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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 2, 2017 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: small change — but a historic moment — as the bank of england raises interest rates for the first time in 10 years. with unemployment at a 42 year low, inflation running above target and growth just above new lower speed limit, the time is come to ease our foot a little off the accelerator. theresa may replaces defence secretary sir michael fallon with one of her most trusted aids gavin williamson — but who is he? do you meet the highest standards mr williamson, do you meet the highest standards? the eu nurses turning their backs on the uk — with a huge decline in the numbers coming here after the brexit referendum. we've got all the sport. a good night for english football last night. very good indeed, three wins from three. bridger pochettino believes his spurs team should be
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seen amongst the best in europe, we'll discuss their magnificent night in europe and gareth southgate is about to name his england squad forfriendlies is about to name his england squad for friendlies with germany and brazil. and some new faces are included. stav has the weather, it gives a clue as to what's happening this weekend. it's going to turn judy this weekend. some choice in the forecast but sunday night looking dry. i'll be joining you in the studio later for a full weather forecast. fake news — you won't hear it here — but you will see it in the collins dictionary — as their word of the year. this afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. for the first time in 10 years the bank of england has raised its key base interest rate. it's up by a quarter of one per cent to 0.5%. it's not much — but with inflation
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running above target the bank said it was time to act. and there could be further rises on the way — good news for savers, but a prospect that will worry borrowers. here's andy verity. the bank of england may look exactly as it did the last time interest rates rose, but the economy doesn't. in the ten years since the peak year of the housing and credit bubble, the amount we produce and earn has barely grown and that means we are more vulnerable to inflation. there it is, 0.5%... with unemployment at a 42—year low, inflation running above target and growthjust above its new lower speed limit, the time has come to ease our foot a little off the accelerator. margy sullivan and her husband live in streatham in south london. soon after buying their house in 1988 the interest rate on the mortgage hit 15%. when rates dropped in the noughties, she took an advantage to repay more than she had to.
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she is now paying less than 2% and can easily cope with the rate rise. money has been cheap for a long time and i'm very aware it could be going up for a long time. i'm surprised it's taken this long for them to do it. paying off while it is cheaper means i have less to pay off now. after last hitting a peak before the 2008 crisis, interest rates dropped to what was then a record low and stayed there for seven years, only to drop again in the wake of the brexit vote. all they have done is taken back the quarter point cut they made last august after the brexit referendum when they were worried confidence might falter and spending might go down. they have taken their foot off the accelerator in terms of monetary policy but not much more than that. that prolonged period of ultralow interest rates may have helped keep the economy out of worse trouble but it's also have damaging effects, not just on savers.
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if you keep money ultracheap you encourage people to borrow more to buy assets like houses and that has pushed the prices of houses beyond the reach of many young people who would like to be able to afford their own home. while higher interest rates should make it more attractive to hold pounds, traders focused on warnings the next rise would not come soon. about half the country's families now on their own homes and only a minority of them have the mortgage. the bank of england is confident now inflation hit its peak last month and families will be able to cope with higher interest rate. andy verity, bbc news. daniel henry is in central london. simon, the last time interest rates
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went up rhianna was number one. and went up rhianna was number one. and we have the smoking ban introduced july 2007, it gives a picture of where we were as a country. there has been a lot of change since then and today the bank of england, as you say, have risen in the interest rates up to 0.25% from 0.25% to 0.5%. i've got louise cooper with me, personalfinance 0.5%. i've got louise cooper with me, personal finance expert. 0.5%. i've got louise cooper with me, personalfinance expert. what do you make of this? can we not get carried away? this isjust a reversal of the emergency rate cut after the referendum. interest rates are still unbelievably breathtakingly stunningly low. 0.5% interest rate is unbelievably low. during the exchange rate mechanism, that crisis, interest rates cut to 12,13, that crisis, interest rates cut to 12,1114, that crisis, interest rates cut to 12,13,14,15%. that crisis, interest rates cut to 12, 13, 14, 15%. historically that crisis, interest rates cut to 12,13,14,15%. historically an interest rate of 5% has been normal.
