep producing the food, simple as that. son danielworks on keep producing the food, simple as that. son daniel works on the farrell and they employ a couple from latvia, paying them more than £50,000 a year between them we are lucky to have these guy, they can seejobs to be lucky to have these guy, they can see jobs to be done which i lucky to have these guy, they can seejobs to be done which i don't have to tell them, think we are lucky to have them. they have been unable to find local workers and don't think they could even if they offered hiring wages. welsh dairy farms have been less reliant on payments than others but the eu has acted to stop prices plummeting, keeping farmers in business. stevens hopes when the uk is outside the eu
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dairies will agree a fixed price for miguel milk. the link between farmers and food producers very close, they work hand in hand, and something that changes the fortune of one impacts on the other. milk from local farmers has of one impacts on the other. milk from localfarmers has come here for hand made cheese for 30 years, 35,000 litres of milk arrive here every week and are turned into cheese. they sell to independent shop, high end supermarkets as well as customers in the eu, japan and canada. they expect brexit to help business, but agree shopper also have to pay a hiring price. we are seeing a lot more opportunities within the uk, replacing maybe foreign imports, so we have had a lot of interest in the last 18 months. but what does that mean for the many restaurants and hotels that are so much part part of the rural economy, with 20 staff, two from
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romania, this business has flourished over three year, it is already having to pay more for local produce, the wine it imports and expectses that to accelerate. produce, the wine it imports and expectses that to acceleratelj think expectses that to accelerate.” think the only way we will come out of this with some kind of result if we are radical about it. in the uk we are radical about it. in the uk we spend just over 8% of our income on food. it will take a big cultural change before shoppers are happy to pay more. so how could the negotiations impact on the british farming industry? 0ur political correspondent, eleanor garnier, has been working with the bbc‘s reality check team and is here to explain. every aspect of our lives will be impacted by brexit and the negotiations between london and brussels. food production and prices are some of those areas. something central to farming in the uk when it comes to brexit is the common agricultural policy, or cap. the financial assistance it gives is vital to farmers right across the eu, including here in the uk. the cap is one of the biggest areas of eu spending, at £39 billion, with each country in the eu paying into the budget to fund the policy. the eu says the payments make up
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nearly half of the income of farmers across the bloc. it supports eight million farmers across the eu, and aims to stabilise their incomes and keep prices roughly the same. when it comes to the impact of the common agricultural policy on the uk, there are around 178,000 farmers who benefit from the scheme. a few get millions of pounds, but the average payment is between £17—18,000 a year. to reassure farmers about what will replace the cap after brexit, the government has already promised to keep up the payments until 2022. leave supporters point out that the uk contributes more to the whole eu budget than it receives back in subsidies like these, so they argue the government should still be able to support farmers once we've left. of course, everyone wants to know will our weekly shop end up
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being more or less expensive? it's impossible to say because there are so many factors — like the value of the pound and, crucially, the weather — that impact food prices. and we don't yet know how brexit will affect the number of seasonal workers who come here and their wages. another big factor that'll influence the cost of food is the nature of the trade deals we strike with the eu and the rest of the world, because tariffs — that's the extra cost put on imported food — and the food standards we adopt after brexit all need to be negotiated. so — will brexit impact food prices? that remains highly uncertain. but if you want to find out more about all this — go to the bbc‘s reality check page online. claims of cheating and abuse in paralympic sport are being examined by a committee of mps today. it comes after a bbc investigation uncovered claims
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of tactics being used to cheat the system internationally. the former paralympic swimmer and bbc sports reporter kate grey reports. that to accelerate. i think the only way we will come out of this with some kind of result if we are radical about it. in the uk we spend just over 8% of our income on food. it will take a big cultural change before shoppers are happy to pay more. in 2015 at the world paraathletics championship live where breen and sophie hahn won gold together in the t3o sophie hahn won gold together in the t30 relay. today, giving evidence to the parliamentary select committee 0livia's father recounted a conversation with the head coach of british paraathletics paula done, suggesting that sophie harp was competing in the wrong category the actual process at classify care, it all seemed pretty loose. but within the conversation she told us that the conversation she told us that the athlete in question, sophie hahn didn't have cerebral palsy, but she had learning difficulties, but she ended up with a cerebral palsy classification. hahn is a two time
