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tv   Britains Best New Building  BBC News  October 31, 2017 8:30pm-9:01pm GMT

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‘than england and wales. brighter than today with slightly more sunshine breaking through. sunshine to the north of scotland. but a blustery wind bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers. central, southern scotla nd and showers. central, southern scotland and the north of northern ireland rain through the day. heaviest in the morning, a bit lighter into the afternoon. for all, temperatures about where they should be for the time of year. maybe 15 or 16 in the south. turning cool wednesday night into thursday morning. cloud pushing southwards with patchy rain either side of it. thursday morning there's a frost in parts of northern scotland. bye for 110w. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: new york city police say several people have been killed and many more injured after a vehicle was driven into pedestrians and cyclists in manhattan. reports say authorities are treating it as a terrorist attack. a labour activist tells the bbc how a senior party figure persuaded her to drop allegations of rape by a party member. a man is convicted of murder after running over an ex—navy
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cash officer with his own car in a robbery gone wrong. welcome to the roundhouse in north london, the riba stirling prize, the hunt for best new britain in britain. fixing mega best new building in britain. we have an attempt to give further education new status and can you reinvent the british pier? that's like other nominees for the prize. —— let's look at the nominees. whoa, look at that! city of dreams! it's like walking to the gates of heaven. it looks seriously so dope. it looks so cool.
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it has got lights, like, notjust regular lights. purple lights. and it's a tremendous fun, it's like a haven of quietness and freedom. and madness. it's just brilliant, for me, it's excellent. wow. i think what's unique about this building is it's a strikingly modern building and a very sensitive conservation environment. i love this building because it reflects so many elements of the historic dockyard. it gets you in here, and you just think, why? what are your thoughts looking out on this now? oh, i love it, it's
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just so peaceful. a very brief glimpse into the six nominated buildings before the announcement and the next ten minutes or so, let's have a longer look at those six building. i'm joined by ollie wainwright, architectural critic, and emma froud, a community architectural correspondent? i make sure that communities are involved in architectural projects. but look at the first one. over dc, you were involved in this from the beginning, hastings pier?m you were involved in this from the beginning, hastings pier? it was a project where i worked with the community to look at the questions they asked about architecture, to make sure they got the architect
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that would work well done. and what they have created is is what they expected? it's they have created is is what they expected ? it's extraordinary they have created is is what they expected? it's extraordinary what they created. this is architecture thatis they created. this is architecture that is doing what architecture is most to do, which is supporting community life. ollie, what do you make of it? my favourite is that it has locally been nicknamed the plank. but may sound a criticism but isa plank. but may sound a criticism but is a massive plank, it's a flexible blank canvas. some people got concerned they lost the end of the pier attraction? its teeming with attractions, it has public shows, attractions, it has public shows, attractions, ourselves, it had has been embraced by big amenity. when i went out there, you feel like you are out at the. —— out at sea. you
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really inhale the experience. you have the community activity in the middle but then a sublime experience at the far end grip is it the future of tambe mike woods? -- is it —— is it the future appears? -- is it the future appears? it is a glimpse into the future. you like this one, the glasgow? this is taking something that is rarely celebrated in this way and giving it civic pride in the centre of glasgow. considering its own privately financed initiative, it has all the things about a city squeeze into one building. has all the things about a city squeeze into one buildingm has all the things about a city squeeze into one building. it has a sense of dignity doesn't it? squeeze into one building. it has a sense of dignity doesn't mm squeeze into one building. it has a sense of dignity doesn't it? it has a real civic presence but as a humility to the architecture because they have mapped this complex brief
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of making sure every skill can be accommodated. you are suddenly met inside by 20 stewards and stewa rd esses inside by 20 stewards and stewardesses marching in uniform pass the test, past the dock workers? it's a high street, you can go to the restaurant and b has on why people are training. it's a miniature world. you think, how brilliant to be a student there. com pletely brilliant to be a student there. completely different, come on of the oceans, tatham, but more modest, —— command of the oceans, tatham. more modest but mavi heritage? it's rambling sheds. it takes visitors on a atmosphericjourney below the floorboards where you discover the septembers therefore so many years. it's a difficult task because the old building they had to respond to is made from this ancient ship timbers themselves. you have to
