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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 1, 2017 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. 8 people are killed in a suspected terror attack in new york. the driver of a truck ploughed into people on a busy cycle path near the world trade centre site in lower manhattan. he then hit a school bus before being shot by police and arrested. this was an act of terror and particularly cowardly act of terror aimed at innocent civilians aimed at people going about their lives who had no idea what was about to hit them. the suspect‘s been identified as a 29—year—old from uzbekistan who came to the us 7 years ago. police say a note was found in the truck that referred to so—called islamic state. this is the scene this morning. we'll be live in new york with the latest in the next few good morning — it's
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wednesday 1st april. also this morning: the nhs reveals it's losing more than a billion pounds a year in england through fraud. in sport, chelsea manager antonio co nte in sport, chelsea manager antonio conte criticises team. good morning from hastings pier which won another award. you can't seat at the moment but it will soon as day breaks. it's beautiful. the same can be said of the in scotland. slowly moving south over the course of the day. ahead of it, when the fog lifts, we will get a bright day with some sunny spells
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andi a bright day with some sunny spells and i will have more on that in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. at least eight people have been killed and ii seriously hurt in new york city, in what officials have confirmed to be a terror attack. eyewitnesses saw a white pick—up truck driving at speed down a cycle path in lower manhattan, before it mowed into a number cyclists and pedestrians. the vehicle, continued for 20 blocks to chambers street where it smashed into a school bus, just a few blocks from world trade center memorial. a 29—year—old man was shot by police before being arrested. officials say a note was found in the truck, which referred to the so—called islamic state group. our new york reporter, nada tawfik, has more. this was the scene of the deadly attack on new york since 9/11. cyclists and pedestrians enjoying a beautiful day struck by a white pick—up truck speed, leaving
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bicycles and bodies in its wake. the journey ends only when he smashes into a school bus and passers—by had to call for help for some of the injured. he can be seen here leaving the vehicle and brandishing a paintball and pellet gun before being shot by police. eyewitnesses describe that panicked moment when they realised something was terribly wrong. he was running around with a gun. so police from stuy came out and they came in and the guy fight a couple of shots before and there was a shootout between the police and the guy and that's when they started to close down everything. he was screaming and he was screaming in the street, he looked frustrated, panicked, confused. from there, whole bunch of customers started running past me, a whole bunch of people came running my way yelling, is got a gun, he's got a gun. the full force of your‘s emergency responders swarmed the area. people
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on the ground from chambers all out to houston. from houston to chambers, multiple people on the ground. we need buses from houston all the way down to chambers. authorities believe this was an act of terror aimed at innocent civilians. they say a note on the suspect‘s vehicle referenced the so—called islamic state. suspect‘s vehicle referenced the so-called islamic state. it's painful day in our city, a horrible tragedy on the west side. that any —— let me be clear based on the indian —— let me be clear based on the information we have at the moment this was an act of terror and a particularly cowardly act of terror. the suspect has been identified as 29—year—old sayfullo saipov who came to the united states in 2010, said to have travelled to florida and working for the company uber as florida and working for the company uberasa florida and working for the company uber as a driver. president trump has been briefed and in a series of tweets promised to crack down further on those entering the country. every day thousands of new yorkers make their way down this
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bike path and just blocks from the site of the world trade center, this attack in lower manhattan is a stark reminder that the city remains a target. this attack happened on one of the most festive days in the big apple. just as people prepared to go trick—or—treating. and new yorkers carried on with that tradition is normal with the annual halloween parade ina normal with the annual halloween parade in a show of defiance and resilience. let us pick on the reaction from world leaders. president trump blaming islamic state. and from the prime minister's official twitter account. canada's prime minister has offered his condolences. the presidents of france: understanding on the bicycle path at
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the edge of the police called. there are the red sikh investigators poring over the scene, trying to pull out any evidence they can find. earlier on, i heard one father described the moment when he was trying to get across the street to pick up his children from school. a police officer had to stop him but he saw in the ground in the distance, the pellet gun at the driver was apparently carrying when he emerged from the vehicle before he emerged from the vehicle before he was shot by police. we know that he was shot by police. we know that he isa he was shot by police. we know that he is a 29—year—old, sayfullo saipov, who was shot and taken into custody. he is being treated in hospital. of course, now, the question is, what was his motive?
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why did he picked this moment? because this is, after all, halloween, what should have been a festive time for the city. more coming up later as we speak to a reporter from cbs. the nhs in england estimates that more than a billion pounds is stolen from the service through fraud each year. that amounts to just under one per cent of its overall budget. the nhs counter fraud authority says patients fraudulently claiming for free prescriptions is one of the biggest problems. our health correspondent, rob sissons, has more. nhs abroad, we are told, has to be tackled on many fronts. now bosses are appealing to list dedicated nhs staff to report anyone they suspect of committing a crime. patients sometimes fiddle the system, falsely claiming forfree sometimes fiddle the system, falsely claiming for free prescriptions or dentistry. professionals including
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dentists have been caught claiming the services not provided. and suppliers have been known to overcharge for items of a higher quality or number than those delivered. earlier this year, the former boss of torbay hospital in devon, was convicted of defrauding the health service of £11,000. she paid her husband here on the left for work you didn't do. now the head of the new organisation fighting fraud says her aim is to see more people convicted. staff can really help us identify fraud and fraudsters and really put a stop to people taking money out of the system so if you are in the nhs, please report any of your suspicions to us and if you are a fraudster and you are committing fraud in the nhs, then we are looking for you and we will find you. the nhs accepts the £1.25 billion fraud figure is an estimate. most cases are undetected. rob sissons, bbc news.
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a government commissioned report will be published today, which aims to identify what lessons can be learnt from the experiences of families of the hillsborough disaster. written by former bishop of liverpool, the right reverand james jones, it's intended to help the authorities respond to future tradegies. the prime minister's deputy, damian green, is to be investigated following an allegation of inappropriate behaviour towards a female conservative activist. the complaint is the latest in a string of sexual allegations sweeping westminster. the first secretary of state has strongly denied the claim. 0ur political correspondent, ben wright, joins us from westminster — what more can you tell us? good morning. damien green is effectively the deputy prime minister. an old friend of theresa may and certainly one of her closest allies in cabinet. he's become the most senior politician to become caught up in these allegations of
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miss behaviour, inappropriate behaviour which allows —— which is swirling around westminster. he strongly denies claims made by a writer and academic who has written in the times today that two insta nces, in the times today that two instances, a meeting she had with damien green in a pub in 2015 in which miss mulgrave claimed he briefly touched her knee and a second time, when mr green sent kate mulgrave a text message which he —— which she believes was flirtatious. she says in the times, he offered me career advice and in the same breath made it clear he was sexually interested. it was not acceptable at the time and should not be a cce pta ble the time and should not be acceptable in westminster in the future. she goes on to say: damien green issued a statement
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himself strongly denying. the most senior civil servant, the cabinet secretary, has been asked to look into this although the time these alleged instances took place, damien green the cabinet. separately, the —— separately, the labour party has launched an investigation how a labour activist called becks baby was treated. in interview, she said when she approached the labour party about an alleged rape that happened to her in 2011, she was discouraged from making any sort of formal complaint was she was told it might not the prospects within the labour party. a reminder of the perils of social
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media. it was supposed to be one of television's best guarded secrets. the newjudge accidentally named the winner ina the newjudge accidentally named the winner in a tweet. don't worry, we've blobbed out the name in this version. she said, "no one told mejudging a gbbo final would be so emotional. i wanted them all to win. bravo." in a later tweet she said she was mortified by the mistake. later on this morning, we'll be talking about who was crowned champion but we'll give you plenty of warning before we do that in case you still haven't seen the final episode. it has been broadcast in the first half—hour of the programme, we will not say. you have been warned.“ you watch it and you haven't seen
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it, it'll be awful. but it is going to be said. you been warned. let's return to our top story — what officials in new york city are calling a terrorist attack. it took place yesterday afternoon in lower manhattan and left at least eight people dead and 11 seriously injured. joining us now from new york is cbs correspondent, kenneth craig. details are still coming out about the suspect — what more do we know about him? also, what about the victims and those who are hurt and injured? also, what about the victims and those who are hurt and injured7m sad and tragic situation which unfolded not far behind me. just to give you a sense of where we are, this all happened just about one or two blocks down the street. that is the westside highway which might be able to see eliminated by the lights behind me. that is where this tragic
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attack all came to a screeching halt. eight people killed during all of this. 11 or 12 others injured. 0f the eight people killed, one of them is from belgium. five others a p pa re ntly is from belgium. five others apparently from argentina. a group of friends here in new york city celebrating the 30th anniversary of their high school graduation. in terms of the people has survived, we understand their conditions range from good too critical. many will have a long physical recovery ahead of them. the picture is emerging of the man responsible. tell us what the man responsible. tell us what the authorities are saying at this stage. we know he is a 29—year—old.
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sayfullo saipov, with a florida license plate and his last known residence is in tampa, florida. as far as we know, they believe this was a lone wolf attack. they do not in the —— they do not believe this was part of some larger terror plot. he came from uzbekistan. during the course of the investigation, authorities also found a note inside that a rented flatbed truck which had some sort of reference to isis. beyond that, we had a commercial drivers license —— he had a commercial drivers license and was a driverfor uber which commercial drivers license and was a driver for uber which has since banned him from being able to drive. they said they did a full background check and they hired him and nothing
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came up. at this point, investigators have a lot of digging to do, talking to people in circles, who they knew, bakeries communications, his cell phone records to try to piece this altogether, figure out if he was working intent with any other groups for larger organisations and how long he might have been plotting the attack. as you mention, the streets in areas directly related to the attack sealed off. as for new york and how it will respond, what is the sense? well, i can tell you the folks here are resilient and courageous. new yorkers not letting the attack, despite how horrific and terrifying it was, bring things to a halt here tonight. it is quiet here tonight, but it is also just past 2am in the morning, and we are right against the crime scene, so you wouldn't be able to see pedestrian traffic
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anyway. but not long after this happened, it was really remarkable to see, it was halloween last night andi to see, it was halloween last night and i saw hundreds and hundreds of families and small children and party—goers and people dressed up in costu mes party—goers and people dressed up in costumes heading out into the night, still celebrating, despite what happened. there is an annual and very large halloween parade that happens in greenwich village every halloween, attracting thousands and thousands of people. there were a lot of questions about whether or not authorities would cancel that event, and that did not happen. new yorkers were encouraged to proceed with their evenings and have a good time, and that is what we saw, despite a very sad event that unfolded. and obviously in the back of everyone's mines here tonight. thank you very much. and we will have more on that throughout the morning. last night was a big night for the architecture world. carol has got the weather for us from hastings pier this morning,
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which has just been given the biggest award in british architecture. good morning to you. and look at the view from hastings pier. what a beautiful sunrise. we will see hastings pier in all its glory as day breaks, but you are quite right. but won that prestigious award last night. it has won a few awards in its time, and when you consider back in 2010 this pier was devastated by fire, and with funding from the national lottery it has been restored to the award—winning pier that it restored to the award—winning pier thatitis restored to the award—winning pier that it is today. it is breezy and chilly here, and in parts of southern england temperatures have fallen to two or three celsius. there is also some mist and fog. through the course of the day in the north, we are looking at rain at times. some of that will be heavy, especially around the central islands and argyll & bute, and in the south we will also see some
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sunshine. if we have a look around the graphics at 9am in the morning, you can see where we have that heavy rain there will be a lot of surface water and spray on the roads. it could lead to some travel disruption but to the north of that in scotland we are looking at some showers. as we are looking at some showers. as we come further south into northern england, a dry start for you. temperatures in manchester by 9am will be about 10 celsius. and it is dry as we push into the midlands, into east anglia and southern counties, when the fog that we currently have lifts. it should do fairly readily through the course of the morning. moving into the south—west, again, a lot of dry weather. variable amounts of cloud, ripening up quite nicely and for wales it is a similar story. find start to the date with some —— a fine start to the date with some sunny spells. along the north coast, we have another edge to the weather front affecting scotland, and that is producing some rain. so through the course of the day it will be breezy, especially in the northern
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half of the country. later we will see local gales around shetland. rain across the central lowlands sinks slowly southwards and weakens in doing so. by the time it gets into northern england it will be lighter, and it will be light rain and drizzle basically. south of that we will see some sunshine, more so than we did yesterday, and temperatures could get up as high as 15 celsius across parts of eastern scotla nd 15 celsius across parts of eastern scotland in south—east england. through the evening and overnight the weather front sinks south again, bringing spots of light rain and drizzle with it. under that, temperature will fall to about ten. ahead of that, in southern england, more widespread fog on the night just gone, especially across wiltshire, hampshire and yorkshire. you can see, despite the temperatures you can see, loads of -1 temperatures you can see, loads of —1 and maybe —2 in the north of scotland. it will be windy as well. tomorrow we have the remnants of that front pushing southwards, lifting the fog and taking the cloud
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with it but a fine day for many of us with it but a fine day for many of us behind that. much cooler across scotla nd us behind that. much cooler across scotland compared to today. in the friday, we have a weather front coming into the north—west of scotland, introducing some rain, and through the day we will see some more rain piling on across south—east england and north—west wales. more of a messy picture and that leads us into a cooler weekend. thank you very much, we will see you later on. it is looking beautiful, and it is only going to get as. we will get to see the pier in all of its glory. let's have a look through some of the papers this morning, and events in new york largely dominating the front pages. that is the image. it is still in the location we have seen on our live coverage this morning, the truck used in the terror attack is still in position, and we know that eight people have been killed and many more injured. we will keep you up—to—date with any developments throughout the morning. lots of reaction to it already from various
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leaders including the new york city mayor, who said this was a particularly cowardly act of terror. and the picture above that story is some of the pride of recent winners having a giggle. you may have heard some of these accounts, this is the labour party being dragged, says the daily mail, into the westminster sexual harassment scandal. party officials accused of covering up a rape. ms bailey says she was attacked in an event when she was just 19 years old and it was covered up just 19 years old and it was covered upa just 19 years old and it was covered up a senior party member. and just underneath is a story about facebook, and jeremy hunt will urge facebook, and jeremy hunt will urge facebook to raise the alarm when children spend too long glued to social media. this is an effort to turn the tide on the damage caused
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by overexposure to the internet. and on the front page of the guardian, as well, those images from new york dominating the front page. westminster shaken by two new claims of sexual assault is the story there, and we will have more coverage of that, of course, throughout the morning from our correspondent in westminster. and bake—off, as well. 0ops is the tagline, one of the judges accidentally revealing the winner before the programme was broadcast last night. we will be talking about that later in the morning. struggling to conceive can be a distressing experience for any couple to go through, but a survey of men dealing with fertility issues suggest their needs are often ignored. the charity habitat fertility network uk says infertility can affect a man's health, career and finances, infertility can affect a man's health, careerand finances, but support remains scarce.