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paralympic champion and world record holder over the t38100 and 200 metre, today and previously there we re metre, today and previously there were allegations that other british athletes are also in the wrong categories. and the anonymous whisperings are something paralympians are whisperings are something pa ralympians are too whisperings are something paralympians are too familiar with. i know i have had a lot of accusations thrown at myself but thatis accusations thrown at myself but that is simply because my class is a lwa ys that is simply because my class is always describeds as a cerebral palsy class and i don't have it, but thatis palsy class and i don't have it, but that is just simply lazy analysis sips of what the classification is. every disability is different so you can't compare one to the other as much as we try. giving evidence todayis much as we try. giving evidence today is 11 time paralympic champion baroness tanni grey—thompson who says britain needs to lead the way on this issue. believe great britain should be the gold standard of integrity, of independence, and we should have an open discussion about misclassification. the classification system was developed
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by the international paralympic committee who have rejected the invite to attend the parliamentary meeting. but a few days ago they did announce as of january 2018 they will review the classification rules and regulations for athletics. following this the ipc have submitted a nine page document as evidence to the committee. this along with other written evidence will be reviewed in due course. the duchess of cambridge has carried out her first solo public engagement since announcing she was expecting her third child. she was forced to cancel a number of engagements due to severe morning sickness in the early weeks of her pregnancy. today she visited the lawn tennis association, for which she is now patron. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph reports. she arrived dressed down, ready to play. it seems the weeks of chronic pregnancy sickness are behind the duchess of cambridge. today she appeared to be back to full fitness a at the national tennis centre in south—west london. as patron of the lawn tennis
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association, it was a chance for her to see how tennis is developing at a grass—roots level. the duchess saw children being given a first taste of the sport. it was actually really exciting. first time meeting a royal family, i nearly screamed, and it was so fun as well. also sharing her expertise was the british women's number one antonio co nte, british women's number one antonio conte, for her, the ——johanna konta, for her the duchess's involvement is important.” konta, for her the duchess's involvement is important. i share my passion and so many other people share that passion as well, to for the children to meet a princess it is very exciting for them, but i think overall, just to see her general interest in the sport, is really encouraging. the duchess took over patronage of the lawn tennis association from the queen, she held the role for 64 yea rs, queen, she held the role for 64 years, but she wasn't the biggest
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fan of tennis, her trips to the all—england club were rare. fan of tennis, her trips to the all-england club were rare. the duchess of cambridge alongside the chairman... the duchess is a keen player and watcher of the game. a regular visitor to wimbledon, she once said tennis was the only sport where she could nearly always beat her husband. there was no husband to triumph over today, but this event appears to be the start of the duchess resuming a fuller diary of royal engagement, ahead of the new baby arriving in april. and finally to the perils of twitter. tonight is the final of the great british bake 0ff — when millions are expected to tune in to channel 4 to find out who has won. it's supposed to be one of television's most closely guarded secrets. but this morning the newjudge, prue leith, accidentally named the winner on twitter. she says she's mortified. here's our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. and don't worry, you don't need to look away now — we will not tell you who has won. hello, thank you'll for coming. the moment is here. i would like to ask the three finalists to step forward.
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i would like to ask the three finalists to step forward. this was supposed to be the moment that the winner of the great british bake—0ff would be revealed. millions were expected to tune in tonight, to find out whether it would be kate, sophie or steven. the winner of the great british bake—0ff 2017 is... no longer a secret. after prue leith, one of thejudges, mistakenly revealed the result on social media. in a quickly deleted tweet, she said: no—one told mejudging a great british bake—0ff final would be so emotional. i wanted them all to win. bravo... followed by the name of the winner. which we have of course removed. hopefully it won't have spoiled it for too many people, but it is a shame because the big story is the fact it has worked. this unlikely move from the bbc to channel 4 has gone really well. they have huge viewing figures and it was supposed to be a celebration tonight, it was the big finale and hopefully it hasn't been spoiled for too many people. prue leith, who is currently in south asia, quickly apologised saying: i am so sorry
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to the fans of the show, for my mistake this morning. i'm in a different time zone and mortified by my error. the show hasn't attracted the massive viewing figures it enjoyed on bbc one, but has still been a big channel 4 hit

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