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0.5% is incredibly low and fact, as isaid, 0.5% is incredibly low and fact, as i said, reverses the rate cut after the referendum. sounds as though you think there is no chance of this being a trend, no chance of this continuing. the big question is what happens next. are we on this sustained period where interest rates get ratcheted up? unlikely, 0k? when we look at what the markets are saying, they say we won't get to a 1% interest rate until 2020. it will take another three years for interest rates to go up just twice more. it gives you a sense of what the market is thinking. do not freak out, this is very, very, very unlikely to be the start of a sustained period of higher interest rates, that's what mark carney said today, one of the reasons why the poundis today, one of the reasons why the pound is trading slightly lower today. so i guess your final take on
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advice of our viewers, sounds like you suggest there is not much to worry about. depends on your personal circumstances, for 800 grand mortgage, if your bank or building society passes through that whole not .25% rate hike, 100 grand mortgage is an extra 20 quid a month, not a big deal. the fear, if rates were where they were historically, 5%, it would crush many households in this country. it's more a case of... the same advice as usual. shop around, look for a better mortgage rate deal. if uncertain about finances, fix, it gives you certainty. if you have credit cards, pay them off. if you wa nt credit cards, pay them off. if you want to savings, shop around. the slide good news for savers is they are going to get a tiny bit more. but savers, when inflation is over 396 but savers, when inflation is over 3% and the base rate is .5%, for savers it still really brutal. for
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most of them, every year, their money is effectively losing purchasing power, losing money every year. slightly better for savers but very grim forthem. year. slightly better for savers but very grim for them. we've seen the pound has ta ken very grim for them. we've seen the pound has taken a dip. since this announcement. again, are these things we have to consider? soap what happens with sterling is when it's low it boosts inflation, something the bank of england has to control. if you look at all economic forecasts for next year, i've inflation will peak in the next three or six months and start for next year... i'll frozen in crazy into the mix. everybody is expecting the uk economy to continue to grow for the next three years, 0k, because nobody predicts a recession. this recovery already is very old, the fifth year of economic recovery even though for many it doesn't feel
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like it. what happens if we have recession in the next couple of years? not unlikely... there is probability of this. rates are only not .5%. what can mark carney and the bank of england do if we enter recession and rates are already incredibly low? they have no room to move, to cut, that is what we should worry about, not this simple reversal of the rate cut following the referendum. mark carney has said he believes households in the uk are well placed to deal with this interest rate rise. we find out if he's right over the coming months. joining me now is martin weale, professor of economics at kings college london and a member of the bank of england's monetary policy committee from 2010 to 2016. they voted 7—2, does it surprise you? i suppose i would have been more surprised if there had been a unanimous vote because it's not long
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ago that the committee was voting to keep the interest rate unchanged. the question, we had from louise cooper, is what happens next. we got a sense this might not be the last interest rate rise. but we're talking very small amounts in reality. the committee certainly said while i was on it, and said again this time, future increases are likely to be limited and gradual. 0f are likely to be limited and gradual. of course we don't know what the future is going to bring but this is certainly saying, at least as i understand it, it is the committee saying they don't expect interest rates to return to the sort of levels we had before the banking crisis. this has cancelled out the cut after the brexit folk. absolutely right, though you have to remember the cut wasn't the only thing done after the brexit folk. the committee undertook a new round of asset purchases and we're still seeing the stimulus from those. the monetary policy committee is the
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problem of uncertainty over a deal on brexit. i mean this has never happened before, this overshadowing issue of monetary policy. how do they deal with that do you think? the minute say they work on an average of possible outcomes, that i am sure is what they've done. i would make the point even though brexit is a particular form would make the point even though brexit is a particularform of uncertainty, the outlook always seems uncertain. it's quite common for forecasters to say things are particularly uncertain. if you look at the inflation report it chose the famous fan chart, they give a good indication of the uncertainty at the bank sees. they are perhaps wiser than they would be in the absence of brexit but have always shown the committee doesn't make any claims to certainty. wages aren't going up,
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inflation is. families already struggling, this is going to be a ha rd blow struggling, this is going to be a hard blow when £30 a month makes a difference to your budget. obviously some people will be affected by it. to be frank, there would be no point in changing the interest rate if you didn't expect it to have any impact. thejob of the didn't expect it to have any impact. the job of the committee is to set monetary policy so as to deliver the inflation target set by the government subject to supporting government subject to supporting government policies for growth and employment. you don't sense we'll see a regular rise every couple of months at this stage?|j see a regular rise every couple of months at this stage? i really would like to say, the right thing for the committee to do is to set policy as it sees things at the time it makes the decision. you can let us know what you think, tweet us using the hashtag. all of the ways to contact us on one screen hashtag. all of the ways to contact us on one screen right now. the chief whip gavin williamson has
