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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 2, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. the sexual harassment scandal at westminster claims its first scalp, as defence secretary michael fallon resigns. he says his conduct had fallen short of the standards now expected, and that it is right to step down. culture has changed over the years. what was... might have been a cce pta ble what was... might have been acceptable 15 or ten years ago is clearly not acceptable now. it is thought fresh claims about sir michael's behaviour have been raised in the last 2a hours. we are live in westminster all morning with the latest. good morning, it is thursday two november. also this morning: police investigating the manchester arena bombing, in which 22 people died, call for the brother of the suicide
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bomber who carried out the attack to be extradited from libya. good morning. could today be the day we see our first rise in interest rates for a decade? i will be looking at how the bank of england will make its decision, and why many experts think they will be increased. five—year—old maisie was left with severe burns after an accident with a firework. now, herfamily is warning of the dangers of amateur displays. when ijust... when i was picking it up, it exploded, and some went on my hands. in sport: spurs are sensational. in an incredible night at wembley, they beat the champions league holders, real madrid, for the first time to make it through to the knockout stages. carol has the weather. good morning. it is a chilly start to the day, we have some mist and
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fog patches, especially in the south, but for most of us it is going to be dry with some sunshine. the exception across the central swathe of the uk where there is a bit more cloud than some sunshine. i will have more details in 15 minutes. —— cloud and some sunshine. good morning. first, our main story: westminster is waking up to the fallout following sir michael fallon‘s resignation, as the prime minster faces having to appoint a new defence secretary. sir michael stood down last night following accusations of inappropriate sexual behaviour, as our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. sir michael fallon had a reputation asa sir michael fallon had a reputation as a reliable figure in government. the long serving mp had several ministerial jobs the long serving mp had several ministerialjobs before becoming defence secretary three years ago. but last night he resigned, saying, at times in the past, his conduct had fallen short. i have behaved in the past, clearly, in a way that has occasionally been below the standards that we require of the armed forces. and i don't think it is right for me to go on as defence secretary, expecting the very
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highest standards of our servicemen and women, and failed to meet them myself. sir michael had been caught up myself. sir michael had been caught up in the claims of inappropriate behaviour currently sweeping westminster. the only public allegation was that 15 years ago he had repeatedly touched the knee of a journalist, who dismissed it as mildly amusing. for some, journalist, who dismissed it as mildly amusing. forsome, his decision to go show that there was strong leadership in government. theresa may has clearly laid the law down, both for the party to parliament, and also more particularly to her cabinet, and said these are the standards that i simply will not accept. if you fall below them with regards to this use of power, to extract from people sexual favours or whatever, that is intolerable and i won't stand for it. but for now, theresa may has a spare space around her top table. she has lost a key ally and must work out how to replace him in a cabinet that was already delicately balanced. let's get the latest now from our political correspondent iain watson. this was an announcement, and it is
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not always true, but it took many people by surprise. it did take people by surprise. it did take people by surprise. it did take people by surprise, charlie, because sir michael fallon has apologised for that incident with a radio presenter 15 years ago. she said she didn't regard herself as a victim, but i think what weighed in the minds of sir fallon and indeed the prime minister was whether any other similar incident might come to life —— michael fallon. people close to him said they did not expect any other breaking news on that subject. nonetheless, perhaps behaviour he had regarded as flirtatious some yea rs had regarded as flirtatious some years ago might be regarded more negatively now. he had certainly said that behaviour that was a cce pta ble said that behaviour that was acceptable 15 or ten years ago might be reviewed rather differently. he has resigned, leaving theresa may with the problem of how to replace him. she does not want to do a big reshuffle ahead of the budget later this month, so we might see of the cabinet being catapulted them. there
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are certainly plenty ofjunior ministers who have direct experience of serving in the armed forces. we will be talking to the former conservative party leader iain duncan smith about how damaging these allegations are for theresa may. the brother of the manchester arena bomber faces arrest in the uk, after prosecutors asked for him to be extradited from libya. hashem abedi is currently being detained by the authorities in tripoli in connection to the attack, which killed 22 people and injured 512 others. our reporter clare fallon is at the greater manchester police headquarters for us. what are they saying about this man? well, police here clearly consider this to be a significant development with their investigation. this arrest warrant that has been issued, the request for hashem abedi's
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extradition to the uk comes as the crown prosecution service assessed the evidence. the arrest warrant states that hashem abedi, the younger brother of the man who carried out the bomb attack at manchester arena, is wanted on suspicion of 22 murders, on suspicion of 22 murders, on suspicion of 22 murders, on suspicion of the attempted murder of other people, who were injured in that bomb attack, and also conspiracy to cause an explosion. but just because conspiracy to cause an explosion. butjust because we now have this arrest warrant and request for extradition, we shouldn't expect it to bea extradition, we shouldn't expect it to be a straightforward process. bearin to be a straightforward process. bear in mind libya is a country with a complex and difficult political situation at the moment, to say the least. but police here are saying the authorities in libya are engaging with them on this, that they are grateful to the authorities therefore considering the request. clearly the hope of police here is that this will mean hashem abedi is brought to the uk, so as he can stand trial here. thank you very much. a man accused of causing the deaths
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of eight people in new york by mowing them down in a truck has been charged with terrorism offences. sayfullo saipov, who is a 29—year—old from uzbekistan, is said to have been inspired by the islamic state group. he was shot and injured by police at the scene of the attack. saipov allegedly admitted that he was inspired to commit the attack at the isis videos that he watched, and he had been planning this attack for two months. there has been a sharp decline in the number of nurses and midwives from the european union wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says, comparing this year to last, there has been almost a 90% drop in new registrations. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. around one in every 20 nurses and midwives working in the uk was trained in the eu. many are from spain, portugal, poland, and romania. but, according to new figures, the numbers are declining. the nurses and midwives' regulator, the mmc, says more than 10,000
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joined the uk register until 2015. but, this year, that fell dramatically to around 1,000. and the number of eu nurses working here already who decided to give up uk registration rose by 67%. clearly, it's a worrying trend, and for those responsible for thinking about what we need in the future, so the nurses and midwives we need in the future to care for us, they'll look at this and think what can we do to reverse that trend? it's really difficult to speculate as to reasons why. the figures add to previous evidence pointing to a significant reduction in the number of eu nurses keen to work in the uk since the eu referendum. the royal college of nursing has described the figures as alarming, and estimated the nhs was short of at least 40,000 nurses. the government said it is ensuring the nhs has the staff it needs for a 25% increase in nurse training places.
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sophie hutchinson, bbc news. interest rates could be about to rise for the first time in ten years. economists predict the bank of england will confirm the move later today. it would mean the cost of some mortgages would go up, but savers should see better returns on their money. 0ur personal finance correspondent simon gompertz explains. this could be a shock for people in millions of homes which are saddled with a variable rate mortgage, homes like this one in olden. the owner, lynn, has struggled financially ever since a lynn, has struggled financially ever sincea car lynn, has struggled financially ever since a car accident stopped working. i am literally living... i wouldn't say on the bread line, but very, very close. in any hike in interest or supermarket bills affect the interest instantly. the bank of england has to decide whether, with the economy growing, there is a case for keeping interest rates low. the governor, mark carney, has already given hints that arises on the way.
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the bank's base rate was cut to 0.5% in the midst of a financial crisis, than the zero point 25% after the eu referendum last year. the speculation is that it will be put back up to 0.5% again. speculation is that it will be put back up to 0.5% againlj speculation is that it will be put back up to 0.5% again. i think, whether you are a saver or a borrower, i don't think the increase will be that significant now. but the likelihood is we will get a series of increases, maybe two saipov over the next two to three yea rs, saipov over the next two to three years, so saipov over the next two to three years, so it will start to have a more material impact on our everyday lives. in the financial world, they are so lives. in the financial world, they are so convinced that a rate rises on the cards, that the pound has gone up in the hope the money kept in the uk will give higher returns. so if that doesn't happen, the markets will be caught on hop. dustin hoffman has been accused of sexually harassing an intern on the set of one of his films in 1985. the writer anna graham hunter says, when she was 17, the oscar—winning actor groped her and made inappropriate comments about sex to her. hoffman has apologised and said he was sorry if he put her in an uncomfortable situation, adding "it is not reflective of who i am."
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jodie foster told bbc breakfast she has been heartened by the response to the harvey weinstein scandal. although she said she had never worked with him, she said it is encouraging people want to talk about the issue. i will seek to how incredibly good it feels to hear women's voices, lots of women's voices, from every part of the industry. just all of the narratives that have come out, different narratives, that are just about the salacious details of a pig in a hotel room, you know? that are about what it is to be a woman in the workplace, what it is to carry around a foundation of shame with you from the time that you were born. what it is to not want to be sexualised every single time you walk down the street.
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jodie was speaking to breakfast exclusively about the netflix series black mirror, and you will be able to see that interview in full in december. children from blackburn are four times more likely to have fillings than their counterparts in south gloucestershire, according to a new report on dental health. it found that, as well as there being a regional divide, there was a consistent gap between the dental health of the rich and poor in england. people from the most deprived backgrounds were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital for dental work. sonali will have the sport in a moment. but first, let's bring you this from bolivia. it was a police dog who stole the show, and the ball, in this football match, rather than the players. the animal escaped from his minder and made a beeline for the ball during the first half of the game. the referee was forced to stop the match, as the players tried to retrieve it from the german shepherd. eventually, though, they were able to resume the game.
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imean, you i mean, you know what it is like trying to chase a dog with a ball. you are never going to get it.|j love the fact they tried. the chasing of the dog is the wrong play, though. set down, let him come to you. play cool and hard to get. and you are going to talk about a rather remarkable night. it wasjust absolutely stunning, and spurs outclassed real madrid completely. it was a glorious night for totte n ha m it was a glorious night for tottenham and a humbling one for the european champions. dele alli scored twice as spurs beat real madrid 3—1, to book their place in the last 16 of champions league. it is the first time in their history they have beaten real madrid.
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sergio aguero became manchester city's all—time record goal—scorer last night, as they won 11—2 at napoli. they are also through to the knockout stages, as their brilliant start to the season continues. liverpool rounded off an impressive night for the english sides. a 3—0 win over maribor leaves them top of their group, and on course to reach the knock—out stages for the first time in nine years. and andy murray will drop out of the world's top ten for the first time in three years when the rankings are released on monday. rafael nadal will cap a remarkable season by ending the year as world number one. we will see you back in just a moment to have a look through the papers. we are talking to carol about this morning's weather. how is it looking? this morning is looking pretty chilly. if you haven't stepped out yet, temperatures are looking quite low in parts of southern england. they are close to freezing. we also have some fog around this morning, that will be slow to clear but especially across
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parts of the south—west of england. in east devon, through dorset, into gloucestershire, heading through hampshire, we even have some spots across east anglia. that will lift, most of it will lift gradually in the next few hours. some of it will bea the next few hours. some of it will be a little more stubborn. you can see we have also got a weather front which has been with us in scotland and northern ireland in northern england, heading southwards as a fairly wea k england, heading southwards as a fairly weak feature. what it is doing is bringing some cloud in some spots of light rain with it, and that will help lift the fog as well. first thing this morning, watch out forfog first thing this morning, watch out for fog across parts of the south—west of england, across southern counties as well. some of it is dense and patchy as well. we also have a few breaks in the cloud but as we move further north where
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we have our weather front across east anglia, the midlands, into parts of wales, we have cloud thick enough to produce some spots of rain. the odd shower across eastern pa rt rain. the odd shower across eastern part of england and scotland but a lot of dry weather as well and clear skies it chilly. a local grass frost across some of the sheltered glens in scotland this morning. for northern ireland, again it is largely dry and chilly for you to start the day, might see the odd shower here and there and for wales again this is evident in the weather front, and we have the cloud around and some drizzle and some patches of light rain. through the day, the weather front sinking southwards. still a lot of brightness ahead of it, some sunshine, and still the odd spot of rain on that weather front. looking at the other side of it, for northern england, scotland and northern ireland, much drierfor you thanit northern ireland, much drierfor you than it was yesterday. it is also going to feel much cooler as well. we have temperatures between seven and ten, and has become further south we still are in double figures. heading on into the evening and overnight, our front figures. heading on into the evening and overnight, ourfront moves a little bit further north. again the odd spot of rain it, rather like the
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nightjust gone. we will see some further fog patches form. nightjust gone. we will see some furtherfog patches form. again, dorset, hampshire, that kind of area across the south, we might see some spots of fog falling across north—east england. chilly where the sky is clearest, in aberdeenshire we are looking at an overnight low of three. in the friday, a cold day to start the day, cloud and some sunshine. through the afternoon we will see this weather front arrive, introducing some rain and a strengthening wind. and it is going to be pushing steadily southwards through the rest of friday. at the same time, we have got some rain coming in across the south—west of england. that will get in the north—west wales as well, and as we go through the night, both of these will merge, leading to a more rejuvenated area of rain the saturday morning. and that is going to be pushing off towards the south—eastern corner. saturday, quite breezy day but behind it we will see some sunshine, showers coming in windward coast around the north and also the west. in the sunday, we still have the remnants of that rain pushing away. some showers in the west, a ridge of high pressure building in, settling things down. it will still be breezy so things down. it will still be breezy so if you are going to bonfire night 01’
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so if you are going to bonfire night ora so if you are going to bonfire night or a fireworks display, it is not looking too bad as we go further into the day. all let's take a look at today's papers. are dominated by the story about sir michael fallon. we will hear more about his decision throughout the programme this morning. we will reflect on what it means for the government. looking at the papers in front of us, he is on every single front of us, he is on every single front page. the guardian, this is how they have written a. fallon quits as harassment scandal grows. the daily mail talking about the whole of the commons and the few raw. the sun... you have to give them credit in some ways for the headline, don't you? fallon his sword. absolutely dominating this morning. the times, fallon resigned as new sleaze claims emerge. 0ur
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political correspondent is saying that there is a suggestion that there may be other information that is yet to emerge. he has been asked about that but did not give an answer. we will have more in an interview later. laura has talked to him, to michael fallon. go on. you would've thought that interest rates would've thought that interest rates would be on the front page today. a big decision for bank of england. dig inside for that and we will discuss it later on. whatjumped out at me with this. famous brands plot to cut out supermarkets. this is a continuation of the war between suppliers and supermarkets. some kind of website or app that will enable view, if you like a particular brand, to get your favourite brand. like a particular mayonnaise? exactly. favourite brand. like a particular mayonnaise ? exactly. a favourite brand. like a particular mayonnaise? exactly. a particular type of yeast extract. they say it could end up being cheaper.