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i remember it was the year 2000, and my wife walked into the kitchen and she said, honey, i think it is time. we started trying. we assumed that it was just we started trying. we assumed that it wasjust going we started trying. we assumed that it was just going to happen fairly normally, and then after nine months 01’ so we normally, and then after nine months or so we decided it was time to go and get some tests done. those test revealed that there was a problem on my side, significantly. so we went and tried a whole heap of rounds of ivf, let's go and do as many rounds of ivf as it takes to get the success of ivf as it takes to get the success that we longed for. what about you, aaron? how long was it for the two of you? from when we we re for the two of you? from when we were trying it is about eight years of essentially not really having any explain the reason why we weren't getting pregnant. and we had three miscarriages during that time.
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which... yes, sort of that unspeakable pain. for me, there was a deep sense of guilt. when you are holding your sobbing wife, at the start of month after month, and then when are going through something like ivf it can be week after week, and lateron, like ivf it can be week after week, and later on, towards the end of ten years on thisjourney, and later on, towards the end of ten years on this journey, sometimes and later on, towards the end of ten years on thisjourney, sometimes it is night after night. you think i am the reason for this, is night after night. you think i am the reason forthis, i is night after night. you think i am the reason for this, i am the cause of you not getting what you so desperately want. so that led to a great sense of guilt for me. when we we re great sense of guilt for me. when we were married, we were, like, 0k, we are going to have five kids. and i remember that. the conversation where you decide how many you will have. i thought i want five kids, that would be amazing. and to think that would be amazing. and to think that ten or 12 years on, it is, like, 0k, that ten or 12 years on, it is, like, ok, no. my big expectations
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and plans have all shifted. yes, very much. do you have that experience of seeing fathers and kids playing, does that affect you? that does occasionally happen walking through a park. you do see a guy with his daughter. i would have loved daughter. and the other thing, i think loved daughter. and the other thing, ithinkl loved daughter. and the other thing, i think i would have been a pretty good dad. looking back on it, i think, yes, we are stronger because of it. some days, some weeks, some months, we are pulled apart. for sure, we are. and other weeks and months it pulls us together, and we are months it pulls us together, and we a re really months it pulls us together, and we are really as a team going through it. if you handle it well, it can also lead to much more intimate friendships, where you do actually ta ke friendships, where you do actually take that old step of sharing yourself with someone else. so if yourself with someone else. so if you handle it well, it can actually bea you handle it well, it can actually be a good thing. thanks to sheridan and aaron who shared their thoughts with us. we we re shared their thoughts with us. we were discussing that issue, and we will discuss it more later on this
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morning. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: a quarter of people return to paid employment within five years of retiring. sean is hard at work this morning finding out why. you can see, that is the view from outside our studios this morning. that is from our building, going across the water over towards where sean is this morning. yes, and you quys sean is this morning. yes, and you guys are sean is this morning. yes, and you guys are looking beautiful, i have to say, in the dark this morning. we have our own sofa over here, because we have lots of people over the morning to talk to about retiring and going back to work. one in four of us do it within five years of retiring, but why is that? we have a group of lads who have retired. and the reason we have got them is that tom got in touch with us a couple of weeks ago when we were talking about retiring on breakfast. what made you decide to text and? my wife had said
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it sounded like i was on an extended holiday, and she said quit it. so it is not on the cards were you just yet. we will talk to lots of people who have done it. first, a bit of news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the number of police front counters in the capital is to be reduced — part of the mayor's attempt to save £8 million for the policing budget. sadiq khan has blamed government cuts, saying another £400 million of savings will need to be found over the next four years. he says just 8% of crimes were reported at front counters last year, and it would be better to prioritise keeping officers
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on the beat. the surrey coroner has been asked to reopen the inquests of five people who died in the guildford pub bombings in 197a. three men and a woman, known as the guildford four, served 15 years in prison for the bombings before their convictions were quashed. nobody else has ever been charged. a south london painter who only picked up a brush for the first time four years ago is now illustrating the latest gucci clothing collection. helen downie from wimbledon took up painting after being diagnosed with cancer. her work became popular on instagram, and was spotted by gucci's art director. iama i am a selfish artist. they don't tell me what to do in any way. i have complete creative freedom, and it is wonderful. i love what aleksandra, the creative director of
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gucci, does. so i bring his work into my own work. let's have a look at the travel situation now. we will start with the good news. the tube appears to be running well so far. no reported problems on any of those lines there. however, a signalling problem that started yesterday means there is no service on heathrow connect trains. also, delays of up to 15 minutes for gwr in and out of paddington. the disruption is expected to last all day. and let's take a look at the roads. in holborn, we have one closed on southampton row, at bloomsbury place, for works. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. there is one or two mist patches around this morning, but that early murkiness will it quite weakly to a dry, bright and sunny day. now, we have a little bit of high cloud around, at least through this morning, so that is going to turn the sunshine we have a little bit hazy. but some dry air moving in from the continent helps to ta ke moving in from the continent helps to take that cloud away. so more sunshine this afternoon and it is really feeling quite pleasant and warm. the maximum temperature up at
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15 celsius later on. now, overnight tonight, a clear picture generally. we will start to see a bit more cloud wriggling its way south as we had the dawn tomorrow morning. but in the meantime, under the clear spells, the light winds, we could see a bit of mist and fog. not especially cold tonight, between six and eight celsius at a minimum. that fog will lift quickly as the cloud pushesit fog will lift quickly as the cloud pushes it away as we had through thursday. it is quite a grey day. lots of cloud, maybe one or two spots of rain, the temper to getting up spots of rain, the temper to getting up to 13 celsius. now, as we head towards the end of the week, towards friday, especially overnight friday, some heavy rain. but that will clear away towards saturday morning, turning more showery through saturday. lots of people heading out on saturday night to celebrate bonfire night. there is still a chance of a shower or two, but it is clearer picture, and it will get colder overnight saturday into sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. when you are holding your sobbing wife, you think, i am the reason for this, iam wife, you think, i am the reason for this, i am the cause and not getting what we so desperately want. the heartbreak of infertility — we'll speak to one expert who says there's not enough support for men dealing with what's often seen as a largely "women's issue". how can the experiences of families affected by the hillsborough disaster help improve the handling of future tragedies? we'll hear from the brother of one victim. and we'll have two winter olympics hopefuls on the sofa to find out how training is going with just 100 days to the games. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. at least eight people have been killed and 11 seriously hurt
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in new york city, in what officials have described as a terror attack. eyewitnesses saw a white pick—up truck driving at speed down a cycle path in lower manhattan, before it mowed into a number people. the vehicle, continued for 20 blocks before it smashed into a school bus. a 29—year—old man was shot by police, before being arrested. our new york reporter, nada tawfik, has more. this was the scene of the deadliest attack on new york since 9/11. cyclists and pedestrians enjoying a beautiful day struck by a white pick—up truck travelling at high speed, leaving bicycles and bodies in its wake. the driver's journey ends only when he smashes into a school bus and passers—by had to call for help for some of the injured. he can be seen here leaving the vehicle and brandishing a paintball and pellet gun before being shot by police. eyewitnesses describe that panicked moment when they realised something was terribly wrong.