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been appointed defence secretary, following the resignation of sir michael fallon. he stood down last night, saying his conduct had "fallen short" of the required standards, after allegations of inappropriate sexual behaviour. sir michael is the first politician to quit following recent claims of sexual harassment in parliament. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports from westminster. the man on the right is usually responsible for defending theresa may, especially from critics on her own side. now gavin williamson's job is to defend the nation. until this morning he was the chief whip, his task to keep tory mps in line and keep the prime minister in office. do you meet the highest standards, mr williamson? the prime minister's chief whip was swiftly replaced by this man, his deputyjulian smith. theresa may wanted to avoid a wide—ranging reshuffle but the question now is whether the rapid departure of the previous occupant of the ministry of defence might in turn lead to further resignations. i've spoken to people today at westminster who are convinced other stories of sir michael fallon's
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past behavious could emerge and it was his inability to guarantee there would be no further revelations that seems to have ended his career, but are there other ministers who may have done something in the past that will be judged unacceptable today? and what that put them in the firing line? people need to recognise there is now a very strong set of rules about this kind of behaviour, we shouldn't pass it by and say that is a one—off. that has changed. i don't think necessarily you will see lots of ministers resign. the vast majority of people in parliament do not get up to this stuff. the leader of the scottish conservatives sees this as an even more dramatic moment. the dam has broken on this now and these male dominated professions, overwhelmingly male dominated professions, where the boys on locker room culture has prevailed and it has been a bit of a laugh has got to stop. and a former parliamentary whip says changes are needed,
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not just to protect victims of harassment at westminster but also mps who might be wrongly accused. there needs to be an independent body i think established so people can have confidence in the system. justice doesn'tjust have to be done, it needs to be seen to be done and thatjustice includes not only protecting innocent mps but also condemning mps who are guilty. business as usual, that's the image the prime minister wanted to portray when she met her israeli counterpart at lunchtime. the problems may be less dramatic than those in the middle east, but it hasn't made herjob at number ten any easier. iain watson, bbc news. vicki young, chief political correspondent, is in westminster. a mixed reaction to the announcement of this defence secretary, the baby faced assassin, they call him, we know he owned a tarantula. 0utside
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westminster most people say, gavin who? it won't make a big difference to most people watching but what it does is show that reshuffles, even the most narrow, always leave people upset. we have benefited from today by getting promotions. dozens, though, haven't had the call. it makes many of them upset. many doubting gavin williamson has the knowledge. he's never been a minister, never run the department, he's been in a back room role trying to discipline mps. the parliamentary side of things, hasn't run a department, doesn't know anything about defence, some of them openly question whether he's right person for thejob. the fact question whether he's right person for the job. the fact he was chief whip, they are normally much involved in reshuffles. it raised eyebrows with people joking involved in reshuffles. it raised eyebrows with peoplejoking he appointed himself. ispoke eyebrows with peoplejoking he appointed himself. i spoke to one former cabinet minister who with raised eyebrows said it was quite a surprise. that is the reaction
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people are getting, reshuffles rarely solve any problems, this was forced on theresa may. theresa may has defended the appointment, saying mr williamson was not involved in discussions about the reshuffle. saying he had been a hard—working effective chief whip and would make a good defence secretary. the other point is that the role of the whip could never be more important than it is now. there is a minority government,", brexit legislation running into trouble. potentially a sex scandal unfolding. not an easy task for a new chief whip. interesting estimate they has been brought in as deputy chief whip. when you look at the list of those in the whips office, it's very male dominated at the time theresa may says she wants people to come forward with grievances. putting estimate the rate in their is trying to change that atmosphere. is former chief whip he will know where the bodies are buried. 0r true, some
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jokey already has a leadership team in place. i think there was an interesting dynamic in the party. we saw at the conservative party conference. the younger generation feel fed up with the old guard and think it is time to remove some of them to move on to fresh faces, who maybe don't have the baggage, who have fresh ideas. that hasn't happened to a huge extent, gavin williamson hasn't been an mp for very long. some feel he could be a potential future leader of the party. that could be some way off. really the government and theresa may trying to deal with what is going on, preparing themselves for more revelations that might come or might not, no one really knows. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, here are the headlines this afternoon. the bank of england has raised interest rates are the first time in a decade in a bid to curb inflation. gavin