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supermarkets are stocking less of these brands overall because they are going to home value stuff. do you then have to shop at many different places? the point of the app different places? the point of the app is that it would help you. the double at wembley last night has inspired most of the headline writers for the back pages. in the times, the cricketers are in australia. mike atherton saying do not let the ben stokes affair ruined the fund for the players. he says a cricket tour is not an olympic. it isa cricket tour is not an olympic. it is a five—month marathon rather than an two week sprint. there is not going to be a formal curfew. the players have agreed amongst themselves to be sensible. so no-one goes out, no—one leaves the hotel? nothing like that. it is a long tour and they feel that the players should see the country. can we talk about kiwifruit? kiwis have been
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banned. kiwis have not been allowed to purchase kiwis in a certain supermarket after the fruit was thrown on stage at harold —— harry stiles. people were throwing them on stage. so they have been banned in manchester for a period of time, under25 are not manchester for a period of time, under 25 are not allowed to purchase kiwis. i think bands would think about that. would've coconuts was in your band name? you would not want to be on stage then. kiwi... coconut. he was not listening to you. it wasjust coconut. he was not listening to you. it was just thinking. coconut. he was not listening to you. it wasjust thinking. great coconut. he was not listening to you. it was just thinking. great to see you both. we will see you later on. syme is now 621. —— time is now 21 minutes past six. michael fallon
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announced last night saying he was resigning as defence secretary saying that his behaviour in the past has fallen short. he gave a short dortmund at a press conference but gave this interview to our political editor. were you worried that more was to come out? the culture has changed over the years. what might have been acceptable 15, ten yea rs what might have been acceptable 15, ten years ago is clearly not a cce pta ble ten years ago is clearly not acceptable now. parliament now have to look at itself and the prime minister has made very clear that conduct needs to be improved and we need to protect the staff of westminster against allegations of harassment. do you feel that you lose have done anything wrong?|j lose have done anything wrong?” have behaved, in the past, clearly ina way have behaved, in the past, clearly in a way that has occasionally been below the standards we require of the armed forces. i don't think it is right for me to go on as defence secretary, expecting the very highest standards of our service men
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and women and failed to meet them myself. do you feel you should apologise for what has happened?” feel we all need to look back now at the past and there are always things you read that —— regret and would have done differently. do you believe that there is a widespread problem at westminster? clearly. the prime minister has made it clear. there are a number of allegations swirling around and many of them are obviously false. but there are some serious issues here and for staff at westminster, they need to be better protected and claims of harassment need to be properly investigated. the prime minister has now said that machinery in motion and from now on that needs to apply to all of us. on the programme we will be talking about that all morning. we will talk to ian duncan smith about it at ten minutes past eight. it's that time of year which hundreds of thousands of families look forward to — letting off some fireworks on bonfire night. yet despite the huge number of people across the uk who will enjoy displays at home
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safely — every year a relatively small number of people do suffer burns. john maguire has been to meet one such family in north devon. just to warn you, some people may find the start of this report a little distressing. what are you doing... fireworks! bonfire night 2016 and like cou ntless bonfire night 2016 and like countless other children, 11—year—old maisie was watching the fireworks in her garden. but then, something went terribly wrong. the fifth one just shot straight across the field. it got stuck in maisie's scarf before it exploded and the scarf on fire.” was trying to pull it out and when i was trying to pull it out and when i was pulling it out it exploded and sunburn that went on my hand. yes. you boot your hand. maisie suffered
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severe burns and was taken from her nearest hospital to a specialist unit in bristol where she had several operations including skin g rafts several operations including skin grafts from her leg. she had five operations in the first week. her mother shows me a video made by a relative that has been viewed online by over a third of a million people. 0ver by over a third of a million people. over the past quarter years there has been a 53% increase in firework injuries treated in hospitals in england. the number has risen from 120 in 2013 to 184 last year. of those, children injured has gone from 28 to 82. is a tiny fraction of those who enjoy bonfire night every year but stephanie says even one child learnt is one child to many.” have been a police officer for nine yea rs have been a police officer for nine years and i have had three children. not a lot worries me but seeing your child in that much pain, it was
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absolutely horrific. a parliamentary debate in the summer discussed banning the sale of fireworks, to restricting them to organise displays. safety and animal welfare issues were raised. but there are legal restrictions on public sales and the threat of prison if fireworks are abused. balanced with a huge amount of their safe use, the government decided against a ban. the british fireworks industry says it isa the british fireworks industry says it is a responsible and heavily regulated ones with 60 new pieces of legislation since 2004. maisie will require more treatment as she grows. but this year her family planning attend a public display if she is happy to do so. and a half or all of them, fireworks will never be the same again. if people are determined to do them at home then let the kids watch them from inside. put a pane of glass between them and the explosives in the garden. what happened to maisie last year was a
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horrific accident that could happen to any child in any garden this year. it is not worth the risk. thank you to maisie and her mother for talking about that with us. we will discuss this issue later about staying safe on bonfire night ‘s with merseyside fire and rescue. information about how to stay safe and ifan information about how to stay safe and if an accident happens, what to do. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. urgent work is needed to renovate the houses of parliament according to officials. and bbc london has gained access to the house of commons and the house of lords to film the state of the building and the work that needs to be done. one option being considered by mps and peers is to move out of the building completely while the work is done;
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i think there is a danger that if you move out of the palace, many of our traditions which are there to support democracy, notjust because people like tradition. they keep us going as the oldest functioning democracy in a major company —— country in europe. 0nce democracy in a major company —— country in europe. once we are row, who knows what will happen. we may return to a completely different scenario. and you can see more on that story in a special programme tonight, when we'll be broadcasting live from the houses of parliament at 6.30. there's been a call for a review of safety guidelines — following a report into the sinking of a work boat after a collision with a catamaran on the thames last year. two men, who were not wearing life jackets, needed to be rescued from the river following the crash with the typhoon clipper near tower bridge in december 2016. the marine accident investigation branch said future guidelines should ensure vessels with limited visibility have an effective lookout. let's have a look
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at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in new southgate, the a406 nth circular is down to one lane w/bnd at bounds green rd for emergency water work near the garage. delays are back to the junction with green lanes it's a foggy start for the motorways this morning , with poor visibility on parts of the m1, the m11 and the essex stretch of the m25 let's have a check on the weather now. it is actually start to the day with temperatures for many areas dropping back down to low single figures this morning. a few patches of mitcham fogged out there as well but it is not widespread you need to watch out for it on the roads. a dry day and there will be cloud around as well. the cloud has thickened through the morning towards northern home counties. you may come across a few
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spots of rain here and there. most of us are dry and the best of any brightness will be towards southern home counties. we will see a light breeze and top temperatures around the average for this time of year 12 or 13 celsius. through this evening and overnight again we will not rule out the possibility of a few patches of mist and fog but for most of us there is plenty of cloud around and starting the day with a mild and open this morning of separate celsius. tomorrow should be another dry day. the best of the brightness through the morning and it will turn but on friday night assist band of rain pushes up from the south merging with one from the north—west. there will be plenty of rain around notjust on friday night but for much of the day on saturday. heavy outbreaks at times. the ground for any fireworks displays on saturday night. by the time you get to the evening it should be dry and clear. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin.
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it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: sexual harassment continues to dominate the headlines, from hollywood to westminster and beyond. but how should employers deal with the issue? we will find out later. we are at hadrian's wall, looking at how the march of visitors to the world heritage site has resulted in the pathways needing restoration work to save the foundations. and what lies beyond the deep blue sea? the producers of the blue planet series have a good idea. we will get the inside story of how they filmed the weird and wonderful creatures far below the ocean. good morning. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: first, our main story: westminster is waking up to the fallout following sir michael fallon‘s resignation, as the prime minster faces having to appoint a new defence secretary.
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sir michael stood down last night following accusations of inappropriate sexual behaviour, as our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. there are some serious things, and those need investigating, and properly looking into, but not everybody who has had the finger pointed at him has been guilty of anything of great consequence. the brother of the manchester arena bomber faces arrest in the uk, after prosecutors asked for him to be extradited from libya. hashem abedi is currently being detained by the authorities in tripoli in connection to the attack, which killed 22 people and injured 512 others. a man accused of causing the deaths of eight people in new york by mowing them down in a truck has been charged with terrorism offences. sayfullo saipov, who is a 29—year—old from uzbekistan, is said to have been inspired
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by the islamic state group. he was shot and injured by police at the scene of the attack. there has been a sharp decline in the number of nurses and midwives from the european union wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says, comparing this year to last, there has been almost a 90% drop in new registrations. interest rates could be about to rise for the first time in ten years. economists predict the bank of england will confirm the move later today. it would mean the cost of some mortgages would go up, but savers should see better returns on their money. dustin hoffman has been accused of sexually harassing an intern on the set of one of his films in 1985. the writer anna graham hunter says,
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when she was 17, the oscar—winning actor groped her and made inappropriate comments about sex to her. hoffman has apologised and said he was sorry if he put her in an uncomfortable situation, adding "it is not reflective of who i am." children from blackburn are four times more likely to have fillings than their counterparts in south gloucestershire, according to a new report on dental health. it found that, as well as there being a regional divide, there was a consistent gap between the dental health of the rich and poor in england. people from the most deprived backgrounds were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital for dental work. those are the main stories, and news ofa those are the main stories, and news of a great wind at wembley. there will be some very happy spurs fans. it was an incredible night for tottenham.