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respond in a humble way. a bit of concrete looks like timber as well. i remember they really had to fit in carefully into this. the same with the british museum, one of the great landmarks of london. yeah. but this building is quite magical, and it looks better in the flesh than a dozen photos. it's an iceberg of a building, you only see the tip. the wooden brick outside, what do you of those? not ground-breaking but interesting piece of cross laminated timber, a cheaper way to build. maybe it will catch on, it's a good model. they also have this cheeky relationship with the homes, in a mixed up street. intentionally cartoonish quality, next to a
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primary school, so it looks like a child's drawing of it how. it's a good addition to the street. and we will now, i think, move very quickly across to louise minchin who is announcing, and ben derbyshire, the president of the royal institute of british architects, the announcement of this year's riba stirling prize. we've just got a couple of seconds and you can do the honours. thank you very much. good evening, ladies and gentlemen. the royal institute of british architects is a global, professional membership body. a charity supporting architect and society to deliver better buildings and places, stronger communities and and places, stronger communities and a sustainable environment. on this very special occasion, we are
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celebrating the winner of the most coveted award in architecture. a prize that illustrates why uk architecture is the envy of the world. the riba stirling prize showcases the remarkable skills for tenacity and problem—solving player of our talented architectural practices. it also rewards the patrons of great architecture. clients that have taken the initiative and sometimes a risk, to create innovative extraordinary environments that delight and inspire. the built environment plays a crucial role in how people understand and value of the world around them. the quality of the places in which we live, work and play, is a reflection of our country's ambition and success. we
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must insist upon and nurture exceptional design, we know that it is worth every penny of investment and more. as chair of the jury, is worth every penny of investment and more. as chair of thejury, i congratulate every single one of this year's finalist. truly remarkable buildings designed and built perfectly for the people that they serve. and here comes the moment, i'm absolutely delighted to announce that the winner of the 2017 riba stirling prize for architecture is, and you will have to wait while i fell it in my other pocket... hastings pier. congratulations. please come and
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join us on stage. we can keep going, we can keep cheering, come on! congratulations. cheering
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ididn't peer i didn't peer into the future but i did make, just in case, a couple of nights. first of all, because we are on live linkup with hastings pier, hello hastings! yes! we've got the hastings pier party going on. it was called win or lose. so this is double suite. i first of all want to acknowledge all the contenders in this stirling prize award which is always hotly contested, and i think you will agree we have seen some incredible quality. so fair play.
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and i would like to acknowledge that you've all done fine buildings but it seems that this year, what really captured the imagination was not doing one. in favour of making space. in favour of making public space. in favour of making public space. when you invent, you need to collaborate, and this project really did define collaboration. sol collaborate, and this project really did define collaboration. so i have to acknowledge that this, and you can see to acknowledge that this, and you can see from the stage here, of the members who worked on the scheme, and incredible design team pt projects. we had a dedicated design team which works closely and very broadly with the client. you cannot do interesting and special projects without a special client and i would
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say hastings pier charity are up there among the most special, even eccentric clients you will ever meet. but i also want to acknowledge the people that delivered it were absolutely fantastic. in the end, the double—macro absolutely fantastic. in the end, the double— macro charity, absolutely fantastic. in the end, the double—macro charity, formally trust, became the project managers to build it using local contractors, and that was a really special process. it was actually realised and delivered. so fair play to all the delivery team, the contractors and ultimately, the agility of the funding came from heritage lottery funding came from heritage lottery fund for which we are also extremely grateful. —— fund for which we are also extremely grateful. — — the fund for which we are also extremely grateful. —— the majority of the funding. finally, i just grateful. —— the majority of the funding. finally, ijust say thanks to the riba for this amazing award,
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andl to the riba for this amazing award, and i guess, it is nice to be recognised by your peers. thank you very much. the winner of this year's riba stirling prize. hastings pier, an extraordinary adventure in reinventing something that many people in the town had thought had gone forever. the building, a huge, empty space, effectively, with a pavilion on top. many calling it the plank. as you were there from day one with the residence, it must be quite a good feeling? yes, i have not seen the residents sense but i'm so delighted, they found a good one. they got a good architect. do you think this is a worthy winner.|j