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he was running around like with a gun. so police from stuy came out and people called the cops and they came in and the guy fight a couple of shots before and there was a shootout between the police and the guy and that's when they started to close down everything. we had to go. he was screaming in the street, he looked frustrated, panicked, confused. from there, whole bunch of customers started running past me, a whole bunch of people came running my way, yelling, "he's got a gun, he's got a gun!" the full force of your‘s emergency responders swarmed the area. police radio: central, be advised there's people on the ground from chambers all out to houston. from houston to chambers, multiple people on the ground. we need buses from houston all the way down to chambers. authorities believe this
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was an act of terror aimed at innocent civilians. they say a note on the suspect‘s vehicle referenced the so—called islamic state. it's a very painful day in our city, a horrible tragedy on the west side. let me be clear based on the information we have at the moment, this was an act of terror and a particularly cowardly act of terror. the suspect has been identified as 29—year—old sayfullo saipov who came to the united states in 2010. he's to have travelled to the east coast from florida and worked for the company uber as a driver. president trump has been briefed and in a series of tweets promised to crack down further on those entering the country. every day, thousands of new yorkers make their way down this bike path on their way to work and school and just blocks from the site of the world trade center, this attack in lower manhattan is a stark reminder that the city remains a target. this attack happened on one of the most festive days in the big apple. just as children prepared to go trick—or—treating. and new yorkers carried on with that tradition as normal with the annual
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halloween parade in a show of defiance and resilience. more coverage of that developing story throughout the morning, speaking to an eyewitness shortly. the nhs in england estimates more than a billion pounds is stolen from the service through fraud every year. that amounts to around 1 per cent of its total budget. the nhs counter fraud authority says patients fraudulently claiming for free prescriptions and dentistry accounted for one of the biggest problems. he had to balance the the first secretary of state, damian green, has been referred to the country's most senior civil servant, after he was accused of making sexual advances towards a female conservative activist. the prime minister's deputy has denied the allegation made by the writer, kate maltby — saying it was deeply hurtful. the complaint is the latest
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in a string of sexual allegations sweeping westminster. a report will be published today, which aims to learn lessons from the experiences of people whose relatives died in the hillsborough disaster. it will include the conduct of past police investigations and look at the families' engagement with public authorities over the last 28 years. written by former bishop of liverpool, the right reverand jamesjones, it's intended to help the authorities respond to future disasters. busy night in sport. they are reporting their bands make the chip —— that of rome and saw them lose. some of the defending has been likened to under eights football and thatis likened to under eights football and that is insulting to monday. they lost 3— nil. manchester united did win that given of hugely big helping hand by the goalkeeper from benfica. antonio conte critical of his players, united though all but through,
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while celtic‘s hopes of manchester united are all but through to the knockout the manchester united, help from 1—man‘s misfortune. after his howler, the benfica keeper seemed to make amends, saving martial‘s penalty. and then he was back. it can bea penalty. and then he was back. it can be a cruel old game. come the second half when marcus ratchford one, this time, there was nothing he could do. blasting united to the brink of the knockout stage. as chelsea, they knew a win against roma would take them through. they we re roma would take them through. they were behind in less than a0 seconds. a stunning strike putting the hosts ahead. and chelsea's night went from bad to worse. defensive to the ring
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saw a second goal and after the break, a 3— nilwin saw a second goal and after the break, a 3— nil win was sealed. theirfans break, a 3— nil win was sealed. their fans enjoyed it. break, a 3— nil win was sealed. theirfans enjoyed it. wonderful from roma and pouring from chelsea. celtic‘s hopes are over but not without a fight. after trailing —— after trailing, without a fight. after trailing —— aftertrailing, mcgregor without a fight. after trailing —— after trailing, mcgregor looked to keep their chances alive but martinez ensured a 2—1win keep their chances alive but martinez ensured a 2—1 win the bayern and to celtic, another win the champions league frustration there was a great disappointment because the second half was really, really bad. bad for a team like us. on the season, we
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show great anger, a great will to do something of importance. hoping to better performances than chelsea. sunderland are looking for another new manager — they sacked simon grayson after last night's draw at home to the championship's bottom side bolton. grayson has only been in the job for four months but he's overseen just one win in 15 league matches. sunderland have had 10 managers in less than nine years. the classification system which underpins paralympic sport is not fit for purpose and athletes have been bullied into keeping quiet, that's according to 11 time paralympic champion baroness grey—thompson. she was speaking at a parliamentary hearing into claims athletes were cheating the system. great britain should be the absolute integrity of —— the absolute gold
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standard of integrity. but where we are, the media coverage, everything, but this was talking about doping in olympic sport, it would be the same reason. so you think it's the equivalent? not quite, but there are similarities in terms of what it can do. a lot of criticism for the classification system. kyle edmund will play america's jack sock in the second round of the paris masters today, having edged past russia's evgeny donskoy in the first round. the british number three had to save a match point in the second set tie—break against the world number 76, before winning in three sets. i guess he is really flying the flag in the absence of andy murray. a good win to him. king let's return to our main story this king morning. let's return to our main story this morning. a 29—year—old man has been shot and arrested in new york, after a white pick—up truck mowed down people on a cycle path in lower
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manhattan. officials later said it was a terror attack. joining us from doha, is martin reardon, former head of the fbi terrorist screening centre. win over this action was intended to break our spirit but we also note that new yorkers are strong and resilient. our spirit that new yorkers are strong and resilient. ourspirit will that new yorkers are strong and resilient. our spirit will never be moved by an act of violence and enactment to intimidate others. we have been tested before as a city very near the site of today's tragedy and new yorkers do not give in in the face of these kinds of actions. joining us from new york, is babatunde ogunniyi. he's a student living in new york and witnessed the attack. i know it is very late there. very pleased to see that you are ok. tell us pleased to see that you are ok. tell us what happened. azzi said, i'm a
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student who goes to college right across the street. it is an area we re across the street. it is an area were a lot of people go, commute, walk their dogs, jogging, an area thatis walk their dogs, jogging, an area that is used a lot recreationally. a lot of skate parks around. me and a friend happened to be across the street at the time. you can see the white truck revving its engine. so me and a friend kind of looked at each other and were wondering why the driver was so aggressive. shortly after the trip, hopped onto the curb and hit two people and at that point, it was a matter of what we do. would we do we run towards the people the garbage truck or see what else is happening? everybody is trying to figure out how to respond.
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shortly after, the truck hit the bus and veered off to the left. it was a chaotic scene. people running around, maybe ten seconds later. people wonder if the person in the truck had shot the gun or someone had shot the person that is in the truck. basically, there was a heap of confusion. what did you do? like isaid,i of confusion. what did you do? like isaid, i initially of confusion. what did you do? like i said, i initially reacted after seeing the people getting struck. kind of went towards that area. it was kind of apparent that there was confusion so that was kind of like... how quick were the emergency services to respond to it they were
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very timely. it was amazing. immediately after, people were trying to assist, try to take stu d e nts off trying to assist, try to take students off the bus, figuring out what was going on and where people needed to be. halley are you feeling now? -- how are you feeling now? i don't think i can put it altogether. still trying to figure it out, what happened. it's a state ofjust shock and disbelief and it's really surreal and it's one of those things, many times a day, you see on television and in the news and you wonder, i have seen it happen but it's not around me and it doesn't affect me but when you see it in person, you actually witness, you
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realise it can happen anywhere. it makes you obviously much more aware. it does. thank you very much. extended coverage of events in new york throughout the programme this morning. but we will bring you what we normally do, sport, weather, and right now, the view in hastings is looking rather wonderful. hastings pier has just won the biggest award in british architecture. carol is there for us this morning, no doubt with another award—winning forecast. good morning, carol. it is beautiful, isn't it? good morning to you both and good morning to you as well. that sunrise has only been getting better and better as we went through the morning. if you look up at the pier, you notice there is no building. often you get something at
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the end of the pier. that is so that events the end of the pier. that is so that eve nts ca n the end of the pier. that is so that events can be held. it is free to attend, but boyzone has been here, dizzee rascal, to namejust two. it won a coveted architectural award for building of the year, one of british architecture's biggest awards, and it is not the only award that this pier has won. and it is chilly and breezy, we are near high tide and it is chilly in other parts of southern england, temperatures falling to two or three celsius in some places and we are looking at some places and we are looking at some mist and fog. but the forecast for us all, in the north we will see some rain at times. in the south, we will see some sunshine as we go through the day, with variable amounts of cloud. for the north this morning, scotland at 9am has some rain. heavy rain in the western end of the central lowlands, and argyll & bute. it has been raining for you for a while, so you may find a lot
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of surface water leaving the travel disruption. north of that there are some showers and the breeze will strengthen as we go through the day. heading south across england, we are looking at a dry as art. variable amounts of cloud, not too cold in the north of england. manchester, 10 celsius. as we come further south we have that and fog to lift. as we go through the course of the day that will slowly lift, and for wales are very similar story. we are looking ata very similar story. we are looking at a cloudy start, some brighter brea ks at a cloudy start, some brighter breaks and then some sunshine will come through. the same for northern ireland, except the north of northern ireland. the other end the front affecting scotland means they will also see some rain. that will move southwards through the course of the day and in doing so the band of the day and in doing so the band of rain will weaken, turn lighter and we will see some drizzle coming out of it as it comes in northern england. kind of the showers continue. the wind strengthens, locally reaching gale force around shetland later on. to the south of that, more sunshine than we saw yesterday, we are looking at bright
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spells. isa 15 in london and aberdeen. through the evening and overnight, the weather front producing the rain continues to sink south into parts of wales as well as central and southern england and under that you will find temperatures about ten. to the south of that we are looking at more fog than we saw last night, especially wiltshire, hampshire and dorset. also colder night in the north, cold enough for a touch of frost in the north of scotland. in prone areas temperatures could drop down to —1 or minus two. tomorrow we start off with that mist and fog. as the weather front continues its descent into southern areas, that will slowly lift but it will be quite a cloudy start to the day. a cloudy day and southern areas anyway, but behind it, fresher conditions come in and we will see some more sunshine. much drier across the northern half of the uk. on friday, weather front coming in the north—west scotland introduces some more rain and through the date we will see more rain in wales.
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variable amounts of cloud for sunny spells, and leading to a colder weekend and not necessarily a dry one either. like what you did this morning with matching the coat colour to the sky behind you, carol, sort of. a nice touch. charlie, you are sort of. a nice touch. charlie, you a re lovely. sort of. a nice touch. charlie, you are lovely. i didn't do that, but bless you for even thinking it. thank you, carol. let's see what the shop looks like from our building. looking across the water, it is not quite as pretty. not in the pastoral colours, but it does have the lovely sean and that picture, talking about retirement. —— pastel colours. can you imagine retiring? no, absolutely not. sean is talking about the people who think they are retired at end up going back to work. it feels a long way for a lot of
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people, retiring, if you are in your or 30s. people who make that decision, a quarter of them are going back to work, and some of these guys are prepping. they are a band full of retired people, and they haven't gone back to work yet, but lots of people do. this is angela's story about why she made the decisions she did. she has been sitting for years. she has been sitting for yearsm is in my dna, come imagine not doing it. it is so relatable. do you know, i was having a conversation with a journalist and she said what is your title. and when i told her she said you must be the older social media manager in the world, and i said, well, probably. social media is about talking to people, about being social, about connecting to people, and that is ageless. you don't really get that type of relationship with someone of a similar age. i
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have been able to work with her and use her insights, through what i am doing. working at this age is not for everybody, but it is definitely for everybody, but it is definitely for me. it brings me so much fulfilment, and i don't ever think of myself as 70. so it doesn't work for everybody, is angela says, but it works for a lot of people. deborah is from the university of manchester. we know one infour university of manchester. we know one in four people, but what else have you found when you have done this research? well, we followed a lot of people, about 2000 people, from 50 until their late 70s. one of the things we were really interested in is who is doing this? who are the people, on average, who are going back to work? we found they were much more likely to be men, i know you have a lot of women here today, but highly educated, people in good health, people whose partners are still at work. so basically the picture we were building up about
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this phenomenon, which is a new social phenomenon, really, is that this is really more privileged people who are tending to do it. people who do it because their work is meaningful, because it is not hard, construction work, that kind of thing. they have a lot of respect, and this is a phenomenon that, although there will be all sorts of other people who do it, largely more privileged people in society. so something that seems to be growing. deborah, thank you for that. so it is growing, but why exactly a re that. so it is growing, but why exactly are people making those decisions? let's have a chat to chris and anne. you have had to make some decisions since he retired.|j had to retire at 60, because it was hsbc policy, this was 15 years ago, and then i did severaljobs like camping and bookkeeping. and i
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decided at 6071 wanted to work with more people, and ijoined one of the largest direct selling companies. and now i am in partnership with a girl that is nearly half my age. so did you do that initially because of financial reasons, or because you just wanted to keep working? well, it was financial, but also i was doing a lot of voluntary work, i was working full—time, but volunteering with different things, and i decided i needed the extra money because i was on a reduced stamp, so my pension was quite low. and obviously the social side of hsbc. i was the oldest, working with over 200 young people and are used to organise social events. i missed all that. now i have that. and you still have that going. so chris, when you hear what ann has done, that works for ann, but three quarters of people are not going back to work once they have retired. is that because they don't want to or because they
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cannot? i think a lot of people still really value having their retirement, but we hear all the time from people who would like to go back to work but don't have the opportunity. even though it is illegal, there is a lot of age discrimination out there. people are sometimes told overtly that they are the world for a job, or told to retire. and if people have been working their whole life on a lower income, by the time they get the retiring they have had to work much longer in the first place, and maybe don't have the energy and the desire to go back to the workplace, like people like ann and angela. definitely, there are a opportunities out there for people who have worked in a professional job for a long time, and debbie made the point that people in lower paid jobs don't always have those opportunities. there is a lot of scope for the government to take action to improve things for people. and i have had lots of people tweeting me this morning about their experiences. we are talking about
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why there is such a growth in un—retirees, as it were. why there is such a growth in un-retirees, as it were. and we are kind of behind you, sort of. this is an angle we don't get to see unless we are in the bar late at night. you can see the whole of media city, thatis can see the whole of media city, that is where you guys are broadcasting from, and it looks absolutely gorgeous this morning. no rain just absolutely gorgeous this morning. no rainjust yet, so absolutely gorgeous this morning. no rain just yet, so we are doing all right. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the number of police front counters in the capital is to be reduced — part of the mayor's attempt to save £8 million for the policing budget. sadiq khan has blamed government cuts, saying another £a00 million of savings will need to be found over the next four years. he says just 8% of crimes were reported at front counters last year, and wants to prioritise keeping officers on the beat.