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what a way to reach the knockout stages of the champions league, beating the holders real madrid for the first time. 3—1 the score at wembley — two goals for dele alli, christian eriksen rounding it all off. they are through with two games to spare. yes, of course, so happy. very pleased for the performance, the performance was fantastic. i think it is an important victory, victory for the cloud, for the fans, for the players, for everyone. i think yes, so happy after... after tonight —— for the club. a record—breaking goal from sergio aguero sent manchester city into the champions league knockout stages with a brilliant 4—2 win at napoli. the argentine surpassed a near—80—year—old record with his 178th city goal, which put the premier league leaders 3—2 up. and they rounded off the victory late on, as raheem sterling scored their fourth. when one guy achieves what he has
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achieved, so it isjust a big congratulations. for all his team—mates he played with, managers, it is big news for him, so he is a legend. for the club, for the history, and... enjoy it, so everybody has to be so proud of him. the perfect night in europe was completed by liverpool, who eased past maribor 3—0. after a goalless first half, mohamed salah opened the scoring with a neat finish off his knee. emre can and then daniel sturridge, in the final minute, keep liverpool top of group e, a point clear of sevilla. england cricket coach trevor bayliss says the players have agreed sensible rules for drinking on the upcoming ashes tour, but there will be no curfews in australia. the squad is in perth preparing for their first tour match without ben stokes, who is still in england, awaiting news on whether he will be charged over an incident outside a bristol nightclub. the players have sat down and had a chat, and they are the ones who have
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come up with it. we certainly don't wa nt to come up with it. we certainly don't want to put too many curfews on them, that keep them in their rooms. certainly it is about picking the right time to have a couple of drinks. but obviously knowing when to stay away from it, when you are preparing for a match. the houston astros have won baseball's world series for the first time, beating the la dodgers 5—1 in the deciding seventh game. astros‘ george springer was awarded most valuable player, after he became the first player to hit home runs in four successive world series games, helping them to a 4—3 triumph. they said they had won it for the people of houston. and that wasn't all that happened in the dodgers stadium. houston astros shortstop carlos correa had something he wanted to ask his girlfriend, daniella rodriguez, a miss texas usa in 2016. you make me the happiest man in the world. will you marry me? will you marry me? o my guide. it goes like
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this. —— oh, my god. you kind of can't say no, though.“ it awkward, or is it lovely? i can't decide. the pressure of that, you have to say yes. there couldn't be a more public environment in which to do it, all those people whooping just behind you. you look terrified. anyway, she seemed to like it! the decline in nurses and midwives from the eu wanting to work in the uk since the referendum is continuing, new figures out today suggest. there was an 89% drop in registrations for nurses from europe, but ministers say a rise in training places will compensate for the drop. joining us down the line now from our central london newsroom is janet davies, chief executive
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and general secretary of royal college of nursing. so just explained to us, talk us through the figures. what is going on here, and how many midwives and nurses are leaving? ok, what we can see here is that there is an increase in the number of nurses and midwives leaving the register, so choosing not to be nurses any more, both from the uk, and there are more leaving than there are joining. but significantly from the european union. so what we are seeing is people not applying to come and work in the uk, but also double the number of nurses from the eu who left last year leaving this year. and those are really talented, experienced nurses that we just can't afford to lose. you must have questions, why do you think this is going on? there is real uncertainty. i think there is absolute lack of clarity for those colleagues of ours who are giving so much to our nhs, working in our nursing homes, working in our nursing homes, working in our families, working in our nursing homes, working in ourfamilies, that they are welcomed and will be able to
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stay. and of course, there is a shortage of nurses across the world. they have got a choice and with that level of uncertainty what we are seeing is that our nurses are beginning to leave us to work elsewhere. and that is really difficult for us, i think. the department of health has responded to this, and i am sure you will be familiar, but they say more than 3000 nationals working in the uk since the referendum. they have said we have been very clear that we want them to continue long after the uk leads the european union. what is it, the message is not getting through? there is absolutely no security and certainty, the message is there, but there is no certainty, i was talking to nurses in scotland who are feeling very worried because they are not absolutely sure what is going to happen. those words of reassurance are not being followed up reassurance are not being followed up by reassurance are not being followed up by action and they are looking elsewhere. it is a real difficulty for us and we need to have some absolute clarity. they need to have clarity that they will be welcome and they will be welcome to stay
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with us. with these numbers declining, what is the impact, for example, on patients in hospitals? it is really significant. we can't manage health services without nurses. we can't provide care of our families and ourselves without nurses. they are absolutely key to the delivery of healthcare. and we are seeing nurses leaving both from the eu, but also from the uk. and in england there are some schemes to put a printer ships in, support nurses with these new nurse associates, but generally we need much more investment into nursing, into the traditional routes as well. in england, where nurses are having to ta ke in england, where nurses are having to take out a loan, we are seeing a decline in the number of people coming into our traditional education and in scotland, northern ireland and wales, we are also seeing a shortage of nurses and a shortage of people coming into the profession. the government say that they are looking to tackle this. we have a new programme to improve staff retention in trusts across england, bringing down turnover rates by 2020. what do you think of
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that? it is a little bit late. we are now in 2017, 2020 is a long time away, people are sick now, we have older people who can't get into care homes because they haven't got the nursing staff. it is rather a long time, but of course, it does take three years to actually get a nurse through their education programme. but we really need to keep all the nurses that we have got now, all those nurses trained in the uk, but significantly those very valuable staff from the uk, we cannot afford to lose them. and just very briefly, young people considering going into nursing, do you think they are changing their mind? is that the kind of feeling you getting, talking to them? no, nursing is a fantastic profession, we have all sorts of problems, it is very badly paid at the moment, but generally they get lots of opportunities. it is a fantastic job and nurses lots of opportunities. it is a fantasticjob and nurses love it when they first come into the profession. but people don't want to ta ke profession. but people don't want to take out a loan. they want to go into that programme, but it is very
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difficult for people. the new programmes are very experimental at the moment. we need to put true investment into training more nurses, but also keeping those nurses, but also keeping those nurses we have got, stopping them getting fed up and getting overtired with poor shift patterns, poor pay, and everything else that actually makes people think it is not worth it any more. thank you for talking to us on breakfast this morning. it is time to have a look at the weather, with carol. good morning, both, good morning to you as well. if you are just starting out, for some of us it is a chilly start today. in cardiff we are looking at two celsius, edinburgh, five. birmingham and manchester not as cold, but we have a weak weather front slowly sinking southwards and on it there is a fair bit of cloud and also some spots of light rain. that has helped maintain the temperature overnight. this morning there is also some fog and the forecast, especially across parts of the south—west. so east devon, through somerset, in through
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gloucester, hampshire, dorset, that will be slow to clear. it may not clear until 10am or 11am this morning. a cold start, and a weather front producing a thicker cloud and some spots of rain. the rain not terribly happy. as we move further north we will see a few showers, touching the coast of eastern scotla nd touching the coast of eastern scotland at times but for most it is dry and cilic. in sheltered glens in the north of scotland, a touch of frost around this morning. for northern ireland, a chilly start, but you can see where we have the cloud that will maintain the temperature level through the course of the night in the same across wales as well. again, the other end of the weather front producing thicker cloud and the odd spot of light rain. through the course of the day as this front moves south, the day as this front moves south, the fog were lifted we will see brighter skies develop behind it. so for scotland, northern england and
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northern ireland, compared to what you had yesterday, it will be a much sunny day to day but it will also feel that bit cooler. across southern areas, again we should be some sunshine. but rather than sunshine for a lot of us it will be a bright day, but temperatures still in double figures. as we head through the evening and overnight period our weather front moves a little bit further north, still taking its cloud and splashes of rain with it. we will see some mist and fog form once again, the likely areas devon, dorset and hampshire. and it will be chilly weather cloud brea ks and it will be chilly weather cloud breaks in the north, so around aberdeenshire, for example, the overnight low will be about three celsius. so tomorrow the fog will slowly left, as it is likely to do today, and then we are looking at bright spells, some sunny spells and a few showers. later this weather front comes in from the north—west. it is sinking south in the wind picks up around it. later in the day again, although it is not on the charts, some rain coming in from the south—west. through the course of the night both the stance of rain will meet and do something heavier for the morning. you can see how
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that band of rain pushes into the south—east as we go through the course of the day. high debts and drier conditions, still a blustery day with some showers out towards the west. and on sunday we lose that band of rain. we start with some showers and a ridge of high pressure builds on. at the end of the day it will be brighter than at the start of it. thank you carol. economists are expecting the first interest rate rise for a decade later today. sean's here with what it all means for you. quite fun to have a look back at your e—mails or social media from ten years ago to see what you were really up to. so — it's not long over a decade ago. many of us were gearing up for another federer—nadal final. and the bank of england's rate setting committee voted for an increase in interest rates. that was the last time they did that. the committee meets most months to decide what level the interest rate should be.
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that is then used by our banks to help set rates for loans and savings, so it's pretty important. and today's vote is being widely watched by both savers and borrowers because many think there could be a rate rise. the last time rates went up rather than down was back injuly 2007 when they rose to 5.75%. but not long after that, the financial crisis hit and so rates were cut to help support the economy until they hit just 0.5% in march 2009. and of course, it stayed at that low low level month after month and year after year until last august in 2016. after the referendum the committee voted to cut rates even lower to 0.25%. the idea behind that cut was again to support the economy, this time to protect against any major shocks after we voted to leave the eu. now, since then, we've seen price rises getting bigger — and it's one of the jobs of the bank of england to makes sure those rises, inflation, doesn't get out of hand.
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which is why some think today is the day for them to act. since the eu referendum the pound has dropped around 15%. that means if you are purchasing goods from a broad, things like cheese or cars they have gone up about 10%. that has pushed inflation up to around 396. has pushed inflation up to around 3%. wages have not increased by nearly as much. what the bank of england it wants to do is get inflation back to a target of 2%. 0ne inflation back to a target of 2%. one way of doing that is to increase rates. there are nine members of this rate setting committee — eight men and one woman — and last time round two voted for an increase but seven of them, including the governor of the bank mark carney, went for no change. but since then the governor has hinted that things might be changing. in order to keep inflation or
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returned inflation to that 2% target ina returned inflation to that 2% target in a sustainable manner they may need to be an adjustment in interest rates in coming months. we will take that decision based on data but the possibility is definite the increased. —— has definitely increased. so what impact will an interest rate rise have? let's look at mortgages. just over two—fifths of homeowners are on variable or tracker rates. these are likely to go up if the base rate increases. but not by much. according to one lender, a homeowner with an average mortgage of £125,000 would see an increase in payments by about £15 a month if rates were to go up by a 0.25% and the bank of england likes to point out that the vast majority of first time buyers who tend to have the biggest loans are on fixed rate deals so they won't see any immediate change. but it will be a different story for savers. while interest rates have been at record lows so have savings rates.
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the average easy—access savings account is currently paying 0.4% in annual interest and some bank accounts are paying as little as 0.01%. so those with variable rate accounts should expect to see their returns go up. so as ever, whether it's good or bad news will depend on whether you're a saver or a borrower. but whenever the first rate rise for a decade is, whether today or next month or even next year ,the bank of england has said that any further rises are likely to be modest and gradual. and at midday today we'll have a lot more detail on what exactly they're thinking. we will be talking loads more about this during the programme so get your questions in. if you have questions about credit cards, mortgage accounts, who is making the decisions. i will try and ask —— a nswer decisions. i will try and ask —— answer them later. every month they
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used to change. it is so strange, those interest rates have been in the same place for ten years. it's true. ‘fake news' is the collins‘ dictionary word of the year. it's their annual report into which words are new, or have come back into fashion, and how often we use them. fake news is often used by donald tump. it means ‘false, often sensational information, under the guise of news reporting'. a few others popular this year include "corbynmania" which is a fervent enthusiasm for the leader of the labour party. "echo chamber" which is when opinions on social media are only read by people who have similar views. "fidget spinner", a small spinning toy designed to improve concentration or relieve stress. joining us now is dr rob drummond, a senior lecturer in linguistics at manchester metropolitan university, who can talk us through it all. would often talk to you about word
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based things. fake news. has donald trump affectively crow barred this into a dictionary? the amount he has used it... it has been around. it is not an unusual word, nor sing to put together. it has been around for all while but the way he is using it is slightly different. it is notjust news that is wrong, there is some kind of more sinister angle, it news that he does not agree with. that meaning is what is changing at slightly. i wanted to ask you about that. the meaning we read there is straightforward but it is a lot more nuanced, isn't it? i think it is. like i say it has more sinister angle because it is the case of constructing reality around yourself. words are hugely important in creating the reality we experienced. it is notjust reflecting reality, the words we use shapes it. when he dismisses whole sections of the media as lies it is
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just things he does not agree with and that shapes reality for a group of people. so might you change the definition to say that fake news is news i do not agree with. the problem is he is onto a good thing for him in that there is fake news around. we have seen during the us elections that there are news stories that appear that just elections that there are news stories that appear thatjust made up stories that appear thatjust made up to dissuade people's opinions. that exists in his tapping into that. people believe it isjust that exists in his tapping into that. people believe it is just made up that. people believe it is just made up news but actually, it is not. there is a big difference between news that is wrong and fake news. that is the difference, isn't it? there is news that is wrong, maybe mistaken, incorrect news but fake has this kind of agency that it is being done in some ways deliberately and that is the difference. echo chamber. that is another work, an interesting one. again. it could relate to certain politicians as well. the idea that you just express
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your opinions in an environment in which people will agree with you anyway. the definition of corbyn mania. that was likely going to happen. and it is obvious. i have done here is fervent enthusiasm for jeremy corbyn. adding mania to anything... i'm sure you have charlie mania on various things... you know where people add —ista?“ accepted thing? we think that the english language is that you can do anything. you can shorten things, change do whatever you want. certain things catch an uncertain one stone. these are a little books like a sad. i was going to ask if they will come and go. will they be in the dictionary for a while? the way colo ns dictionary for a while? the way colons do it, they have it one main one, that those in the print version
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but the other stay on the fringes online. are going over the years, i think fake news is serious, going over the years of the list, it is a reflection of what was going on. look back at 17 annual fee corbynmania and wonder what it was all about. that it reflects the time. is on us historical document as well. and you'd definition of unicorn. i did not know. this is a business term, right? to do with a recently launched business enterprise valued at over $1 billion ora enterprise valued at over $1 billion or a mythological creature. it taps into that mythological sort of fantastic idea that is not really real that people seem to like. the idea of a business idea... thank you so idea of a business idea... thank you so much. great to speak to you. five minutes to seven. time now to get the news, travel and weather where
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you are.. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. urgent work is needed to renovate the houses of parliament according to officials. and bbc london has gained access to the house of commons and the house of lords to film the state of the building and the work that needs to be done. one option being considered by mps and peers is to move out of the building completely while the work is done. i think there is a danger that if you move out of the palace, many of our traditions — which are there to support democracy, they are there notjust because people like tradition. they actually keep us going as the oldest functioning democracy in a major country in europe. once we are out who knows what will happen. we may return to a completely different scenario. and you can see more on that story in a special programme tonight, when we'll be broadcasting live from the houses of parliament at 6.30.