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they got a good architect. do you think this is a worthy winner. i do, it is difficult to convey the power through the photographs, you have to stand on the end of this pier leaning pcbs, taking in the view, feeling the expense of the sea. as you say, it is a public space. it is not a photogenic or immaculate work of architecture in that space, it is a basic piece of public space that serve its function. do you think that people going on there bucket and spade holidays will take do this when they do not get the end of the pier amusement, the penny slots and whatever, it is a bit of an adventure in architecture? have the architects led the public was not a yes, but to witness the public using it today, alex said he didn't do a building but the building in the middle is extraordinary. it's got a cluster of beach huts around, but thatis cluster of beach huts around, but that is what good architecture does. it supports and enhances human
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rights. —— human life. every nook and cranny has been used. you have the steps going to the cafe, with the steps going to the cafe, with the seating, so the public really depends in an unexpected ways that they weren't imagining. depends in an unexpected ways that they weren't imagininglj depends in an unexpected ways that they weren't imagining. i know there's a gathering of people on the pier at the moment watching the announcement, that doesn't happen off with architectural awards, the thousand people, shareholders, they brought pier themselves, this is more thanjust brought pier themselves, this is more than just the architects' story? yes. it's architecture, architects being the facilitator for the desires of a community. and it's really wonderful to see, you see the people, i was there at the weekend they were running workshops, thejoy of people running things in that building. the power of amenity ownership. before, it has been owned bya
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ownership. before, it has been owned by a company in panama, they did not ca re by a company in panama, they did not care when it burned down, they compulsively purchased the structure of the £1, give it to the charity, thenit of the £1, give it to the charity, then it shows the power of building momentum of people that live there to make this project up. it did seem like this first. i think now is a good moment for us to actually have a look, killing —— look at hastings pier and the story of how we got here after that terrible fire in 2010. it gets you in here. you just think, why? you were here when it broke down? you were here when it burned down? i was. people that i've never spoken to before were stopping me to talk about the pier and everyone was devastated. it was really quite upsetting. the fact there had been a massive
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fire and it felt like actually, how is it going to come back from that? did you think it was all over then? i did and i knowa lot of people did, and it was actually the opposite. so, seven years after that fire, hastings pier has been reborn. jill, dot and gillian are shareholders, the local community now owns the pier. and it's been rebuilt. this curtain of glass, finally give the people of hastings a panoramic view out to the sea. the woodwork here is the original timber from the pier. there are still some of the scorch marks from the fire of 2010. but the most important innovation is this. nothing. what they chose not to build. the empty space. there is no end of the pier.
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and there's a good reason for all this space. the history of britain's piers is a story of recurring disaster, flimsy wooden attractions that have a habit of going bankrupt and burning down. so much to listen to, say much to see. and everything must be the finest in the world. even the potato peeler. the old seaside attractions have gone. in their place, open space that can be used for a variety of moneymaking enterprises. the victorians had this great concept of walking over the sea, promenading. and thanks to them, we've got this madness in our society called piers. madness? absolutely bonkers. madness? peter weaver is a piers engineer, 3000 tonnes of new steel have been added to try to keep the elements at bay. it's a triumph of hope
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over reality isn't it? yes and that's the biggest challenge. how does the pier fund its own maintenance ? that's where piers have a problem. so, 145 days after it was first opened, hastings pier is reborn and is now britain's best new building of 2017. what are your thoughts looking out on this now? 0h, i love it. it's so peaceful. i'm joined now by the winner of this yea r‘s i'm joined now by the winner of this year's riba stirling prize, alistair of drm n architects. it must be a good feeling? it's a fantastic feeling. not only have we laboured on behalf of the people that worked on behalf of the people that worked on this project. it's not the normal
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product at all? it was initiative by a local community group who kick—started an effort to save a derelict pier that then caught fire and had to be rethought. it was a long process, seven years of thinking and drawing and composing, to now come here and be recognised as not just a to now come here and be recognised as notjust a immunity room project, but an exemplar of design, it's fantastic. a lot of people, when they saw the plans, thought, "hang ona they saw the plans, thought, "hang on a second, i can see a pier but not anything else, you've forgotten to build the buildings." the joke was that it was the plank. conceptually, it was a hard one at first, but the thought was, it had to be so many different things for the many people, you have do make things that enable lots of different things, and to build one so—called iconic building at the end of it