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the surrey coroner has been asked to reopen the inquests of five people who died in the guildford pub bombings in 197a. three men and a woman, known as the guildford four, served 15 years in prison for the bombings before their convictions were quashed. nobody else has ever been charged. a south london painter who only picked up a brush for the first time four years ago is now illustrating the latest gucci clothing collection. helen downie from wimbledon took up painting after being diagnosed with cancer. her work became popular on instagram, and was spotted by gucci's art director. i'm a selfish artist. they don't tell me what to do in any way. i have complete creative freedom, and it's wonderful. i love what alessandro michele, the creative director of gucci, does, so i bring his work into my own work. travel now. we will start with the good news.
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the tube appears to be running well so far. no reported problems on any of those lines there. however, a signalling problem that started yesterday means there is no service on heathrow connect trains. also, delays of up to 15 minutes for gwr in and out of paddington. the disruption is expected to last all day. and let's take a look at the roads. in holborn we have one lane closed on southampton row, at bloomsbury place, for works. well, over to the weather now. here is kate kinsella. good morning. there's one or two mist patches around this morning, but that early murk will lift quite quickly to a dry, bright and sunny day. now, we have a bit of high cloud around, at least through this morning, so that's going to turn the sunshine we have a little bit hazy, but some dry air moving in from the continent helps to take that cloud away. so more sunshine this afternoon, and it is really feeling quite pleasant and warm. the maximum temperature up at 15 celsius later on. now, overnight tonight, a clear picture generally. we'll start to see a bit more cloud
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wriggling its way south, as we head to dawn tomorrow morning. but in the meantime, under the clear spells, the light winds, we could see a bit of mist and fog. not especially cold tonight, between six and eight celsius ata minimum. now, that fog will lift quite quickly as the cloud pushes it away as we head through thursday. it is quite a grey day. lots of cloud, maybe one or two spots of rain, the temperature getting up to 13 celsius. now, as we head towards the end of the week, towards friday, especially overnight friday, some heavy rain. but that will clear away as we head into saturday morning, turning more showery through saturday. lots of people heading out on saturday night to celebrate bonfire night. now, there's still a chance of a shower or two, but it's clearer picture, and one thing to note — it is going to get colder overnight saturday into sunday. that is all for now. i'll be back in half an hour. remember, you can go to our website at the usual address for more.
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goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. 8 people are killed in a suspected terror attack in new york. the driver of a truck ploughed into people on a busy cycle path near the world trade centre site in lower manhattan. he then hit a school bus before being shot by police and arrested. this was an act of terror and particularly cowardly act of terror aimed at innocent civilians aimed at people going about their lives who had no idea what was about to hit them.
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the suspect‘s been identified as a 29—year—old from uzbekistan who came to the us 7 years ago. police say a note was found in the truck that referred to so—called islamic state. this is the scene this morning. we'll be live in new york with the latest in the next few minutes. good morning — it's wednesday 1st november. also this morning: the nhs reveals it's losing more than a billion pounds a year in england through fraud. theresa may orders an investigation into allegations that damien green made advances to a female activist. in sport, chelsea manager
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antonio conte accuses his side of lacking hunger and desire as they're beaten three nil by roma, their first defeat in this season's champions league. and carol has the weather. would you go back to work after you've retired? would you go back to work after you've retired ? i would you go back to work after you've retired? i popped over the water to see why one in four of us are doing just that and on the sofa, chatting to a few retirees and those who came out of retirement. but what is it looking like? carol has the weather. good morning. a beautiful sunrise at the moment in hastings. we are on the pier which last night won another award. it was crowned building of the year at the prestigious awards. a key the sun is up prestigious awards. a key the sun is up from many lovers, a dry day with some bright and sunny skies however we do is have some rain, heavy at the moment across western parts of scotla nd the moment across western parts of scotland that i will fill you in with all the details in 15 minutes.
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at least eight people have been killed and 11 seriously hurt in new york city, in what officials have confirmed to be a terror attack. eyewitnesses saw a white pick—up truck driving at speed down a cycle path in lower manhattan, before it mowed into a number cyclists and pedestrians. the vehicle, continued for 20 blocks to chambers street where it smashed into a school bus, just a few blocks from world trade center memorial. cyclists enjoying a beautiful autumn day struck by a white pick—up truck travelling at high speed, leaving bicycles and bodies in its wake. the driver's journey ends only when he smashes into a school bus and passers—by had to call for help for some of the injured. he can be seen here leaving the vehicle and brandishing a paintball and pellet gun before being shot by police.
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eyewitnesses describe that panicked moments when they realised something was terribly wrong. he was running around like with a gun. so police from stuy came out and people called the cops and they came in and the guy fight a couple of shots before and there was a shootout between the police and the guy and that's when they started to close down everything. we had to go. he was screaming in the street, he looked frustrated, panicked, confused. from there, whole bunch of customers started running past me, a whole bunch of people came running my way, yelling, "he's got a gun, he's got a gun!" the full force of your‘s emergency responders swarmed the area. police radio: central, be advised there's people on the ground from chambers all the way to houston. from houston to chambers, multiple people on the ground. we need buses from houston all the way down to chambers. authorities believe this was an act of terror aimed at innocent civilians.
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they say a note on the suspect‘s vehicle referenced the so—called islamic state. it's a very painful day in our city, a horrible tragedy on the west side. at the moment, this was an act of terror and a particularly cowardly act of terror. the suspect has been identified as 29—year—old sayfullo saipov who came to the united states in 2010. he's to have travelled to the east coast from florida and worked for the company uber as a driver. president trump has been briefed and in a series of tweets promised to crack down further on those entering the country. every day, thousands of new yorkers make their way down this bike path on their way to work and school and just blocks from the site of the world trade center, this attack in lower manhattan is a stark reminder that the city remains a target. this attack happened on one of the most festive days in the big apple. just as children prepared
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to go trick—or—treating. and new yorkers carried on with that tradition as normal with the annual a sad tragic situation which unfolded not far behind me. just to give you a sense of where we are, this all happened just about one or two blocks down the street. that is the westside highway you which might be able to see illuminated by the lights behind me. that is where this tragic attack all came to a screeching halt. eight people killed during all of this. 11 or 12 others injured. of the eight people killed, one of them is from belgium. five others apparently from argentina. a group of friends here in new york city
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celebrating the 30th anniversary of their high school graduation. in terms of the people has survived, we understand their conditions range from good too critical. many will have a long physical recovery ahead of them. what is the sense as to how new york will respond? i can tell you, the folks are resilient and courageous. folks are not letting the attack, despite how terrifying it was, bring things to a halt. it also past two o'clock the morning. not long after this happen, it was really
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remarkable to see. i saw a number of families, hundreds of hunters of families, hundreds of hunters of families and small children and party—goer is and people dressing up from costumes heading up into the night, still celebrating, despite what happened. there is an annual and very large halloween parade. it a tt ra cts and very large halloween parade. it attracts thousands and thousands of people. a lot of questions about whether or not authorities would cancel the event in light of what happened. that did not happen. new yorkers were encouraged to proceed with their evenings and that is what we saw, despite a very, very sad events that unfolded and obviously in the back of everybody‘s minds. kenneth gray, cbs correspondent. early hours of the morning there. we
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will speak with chris phillips, the former head of the national counterterrorism office. the nhs in england estimates that more than a billion pounds is stolen from the service through fraud each year. that amounts to just under 1 per cent of its overall budget. the nhs counter fraud authority says patients fraudulently claiming forfree prescriptions is one of the biggest problems. the prime minister's deputy, has strongly denied the claim. our political correspondent, ben wright, joins us from westminster — what more can you tell us? good morning. damien green is effectively the deputy prime minister. an old friend of theresa may and her closest ally in cabinet. he's become the most senior
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prominent politician to become caught up in these allegations of misbehaviour, inappropriate behaviour which are swirling around westminster. he strongly denies claims made by kate maltby, a writer and academic who has written in the times today that two instances, a meeting she had with damien green in a pub in 2015 in which miss maltby claimed he briefly touched her knee and a second time, when he sent her a text message which she believes was flirtatious. damien green issued a statement himself strongly denying.
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the most senior civil servant, the cabinet secretary, has been asked to look into this although the time these alleged instances took place, damien green was not in cabinet. separately, the labour party has launched bailey into how she was treated. in interview, she said when she approached the labour party about an alleged rape that happened to her in 2011, she was discouraged from making any sort of formal complaint
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was she was told it might not good for prospects within the labour party. the party claims it is taking the allegations seriously and will look into it. a government commissioned report will be published today, which aims to identify what lessons can be learnt from the experiences of families of the hillsborough disaster. written by former bishop of liverpool, the right reverand jamesjones, it's intended to help the authorities respond to future tradegies. we're about to reveal who won the great british bake off last night. if you don't want to know, then now is the time to dip the volume and cover your eyes. it was meant to be one of television's most closely guarded secrets. 11 hours ahead of the final last night — newjudge, prue leith, accidentally named the winner in a tweet.