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there's been a call for a review of safety guidelines — following a report into the sinking of a work boat after a collision with a catamaran on the thames last year. two men, who were not wearing life jackets, needed to be rescued from the river following the crash with the typhoon clipper near tower bridge in december 2016. the marine accident investigation branch said future guidelines should ensure vessels with limited visibility have an effective lookout. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in new southgate, the a406 nth circular is down to one lane westbound at bounds green rd for emergency water work near the garage. delays are back to the a10 interchange. traffic the a10 interchange. is also building wapping.
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it is a chilly start to the day with temperatures for many areas dropping back down to low single figures this morning. a few patches of mist and fog out there as well but it is not widespread. you need to watch out for it on the roads. a dry day and there will be cloud around as well. the cloud has thickened through the morning towards northern home counties. you may come across a few spots of rain here and there. most of us are dry and the best of any brightness will be towards southern home counties. we will see a light breeze and top temperatures around the average for this time of year, 12 or 13 celsius. through this evening and overnight again we will not rule out the possibility of a few patches of mist and fog but for most of us there is plenty of cloud around and starting the day with a mild note than this morning of seven or eight celsius. tomorrow should be another dry day. the best of the brightness through the morning and it will turn bad on friday night as this band of rain pushes up from the south merging with one
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from the north—west. there will be plenty of rain around notjust on friday night but for much of the day on saturday. heavy outbreaks at times. damp ground for any fireworks displays on saturday night. by the time you get to the evening it should be dry and clear. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. the sexual harassment scandal at westminster. defence secretary michael fallon resigns amid allegations of inappropriate behaviour. he says his conduct had fallen short of the standards now expected, and that it is right to step down. the culture has changed
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over the years. what was — might have been acceptable 15, ten years ago is clearly not acceptable now. it is thought fresh claims about sir michael's behaviour have been raised in the last 24 hours. we are live in westminster all morning with the latest. good morning, it is thursday 2 november. also this morning: police investigating the manchester arena bombing, in which 22 people died, call for the brother of the suicide bomber who carried out the attack to be extradited from libya. good morning. could today be the day we see our first rise in interest rates for a decade? i will be looking at how the bank of england will make its decision, and why many experts think they will be increased. five—year—old maisie was left
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with severe burns after an accident with a firework. now, herfamily is warning of the dangers of amateur displays. when ijust... when i was pulling the top, it exploded, and some went on my hand. in sport: spurs are sensational. in an incredible night at wembley, they beat the champions league holders, real madrid, for the first time to make it through to the knockout stages. also this morning: are too many tourists damaging hadrian's wall? we are there live to report on the emergency repair works that are being carried out as a result. isa is a chilly start today. we also have some fog, especially in southern areas, but for most it will be dry with some sunshine, except in the central swathes of the uk where we have some spots of light rain stock will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story: westminster is waking up to the fallout following sir michael fallon's resignation, as the prime minster faces having to appoint a new defence secretary. sir michael stood down last night following accusations of inappropriate sexual behaviour, as our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. sir michael fallon had a reputation as a reliable figure in government. the long—serving mp had several ministerialjobs, before becoming defence secretary three years ago. but last night he resigned, saying, at times in the past, his conduct had fallen short. i have behaved in the past, clearly, in a way that has occasionally been below the standards that we require of the armed forces. and i don't think it's right for me to go on as defence secretary, expecting the very highest standards of our servicemen and women, and fail to meet them myself. sir michael had been caught up in the claims of inappropriate behaviour currently sweeping westminster.
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the only public allegation was that, 15 years ago, he had repeatedly touched the knee of a journalist, who dismissed it as mildly amusing. for some, his decision to go showed that there was strong leadership in government. theresa may has clearly laid the law down, both for the party to parliament, and also more particularly to her cabinet, and said, these are the standards that i simply will not accept. if you fall below them, with regards to this use of power to extract from people sexual favours, or whatever, that is intolerable and i won't stand for it. but, for now, theresa may has a spare space around her top table. she has lost a key ally and must work out how to replace him, in a cabinet that was already delicately balanced. let's get the latest now from our political correspondent iain watson. this genuinely came as a surprise, this decision to step down by sir
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michael fallon genuinely came as a surprise to many people in parliament. it did indeed come as a surprise, not just to parliament. it did indeed come as a surprise, notjust to people here at westminster, but also to the radio presenter who was involved in this initial incident 15 years ago, julia hartley brewer. she told the bbc last night that she regretted any role she may have played inadvertently in this downfall.” role she may have played inadvertently in this downfall. i am worried if my knee has brought down a cabinet minister, i believe it is being called knee—gate. i think it is absurd for anyone to lose their job over touching a reporter on their knee, 15 years ago. it didn't bother me then, it doesn't bother me now, and it has got out of hand. interesting choice of words from julia hartley brewer thomas bing ‘s got completely out of hand. i was talking to a former minister about an atmosphere of hysterias —— julia hartley brewer saying that things
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have gone completely out of hand. what was regarded as flirtatious behaviour in the past, but may be regarded today as completely unacceptable. this could be a difficult position theresa may will find herself in, regarding how she will handle other allegations. 0n monday she will talk to other political parties about getting new procedures in place to deal with complaints of sexual harassment. she also has to replace the defence secretary. she doesn't want to do a major reshuffle ahead of this month's budget. she will possibly be looking at some junior ministers with direct experience of the armed forces. we will be talking to the former conservative party leader iain duncan smith about how damaging these allegations are for theresa may. that is after 8:00am. the brother of the manchester arena bomber faces arrest in the uk, after prosecutors asked for him to be extradited from libya. hashem abedi is currently being detained by the authorities in tripoli in connection
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to the attack, which killed 22 people and injured 512 others. 0ur reporter clare fallon is at the greater manchester police headquarters for us. what more are they saying about this man? well, you get a sense from police here that they certainly consider this to be a significant development with their investigation. we know that this arrest warrant was issued and the request for extradition made after the crown prosecution service here considered the evidence. and the arrest warrant states that hashem abedi, the younger brother of salman abedi, the younger brother of salman abedi, is wanted on suspicion of murder, attempted murder, and conspiracy to cause an explosion. we are almost six months now from the bomb attack at manchester arena, in which 22 people were killed. and police have told us that there are still two people in hospital, being treated for their injuries. they have told us that, in all, more than 500 people were injured, and that
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figure includes people who were physically injured, but also people who police say have suffered serious, long—lasting psychological and mental trauma as a result of what happened. as for the potential extradition of hashem abedi, i don't think we should assume that that would be a straightforward process, bearing in mind the complex situation in libya at the moment. the police here say the authorities in that country are engaging with them. they say they are grateful to libyan authorities were considering their request. and clearly police here are hoping that, by going through this process, it will mean they get hashem abedi into the uk so he can stand trial here. we really get a sense of how many people are affected by that, thank you. a man accused of causing the deaths of eight people in new york by mowing them down in a truck has been charged with terrorism offences. sayfullo saipov, who is a 29—year—old from uzbekistan, is said to have been inspired by the islamic state group. he was shot and injured by police at the scene of the attack.
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saipov allegedly admitted that he was inspired to commit the attack by the isis videos he watched, and had been planning this attack for two months. there has been a sharp decline in the number of nurses and midwives from the european union wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says, comparing this year to last, there has been almost a 90% drop in new registrations. 0ur health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. dustin hoffman has been accused of sexually harassing an intern on the set of one of his films in 1985. the writer anna graham hunter says, when she was 17, the oscar—winning actor groped her and made inappropriate comments about sex to her. hoffman has apologised and said he was sorry if he put her in an uncomfortable situation, adding "it is not reflective of who i am." jodie foster told bbc breakfast she has been heartened
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by the response to the harvey weinstein scandal. although she said she had never worked with him, she said it is encouraging people want to talk about the issue. i will speak to how incredibly good it feels to hear women's voices, lots of women's voices, from every part of the industry. just all of the narratives that have come out, different narratives, that aren't just about the salacious details of a pig in a hotel room, you know? that are about what it is to be a woman in the workplace. what it is to carry around a foundation of shame with you, from the time that you were born. what it is to not want to be sexualised every single time you walk out in the street. sir michael fallon resigned
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yesterday as defence secretary, over allegations he touched a journalist's knee 15 years ago, but didn't go into further detail about how his behaviour may have fallen short in the past. but he has paid for it now with hisjob, telling the bbc that what had been acceptable 15 or ten years ago is clearly not acceptable now. let's talk now to the political commentator isabel 0akeshott, who has spent many years reporting from the heart of westminster. thank you very much for your time this morning. could you give us a reflection on the announcement last night that, as i understand it, it took many people by surprise, sir michael fallon resigning. absolutely, i think this was an absolute bombshell. i have been saying for the last few days that this is all a storm in a teacup, and
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this is all a storm in a teacup, and this spreadsheet that was circulating at westminster and far beyond didn't really amount to a row of beans, there were a lot of old stories and untrue allegations. but, with the resignation of the defence secretary, suddenly we have moved into a whole new league here. and i think the point is that it appears to set the bar very low for indiscretion, and the point at which a cabinet minister may feel this position is no longer tenable. i am fairly sure, and in fact michael fallon himself has strongly hinted, that this resignation is nothing to do with what is now being called knee—gate, and that unfortunately michael fallon's cupboard was somewhat bristling with sexy skeletons that were just waiting to tumble out. he has indicated he was not able to reassure the prime minister they would not be further allegations in relation to this past
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behaviour, and that is why he has stepped down. and we heard just a moment ago the comments ofjulia hartley—brewer, who mentioned the knee—gate incident, the correspondent. i am sure you know her well. she has said herself it would be ridiculous if him touching my knee had led to this resignation, in and of itself. indeed. the questions here start to be about proportion, don't they? about what is the punishment or the consequences of what action within parliament. indeed, and at the moment, i must say, from my perspective, it all feels ridiculously disproportionate. it is an extraordinary spectacle that you have the head of the armed forces, in the guise of michael fallon, and the mod, having to step down a p pa re ntly the mod, having to step down apparently in a row that was triggered by an incredibly minor incident more than a decade ago, that the victim,", doesn't feel
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merited anything like that level of response. julia hartley—brewer has been very clear that she was perfectly capable of dealing with that at the time, she swatted him off with a threat to punch him if he carried on doing it, and everyone moved on. the question is what else is in that cupboard of this, and presumably it is something rather more serious. one of the ways possibly of trying to sort out... and i hesitate with the terminology about this, the stuff that is more grave than others. you mention the spreadsheet of shame, as it is known, this list of people about whom they have been some complaints. 0ne whom they have been some complaints. one way of doing that would be to deal with it very quickly and put those which are more serious either into the hands of police, or into a different area. ijust into the hands of police, or into a different area. i just think this whole thing has got way out of hand, and you are right that one of the problems is that everything is being kind of lumped together in this
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great swirling soup of rumour and insinuation. most of the behaviours on that spreadsheet, i have seen the unredacted version, are pretty standard stuff in any work based of the size of the palace of westminster. 14,000 pass holders. i mean, show me in the workplace at that scale that doesn't have a few office affairs between equals. there may, iam office affairs between equals. there may, i am sure there are, be some cases of inappropriate behaviour. again, that would be in any workplace of that size. i really wouldn't want people to imagine that westminster is a kind of seething mass of marauding sex pests. it really is by and large a very respectable place to work. really is by and large a very respectable place to workm really is by and large a very respectable place to work. it is interesting the terminology used, because we're interviewing iain duncan smith later on and i suspect that were he to contextualise this story the way you have, saying it is the just like any other workplace, he would be pilloried the saying
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that. and isn't at the point, that people expect things to be different in that place because people are elected, that they pontificate to do with things about people's morals and ethics. so for some reason, in and ethics. so for some reason, in and around that, they have to be different values. i agree that we should hold our members of parliament, whether they are elected members of parliament or peers, to a higher standard than others. it is a tremendous honour and privilege to be an mp, or to be appear, and they do have to set a higher standard. where i don't think we need to get involved is in legitimate romantic relationships between equals. there isa relationships between equals. there is a very clear difference between people who are having extramarital affairs with people of their own status. we may not approve of that, but i don't really feel that we, the voters, need to get ourselves involved in that. where it becomes much more dodgy is where you have got politicians who are in some way