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williamson named as new defence secretary following the resignation of sir michael fallon. a sharp decline in number of nurses and midwives from the european union wanting to work in the uk. in sport, gareth southgate includes three new names to his england squad for the upcoming friendlies with germany and brazil. swansea striker tammy abraham called up afterfive goals so abraham called up afterfive goals so far this season whilst on loan from chelsea. ruben loftus—cheek of crystal palace is in, as is liverpool's joe gomez. crystal palace is in, as is liverpool'sjoe gomez. fixtures announced for the rugby world cup of japan. eddie jones says announced for the rugby world cup of japan. eddiejones says they will have no excuses, beginning with matches against tonga and united states. mark stoneman says their hope —— he hopes there was a way back for ben stokes who's been excluded from the ashes series after his arrest in september. i'll be back with more on those stories just after half past. there's been a sharp decline in the number of nurses from european union countries
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wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says there was a drop of nearly 90 per cent in new registrations for eu nurses, compared to the same period the year before. the department of health says an increase in training places will compensate for the fall. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has the details. around one in every 20 nurses and midwives working in the uk was trained in the eu. many are from spain, portugal, poland and romania. but according to new figures, the numbers are declining. the nurses and midwives' regulator, the nmc, says in the year to september 2016, more than 10,000 joined the uk register. but this year that fell dramatically, to around 1000. and the number of eu nurses already working here who decided to give up their uk registration rose by 67%. it's a worrying trend, and for those who are responsible for thinking about what we need in the future, so the nurses and midwives we need in the future to care for us,
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they'll obviously look at this and think what can we do to reverse that trend. in the aftermath of the referendum a campaign was launched to support eu staff in the nhs, but today's figures suggest that's not been enough reassurance and many eu nurses are no longer keen to work in the uk. there's a shortage of nurses across the world. they've got a choice and with that level of uncertainty what we're seeing is that our nurses are beginning to leave us to work elsewhere and that's really difficult for us here, i think. those who represent nhs hospital trusts and others say nurse recruiters have been concerned about the situation for some time. the vast majority of hospitals are telling us they are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit from overseas. the numbers will come as a concern, but unfortunately not a surprise to them. many of them are still going out to europe and the rest of the world to recruit nurses and doctors from overseas, but it's becoming increasingly challenging at the moment. nurse leaders have described
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the sudden lack of interest from eu nurses in working for the nhs as alarming. it's estimated the nhs is already 40,000 nurses short, but the government has said it's ensuring the nhs has the staff it needs through a 25% increase in nurse training places. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. two soldiers have been charged with negligence, following the death of three servicemen during an sas training course in the brecon beacons. craig roberts, edward maher and james dunsby were taking part in a 16 mile recruitment exercise on the hottest day of 2013. an inquest found that neglect contributed to the deaths. the case will be heard in a military court where the maximum sentence is two years in prison. paul heaney has the details. craig roberts, edward meir and james dunsby were trying to join the sas. a timed 16 mile march on one of the hottest days of the year. in the brecon beacons in the 2013. of
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course it was going to be tough, but neglect by the ministry of defence also played a part in their death. according to an inquest. the army later apologised. we are truly sorry for the mistakes the coroner identified today. we've already made a number of changes to the exercises in terms of the way it is run in terms of our own investigations and those of the health and safety executive. in march last year the health and safety executive said the ministry of defence would have faced prosecution for what happened that day if it didn't have immunity. an independent body called the special prosecution authority initially decided not to pursue charges against individuals involved in the training exercise. that decision was challenged by relatives of the soldiers who died. we've heard from one serving soldier and one who has since left the service, they will
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face charges of negligence. the trial will take place in a military court. the director of special services at the time said they push themselves beyond their ability to endure here, the process of possibly holding individuals to account for what happened that day continues more than four years after their deaths. the chief executive of tesco, dave lewis, has been giving evidence at the trial of three former executives at the supermarket. they're on trial on fraud charges, in connection with an alleged multi—million pound accounting scandal. earlier our business correspondent emma simpson sent us this update from outside southwark crown court. today we have the boss of britain's biggest retailer taking a stand as a witness for the prosecution, coming face—to—face with his three former senior executives on trial for alleged fraud and false accounting. we spent the morning learning about the chronology of events leading up to the moment when dave lewis