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she said, "no one told mejudging a gbbo final would be so emotional. i wanted them all to win. bravo to sophie." prue later tweeted to say she was was mortified by herfaux pas. you would be! you have been warned. it was a tense final showdown, but it was amateur baker sophie faldo who beat her rivals. was it down to her honey bee themed showstopper perhaps? we'll be discussing that and lots, lots more a little later on. it's just coming up to 1a minutes past seven. let's return to our top story — what officials in new york city are calling a terrorist attack. it happened near a school and students there have been speaking about their shock. we saw this guy and he had guns and
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a beard maybe. everybody said to go back into the school. and there were a number of teachers directing us inside, run, get inside quickly. everybody was freaked out. inside, run, get inside quickly. everybody was freaked outlj inside, run, get inside quickly. everybody was freaked out. i was worried that me and my friends would get shot. i was listening for gunshots. i was waiting. kind of anticipating. i was just gunshots. i was waiting. kind of anticipating. i wasjust scared for me and my friends. i wasjust worried about my friends and also my friends being hurt. just wanting to make sure my family stayed safe. the first thing we did was call our families, our parents, to tell them we we re families, our parents, to tell them we were ok and everybody was ok. let us speak to chris phillips. first of all, if you could address for us the nature of this attack, what we know about how it was carried out. once again it is a simple kinetic
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attack using a hired vehicle, which is interesting. i don't know why you would feel the need to use a hired vehicle, but using it to run people over. it is an almost impossible thing to stop completely. of course, you can protect certain areas, iconic sites, but it is impossible to prevent this completely. yes, now, already authorities were questioned about... you mentioned the rental. this is an area where there has been quite a lot of focus, as to what checks were made over renting vehicles. inevitably people start asking what could have been done. of course you do, but this bears a lot of resemblance to other attacks that have happened around the world. and of course, if you shut off the rental part of this, you can either steal a car or use your own car. this guy was an uber driver, for goodness' sake, driving
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around the city. we have to be realistic about what police and security services can do. i think wa nts security services can do. i think wants this person had made the decision, and we don't know exactly when he made the decision to do this, it could have beenjust a matter of minutes before he ashleigh carried out the attack. we need to bearin carried out the attack. we need to bear in mind there is a limited amount we can do, but we can protect certain areas, and i think that is what we need to do more of. so what we know at this stage about the man who is in hospital as we speak, a 29—year—old, we understand, from this pakistan, lived in america for seven yea rs. this pakistan, lived in america for seven years. it is significant here still alive —— uzbekistan. it makes it quite different to the scenarios we have seen it quite different to the scenarios we have seen over it quite different to the scenarios we have seen over the years. yes, and there will be some intelligence to be garnered from him over the next months and years ahead. however, in terms of what evidence we can get, this guy could easily be
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working on his own, and hasjust made the decision to go and do this on the morning of the attack. we have to be realistic. unfortunately these types of attacks happened in some cities on a daily basis, around the world. what we have to get to the world. what we have to get to the point of inner west is understanding what we can do to stop people from wanting to do this in our own countries. “— people from wanting to do this in our own countries. —— in the west. and our correspondent from cbs made this earlier, this was a day in america when they were an awful lot of things happening in the street, in new york. it is halloween, isn't it? the big cities have so many things going on. we are seeing images of some of the festivities, which carried on regardless, quite rightly, in that situation. the challenges in any big city like that are enormous. they are, and what we have seen is iconic locations being attacked at iconic times, effectively, whether it is holidays, ramadan is an example, you always
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see a spike in terrorist attacks around the world. so the authorities will be aware of that, and they do a lot of work around protecting places and people. but as i said before, there is a very limited amount you can do to prevent this happening at all but we can do a lot of work around iconic sites, and our iconic sites in the uk are more protect than other iconic sites. thank you for speaking to us. we will have more on that story throughout the morning. it was a big night for all architecture last night, when hastings pier won a very prestigious architecture award, and carol is on the pier looking gorgeous, the pastel colours are beautiful. good morning to you both. the sunrise in hastings has been spectacular this morning. seven years ago, hastings pier was devastated by fire. three yea rs later pier was devastated by fire. three years later it was bought by
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hastings pier charity, and together with the national lottery heritage fund,it with the national lottery heritage fund, it was restored to this beautiful pier that you can see here today, and as steph said, last night the architects to design this pier actually one this prestigious award. it is chilly and breezy, and across southern england temperatures have fallen to about two or three celsius. we also have some mist and fog around. in the north of the country we have some rain, and there will be rain at times through the course of the day. in the south, when the fog lifts, we are looking at sunshine or at worst bright spells. rain across central scotland, the heaviest rain in the west, the glasgow area, around argyll and bute. there will be a lot of surface water and spray around, because it has been raining for sometime, so take extra care if you are travelling. to the north of that, some showers. coming south across england, a cloudy start with
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fog across parts of hertfordshire, berkshire, oxfordshire, heading down towards southampton, bournemouth, for example. that will be slow to let this morning, but it will. we are looking at variable amounts of cloud with some bright spells coming through. for northern ireland, some rain across the north. a weather front affecting scotland, but further south it is dry. however, for you, you will see rain crossing slowly through the course of the day as it heads south. it is the same in scotland, where we have the heavy rain the rain will push slowly southwards, getting into northern england as a weaker band of light rain and some drizzle. the showers will persist across the north of scotland, the wind strengthening. later we will have local gales around shetland and further south it will brighten up. we will see some sunny spells coming through. in the sunshine, temperatures could get up to 15 in london and also 15 around aberdeenshire. through the evening and overnight, the front producing the rain continues to sink into central and southern england and
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wales. away from it, cloud and light rain. temperatures not falling as low, we are looking at about ten. we will see more mist and fog compared with the nightjust gone. around wiltshire, yorkshire and dorset. behind the band of cloud and rain it will be a cool night with a touch of frost across the far north of scotland. tomorrow morning, the fog we re scotland. tomorrow morning, the fog were left. as the weather front continues its descent southwards, taking cloud with it and the odd spot of rain, for the rest of us it will be a bright afternoon and much drier across the northern half of the country, especially western scotland, that it has been. it will also feel fresher. a new weather front on friday will introduce some rain, and we will see further rain coming in across west england and also north—west wales through the day. that leads us into a cooler weekend. so keep your woolly pullies to hand. struggling to conceive can be
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a distressing experience for any couple to go through, but a survey of men dealing with fertility issues suggests their needs in particular are too often ignored. the charity fertility network uk says infertility can affect a man's mental health, career and finances, but warns emotional support remains scare. sheridan voysey and aaron deemer have shared their stories with us. i remember it was the year 2000, and my wife walked into the kitchen and she said, honey, i think it's time. we started trying. we assumed that it was just going to happen fairly normally. and then, after nine months or so, we decided it was time to go and get some tests done. those tests revealed that there was a problem on my side, significantly. so we went and tried a whole heap of rounds of ivf —
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let's just go and do as many rounds of ivf as it takes to get the success that we longed for. what about you, aaron? how long was it for the two of you? from when we were trying, it's about eight years of essentially not really having any way to explain the reason why we weren't getting pregnant. and we had three miscarriages during that time, which — yeah, sort of that unspeakable pain. for me, there was a deep sense of guilt. when you're holding your sobbing wife at the start of month after month, and then when you're going through something like ivf, it can be week after week, and later on, towards the end of ten years on thisjourney, sometimes it's night after night. you go, i'm the reason for this. i'm the cause of you not getting what you so desperately want.
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so that led to a great sense of guilt for me. when we were married, we were, like, ok, we're going to have five kids. and i rememberthat, i remember being in this... the conversation where you decide how many you'll have. i thought, i want five kids, that would be amazing. and to think that, ten or 12 years on, it's like — ok, no. what — my big expectations in life, and these plans have all shifted. yes, very much. do you have that experience of seeing fathers and kids playing, does that affect you? that does occasionally happen. walking through a park, you do see a guy with his daughter. i would have loved a daughter. and the other thing, aaron, i actually would have been a pretty good dad. looking back on it, i think, yeah, we are stronger because of it. some days, some weeks, some months, we were pulled apart.
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for sure, we are. and other weeks and months, it pulls us together, and we are really as a team going through it. if you handle it well, it can also lead to much more intimate friendships, where you do actually take that bold step of sharing yourself with someone else. so, if you handle it well, it can actually be a good thing. sheridan and aaron's journey to fatherhood continues. joining us now is dr esmee hanna from leeds beckett university. she is one of the lead researchers behind the study. good researchers behind the study. morning to you. whl aaron's good morning to you. when you see aaron's journey, you good morning to you. when you see aaron'sjourney, you really think good morning to you. when you see aaron's journey, you really think it is great to actually hear someone talking about it, isn't it? absolutely. it is one of those things that we don't actually hear much about, in society, men's views on wanting to have children. aaron's story showed that men are deeply
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affected by the experience of not being able to become a father. that desire to have a child is there, and that disruption of what they hoped their life would be, of being able to raise their own children, it can be really traumatic if that is not possible for men. so how are well geared other health services to deal with that side of it? if you like, the emotional side of it? how well geared up are they for that? from our research, men are not well geared up for that. their emotional needs are not being met. there is still that assumption that men are perhaps disappointed by not being able to have children, but not devastated in the way that women might be. we know from our experience that men experience depression and anxiety, stress around not being able to have children, and liken it to agree for trauma in their lives, almost a bereavement process of not being able to have a child. really they need more support around that experience. so what do you think would get rid of the embarrassment or the stigma around it?|j
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would get rid of the embarrassment or the stigma around it? i think just having these conversations is a really great starting point, and men like aaron sharing their stories and saying this has happened to me, so that men can say this is also my experience, as well. wejust that men can say this is also my experience, as well. we just don't have those conversations, and so that stigma still exists because of the silence around men and infertility. of the silence around men and infertility. of the new look to different countries to see a different countries to see a different culture around these things. do you think we are behind the curve on this? other other places that do this better? not necessarily. i think the ideas around masculinity, men should be able to be a father, and that is an important part of being a man, his dominantand important part of being a man, his dominant and lots of countries. so we are actually in the same sort of position as other places, but we do really need to have those conversations and really get men able to share what is really important to them. has the view changed at all, though? you would think of and we are talking so openly about mental health and there have been massive campaigns, involving people like the royal
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family, around mental health. has that made a difference?” family, around mental health. has that made a difference? i think the fa ct that made a difference? i think the fact that you can get people to talk on screen about those experiences shows that there has been some acceptance, but that still requires acceptance, but that still requires a huge amount of personal bravery to do that for those men, because it is so do that for those men, because it is so hidden from view, really. at the more conversations we have, the easier those things become. so having those conversations, in the same way as the mental health agenda, is an important step in that. the more we do it, the easier it becomes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the number of police front counters in the capital is to be reduced — part of the mayor's attempt to save £8 million for the policing budget. sadiq khan has blamed government cuts, saying another £a00 million of savings will need to be found over the next four years. he says just 8% of crimes were reported at front counters last year, and wants to prioritise keeping officers on the beat.
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the surrey coroner has been asked to reopen the inquests of five people who died in the guildford pub bombings in 197a. three men and a woman, known as the guildford four, served 15 years in prison for the bombings before their convictions were quashed. nobody else has ever been charged. a south london painter who only picked up a brush for the first time four years ago is now illustrating the latest gucci clothing collection. helen downie from wimbledon took up painting after being diagnosed with cancer. her work became popular on instagram, and was spotted by gucci's art director. i'm a selfish artist. they don't tell me what to do in any way. i have complete creative freedom, and it's wonderful. i love what alessandro michele, the creative director of gucci, does, so i bring his work into my own work. travel now.
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now, starting with the tube, it all appears to be running well so far. no reported problems on any of those lines there. however, a signalling problem that started yesterday means there is no service on heathrow connect trains. also, delays of up to 15 minutes for gwr in and out of paddington. we are expecting the disruption to last all day. and let's take a look at the roads. in holborn we have one lane closed on southampton row, at bloomsbury place, for works. well, over to the weather now. here is kate kinsella. good morning. there's one or two mist patches around this morning, but that early murk will lift quite quickly to a dry, bright and sunny day. now, we have a bit of high cloud around, at least through this morning, so that's going to turn the sunshine we have a little bit hazy, but some drier air moving in from the continent helps to take that cloud away. so more sunshine this afternoon, and it's really feeling quite pleasant and warm. the maximum temperature up at 15 celsius later on. now, overnight tonight, a clear picture generally. we'll start to see a bit more cloud wriggling its way south, as we head through to dawn tomorrow morning. but in the meantime,
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under the clear spells, the light winds, we could see a bit of mist and fog. not especially cold tonight, between six and eight celsius ata minimum. now, that fog will lift quite quickly as the cloud pushes it away as we head through thursday. it is quite a grey day. lots of cloud, maybe one or two spots of rain, the temperature getting up to 13 celsius. now, as we head towards the end of the week, towards friday, especially overnight friday, some heavy rain. but that will clear away as we head into saturday morning. turning more showery through saturday. lots of people heading out on saturday night to celebrate bonfire night. now, there's still a chance of a shower or two, but it's clearer picture, and one thing to note — it is going to get colder overnight saturday into sunday. that's all for now. i'll be back in half an hour. remember, you can go to our website at the usual address for more. now, it is back to charlie and steph. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast
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with charlie stayt & steph mcgovern. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. at least eight people have been killed and 11 seriously hurt in lower manhattan area of new york city, in what officials have described as a terror attack. eyewitnesses reported seening white pick—up truck driving at speed down a cycle path and into people. it continued for 20 blocks before crashing into a school bus close to the world trade center memorial. a 29—year—old man was shot and arrested by police. officials say a note was found in the vehicle, which referred to the so—called islamic state group. the mayor of new york city, bill de blasio, had this reaction to the news. your we know that this action was intended to break our spirit. but we also know that new york is a strong
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and resilient and our spirit can never be moved by an act of violence, and act meant to intimidate us. we have been tested before as a city very near the site today's tragedy and new yorkers do not giving in the face of these kinds of actions. our north america editor, jon sopel, has been following developments overnight. it was quite interesting that the white house was cautious at first as to how it should revert to the attacks of the president not using the phrase radical islamic terror that he has donned previous occasions when barack obama was president or attacks that have taken place in europe. you can be sure the president is being briefed by law enforcement officials and national security chiefs just on what they
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know about this person. there are those in the white house, national security hawks, who believe there is no such thing as a lone wolf attack. that you don'tjust no such thing as a lone wolf attack. that you don't just attack out of nowhere. there are footprints you would have left in the sand that will maybe lead to other people so i could imagine, there will be intense activity to try to find out more about this person, whether he was acting in concert with anyone, whether he had been radicalised or had training and the potential of course if you are an american national security person, what the potential is for further attacks like it but it follows a pattern that we have seen. we have seen this in paris, in london, in nice, in berlin, where someone has gotten behind the wheel a car and it is easy to cause carnage, the softest of targets. the nhs in england estimates more than a billion pounds is stolen
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from the service through fraud every year. that amounts to around 1 per cent of its total budget. the nhs counter fraud authority says patients fraudulently claiming for free prescriptions and dentistry accounted for one of the biggest problems. the first secretary of state, damian green, has been referred to the country's most senior civil servant, after he was accused of making sexual advances towards a female conservative activist. the prime minister's deputy has denied the allegation made by the writer, kate maltby — saying it was deeply hurtful. the complaint is the latest in a string of sexual allegations sweeping westminster. the report will be published today dealing with lessons from the hillsborough disaster. it will include the conduct of past police investigations and look at the families' engagement with public authorities over the last 28 years. written by former bishop of liverpool, the right reverand jamesjones, it's intended to help the authorities respond to future disasters. antonio conte critical
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of his players, united though all but through, while celtic‘s hopes of manchester united are all but through to the knockout some of the football last night was likened to underrate. the massive blunder by the benfica goalkeeper. ils bill for the goalkeeper. but there were defeats for both chelsea and celtic, as andy swiss reports. for manchester united, help from one man's misfortune. after his howler, the benfica keeper seemed to make amends, saving martial‘s penalty.