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abusing their position to take advantage of younger and more junior people, who then feel in a very awkward and upset position. mighti might i ask you one other thing. michael fallon made his reference in front of the ministry of defence sign, referencing service men and women. had he been housing minister... what he is to in his job? he almost seemed to make reference to the fact that because he represented service men and women that made it relevant. he did. i think you have to see this slightly in the context of a recent scandal in the context of a recent scandal in the armed forces involving navy personnel. it is only a few days since we have seen yet more salacious revelations about what has been going on on one of our nuclear submarines. a number of navy personnel have been forced to step down from theirjobs or sidelined or
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demoted as a result of inappropriate behaviour on a submarine. it is quite difficult for the defence secretary to preside over that and hold his head high if he knows himself that in his workplace his own standard of behaviour has not been as exemplary as it should be. thank you very much for your time this morning. as we mentioned, we will be talking to iain duncan smith just after eight o'clock this morning. that catch up on all of the weather details. a chilly start across many parts of the uk and fog across many parts of the uk and fog across parts of seven —— southern england. this weather front, across parts of seven —— southern england. this weatherfront, it across parts of seven —— southern england. this weather front, it is pushing southwards has got cloud in it and some spots of light rain. under it it is not quite as cool
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start as it is across the rest of the uk. to this morning, fog across a stubborn through gloucestershire and hampshire. most of that will lift readily by about ten o'clock. some may stretch to 11. patchy frogs will across the east anglia that should lift as well. where we have our weather front is where we have the thickest cloud and spots of rain. a couple of showers affect the north of england at the moment. a few in the north—east of scotland. they will fade as we go through the next few hours and for many it will be dry. a chilly start both sunshine around as well. in northern ireland, brightening up from the north. the re m na nts of brightening up from the north. the remnants of the front across the south producing a fair bit of cloud and again, michael as a result. and in the west we have a weather front and fair bit of cloud as well as rain. through the course of the day the weak weather front since a little further south on the lifting the fog. the bright skies will be across the far south of england and
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behind it for northern england and ireland, scotland, a much drier day that was yesterday at a much sunnier wa nt that was yesterday at a much sunnier want a colour will also feel that bit fresher. are still hanging on to them double figures. into the evening and overnight, a weather front meanders a little further north and it will still have the odd spot of rain. we will see some mist and fog patches forming again tonight, especially around devon, dorset and hampshire and by the end of the night we will begin to see the signs of rain coming in across north—west scotland. through tomorrow, the band of rain will think southwards and the breezy. a few showers dotted here and there but for many it will be a dry day with variable cloud so bright spells or some sunny spells even. by the time we get to the end of the day, we will start to see more rain sweeping up from the south—west. we will have that band of rain coming from the south—west, this one coming south and they shall meet overnight and by the time we get to morning,
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here they are heading in a south—easterly direction. some of that rain could well be heavy. it will be a breezy day on saturday but behind that rain there will be quite a bit of sunshine around. still a battering of showers along the coast in particular. look at the temperatures. eighth and ninth in the north, 12 and 13th in the south. 0n the north, 12 and 13th in the south. on sunday, the back—end of the rain pulls away and then we start off on a chilly note with sunshine around and we will still have showers in the west. what you will find is through the course of sunday, the high pressure builds in and that will kill off a lot of showers. if you are going to have anything in the evening, a bonfire party or a fireworks display, it will be breezy but for many of us it should be dry. sunday and is better than that sta rts sunday and is better than that starts in terms of the weather. we will look out for sunday. thank you, carol. it is at time of year in when hundreds of thousands of families let up fireworks on bonfire night.
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despite the huge number of people across the uk who'd enjoyed displays at home safely, every year a relatively small number of people suffer burns. we have been to me one such family in north devon. and to warn you , such family in north devon. and to warn you, some people might find the start of this report distressing. what are you doing... fireworks! bonfire night 2016 and like countless other children, 4—year—old maisie was watching the fireworks in her garden. but then, something went terribly wrong. the fifth one just shot straight across the field. it got stuck in maisie's scarf before it exploded and set the scarf on fire. i was trying to pull it out and when i was pulling it out it exploded and burn went on my hand. yes. you burnt your hand. maisie suffered severe burns and was taken from her nearest hospital to a specialist unit in bristol where she had several operations including skin grafts from her leg.
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she had five operations in the first week. her mother shows me a video made by a relative that has been viewed online by a third of a million people. over the past four years, there has been a 53% increase in firework injuries treated in hospitals in england. the number has risen from 120 in 2013 to 184 last year. of those, children injured has gone from 28 to 82. is a tiny fraction of those who enjoy bonfire night every year but stephanie says even one child burnt is one child to many. i have been a police officer for nine years and i have had three children. i've seen most things. not a lot fazes me but seeing your child in that much pain, it was absolutely horrific. a parliamentary debate in the summer discussed banning the sale of fireworks, to restricting them
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to organised displays. safety and animal welfare issues were raised. but there are legal restrictions on public sales and the threat of prison if fireworks are abused. balanced with a huge amount of their safe use, the government decided against a ban. the british fireworks industry says it is a responsible and heavily regulated ones with 60 new pieces of legislation since 2004. —— regulated ones with 16 new pieces of legislation since 2004. maisie will require more treatment as she grows. but this year her family planning attend a public display if she is happy to do so. but for all of them, fireworks will never be the same again. if people are determined to do them at home then let the kids watch them from inside. put a pane of glass between them and the explosives in the garden. what happened to maisie last year was a horrific accident that could happen to any child in any garden this year.
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it is not worth the risk. maisie's mother gave some very good advice at the end of that report. many of you are getting in touch. thank you for your support and messages. when you hear about something like that does make you think. michelle says the banning is not the answer. what needs to happen is that the marketing push needs to stop. discourage people away from purchasing them. some people feel quite strongly. lacey and helen say that they agree there should be banned for public use and only displays should be permitted. we will be talking about advice from a fire safety officer here on brea kfast a fire safety officer here on breakfast a little later. and a reminder about hedgehogs. yes. you hear about this. hedgehogs call in and they get caught up. please ensure before lighting any bonfire
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is eithers to make sure that there are no wildlife in their. keep your thoughts coming out. some people still purchase their own fireworks and have displays at home. theyjust need to stick to guidelines. 25 minutes past seven. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. urgent work is needed to renovate the houses of parliament according to officials. and bbc london has gained access to the house of commons and the house of lords to film the state of the building and the work that needs to be done. one option being considered by mps and peers is to move out of the building completely while the work is done. i think there is a danger that if you move out of the palace, many of our traditions — which are there to support democracy, they are there notjust because people like tradition.
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they actually keep us going as the mother of parliaments, the oldest functioning democracy in a major country in europe. once we are out who knows what will happen. we may return to a completely different scenario. and you can see more on that story in a special programme tonight, when we'll be broadcasting live from the houses of parliament at 6.30. the royal british legion will launch its london poppy appeal today — and is hoping to start the campaign by raising £1 million on the first day in what's hoped will be the largest one—day street collection of its kind. while the poppy is often associated with the first and second world wars, the 2017 campaign is calling on the public to build on those perceptions and wear the flower in support of those in our armed forces, both past and present. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in new southgate, the a406 north circular is down to one lane
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westbound at bounds green rd for emergency water work near the garage. delays are back to the a10 interchange. heading through wapping, westbound traffic on the highway is building from the limehouse link towards tower hill. let's have a check on the weather now. it is a chilly start to the day with temperatures for many areas dropping back down to low single figures this morning. a few patches of mist and fog out there as well but it is not widespread. you need to watch out for it on the roads. a dry day and there will be cloud around as well. the cloud has thickened through the morning towards northern home counties. you may come across a few spots of rain here and there. most of us are dry and the best of any brightness will be towards southern home counties. we will see a light breeze and top temperatures around the average for this time of year, 12 or 13 celsius. through this evening and overnight again we will not rule out the possibility of a few patches of mist and fog but for most of us
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there is plenty of cloud around and starting the day with a milder note than this morning of seven or eight celsius. tomorrow should be another dry day. the best of the brightness through the morning and it will turn wet on friday night as this band of rain pushes up from the south merging with one from the north—west. there will be plenty of rain around notjust on friday night but for much of the day on saturday. heavy outbreaks at times. damp ground for any fireworks displays on saturday night. by the time you get to the evening it should be dry and clear. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has resigned following accusations
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of inappropriate sexual behaviour. he said his conduct had fallen short of the high standards expected. he is the first politician to quit following wider claims of sexual harassment at westminster. the prime minister must now appoint a new defence secretary. last night, the tory mp jacob rees—mogg insisted some politicians were being unfairly accused. there are some serious things, and those need investigating, and properly looking into. but not everybody who's had the finger pointed at him has been guilty of anything of great consequence. police investigating the manchester arena bombing, which killed 22 people, say they are applying to bring the brother of the bomber to the uk. they have issued an arrest warrant for hashem abedi, who is currently being held in libya. greater manchester police say authorities there are considering the request. police also revealed 512 people are now known to have been injured in the blast back in may. a man accused of causing the deaths of eight people in new york
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by mowing them down in a truck has been charged with terrorism offences. sayfullo saipov, who is a 29—year—old from uzbekistan, is said to have been inspired by the islamic state group. he was shot and injured by police at the scene of the attack. there has been a sharp decline in the number of nurses and midwives from the european union wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says there was almost a 90% drop in new registrations for eu nurses comparing this year to last year. the department for health says a rise in training places will compensate for the fall. there is absolute lack of clarity for those colleagues of ours who are giving so much to the nhs, working ina nursing giving so much to the nhs, working in a nursing home scott working with ourfamilies, but in a nursing home scott working with our families, but they are welcome, and they are able to stay. and there isa and they are able to stay. and there is a shortage of nurses across the
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world. they have a choice and with that level of uncertainty we are seeing our nurses begin to leave us to work elsewhere. interest rates could be about to rise for the first time in ten years. it is expected the bank of england will confirm the move later today. economists say it would mean the cost of some mortgages would go up, but savers should see better returns on their money. the bank of england says any rise would be modest. dustin hoffman has been accused of sexually harassing an intern on the set of one of his films in 1985. the writer anna graham hunter says the oscar—winning actor groped her and made inappropriate comments to her when she was 17 years old. hoffman has apologised and said he was sorry if he put her in an uncomfortable situation, adding, "it is not reflective of who i am." children from blackburn are four times more likely to have fillings than their counterparts in south gloucestershire, according to a new report on dental health. it found that, as well as there being a north—south regional divide, there was a consistent gap between the dental health of the rich and poor in england. people from the most deprived
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backgrounds were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital for dental work. it isa it is a phrase adopted by the leader of the free world, and has been accused of influencing elections and fa ke accused of influencing elections and fake news. we are talking about the phrase fake news, largely used by president donald trump. it has been named as word of the year. the term has seen its usage soar by 300% since 2016. other words on the list include colburn mania, —— corbyn mania, describing enthusiasm of jeremy corbyn. and it is the connotations attached to fake news, as opposed to just getting things
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wrong, and in not fake news, carol will have the real weather. and we have real sport. real madrid totally outclassed. real news. totally outclassed by totte n ha m real news. totally outclassed by tottenham at wembley. and what a way a?“ the... end, beating to reach the businesrendzbzaflng- holders, real 2, ,, to reach the businesrendzbzaflng- holders, real 2, the the holders, real madrid, for the first time. 3—1 the score at wembley — two goals for dele alli, christian eriksen rounding it all off. they are through with two games to spare. yes, of course, so happy. very pleased for the performance, the performance was fantastic. i think it's an important victory, victory for the club, for the fans, for the players, for everyone. i think — yes, so happy after — after tonight. when one guy achieves what he has achieved, so it'sjust a big congratulations. for all his team—mates he played with, managers, it's big news for him, so he's a legend. for the club, for the history, and — enjoy it, so everybody has to be
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so proud of him. a record—breaking goal from sergio aguero sent manchester city into the champions league knockout stages with a brilliant 4—2 win at napoli. the argentine surpassed a near—80—year—old record with his 178th city goal, which put the premier league leaders 3—2 up. and they rounded off the victory late on, as raheem sterling scored their fourth. when one guy achieves what he has achieved, so it'sjust a big congratulations. for all his team—mates he played with, managers, it's big news for him, so he's a legend. for the club, for the history, and — enjoy it, so everybody has to be so proud of him. the perfect night in europe was completed by liverpool, who eased past maribor 3—0. after a goalless first half, mohamed salah opened the scoring with a neat finish off his knee. emre can and then daniel sturridge, in the final minute, keep liverpool top of group e, a point clear of sevilla. andy murray will drop out of the world's top ten for the first time in three years, after results at the paris masters ensured others will overtake him.