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learned about this huge gap or black hole as it has been described in the company's hole as it has been described in the compa ny‘s accounts. dave hole as it has been described in the company's accounts. dave lewis, remember, only started this job three weeks earlier having been parachuted in to try to turn tesco around. things were so bad he volunteered to start earlier than planned. it was an unusual situation, he said. we had about a series of scheduled meetings with the tesco executive committee, which one of the defendants, chris bridge, the former uk md, attended. dave lewis told them to alert him if they had any significant financial or reputational issues for the group. it wasn't until september the 19th when dave lewis learned about the so—called legacy paper, which revealed a £246 million hole, improperly recognised income. dave lewis told the court he was shocked
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and surprised, he'd never experienced anything like this before. what was new, he said, was the proposition here that £246 million of income had been included in the first half of the year. on the basis of this paper it was deemed questionable. it needed to be taken very seriously indeed. the three defendants deny the charges and the trial continues. the dictionary publisher collins has announced its word of the year — see if you can guess what it is. the fake news. fake news. this is fa ke the fake news. fake news. this is fake news. that or they got fake news. you are fake news. bbc that's another beauty. if you hadn't guessed already — the word —or phrase— of the year is ‘fake news'. it's been given a boost by president trump, who has adopted it. collins say use of the term has risen by 365% since 2016. he has adopted it almost on a daily basis. let's look at the weather,
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can't promise sunshine but we can promise fireworks. stav is here. absolutely fireworks, the big weekend is coming up. people will have plans on saturday or sunday night. 0ne have plans on saturday or sunday night. one thing is for sure, it's certainly going to be chilly, a traditional cold wrap—up type of bonfire night. there will be showers probably saturday night across western parts of the uk, so if you have any plans or you are going to make plans, i would wait until sunday, because it looks like be dry for most of us. get those pets indoors. this is going to go on for two weeks. only in your household. what about tomorrow? looking cloudy. today has been lovely, we had flooding in parts of scotland. it's gorgeous now flooding in parts of scotland. it's gorgeous flow across flooding in parts of scotland. it's gorgeous now across the central and the south, lots of sunshine. i've got weather watching pictures. this is angus, unbroken sunshine. today? this morning, yeah, glorious. a bit
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cool but at least there is sunshine and dense fog across the south. this fog is developing into tonight. the satellite picture from early on, for patches across the south are giving way, sunshine in the south, the best across scotland. as we head towards the latter part of the afternoon, fine end today with late sunshine. cloud continuing to hold on across east anglia, parts of the midlands, towards wales. across northern england and scotland, temperatures will start to fall away after a chilly day. with all that sunshine, clear skies means temperatures. to plummet. more clout for the far north—east of scotland, for the northern isles. 0vernight cloud builds up again. looks like it'll turn cloudy. across the board. there will be holes in the cloud. where there are, it'll be quite chilly. for the north—east of scotland and again across the south. we could see
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mist and fog developing and it could be pretty dense again into friday morning. watch out for that again if you are heading out on the roads. elsewhere, pretty cloudy, nowhere near as much sunshine as today. we'll see a change taking place across the north—west of the uk, a sign of things to come. wet here, windy and turning colder. 12—14dc across the south, pretty good for this time of year. we see this area of low pressure, whether france pushing into the start of the week. looks like it'll bring a wet day on saturday. then behind it, this cold air begins to dig in. called north—westerly ‘s will push across the whole country by the time saturday is out. it'll be miserable across england and wales for time on saturday, most should clear out, then sunshine and blustery showers, turning significantly colder than a single figures. showers continue across western areas during saturday
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night, something to bear in mind if you are heading off to bonfire night. on sunday, looks dry. pressure building, so more sunshine around. one ortwo pressure building, so more sunshine around. one or two showers here and there. temperatures going to be in single figures for most places. if you are heading out on sunday night, the 5th of november, you have a better chance of staying dry but it'll be cold, you have to wrap—up. simon. the bank of england has announced it is raising interest rates for the first time in more than ten years. the cost of borrowing increased from a court to half of 1%. with unemployment at a 42 year low, inflation running above target and growth just above its new lower speed limit, the time has come to ease oui’ speed limit, the time has come to ease our fought a little off the accelerator. former chief whip gavin williamson has been appointed as new defence secretary, replacing michael fallon who resigned yesterday. figures show the number of new nurses coming to work in the uk from