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and then he was back. it can be a cruel old game. come the second half when marcus ratchford won, this time, there was nothing he could do. blasting united to the brink of the knockout stage. at chelsea, they knew a win against roma would take them through. they were behind in less than a0 seconds. a stunning strike putting the hosts ahead. and chelsea's night went from bad to worse. defensive to the ring saw a second goal and after the break, a 3— nilwin was sealed. their fans enjoyed it. wonderfulfrom roma and pouring from chelsea. there is a great disappointment
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because the second half was really, really bad. bad for a team like us. there is a season where we show the great anger, a great will to do something of importance. celtic‘s hopes are over but not without a fight. after trailing, mcgregor looked to keep their chances alive but martinez ensured a 2—1win the bayern and to celtic, another win for the champions. three more english science feature tonight. the classification system which underpins paralympic sport is not fit for purpose and athletes have been bullied into keeping quiet, according to the 11—time paralympic champion baroness grey—thompson. and was speaking at a parliamentary hearing into claims athletes are cheating the system.
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great britain should be the absolute gold standard of integrity. but where we are, the media coverage, everything, but this was talking about doping in olympic sport, it would be the same reason. so you think it's the equivalent? not quite, but there are similarities in terms of what it can do. a lot of criticism for the system. it was interesting hearing from the father of one para athlete who wa nted father of one para athlete who wanted his daughter to give up the sport altogether because she was not competing on a level playing field. that is not what the sport is about. people spend years making plans for life after work —
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and you might expect them to just want to put their feet up once they do finally retire. sean has more of this. from our building is the camera on the roof which shows you where he is. i don't know if he can make it out there, just near the yellow boat is one of our red sofas and sean is waiting it does. there is something moving down there. good morning, sean. good morning, everybody. we are talking retirees or particularly those who return to the workforce. one in four of us do that i view the angela,
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starting with you, you've done this, you are tired and then started to go back to work. in a place that a lot of people might not associate that with. i decided to follow my passion for animals and travel and i got involved with a company that is a pet and housesitting company and i joined them and i've used by marketing and sales experience combined with my passion for pets and travel and i enable pet lovers to travel and i'm a social media manager. the key bit, social media manager. the key bit, social media manager. 30, a0, 50 years ago, nobody would have been aware of that job. wouldn't that be quite intimidating? a lot of people would think, i can't do that without experience. you can read train at anything and social is all about communicating and connecting with the audience, the media part, you
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can train to do that but when you got a passion and knowledge, and you can actually use that and get that across to people, it's all about telling the story, it's all about communicating with people and fats but i do, i talk with like—minded people who love pets, who love travel and got 300,000 around the world. i talk globally, to everybody and every country around the world. tra nsfera ble and every country around the world. transferable skills. debra, from the university of manchester, you've done this with search so what is driving people to do this? window there are a lot of different motivations. some do it because they must, some love it, like angela they are following passion and meaning it actually, when you ask people while at what —— why they are doing it, they tick a lot of different boxes. there are multiple reasons. we know people, their quality of life improves, people like angela. they are doing it because they want to. who is doing it? really privileged
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people, that is the bottomline. it is disproportionately men, people with higher than secondary education, good health and people whose partners already work. it's the extra money coming in and which is mostly coming into households which are quite well off. you hear that, privileged people. aged uk is the body you represent. other a lot of people out there who would like to get into the workplace but can't? there are a lot of people who want to retire but equally, there are a lot of people who really would like the opportunity to get back in and it's not people passed state pension age, people from the age of 50 who really struggle. it can be because of age discrimination which is illegal but still rife or lack of flexible working options or employers helping them, and they need a bit of support from their employer which is not there. angela,
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a lot of people getting in touch. alison, 73 and sarah's barba, 83 still going strong. john is 77 and still going strong. john is 77 and still going strong. john is 77 and still going as a cameraman. if you spend your whole life being a labourer and you retire, it quite ha rd labourer and you retire, it quite hard view to go back into labouring again. that i pick up on the privileged aspect. we have a great number of retirees who come to trusted house sitters and they are travelling as they start a new career and they do it, it is not traditional work because they don't get paid that they are travelling more than ever thought possible and they are starting new careers. we have many who start travel blogs and they earn a living match race with using the skills that you've got and it's not just for the using the skills that you've got and it's notjust for the privileged. i think it got a passion and you go out there, i retrained and it's
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something that you can always do. out there, i retrained and it's something that you can always dom doesn't have to be a starting point. we will talk about this much more in the next hour. keep your messages coming in. have you been able to go back to work or are you glad to retire at the earliest opportunity? send us an email or a tweet. i can't ican't imagine i can't imagine retiring, i bet you can't either. our main stories this morning. at least eight people have been killed and 11 seriously injured ina been killed and 11 seriously injured in a truck attack on the streets of new york. the prime minister's most senior minister is to be investigated following an allegation of inappropriate behaviour. damien green has described the claims is absolutely and completely untrue. —— damian. hastings pier has just
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won the biggest award in british architecture. carol is there for us this morning, no doubt with another award—winning forecast. good morning. good morning. it was crowned building of the year last night. the architect won a very prestigious award, and you can see this is restored word from the old pier. if you have a look at the decking i am walking on, there are 82 kilometres of wooden deck. it is resista nt to 82 kilometres of wooden deck. it is resistant to grapple, a marine eating worm that eats itself into the word. —— gribble. and there are 500,000 stainless steel deck screws. it is built using the same pylons as the old pier, with new ones added during its construction. it was devastated by fire ten years ago, and then the charity, the hastings pier charity boarded for £1 and
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2013, and with a grant the national lottery heritage fund they restored it to the beautiful pier that it is today. hastings is bathed in sunshine this morning. to give you an idea of where we are, if you look that way, that is where beachy head is. it is breezy in hastings, and chilly across the southern parts of england generally. we have some mist and fog patches around. the story for the whole of the uk is that in the north there will be rain at times and in the south we will have some sunshine. more so than we saw yesterday. so starting the forecast, at 9am in scotland we have some heavy rain, especially across the western side of the central lowlands and argyll & bute. it has been raining for some time for you, so we are likely to see a fair bit of surface water and spray on the roads. for all of england a dry start, variable amounts of cloud with some sunny spells, and fog across oxfordshire, berkshire, the
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likes of southampton, worn myth, but will slowly lived through the day. heading into the south—west again, variable amounts of cloud, as we have across wales. and then moving into northern ireland, most of northern ireland at this stage is dry. however, we do have some rain across the far north of northern ireland. it is the same weather front affecting scotland, and as we go through the course of the day, very slowly that will push southward, bringing rain across the west of northern ireland, and northern england. that is a lighter feature with some drizzle. we hang on to the showers, some of those heavy. windy by the end of the day, especially across shetland, with local gales. in the south, when we lose the mist and fog it will brighten up with some sunny spells developing. highs today in london and possibly aberdeenshire up to 15 celsius, all of us staying in double figures. through the evening and overnight weather front things southwards into central and southern england and wales. a band of cloud
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with light rain and drizzle on it. we are looking at overnight lows about ten. behind it, cold enough in scotla nd about ten. behind it, cold enough in scotland in sheltered areas for a touch of frost. some fog around tomorrow as well, tomorrow morning, across hampshire, wiltshire and dorset as well. as the weather front sinks southwards, that fog will lift but the cloud will continue. so quite a dull and grey day for you. behind it we are looking at a brighter skies across northern england, northern ireland and scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland than today, but also a lot fresher. in scotland, temperatures struggling to get into double figures. for friday, two weather fronts coming our way, the first across northern scotland introducing some rain. the next one coming across england and wales, also bringing in some rain. elsewhere, cloudy, some sunny breaks and one or two back showers. that leads us into a cooler weekend. so get your winter clothes out. i have already got them
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out, after your wise advice. little blustery, isn't it? birds of prey may rule the skies, but according to the rspb, peregrine falcons, red kites, buzzards and hen harriers face a bleak future. the charity have logged dozens of crimes against birds over the last year, yet none have resulted in a single prosecution. guy shorrock from the rspbjoins us now. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. can you explain what crime we are talking about here? we are talking about offences like shooting, trapping and poisoning. we are talking about iconic words such as golden eagles, peregrines, etc, and people trying to remove them from the landscape. the ones we are finding are literallyjust the tip of the iceberg. and we know from biological monitoring we have huge areas where these birds are absent or not doing very well. the 81 you are talking about is where you have the evidence, the evidence the dead
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bird itself, is that right? that's right, this is actually finding the bodies of finding the illegal traps. i have been doing thisjob for 26 yea rs, i have been doing thisjob for 26 years, andi i have been doing thisjob for 26 years, and i am getting a bit fed up of picking up these bodies, the problem is that the problem is not going away and we really need the government to step in and start putting pressure on the sporting estates where the problems lie. and you can maybe talk us through some of the images. what is this one? this is a mail hen harrier, it is a beautiful bird. in the last year, for example, we had three pairs breeding in england. we have habitat a/300 pairs, and the conflict is with the estates, which are managing shooting. we have the golden eagle, another species with big problems in scotland. have you got any idea who is doing this? we know exactly where the problem lies. over two thirds of the problem lies. over two thirds of the people convicted are gamekeepers, but the problem is more complicated than that. it is the people who manage and run these sporting estates, who ultimately not being held accountable. what we want
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the government to do is to bring in new legislation, to make them can be responsible for their staff. we already have laws like this in scotland. what we also want to see is licensing of these estates, and the law—abiding estates have nothing to fear. but if you continue to break the law, kill these birds, damage their habitat, you will lose licence to operate, and i think that will be a real deterrent. can ijust be clear on what you say, you can't get a ccess be clear on what you say, you can't get access to these places. so how do you know so confidently who is to blame? as i say, we know from the profile of the people who have been convicted, we know from the scientific evidence, and we know from the locations where this is taking place. there is no dispute where the core problem lies. the key areas are the up lines of northern england and scotland, intensive moors managed for grouse. and until we get some accountability for these
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estates, the gamekeepers are going to do what they are told are expected to do. there are just there arejust100 days there are just 100 days to go until the winter olympics. team gb typically has less success in the winter games. while we have also had some standout moments at the winter games, there are fears some snow sports can be elitist and expensive to pursue. so mike has been finding out about a scheme aiming to make them more accessible to all. they can be a life changing moment, when you step on to a ski slope for the first time, especially when it isa the first time, especially when it is a world away from what you are used to. the first time i stepped onto the snowboarder was so scared, because if you think about it, for someone because if you think about it, for someone who hasn't really seems no, you are essentially falling.|j someone who hasn't really seems no, you are essentially falling. i could not believe i am here. the last time i saw it, and the first time i saw snow. there are not that many opportunities for kids in care, unfortunately, but it opens many doors. they have been given free
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access to snow sports thanks to the scheme, which raises its money through fundraising events, youth trust, foundations, sponsors and individual donors. olympians get involved with their top tips as well. that's it, relax. like britain's number one ski cross racer. they were not as lucky like me to have that holiday every year to the mountains. but here they are now, getting the same joy out of skiing as we do. those who show enthusiasm can come back for a second session undergraduate scheme and it is still not costing their families a penny. even when they then complete the next step, from inner—city to the alps. takejonjo's story. he is now a ski instructor in a resort. schoolwasn't great.