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murray hasn't played since the summer due to a hip injury. british number two kyle edmund was in action in paris, though, but suffered a second—round defeat at the hands of jack sock. he lost in a third—set tie—break, despite twice serving for the match. england cricket coach trevor bayliss says the players have agreed sensible rules for drinking on the upcoming ashes tour, but there will be no curfews in australia. the squad is in perth preparing for their first tour match without ben stokes, who is still in england, awaiting news on whether he will be charged over an incident outside a bristol nightclub. the players have sat down and had a chat, and they're the ones who have come up with it. we certainly don't want to put too many curfews on them, that keep them in their rooms. certainly it's about picking the right time to have a couple of drinks, but obviously knowing when to stay away from it when you're preparing for a match. the houston astros have won baseball's world series for the first time,
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beating the la dodgers 5—1 in the deciding seventh game. astros‘ george springer was awarded most valuable player, after he became the first player to hit home runs in four successive world series games, helping them to a 4—3 triumph. they said they had won it for the people of houston. jodie foster told bbc breakfast she has been heartened by the response to the harvey weinstein scandal. although she said she had never worked with him, she said it is encouraging people want to talk about the issue. i can't speak to the harvey weinstein story, i have never worked with him and i don't have anything to say about that. it is an interesting time in the world, i think, for women. there is a
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consciousness in the world that is higher than it's ever been. and then there is a lack of consciousness in there is a lack of consciousness in the world and the lack of ethics in the world and the lack of ethics in the world and the lack of ethics in the world that is higher than it has ever been. it happens everywhere. like, white, small, thin, mail. the sexual abuse and sexual harassment in the workplace is very widespread —— black. it is certainly not exclusive to our industry. i will speak to how incredibly good it feels to hear women's voices, lots of women's voices, from every part of the industry. just all of the narratives that have come out, different narratives, that aren't just about the salacious details of a pig in a hotel room, you know? that are about what it is to be a woman in the workplace. what it is to carry around a foundation of shame with you, from the time that you were born. what it is to not want to be sexualised every single time you walk out in the street. you know, this is... feminism wasn't
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just invented yesterday, or three minutes ago. i mean, women's issues are something that has been important and that is important and has been a part of our lifetime, and suddenly there are people who are actually wanting to talk about it. jodie foster reflecting on events in hollywood, but interesting to think about things on a wider scheme, as well. it is worth saying that she is directing part of the black mirror tv series. we will hear more of that interview in december, when we will hear more from her. she was thoughtful about how women's voices are being heard more, and she is thinking that is a good thing. are being heard more, and she is thinking that is a good thingm are being heard more, and she is thinking that is a good thing. it is interesting to hear her point of view. we will have a wider discussion as well. we are joined now by employment lawyer and hr consultant emma renkey, and occupational psychologist shelly rubinstein.
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thank you forjoining us. first of all, we are talking about obviously what has been talked about in westminster and hollywood, but very interesting hearing from jodie foster about women's voices. what do you make of what she said, first of all? well, i think it is about taking the power back, because often sexual harassment is about power and control of men over women. what about you, as well? i think it is really important that an open culture is created. i think workplaces can do a lot to create an environment where employees feel like they can talk about these issues. what is your experience in the workplace? does the recourse to employment law... i guess for many people it is one place that you don't want to be, neither the company nor the victim wants to be in that situation, but sometimes it is necessary. possibly the backdrop to someone feeling like they could do something in advance of getting
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to that stage? i think that it is really disappointing when these issues do end up in an employment tribunal. obviously legislation needs that, the teeth behind it. but there is a lot that hr and organisations can do to prevent these types of matters reaching that level. because presumably you must have seen so many cases where it is not a one—off incident. if things get to that scale, you look at the track record and behaviour pattern that gets to that point, and could have addressed, possibly not stopped but addressed. definitely, and it is about creating an environment where employees feel they can raise those concerns employees feel they can raise those concerns and also line managers and individuals in the business know—how to look out for these kinds of issues and tackle them at first instance. and i know you work specifically with companies, don't you, and how to deal with culture. lets talk about the impact on victims. and they can be mail or
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female, obviously. how does it affect them in the workplace? so physically they can be feelings of nausea and a whole range of headaches, insomnia, and are also the emotional impact. people can lose confidence, and self—esteem. there is increased anxiety. that means people are concentrating less on their work and more on the issue. it also leads to people talking about it and losing confidence in the company, so it has a broader impact. and how important is it that if someone has something which has made them uncomfortable, for example, is able to report it? that is one of the things we do, we go into organisations. and i agree with emma that it is about creating that culture and having the policies and guidelines. one of the things we know from westminster is that having an independent place to go, because sometimes it is your line manager who is doing the harassing, so having an independent approach and creating a culture of treating every employee, male or female, creating a culture of treating every employee, male orfemale, with respect, is at the heart of it.
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patterns of inappropriate behaviour can almost inadvertently be endorsed by people around, can't they? so if the culture is one that allows certain language, or certain physical... it can literally be a matter of people behaving physically. that can legitimise some one's behaviour. it can, and that links back to the culture. we have heard in the past people talking about laddish culture, and what is acceptable. it comes down to policies and training people in how to behave, that that is acceptable. people think it is humourless and feminist, all that sort of stuff. actually, it isn't. it is about human decency, and ensuring people don't feel they are being controlled by others in an inappropriate way. and we need to talk in some ways about grey areas. is there a clear line, and whereas that line?” about grey areas. is there a clear line, and whereas that line? i agree with shelley that training is key,
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so that individuals understand what constitutes sexual harassment. because i think they can be issues with that. i don't think there is a full on grey area. i think if we ta ke full on grey area. i think if we take a zero tolerance approach, then thatis take a zero tolerance approach, then that is the best way to prevent these types of issues arising and getting out of hand. see, this is where it gets difficult. zero tolerance is one of those phrases, you can save you, does that mean anything in legal terms? and in practical terms, in the workplace, what does zero tolerance mean? zero tolerance of what? well, when we talk about legal terms, what the law saysis talk about legal terms, what the law says is that when we are talking about sexual harassment, it is not just the purpose but the effect that has on the victim. so that is a subjective tests. so where we are preventing all kinds of these behaviours, taking a zero tolerance approach, then we are going to be complying with the law. just ticking up complying with the law. just ticking up on that thought about zero tolerance, is that what it needs to be? i think so, tolerance, is that what it needs to be? ithink so, because it tolerance, is that what it needs to be? i think so, because it starts
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with one thing and it leads to another. i think it goes back to education in schools, about teaching each other respect. but in the workplace, if we are saying what are the values of the organisation and our people doing that? then zero tolerance is about everything. it is not about not having any humour, it is about what is appropriate and understanding. do you think we are ina understanding. do you think we are in a position now, because we had sir michael fallon talking about a culture ten or 15 years ago, that is what he referred to, do you think we are ina what he referred to, do you think we are in a stage where we are going through a major cultural shift?” think so, i think it is a generational issue. older people might have thought it was acceptable then, but what we know is there are fewer young people in the workforce, and they do not want to work in places that have culture is the this. and with the way that we will have fewer young people available, we need to attract people, and that means we have to stamp this out. and zero tolerance has a crucial part of that. thank you very much for your time. we will be talking to iain duncan
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smith later here on reckless. time now to take a look at the weather. good morning. this morning there was quite a bit of fog around. if you are travelling first thing bear that in mind. especially so across parts of southern england. will take its time to clear in for some will not clear or until ten or 11. for others of us it is a chilly start to the day and we also have sunshine in the forecast today. where we do not have sunshine is where we have this weather front. it is a weak affair moving southwards and is well as having a lot of cloud around it also has some spots of light rain and some drizzle. it is the fog that we are keeping an eye on this morning across parts of southern england. south—west, heading down through gloucestershire, hampshire, berkshire and some of the southern counties generally. it is dancing parts so take extra care if you travel. it will lift through the morning. then you can see where we have all this cloud from the weather
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front. that reduces spots of rain, a publisher of a likely across eastern england but brightening up across the north of england and scotland. the shell as we currently have continue to fade. where we have had clear skies by noted as a cold start of the day. in northern ireland, the north will brighten up first of all in the south will hang on to cloud. across wales we also have the tail end of a weather front producing thick cloud and spots of rain. as we go through the day, the weather fronts flights to the south kept taking rain with it, lifting the fog. the south brightens up nicely with the difference today will be scotla nd with the difference today will be scotland and northern england and northern ireland. much brighter than yesterday with contract it you will also feel cooler as well. the top temperature is between seven and ten. as we head south, it reaches from seven until 15. overnight tonight the weather front meanders northward again taking its cloud with a. once again we will see some
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fog forming across dorset in through hampshire and perhaps devon. also a cold start to the day in aberdeen shire. temperature dropping to three. and note that, you would noted if you step out early on. a weather front coming into the north—west introducing rain, blustery wind around it. for the rest of the uk you will be a bright day with sunny spells coming through as well. later on in the day, another batch of rain will come from the south—west. overnight, that batch of rain willjoin forces with the one coming south. on saturday morning it will be quite a wet start in the south—eastern quarter of the uk. that will slowly move away into the near continent through the day behind in its wake. quite unsettled for the next few days. thank you very much, carol. thank you. were cut back on now. july 2007, that date is significant, just before the financial crash and the
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bank of england last increased interest rates. ten years ago. shone, will you tell us if they raise them today? do you now? now. i do not know for certain. but it is a big one. ten years ago... that is how long it has been since a rise in interest rates. much has changed since then. the vote today will be widely watched. by savers and by borrowers because lots of experts think there could be a rate rise. that luck to you can see that was the last time rates were arrived. not long after that, the financial crisis hit and that was when rates we re crisis hit and that was when rates were cut to help support the economy. at that point they hit 0.5% in march 2009. from there, this is the bit we are familiar with. a long straight line until august of last year where
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rates stayed at 0.5% untiljust after the vote to leave the eu and they were cut again to 0.25%. that was to protect from major shocks. since then it has stayed at that level but the governor of the bank has hinted that things may now be changing. in order to keep inflation or returned inflation to that 2% target in a sustainable manner they may need to be an adjustment in interest rates in coming months. we will take that decision based on data but the possibility has definitely increased. i remember so well ten years ago because i was on the news channel and every month we would wait and they did not change. how about, for example, people with a large mortgage. could be harmfulfor them? it depends how much —— many interest rate rises there are. we're talking potentially about one rise today and may not even happen today. the bank says it wants it starts to raise
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rates it will be gradual and slow. so if, the statistics that have been done, the bank of england says that most new home owners are on a fixed rate deal to do whatever happened at lunchtime today, nothing will change for a fixed rate deal. if you are on a variable, a tracker mortgage, two fifths of home owners are on those. this will make you see a rise. and we used to say —— think that was normal. but three very long period now, since march 2009, there has been no change in rate. it mayjust been no change in rate. it mayjust bea been no change in rate. it mayjust be a little step up. not much of a different today but it depends on what the bank of england will do over the long one. that is an important point. many people think that it will go up 1%, automatically. the margins are going to be very slight and that has been go ahead —— declared policy already. that is true whatever they do when they do. it may not be today. experts think it may be but it might
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not. there are nine on the committee and you need a majority voting in a certain direction for it to happen. we have lots of questions. peter on twitter wants to know what impact on unemployment? we have heard from business lobby groups. the chamber of commerce were saying recently they are concerned about the bank of england looking at raising rates. they do not think the economy are strong enough to do that. many people don't think the economy is strong enough rate rise. but... that could have a knock—on effect on businesses. as they have loans could raise costs for them and it could to cost u p raise costs for them and it could to cost up for consumers in general. might it infect consumer confidence a little bit if people's mortgages go a little bit if people's mortgages 9° up a little bit if people's mortgages go up and that could have an effect. that is not straightforward. the bank of england will need to take into account. are not sure mentioned this already but this could be the first time they have ever known a rate rise. if you have gotten a
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mortgage within the last decade, this could be the first time this has happened to you. this is another argument. many people say the bank of england should have raised rates awhile ago, to get people in the mindset that rates can rise. many people, loads, if you have purchased in the last ten years, they would be used to that long straight line we on the grass. it can be a philosophically mental thing as well, not just about philosophically mental thing as well, notjust about can we survive. we will find out at lunchtime today. thank you very much. it has survived the thousands of years but conservationists say that hadrian ‘s wall could now be at risk of permanent damage or even collapse u nless permanent damage or even collapse unless urgent action is taken to preserve it. the national trust says increased visitor numbers and erosion from weather takes its toll. holly hamilton is alongside the wall is this morning. what a beautiful morning you have! how is it up? there are worse places i could be on a thursday morning. look at that