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would not serve all the people who are not using about that time. would not serve all the people who are not using about that timem has also provided the town and visitors with a proper view. you can sit out, 365 days a year, you don't get that then every other double—macro? get that then every other double-macro? absolutely,s eyebrows, her domestic british ideal. —— peers are a british ideal. it's a space where you can be part of the weather. sometimes in the year, you will be on your own, sometimes there will be on your own, sometimes there will be on your own, sometimes there will be packed thousands of people there because there are also a band ora there because there are also a band or a circus. it is about creating possibilities. do you have a question for him? at a brave move to have left it open and not do the obvious thing and placing the iconic building at the end, were you worried it might end up being barren and an empty space for the year? was
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that concern in the back of your mind? we were never worried it be barren. partly because the local people are genuinely eccentric and fun and they love life, they love dressing up, they will always have events and that was never a risk. the idea of making a big public space was so beguiling because we don't have that much in the uk. we don't have that much in the uk. we don't have that much in the uk. we don't have open public space that isn't full of stuff. and here we have the opportunity to demonstrate people's imagination and the way in which they can colonise and use the spaceis which they can colonise and use the space is very important. children are always good at that. congratulations, the winner of this yea r‘s congratulations, the winner of this year's tom, riba stirling prize. this is what it
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was all about. hastings pier, described in the 1870s as peerless, a masterpiece of victorian engineering, it's gone through fire, storm neglect, changing fashion. what we've seen today is an attempt to reinvent the british pierfor the future. the winner of this year's riba stirling prize, hastings pier. good evening. well done hastings pier. some lovely weather touring intrude appear tomorrow, but the
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moment, halloween is fairly quiet, nothing to fight for as far as the weather is going, quite misty over the hills, northern ireland once again, we have cloud and outbreaks of rain, wettest of all the across parts of scotland. there will be clear skies in the north, and clearer conditions at times over england and wales, mist and fog forming a cool stock to wednesday. the wettest spots will be in argyll and bute towards glasgow, part of ayrshire as well, and possibly stirling, dundee and edinburgh and the north of northern ireland. more than that, showers, a blustery wind across northern ireland, and across england and wales, there will be better cloud breaks expected on wednesday afternoon, a bit more sunshine and that will make it feel warmer. not too bad, even with that cloud and rain across parts of southern scotland which turn lighter and patchy through the day, patchy rain and drizzle will work
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southwards into parts of northern ireland later. all duty this weather front with into thursday morning will work its way southward, and around that front, we will see temperatures left as we it will be a chilly night, the coldest will be the far north of england, scotland and northern ireland, and across the grampians we may see an air forced into the of thursday. lovely crisp, fresh start, lovely conditions across north and uk competitor they and tomorrow, a lot of classy wales, the midlands and east anglia, pushing southwards eventually reaching south by the end of the day. patchy rain and drizzle with the cloud, and starting to feel that little bit colder as well. by freddie, best of the something will be across the eastern half of the country, there will be increasing cloud across the west, there will be ta blet cloud across the west, there will be tablet is higher than first, later in the day, outbreaks of rain, and
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it will work southwards, and killing decay, for england and wells on friday night, it will produce wet weather, gradually clearing this weekend, introducing colder air. the weekend, introducing colder air. the weekend, if you have fireworks activity planned, it will be sunshine and showers, but the chilly breeze will be most notable. the international headlines next. e this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 9pm: several people have died and many others injured after a vehicle drove into pedestrians and bicycles in new york — in what's being in what's being described as a terrorist attack. e a woman tells the bbc how a senior labour party figure e persuaded her to drop allegations of rape by a party member. a man is found guilty of murdering a former royal navy officer by running him over with his own car. british police are investigating multiple sexual abuse allegations, made by seven women, against the american film
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producer harvey weinstein. also this hour, a father and five children are believed to have been killed in a fire at a farmhouse in mid wales. three other children escaped the blaze, which broke out in the early hours of monday.
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