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everybody was a bit down at heel, you know? i didn't know who i was, so you know? i didn't know who i was, soi you know? i didn't know who i was, so i was just following a crowd and trying to fit in. until i started skiing, ididn't trying to fit in. until i started skiing, i didn't have a clue who i was. it is crazy, because it is not just a different area, a different place. it is a completely different people, i completely different upbringing and background to what i had. i have had to learn a lot about myself. snow camp is not about finding the next olympian, but the life skills they have got have enabled them to find work in the snow sports industry. it has really built up my confidence. i find snow sports industry. it has really built up my confidence. ifind it easier speaking to people don't know. now i am skiing all the time, and there is much freedom. it is a big life changer. it has really changed the game for me. being out here is amazing. the view is much nicer than london. if it wasn't for
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snow campi nicer than london. if it wasn't for snow camp i would probably be doing something stupid. and it is last yea r‘s something stupid. and it is last year's graduates who come back to coach this year's newcomers. when young people come to snow camp for the first time they are taught by apprentices and that is an amazingly inspiring thing. to say who are you? you ami inspiring thing. to say who are you? you am i ski instructor, and they can say this time last year i was you. and this time last year, my ski instructor had not been on the snow before and now it is downhill all the way. and we will be talking to some of the people hoping to make tea m some of the people hoping to make team gba some of the people hoping to make team gb a little bit later in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the number of police front counters in the capital is to be reduced — part of the mayor's attempt to save £8 million for the policing budget. sadiq khan has blamed government cuts, saying another £a00 million of savings will need to be found over the next four years. he says just 8% of crimes were reported at front counters last
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year, and wants to prioritise keeping officers on the beat. the surrey coroner has been asked to reopen the inquests of five people who died in the guildford pub bombings in 197a. three men and a woman, known as the guildford four, served 15 years in prison for the bombings before their convictions were quashed. nobody else has ever been charged. a south london painter who only picked up a brush for the first time four years ago is now illustrating the latest gucci clothing collection. helen downie from wimbledon took up painting after being diagnosed with cancer. her work became popular on instagram, and was spotted by gucci's art director. i'm a selfish artist, and they don't tell me what to do in any way. i have complete creative freedom, and it's wonderful. i love what alessandro michele, the creative director of gucci, does, so i bring his work into my own work. travel now.
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now, starting with the tube. it all appears to be running well so far. no reported problems on any of those lines there. however, a signalling problem that started yesterday means there is no service on heathrow connect trains. also, delays of up to 15 minutes for gwr in and out of paddington. we are expecting the disruption to last all day. and let's take a look at the roads. in holborn we have one lane closed on southampton row, at bloomsbury place, for works. well, over to the weather now. here is kate kinsella. good morning. there's one or two mist patches around this morning, but that early murk will lift quite quickly to a dry, bright and sunny day. now, we have a bit of high cloud around, at least through this morning, so that's going to turn the sunshine we have a little bit hazy, but some drier air moving in from the continent helps to take that cloud away. so more sunshine this afternoon, and it's really feeling quite pleasant and warm. the maximum temperature up at 15 celsius later on. now, overnight tonight, a clear picture generally. we'll start to see a bit more cloud wriggling its way south, as we head through to
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dawn tomorrow morning. but in the meantime, under the clear spells, the light winds, we could see a bit of mist and fog. not especially cold tonight, between six and eight celsius ata minimum. now, that fog will lift quite quickly as the cloud pushes it away as we head through thursday. it is quite a grey day. lots of cloud, maybe one or two spots of rain, the temperature getting up to 13 celsius. now, as we head towards the end of the week, towards friday, especially overnight friday, some heavy rain. but that will clear away as we head into saturday morning. turning more showery through saturday. now, lots of people heading out on saturday night to celebrate bonfire night. now, there's still a chance of a shower or two, but it's a clearer picture, and one thing to note — it is going to get a little bit colder overnight saturday into sunday. that's all for now. i will be back in half an hour. remember, you can go to our website at the usual address for more. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with
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charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. eight people are killed in what's being treated as terror attack near the world trade center site in new york. the driver of a truck ploughed into people on a busy cycle path in lower manhattan. he then hit a school bus before being shot by police and arrested. this was a cowardly act of terror aimed at innocent civilians. aimed at people going about their lives who had no idea of what was about to hit them. the suspect has been identified as a 29—year—old from uzbekistan who came to the us seven years ago. police say a note was found in the truck that referred to so—called islamic state. this is the truck used in the attack still at the scene this morning. we'll have the latest from new york in the next few minutes. good morning.
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the nhs reveals it's losing more than a £1 billion a year in england through fraud. theresa may orders an investigation into allegations her deputy, damian green, made inappropriate advances to a female activist. mr green has denied the claims, calling them deeply hurtful. in sport, the chelsea manager antonio conte accuses his side of lacking hunger and desire as they're beaten 3—0 by roma, their first defeat in this season's champions league. good morning. would you fancy going back to work after you've retired? i've popped over the water to see why one in four of us doing that. i will be speaking to some retirees and some non retirees on my sofa later. carol has the weather. well,
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we did think carol was there, we are getting a good look around hastings pier. can you hear us? no sound from carol. carol is on hastings pier. it is blustery. that maybe affecting conditions. good morning. first, our main story. five argentinean men and a belgian woman are among eight people that have been killed in new york city, in what officials have described as a terror attack. 11 people were also seriously injured when a white pick—up truck drove at speed down a cycle path in lower manhattan and ploughed into cyclists and pedestrians. the vehicle continued for 20 blocks before it smashed into a school bus. a 29—year—old man was shot by police before being arrested and taken to hospital. our new york reporter, nada tawfik, has more. this was the scene of the deadliest attack on new york since 9/11.
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cyclists enjoying a beautiful autumn day, struck down by a white pick—up truck travelling at high—speed, leaving bodies and bicycles scattered in its wake. the driver's journey ends only when he smashes into a school bus and passers—by had to call for help for some of the injured. he can be seen here leaving the vehicle and brandishing a paint ball and pellet gun before being shot by police. eyewitnesses describe the panicked moments when they realise something was terribly wrong. he was running around like with a gun and so police came out and then people called the cops and so they were coming in and the guy fired a couple of shots before and then there was like a shoot—out scene like the police and the guy and that's when they started to close down everything and we had to go. he was screaming and he was screaming in the street. he looked frustrated, panicked and confused. from there, a whole bunch of customers started running past me, a whole bunch of people
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came running past my way yelling, "he's got a gun. he's got a gun." the full force of new york's emergency responders swarmed the area. be advised, we have multiple people on the ground. there is multiple people on the ground. we need buses. authorities believe this was an act of terror aimed at innocent civilians. they say a note in the suspect‘s vehicle referenced the so—called islamic state. it's a very painful day in our city. horrible, tragedy on westside. let me be clear that based on the information that we have at this moment this was an act of terror and a particularly cowardly act of terror. the suspect has been identified as 29—year—old sayfullo saipov who came to the united states in 2010. he's said to have travelled to the east coast from florida and to have worked for the company uber as a driver. president trump has been briefed and in a series of tweets he promised to crackdown further
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on those entering the country. every day thousands of new yorkers make their way down this bike path on their way to work and school and just blocks from the site of the world trade center, this attack in lower manhattan is a stark reminder that the city remains a target. this attack happened on one of the most festive days in the big apple, just as children prepare to go trick or treating and new yorkers carried on with that tradition as normal with the annual hallowe'en parade in a show of defiance and resilience. it is the early hours of the morning in new york city now. kenneth craig is a correspondent with cbs news in new york and is close to the scene of the attack. obviously, a very sad and tragic situation that unfolded not far behind me. just to give you a sense of where we are — this all happened just a block or two down the street. that's the west side highway that you might be able to see illuminated
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by the police lights behind me. that is where this tragic attack all came to a screeching halt. eight people killed during all of this. some 11 or 12 others injured. of the eight people who were killed, we understand one of them is from belgium. five others apparently from argentina. apparently a group of friends here in new york city celebrating the 30th anniversary of their high school graduation and in terms of the people who survived and are in local hospitals we understand their conditions range from good to critical. many of them will have a very, very long road of physical recovery ahead of them, never mind the emotional scars they'll have to deal with obviously for the rest of their lives. kenneth, as you mentioned the streets, those areas directly related to the attack sealed off. as to new york and how it will respond, what's the sense? well, i can tell you the folks here are resilient and courageous.
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new yorkers not letting the attack here, despite the how horrific and terrifying it was, bring things to a halt here tonight. it's quiet right now, but it's also just past two o'clock in the morning and we're right against the crime scene so you wouldn't be able to see pedestrian traffic anyway, but not long after this happened, it was really remarkable to see, it was hallowe'en last night and i saw hundreds and hundreds of families and small children and partygoers and people dressed up in costumes, heading out into the night, still celebrating despite what happened. there is an annual and very large hallowe'en parade that happens every hallowe'en and attracts thousands and thousands of people. there were a lot of questions about whether or not authorities would cancel that event in light of what happened here. that did not happen. in fact, new yorkers were encouraged to proceed with their evenings and to have a good time and that's
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what we saw despite a very, very sad event that unfolded and obviously in the back of everyone's minds here tonight. kenneth craig, cbs correspondent talking to us from new york. the nhs in england estimates that more than £1 billion is stolen from the service through fraud each year. that amounts to just under 1% of its overall budget. the nhs counter fraud authority says patients wrongly claiming for free prescriptions is one of the biggest problems. our health correspondent, rob sissons, has more. nhs fraud, we are told, has to be tackled on many fronts. now bosses are appealing to honest, dedicated nhs staff to report anyone they suspect of committing a crime. patients sometimes fiddle the system, falsely claiming for free prescriptions or dentistry. professionals including dentists have been caught claiming for services not provided. and suppliers have been known to overcharge for items of a higher quality or number
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than those delivered. earlier this year, paula vasco—knight, the former boss of the torbay hospital in devon, was convicted of defrauding the health service of £11,000. she paid her husband, seen her on the left, for work he didn't do. now the head of the new organisation, fighting fraud, says her aim is to see more people convicted. nhs staff can really help us to identify fraud and fraudsters and to really put a stop to people taking money out of the system. so if you're in the nhs and you're working in the nhs please report any of your suspicions to us and if you are a fraudster and you're committing fraud in the nhs then we're looking for you and we will find you. the nhs accepts the £1.25 billion annual fraud figure is an estimate. most cases are undetected. the prime minister's deputy, damian green, is to be investigated following an allegation of inappropriate behaviour towards a female conservative activist.