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view. you can really understand why tens of thousands of people flocked to this point every single year. hadrian ‘s wall, the northern most pa rt hadrian ‘s wall, the northern most part of the roman empire in britain. look at that. at a stunning. looks nearly 2000 years ago and its primary role was as defence, to keep out the barbarians. but, hadrian, do not worry about the bavarians, it it is the tourist. they are beginning to ta ke is the tourist. they are beginning to take their toll. the national trust owns just six miles of the wall and says it is beginning to wear away and expose the foundations. they have had to act, bring in helicopters and 35 ton of rock to try and rebuild. let's be to some of the people who can tell me more about the wall and what is being done. tony, you are from northumberland national park authority. visitors come here in the tens of thousands each year. you have seen a rise. yes. there has beena have seen a rise. yes. there has
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been a modest rise of the last few years which is a good news story, really. we have had about 3% increase in tourism across the county. we see about a million visitors a week here. that is incredible. and as you said it is a good news story and we do want to see more people visiting. at the same time, however, if it is doing damage, what can be done to prevent that? the very thing that the national trust are doing in bringing stone in and putting a path, this is historic damage. the damage has been there for 20 years. nowadays we know a little more. we have a national trail which the national park authority maintains an behalf of a wider partnership. coast—to—coast along the wall and we produce a sustainable service that people can walk along. we should not deter people from coming. they can come here. if they stick to the path and then follow the signs we can avoid damage to what is a really important monuments because heritage is worth {16.4 billion to the national economy each year. and we do need to invest if we want to ensure that
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that heritage can continue to produce that value for the nation. speaking out to john produce that value for the nation. speaking out tojohn with the world heritage and you look after a number of sites. ‘s wall is your primary focus. who are technically, is in charge of the wall? i got the pleasure of working with all the partners who work along the wall. they are dedicated bunch of style and an army of volunteers that operate all throughout the year helping the tens of thousands of visitors to get the maximum enjoyment. are 31 world heritage sites in the uk, just over 1000 across the world and they are important to the whole of humanity. they are places to come and visit, to come and experience. look behind us right now, this isjust the place to be. it is incredible. the fact that you have had to take action. we have seen pictures of the helicopter coming in, bringing in 35 ton of stone just to restore it. coming in, bringing in 35 ton of stonejust to restore it. it is incredible. it is a 2000 —year—old monument that is a living, working,
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brooding landscape that operates... a whole site is well over 100 miles long from coast—to—coast. is part of the community. it needs tlc. we work on it all year round on various parts. just keeping on top of things. we keep a nice focus, find out what is happening and then do what is needed. but perfectly happy. you are doing an incrediblejob. the only thing i can think of one of wry look at it is game of thrones. it is like something game of france. that did inspire the original books. is one of the minders of the wall, you havejohn one of the minders of the wall, you have john scott... one of the minders of the wall, you havejohn scott... you might as well bejohn snow. havejohn scott... you might as well be john snow. i havejohn scott... you might as well bejohn snow. i am joined by the king of the north. back to you. about does look dramatic there. thank you very much indeed. hopefully we will back in the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. urgent work is needed to renovate the houses of parliament according to officials.
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and bbc london has gained access to the house of commons and the house of lords to film the state of the building and the work that needs to be done. one option being considered by mps and peers is to move out of the building completely while the work is done. i think there is a danger that if you move out of the palace, many of our traditions — which are there to support democracy, they are there notjust because people like tradition. they actually keep us going as the mother of parliaments, the oldest functioning democracy in a major country in europe. once we are out who knows what will happen. we may return to a completely different scenario. and you can see more on that story in a special programme tonight, when we'll be broadcasting live from the houses of parliament at 6.30. the royal british legion will launch its london poppy appeal today — and is hoping to start the campaign by raising £1 million
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on the first day in what's hoped will be the largest one—day street collection of its kind. while the poppy is often associated with the first and second world wars, the 2017 campaign is calling on the public to build on those perceptions and wear the flower in support of those in our armed forces, both past and present. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in new southgate, the a406 north circular is down to one lane westbound at bounds green rd for emergency water work near the garage. heading through wapping, westbound traffic on the highway is building from the limehouse link towards tower hill. bea40 be a 40 is also blocked london bound because of a car fire with delays back through headington. it is a chilly start to the day with temperatures for many areas dropping back down to low single figures this morning. a few patches of mist and fog out there as well
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but it is not widespread. you need to watch out for it on the roads. a dry day and there will be cloud around as well. the cloud has thickened through the morning towards northern home counties. you may come across a few spots of rain here and there. most of us are dry and the best of any brightness will be towards southern home counties. we will see a light breeze and top temperatures around the average for this time of year, 12 or 13 celsius. through this evening and overnight again we will not rule out the possibility of a few patches of mist and fog but for most of us there is plenty of cloud around and starting the day with a milder note than this morning of seven or eight celsius. tomorrow should be another dry day. the best of the brightness through the morning and it will turn wet on friday night as this band of rain pushes up from the south merging with one from the north—west. there will be plenty of rain around notjust on friday night but for much of the day on saturday. heavy outbreaks at times. damp ground for any fireworks displays on saturday night. by the time you get to the evening it should be dry and clear. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. the sexual harrassment scandal at westminster — defence secretary michael fallon resigns amid allegations of inappropriate behaviour. he says his conduct had fallen short of the standards now expected and that it's right to step down. the culture has changed over the yea rs. the culture has changed over the years. what might have been a cce pta ble years. what might have been acceptable 15 or ten years ago is clearly not acceptable now. acceptable 15 or ten years ago is clearly not acceptable nowm acceptable 15 or ten years ago is clearly not acceptable now. it is thought fresh claims about his behaviour had been raised in the last 24 hours. we live in westminster all morning with the latest. good morning, it's thursday 2nd november. also this morning...
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police investigating the manchester arena bombing — in which 22 people died — call for the brother of the suicide bomber who carried out the attack to be extradited from libya. good morning. could today be the day we see our first rise in interest rates for a decade? i'll have more on why many experts think they will be increasing a little later... five—year—old maisie was left with severe burns after an accident with a firework — now her family is warning of the dangers of amateur displays. when i was putting it down, it exploded. some went on my hand. in sport, spurs are sensational. in an incredible night at wembley, they beat spanish giants real madrid to make it through to the knock—out stages of the champions league. our live cameras over hadrian ‘s wall this morning, showing a rather
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dramatic image. blue skies and cloud as well. carroll, what is the picture for the rest of the uk? a chilly start to the day for many of us but there is quite a bit of sunshine. some fog affects the southern counties that will be slow to clear and a band of cloud across the centre of the uk producing the odd spot of light rain. more details in15 odd spot of light rain. more details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. the defence secretary sir michael fallon has resigned following accusations of inappropropriate sexual behaviour. he said his conduct had fallen short of the high standards expected — he is the first politician to quit following wider claims of sexual harrassment at westminster. the prime minister must now appoint a new defence secretary. our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. sir michael fallon had a reputation as a reliable figure in government. the long—serving mp had several ministerialjobs, before becoming defence secretary three years ago. but last night he resigned, saying, at times in the past, his conduct had fallen short.
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i have behaved in the past, clearly, in a way that has occasionally been below the standards that we require of the armed forces. and i don't think it's right for me to go on as defence secretary, expecting the very highest standards of our servicemen and women, and fail to meet them myself. sir michael had been caught up in the claims of inappropriate behaviour currently sweeping westminster. the only public allegation was that, 15 years ago, he had repeatedly touched the knee of a journalist, who dismissed it as mildly amusing. for some, his decision to go showed there was strong leadership in government. theresa may has clearly laid the law down, both to the party, to parliament, and also more particularly to her cabinet, and said, these are the standards that i simply will not accept. if you fall below them, with regards to this use of power to extract from people sexual favours, or whatever, that is intolerable and i won't stand for it.
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but, for now, theresa may has a spare space around her top table. she has lost a key ally and must work out how to replace him, in a cabinet that was already delicately balanced. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. let's get the latest now from our political correspondent iain watson. so, this is a very significant moment, isn't it? sir michael fallon resigning. but the news came as a surprise to many people, not least julia hartley—brewer, the journalist first raise the issue of what happened? i spoke to people at westminster and it was assumed the incident was put to bed, as it were, butjulia hartley incident was put to bed, as it were, but julia hartley brewer spoke incident was put to bed, as it were, butjulia hartley brewer spoke to the bbc last night and regretted any pa rt the bbc last night and regretted any part that she played in michael fallon's downfall. i would be worried if mine the brought down a cabinet minister, i think it is
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being referred to as knee—gate. it's absurd if he's lost hisjob for touching a woman on her knee 15 years ago. it didn't really bother me, it doesn't bother me now. things have got completely out of hand. an interesting choice of words, things have got "completely out of hand" she says, and a former minister i spoke to suggested there was hysteria around westminster at the moment. michael fallon went, as we understand it, not simply because of the incident but because he could not guarantee that other similar insta nce not guarantee that other similar instance wouldn't eventually emerge. but for other ministers, if this sets the bar for future behaviour and how it is interpreted, others who have done something flotations in the past could now be regarded as com pletely in the past could now be regarded as completely unacceptable. —— flirtatious. now, the prime minister has to replace michael fallon, find a new defence secretary but she
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doesn't want a big reshuffle ahead of the budget this month. it's more likely she will look for a minister biddy cabinet level with direct x —— for a minister beneath the cabinet level with direct experience in the armed forces. we'll be talking to the former conservative party leader iain duncan smith about how damaging these allegations are for theresa may. the brother of the manchester arena bomber faces arrest in the uk after prosecutors asked for him to be extradited from libya. hashem abedi is currently being detained by the authorities in tripoli in connection to the attack which killed 22 people and injured 512 others. our reporter clare fallon is at the greater manchester police headquarters for us. good morning. we have more information about this man and the number of people hurt and injured in this actual incident? that's right, you certainly get a sense from police here that they consider this to bea police here that they consider this to be a significant development
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within their investigation. the arrest warrant that has been issued, and the request for the extradition of hashem abedi comes after the crown prosecution service here assessed the evidence. the arrest warrant that has been issued is on the basis that salman abedi's younger brother is wanted on suspicion of murder, attempted murder and conspiracy to cause an explosion. we are now almost six months on from the bomb attack at manchester arena where 22 people we re manchester arena where 22 people were killed. children among the victims. police have told us that there are still two people in hospital being treated for their injuries. they've also told us that in all more than 500 people were injured, including people physically injured, including people physically injured in the bombing but also people who police say have suffered severe and long—term psychological and mental trauma. as a result of what happened. as for this extradition request, i do not think we should expect that this will be
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simple or straightforward. bearing in mind the difficult situation in libya at the moment. but, police say that the authorities and libya are engaging with them. they say that they are grateful to the authorities in libya for considering this extradition request and clearly detectives are hoping that by going through this process, it will result in hashem abedi being brought to the uk so that he can stand trial here. claire, thank you. a man accused of causing the deaths of eight people in new york by mowing them down in a truck has been charged with terrorism offences. sayfullo saipov who's a 29—year—old from uzbekistan, is said to have been inspired by the islamic state group. he was shot and injured by police at the scene of the attack. saipov allegedly admitted that he was inspired to commit the attack by the isis videos he watched, and had been planning this attack for two months. there's been a sharp decline in the number of nurses and midwives from the european union wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says there was almost a 90 per cent
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drop in new registrations for eu nurses comparing this year to last year. the department for health says a rise in training places will compensate for the fall. there is an absolute lack of clarity for colleagues of ours who are giving so much to our nhs, working in nursing homes and working with families, that they welcome that they will be able to stay. of course, there is a shortage of nurses across the world. they have a choice and with that level of uncertainty they see that our nurses are leaving us to work elsewhere. interest rates could be about to rise for the first time in ten years. it is expected the bank of england will confirm the move later today. economists say it would mean the cost of some mortgages would go up but savers should see better returns on their money. the bank of england said any rise would be modest. dustin hoffman has been accused of sexually harassing an intern on the set of one of his films in 1985. the writer anna graham—hunter says
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the oscar—winning actor groped her and made inappropriate comments to her when she was 17 years old. hoffman has apologised and said he was sorry if he put her in an uncomfortable situation, adding, "it is not reflective of who i am." children from blackburn are four times more likely to have fillings than their counterparts in south gloucestershire, according to a new report on dental health. it found that as well as there being the north—south regional divide, there was a consistent gap between the dental health of the rich and poor in england. people from the most deprived backgrounds were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital for dental work. theresa may started the week vowing to crack down on the sex scandal gripping westminster, this morning she has lost one of her key allies after sir michael fallon admitted his behaviour in the past had "fallen short". so was he right to go,
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and how could his departure impact on the prime minister's position? we'll be asking the conservative party's former leader iain duncan smith injust a minute, but first let's hear what sir michael told our political editor laura kuenssberg. were you worried that more was to come out? well, the culture has changed over the years. what might have been acceptable 15, ten years ago is clearly not acceptable. parliament now has to look at itself and the prime minister has made very clear that conduct needs to be improved and we need to protect the staff of westminster against any particular allegations of harassment. do you feel that you yourself have done anything wrong?” have behaved, in the past, clearly, ina way have behaved, in the past, clearly, in a way that has occasionally been below the standards that we require of the armed forces. i do not think it is right for me to go on as defence secretary, expecting the very highest standards of our
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servicemen and women and failing to meet them myself. do you feel you should apologise for what has happened? i think we've all got to look back at the past. there are a lwa ys look back at the past. there are always things that you regret or would have done differently. iain duncan smithjoins us now. thank you forjoining us. as he made the right decision, in your view? obviously only he can make that judgment. we do not know all of the details as to why he did it, and sorry to see him go, i've served with him in cabinet and sorry to see him go, i've served with him in cabinetand i sorry to see him go, i've served with him in cabinet and i think he was a strong member of the cabinet but i think what is key behind all of this and the decision was how the prime minister has approached this from the beginning. she made it clear not just within from the beginning. she made it clear notjust within the party but within the cabinet that the standards that she sets must be met and if there are any questions about meeting those standards, regarding the use of their power, then they showed themselves consider their position. if they do not later on, she will be forced to deal with
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them. she has said she will speak to them. she has said she will speak to the other parties. i know that today we are talking about a cabinet minister but all politicians and politics in general has to re—examine itself about the use of power and there's a chance in the labour party of a cover—up. everyone has to deal with this and every institution, the bbc, light entertainment and any organisation you opened up, i suspect you will start to find what took place over the last few years is not acceptable but it did take place. our other people considering their positions? that i cannot say, but i am told categorically that she was, how can i put it, very clear when she spoke to the cabinet about what she plans to the cabinet about what she plans to do and what she wants to do, and i think that parity leaves the various members of the cabinet and the party to recognise whatever limitations there were about their
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behaviour in the past and decide whether or not they met those standards. clearly sir michael fallon thought that was not the case. he therefore took the decision to resign but the key element isn't so much on his decision but it is the reason for that decision and the reason why theresa may has made it very clear, i know she feels very strongly about this, that we have two lead in parliament on this so that others themselves recognise that others themselves recognise that they have to get their own houses in order. can i ask, there has to be higher standards as a cabinet minister, because he is staying on as an mp? you would have to speak to michael fallon about that. the standards she is talking about immediately with regards to a cabinet are enforceable by her and in the code. parliament is to make a final decision about where it goes and what it tolerates and what it does not tolerate. she has said she will lead on that but she is meeting
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with other leaders of the parties to discuss with the speaker exactly how they set the standards in place and most importantly how people have redress if these events have taken place. yes, there are sexual issues and some charges that are not as powerful as other charges but the key element is about an abuse of power and that's the point to dwell on. in any organisation where people use power to coerce people to do things they would not normally do, thatis things they would not normally do, that is offensive behaviour and that is what this is really all about, which is to say even if that was quasi tolerated in the past, it will not be from that point on. you were leader of the party as well, you have been in politics for years, over the years have people reported or complain to you? i have never had any direct reports
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to me. if you talk to your journalist friends, people are all mentioned things, but i have never had a direct discharge about a specific incident that needed to be reported. the reality is people have been vaguely aware that there are things taking place. i ask you to make this clear to members of the public, the vast majority of people came here for a reason, they want to improve the quality of life for people in this country and the country is by and large well served by this. obviously one or two people have done things they should not have done things they should not have done things they should not have done and that is the key element of this. people who come to work here, young or old, it makes no difference, must not fail at some point that beyond their brief, beyond the job they are doing, they may be required to do things
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they may be required to do things they would not normally do unless they would not normally do unless they consented to that for various other reasons. that is the whole point, it is about the abuse of power we need to tidy up on. there have been claims theresa may was warned, the whips may have been using information to influence the way people voted and people have said that on this programme. have you seen that happen? there is no question that the whips listen to what is being said, they note down everything they hear about what people say about other people. but like any other organisation if people say that something untoward has happened and an offence is committed, the whips are under the same rules as everybody else and they must report that and ensure that something is done. the idea in the past that people may have covered up stuff, in the recent past ido covered up stuff, in the recent past i do not believe that will have happened. the whips' officers have changed out of all recognition and they are far less likely to say to somebody, if you do this, we will not talk about that. i do not believe it goes on any more. you
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said less likely. you said you heard things that were said to people and journalists, but you did not want to pursue that? the point is it is all hearsay. if somebody had reported that link to me directly about something, i would that link to me directly about something, iwould have that link to me directly about something, i would have taken it further. that is what most people would have done. you just hear these things in passing. you can ask the same question of many of the journalists who report on parliament in westminster. also in light entertainment. i was on another tv programme today and the make—up artist turned to me and said many yea rs artist turned to me and said many years ago i was assaulted by famous names and it was considered something that happened and i was told not to make a fuss about it. this is going on in lots of institutions, it is notjust about parliament. it needs to be put straight. what is going on in parliament today, open up the doors
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of the bbc and the independent television, go into business and institutions, this is not a thing to do with parliament, it is about a culture and it is ironically but time to call time on a culture that turns a blind eye. iain duncan smith, thank you very much. iain duncan smith, thank you very much. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: our cameras this morning are having a glimpse over hadrian ‘s wall. it is dramatic as the skies often are in that part of the world. it looks beautiful. you can see why people want to go on to walk there and the walking is damaging the wall. we will be back there later on and hollywood explain what is happening. with that image in mind, tell us what the weather is like, carol. you can see from my pictures it is not like that everywhere, there is
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dense fog in salary and in southern counties generally. it will slowly lift as we go through the morning. we have got a weather front coming south and under that it is not as cold start to the day as it is in many other parts of the day. in blackpool it is nine and in birmingham it is nine, but behind that it birmingham it is nine, but behind thatitis birmingham it is nine, but behind that it is cold. by ten o'clock this morning we will see that fog lift from devon, gloucestershire, dorset and hampshire and across southern counties. some of it will clear by 11, most of it by ten. a weather front across the central swathe of the country producing spots of light rain, but brightening up in northern england and scotland. we have had quite a few showers in the north and east this morning, but they will fade. it will feel cooler than it
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did yesterday. in northern ireland it will brighten up from the north. at this stage in the day across wales there is still a weather front and it is still cloudy with the odd spot of rain likely. through the day this weather front moves southwards and when the fog lifts we will see sunny spells in southern england. a different day compared to yesterday in northern england, scotland and northern ireland. temperatures still in double figures as we can't further south, but single figures in the north. this evening and overnight the weather front drifts further north. fog will reform across dorset and hampshire, devon as well tonight. we have got a band of rain starting to show its hand in north—west scotland. that will slowly sink southwards with the strengthening wind around it, but for many of us tomorrow it will be a
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quiet day. we may see the odd shower, but for most of us it is bright and sunny spells. later on a system bright and sunny spells. later on a syste m co m es bright and sunny spells. later on a system comes up from the south—west and joins forces with one from the south. on saturday it is a wet start, and then for sunday again it isa dry start, and then for sunday again it is a dry start for many, chile with showers, but a ridge of high pressure builds in through the day and many will lose the showers later on in the afternoon. it is that time of year when hundreds of thousands of families look forward to setting off fireworks on bonfire night. even though hundreds enjoy the fireworks relatively safely, every year some people suffer injuries. this is what maisie and her mother told us about what happened. it got stuck in her
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scarf before it exploded and her scarf before it exploded and her scarf caught on fire. when i was pulling it off it exploded and some burn went on my hand. you burn your hand trying to pull it off. maisie was taken to a specialist unit in bristol where she had several operations, including skin grafts to her leg. her mother shows me a video made by a relative that has been viewed online by the third of a million people. guy keen, seniorfire officer at merseyside fire and rescue service joins us now. you can see how devastating that was for maisie and her family. you can see how devastating that was for maisie and herfamily. it you can see how devastating that was for maisie and her family. it was a family event that went wrong. what is your message to people who are thinking about having that? that is what people want to do. we are concerned about the number of
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injuries and the way they have gone up injuries and the way they have gone up in the last four years in particular. we have seen some riders particularly with children, injuries have gone up by a third. it is important we get safety messages out. we encourage people to go to professional displays where the risks are lower. we appreciate there are not as many displays on these days and we want to make sure that people run their fireworks displays as safely as they can in their back gardens. they had gone to make some effo rts gardens. they had gone to make some efforts to make it safe in maisie's case. the fireworks come in nice packages and everything appears safe, but we have seen horrendous injuries, burns in particular. we wa nt to injuries, burns in particular. we want to avoid that by giving three key safety messages. one around fireworks, one around bonfires and one around burns. go on. we start
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with fireworks, make sure you are buying british standard fireworks, save fireworks. it has a number 7114 on the box. you will be buying from licensed retailers, responsible retailers. we are aware you get people buying out the back of a van and these fireworks quite often are not safe. we make a strong emphasis on going to a retailer from licensed premises. you are talking about the burns issues, does that mean people are too close to fireworks? they used to be safety films, i do not know if they still run now, for example about a rocket and being a certain distance from it. if that is the principal danger? if they are too close and not minding the fireworks safety lay, as we saw with
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maisie, the fireworks shot off in the wrong direction and u nfortu nately the wrong direction and unfortunately caused that horrendous injury, so that is what we avoid now. if you look on the cbbc website you have got the fireworks code. take your time you have got the fireworks code. take yourtime and you have got the fireworks code. take your time and read it and take measures to have a safe space. and you have got advice about burns. measures to have a safe space. and you have got advice about burnsm you have got advice about burnsm you have got somebody who has been burnt and clothing is burning, stop, drop them and roll them and if you have a bucket of water and douse the burn injury, 20 minutes with cold water and seek medical advice. we will make sure we have got it on our website as well. time to get the news good morning. it's a faulty start of
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the day across southern areas of england, a chill in the airfor many of us but for most of the uk today is going to be a dry day, with lengthy spells of sunshine. in the south, its continuing to clear. sunny spells, particularly in south—west england but you will notice this area of cloud in central areas. further north, in scotland and northern ireland and northern england, we have sunshine and will end the day with some sunshine as
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well. temperatures today getting up to about 10—13d. through the evening and night, we still have that crowd in central areas. clear spells either side. more in the wake of rain moving into the far north—west of scotland. temperatures down 6— 9 degrees in the countryside. there could be a couple of fog patches and some cloud, particularly in central areas. some breaks in the cloud in southern england. a bit towards the far north—west and temperatures 10-14. as far north—west and temperatures 10—14. as we go into the weekend, these two weather systems converge together. quite a bit of rain into the early hours of saturday morning in central areas. these weather systems heralding in colder air coming in from the north—west. as we go through saturday and more so into sunday. this is how saturday is lacking. early morning rain, clearing to the south—east, it could
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ta ke clearing to the south—east, it could take all day before it clears from the south and east, but a mix of sunny spells and showers, getting colder here. temperatures of eight or9 colder here. temperatures of eight or 9 degrees, which extends to all parts on sunday. mostly dry though, a chilly north—westerly wind, and maximum temperatures of 8—11d. more details available on the website. maximum temperatures of 8—11d. more details a\ from e on the website. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and sally bundock.
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more cash — and more controversy. facebook‘s profits rise again despite growing concerns over it's role in last year's us election. the social network made more than $4.5bn injust three months but says its going to spend more on security and policing the service. also in the programme.... it could be a boost for global trade — china cuts import tariffs on consumer products just days before the us president arrives to talk business.

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