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the first secretary of state has strongly denied the claim. our political correspondent, ben wright, joins us from westminster. take us step by step through what we know about this? good morning, charlie. damian green has left his house telling reporters, gathered outside that all the allegations are com pletely outside that all the allegations are completely false. mr green is effectively the deputy prime minister. one of theresa may's old est minister. one of theresa may's oldest friends. her close ally probably in the cabinet and now the most senior politician to be caught up most senior politician to be caught up in these allegations of inappropriate behaviour that are swirling around westminster. mr green is responding to claims made in today's times newspaper by a woman called kate maltby, she is 30 yea rs woman called kate maltby, she is 30 years younger than damian green, she is an academic and writer and involved in conservative politics and she described a couple of
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incidents, the first a meeting with damian green in a pub in 2015 in pub during which she says damian green briefly touched her knee. about a year later, mr green sent her a text that she felt was suggestive and inappropriately flirtatious. i will read you a bit. she said, "he offered me career advice and in the same breath made it clear he was sexually interested. it was not a cce pta ble sexually interested. it was not acceptable to me at the time and it should not be acceptable behaviour in westminster in the future. this is not the most terrible thing that ever happened to a woman. mr green belong to say a different generation and dame as you read this, i doubt you have any idea how embarrassed and professionally compromised you made me feel." damian green issued a strong statement denying anything inappropriate happened. he said tth "it is untrue that i ever made any
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sexual advances on ms maltby. this untrue allegation has come as a com plete untrue allegation has come as a complete shock considering it came from as someone i considered as a friend." number ten will look at this and decide whether damian green has breeched the ministerial code. separately the labour party has announced it will have an investigation into claims made by a young activist called bex bailey. she said an alleged rape, that she reported to the labour party and sought advice on, was not taken seriously and she was advised at the time in 2011, that to pursue it would harm her career. the labour party now saying it will take that very seriously and will try and figure out what happened. ben, thank you very much. the time is 8.11am. a report will be published today, which aims to learn lessons from the experiences of people whose relatives died in the hillsborough disaster.
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it will include the conduct of past police investigations and look at the families' engagement with public authorities over the last 28 years. written by former bishop of liverpool, it's intended to help the authorities respond to future disasters. steve kelly lost his brother, mike, at hillsborough. he joins us now on the sofa. and joe delaney, from the grenfell residents committee, joins us from west london. what was mike like? he loved his cricket and football and a bit of a loner in his life. he was a good family man and you know, sadly went toa family man and you know, sadly went to a football game and never came home and we've never really got ourselves around that. and you know, this continual battle for 28 years,
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hopefully it will come to a bit more ofa hopefully it will come to a bit more of a conclusion today when, you know, the bishops report is presented to the prime minister to see the effects it has on families. you were one of those who had the opportunity to speak directly to the bishop and what was the nature of the information that he was trying to get from you? well, just, exactly how we have been treated as families on the identification process, to the present day. how the police have dealt with us. how we have been guided or supported by them or whatever and how the process through all these years has affected us as families, as individuals. and what we re families, as individuals. and what were you able to tell them about that? well, it was quite a long interview i had with the bishop. was it over a period of hours? over hours. there was a couple of his tea m hours. there was a couple of his team with him from the home office. we went through the bones of it. you know, it's one of them interviews,
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again, it hurts because you're reliving every moment again of your journey and you're remembering the fa ct journey and you're remembering the fact that at the back of your journey, is your brother and your family, who have gone since and you're trying to make it right for them and it was a difficult couple of hours. i guess you probably want everything that has been learned from hillsborough to help people like the people at grenfell. joe, what is your situation at the moment? i'm still evacuated to a hotel in hammersmith. there is still no word of when we can return to the block i live in one of the blocks attached to the tower. we haven't heard back from the enquiry. a lot of us aren't sure what are stages will be in the enquiry. we have not heard from the police that much. they contacted me a couple of times and said they would like to do some interviews. i
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have not heard back from them since. pretty much without our solicitor we would not — — pretty much without our solicitor we would not —— we would be up in the year. we wouldn't know anything. eigg it sounds like you are feeling let down? i would say so, yes. in other circumstances organisations such as victim support can help them. in this circumstance there isn't anything at all. that is a big problem. a lot of us car fumbling in the dark we don't know what is going on, we don't know who or how to contact people. a lot of people don't understand the enquiry process. this adds to the frustration and upset people are already feeling. stephen, when you hear that, what do you make of it? sounds wearily familiar? it is groundhog day for me. at the time of
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hillsborough we were just ordinary people going about our business, and all of a sudden we were thrust into challenging a government. that was the difficult process. we had to mobilise. we were a little bit luckier than the people at grenfell. we were more of a confined community. i think grenfell residents have been disbursed. that isa residents have been disbursed. that is a problem. we were in a tight knit group. it is about the community sticking together. they have been sent all over places. they have been sent all over places. they have not had a hub to get together and mobilise themselves properly. apart from the raw emotions of what you have been through over so many yea rs, you have been through over so many years, the thing that occurs so often in these situations is people listens —— listen. somebody
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listening to what you are saying seems to be the common thing? hopefully when this report is presented to parliament today, it shakes the ministers to the core and they see the effect it has had on hillsborough families. we wanted ministers to look and for this to hurt. so that when dealing with families of grenfell and other disasters they will make it work. we wa nt disasters they will make it work. we want justice and people's disasters they will make it work. we wantjustice and people's lives put backin wantjustice and people's lives put back in order as soon as possible. what are your thoughts on what you wa nt to what are your thoughts on what you want to hear from this report today? i would like the same, to be honest. i really do think that a lot of ministers in particular really need a kick up the backside. they really don't seem to get the impact that something like this will have, not just on people like myself who were evacuated, or people from the tower
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who suffered dreadfully. but also the wider community. how do we access the enquiry process? how can we ensure that we have a voice in that process? if it hadn't been for certain groups of solicitors who have aided us, a lot of us wouldn't have aided us, a lot of us wouldn't have aided us, a lot of us wouldn't have a clue what to do. i never knew what a core participant was before this enquiry process. i have seen public enquiries on the news. it is this level of detail. there is absolutely no support whatsoever. one thingl absolutely no support whatsoever. one thing i am sick of hearing from government local and central is that lessons have been learned. unfortunately, we are not seen that on the ground here. thank you. you were nodding at that point asjoe thank you. you were nodding at that point as joe was thank you. you were nodding at that point asjoe was speaking? thank you. you were nodding at that point as joe was speaking? yeah, i really don't think lessons have been learned. watching what is happened at grenfell since their disaster,
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when i have seen how people have been treated, i don't think lessons have been learned. we really need to keep challenging the authorities, pushing for a day hillsborough type law to ensure that public bodies are brought to account as quickly as possible, to ensure people get their lives back on track. really appreciate you both coming in. we will find out more details about that report mid—morning. more on that report mid—morning. more on that across the bbc news. carol's got the weather for us from hastings pier, which has just been given the biggest award in british architecture. it is looking lovely. where are you? it certainly is. we are looking at the old pier. these pylons you can see used to hold the landing deck in victorian days. that is where the victorians would more their pleasure boats. if you come along a bit, this is the remnants of
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the old pier attached to the newly restored peer, here in all its glory. it won the prestigious award last night, the riba sterling award, the architect who designed it won that particular award. a stunning start to the day in hastings. mist and fog in the south. rain in the north. in the north today there will be some rain at times. in the south in the sun will come out. we start in scotland at nine o'clock. rain across the central lowlands. the heaviest rain in the west, around glasgow and argyll and bute. take extra care. a lot of surface water on the roads. as we come into northern england and the rest of england it is a dry stored. mist and fog around berkshire, hertfordshire,
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oxfordshire, heading towards southampton and bournemouth. it will slowly lift through the morning. it is patchy. as we drift into the south—west, it is a bright start with sunny spells. wales also had a bright start with sunny spells. into northern ireland, the north of northern ireland, the north of northern ireland, the north of northern ireland seeing some rain. the rest of northern ireland is dry. the rest of northern ireland is dry. the weather from producing the rain in northern ireland will sink south during the day. weakening and taking what's left of the rain. the same holds true for scotland. where you have the heavy rain, that will sink southwards into northern england, weakening, so the rain will be lighter and more drizzly. the showers will persist in the north. some of them heavy. blown along on a good breeze. that wind picking up to possibly gale force. south of it we are looking at some sunshine. through this evening and overnight
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the weather front continues to sink into central and southern england, parts of wales. with patchy rain temperatures were not for that low. ahead of it, there would be more fog along —— around. especially from wiltshire, hampshire and dorset. to the north of the weather front it will be chilly. cold enough for frost in the west of scotland. tomorrow, that is where we will see the sunshine. the northern half of the sunshine. the northern half of the country. try and sunnier than today. also cooler. as a weather front sinks south, it will lift the mist and fog but bringing cloud instead. as we head into friday, a new weather front in north—west scotla nd new weather front in north—west scotland introduces some rain. another one in south—west england and wales also introducing some rain. in between, try and writers with some showers. that leads smack into a cooler
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weekend. let's return to our main story this morning. a man is in police custody in hospital in new york, after eight people were killed and 11 injured in what's been described as a terrorist attack. let's speak to arash aramesh, a us national security expert and foreign policy analyst. what are your thoughts on this attack? it was quickly linked to so—called islamic state. what are your thoughts? it is certainly a very tragic day in new york. this was the worst terror attack since 9/11 in new york city. new york is a very diverse city, it is the centre of our commerce and it represents some great american and new york values. from the face of it we can tell that this was a poorly organised and a poorly planned attack. for the most part most
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signals indicate this was a lone wolf inspired by isis. there was little planning or organisation from isis central in iraq or syria. locally, because of his amateurish actions, he took eight lives, not more. having said that, even one life is too many. we saw the innocent lives of eight people lost yesterday. i want to quickly go over a few indicators that stand out. first and foremost, he was driving down southbound instead of northbound. if you look at the highway he was going on, there is much more heavy foot traffic on the northbound. so if you wanted to maximise casualties, you would have gone on the other direction. he was going south, thankfully. secondly, for about a month now, isis has been putting out a publication talking about how easy it is to get guns in
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the us. unfortunately, that is the case. even some terrains individuals can purchase weapons, as we saw last month with the attack in las vegas where the attacker had access to multiple assault rifles and hundreds of rounds of ammunition. but in this case, this individual, sayfullo saipov, failed to obtain a single firearm. he had to weapons, a pentagon and a —— another gun. if you are going into this kind of attack and you bring a fake gun, you are telling smack you want to be shot. he was planning not to come out of this alive. thankfully he is alive and we have a life suspect in custody. very similar to what happened in boston. this can shed a lot of light into the mindset of this sort of individual and how they get radicalised and their operations. and if, and it is a big
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if, if there is any operating sound in the us operating, this individual can shed some light. —— operating cell. thank you for your time. we will continue to follow the story throughout the morning. good morning. there is a lot of dry weather in the forecast especially today across england and wales. a bit of patchy fog across southern areas. that will clear away, but it is across scotland where we have got heavy rain through today in the west of scotla nd heavy rain through today in the west of scotland which will work its way further south. further north, a good scattering of showers really into the afternoon. temperatures about 12 or 13 celsius, you notice the rain as it moves its way out of western scotla nd as it moves its way out of western scotland into the south. a bit of rain moving into northern ireland
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during this afternoon, but for much of england and wales, as you can see, it's looking fine and dry really with good spells of sunshine particularly across wales and the midlands and southern areas of england where maximum temperatures will get up to 13 or 1a celsius, perhaps more cloud in the far north—east. through this evening and tonight, we have got this cloud and rain which is going to move its way southward. the rain breaks up, but there will be a few spots of rain and drizzle at times across wales and drizzle at times across wales and the midlands. to the south of that, a chilly night with fog developing across southern areas. further north, chilly to start off on thursday morning, but there will be good sunshine through scotland and northern england and northern ireland as well. that cloudier zone is still with us across wales, through the south midlands and into the south—east and the far south after the fog clears away, there will be some sunnier spells. on into friday, a fairly quiet day really. some rain spreads into the far north and the west. later on, rain develops across wales and south—western areas of the uk, but
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it's as we go into the weekend that cold air really starts to filter in across cold air really starts to filter in a cross m ost cold air really starts to filter in across most parts really as we go into saturday. with that, there will be rain at times as well, but still sunny spells. particularly in northern and western areas. but a notable chilly wind. that's it from me. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and sally bundock. we are leading with the attack in new york where authorities are describing it as an act of terror. eight people have been killed and 11 injured. live from london, we will be bringing you the latest business news as usual. it's wednesday, 1st november. an unusual programme today. we are
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bringing you the latest on the events in new york. at least eight people have been killed in new york — and 11 people injured — by a man who drove a pick—up truck

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