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other european nurses has fallen by almost 90% in the past year. sport now, and an historic moment last night for english clubs. yes, fantastic in the champions league. tottenham hotspur manager mauricio pochettino believes his side belong in and amongst the best in europe, after they beat the champions league holders real madrid for the first time in their history. they are the winners of the last three out of four. dele alli scored twice. it is his anniversary today of making his first game as an mk dons substitute. so he has come a very long way indeed, as has the argentina striker sergio aguero. his 178th goal came last night. afterwards his manager called him a legend. big games coming up for england but
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perhaps they will be playing without some big names will stop yes, the likes of wayne rooney have gone. they have called up three uncapped players, they are looking for new blood for their new friendlies against germany and brazil later this month. joe gomez of liverpool is included, as is ruben loftus—cheek from crystal paris and tommy abraham also, who has only made 12 top—flight appearances, but the swansea striker has done enough. there is no place though for daniel sturridge, alex 0xlade—chamberlain all one other player you might have expected. the full squad is available on our website. draws have been made for the rugby union world cup injapan. all the fixtures are on the bbc sport website. eddiejones says his side
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have the perfect draw. they will start with tonga and the united states. it isa it is a great start for us. you have to win the four games anyway, but france and argentina at the end are great for us. we have a real variety in the cities we are playing in, which will be stimulator for the players and great for deep fans. —— for the fans. english golfers florentina parker and georgia hall are in contention at the abu dhabi 0pen. 8—under par, four shots behind south africa's lee—anne pace. hall's impressive round of 67 included six birdies and only one dropped shot. there was reason to celebrate for the people of houston, just months after hurricane harvey devastated the us city. their team, the astros, have won baseball's world series for the first time, beating the la dodgers in the deciding game. astros‘ george springer was named mvp, after he became the first player to hit home runs in four successive world series games, helping them to a 5—1 win on the night.
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mvp is most valuable player. afterwards, the astros dedicated the win to those affected by the recent disaster. 0ur reporter nick marshall mccormack was there. this team's motto means learn history, and that is what they have done to night. they have been out la dodgers' home turf to win their first ever world series. some of them have tears streaming down their faces. since they were kids playing baseball in the backyard, they drew and of getting here. some of the best players in the game never get the chance to play in a world series but these guys have done it. they have achieved history and now they can go and soak it all up. the people of houston have had a tough time and we are so pleased for them now. we have not won in 56
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yea rs. them now. we have not won in 56 years. when we get back it is going to bea years. when we get back it is going to be a great feeling. that is why we wear our patch on ourjerseys, to show that city how much we love them. a roller-coaster of emotions for the players and these guys, too. they brought every moment in these stands while around them was a sea of blue from the la dodgers. now these fans are going back to houston to party with the astros. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's get more now on the mini—reshuffle of the government in the wake of sir michael fallon's resignation. joining us now from westminster is kate mccann, senior political correspondent at the telegraph. gavin williamson, most people out there are saying, who is that? gavin williamson, most people out there are saying, who is that7m was certainly a surprise to a lot of journalists and certainly to some ministers and mps in the conservative party. gavin williamson has been the chief whip not even for
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very long, and he has not been an mp for very long. he's only 41. he has not worked in a government department before. he was previously an adviser to david cameron. but he has become one of theresa may's closest advisers in office. particularly with the difficult times the government is facing, that isa times the government is facing, that is a really impressive record. so gavin williamson does have some strength. but on the flip side, not many people are aware of him and he has no background in defence. he has never worked in defence or been a defence minister. the only thing i could find in his history so far is he was on the northern ireland affairs committee back when he first became an mp. it is a surprise in some senses because of all that, but then on the flip side, theresa may obviously trusts him, he is one of hope closest advisers. he's very successful. so perhaps that is why she has chosen him. is that a sign of her strength or weakness?m
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depends who you are. some ministers have said this is an awful decision, and privately they are sending text m essa g es and privately they are sending text messages saying, this only shows how wea k messages saying, this only shows how weak the prime minister was, because there were other candidates that might have been better suited, in their eyes. people penny mordant who had been a defence minister before. ben wallace, security minister. gavin williamson is relatively well—known. 0n the other side of that, he's very good at knowing what is going on in the party and he has been very successful before. so he was a key part of the dup negotiation and while you can again look at that in two ways, some think it was a success, some don't, it was a su ccess it was a success, some don't, it was a success in that it meant the government could stay together and command the majority in the house of commons. this has certainly put the cat amongst the pigeons in terms of other ministers who might have expected with some justification, to feel they were better qualified for thisjob. feel they were better qualified for this job. it has. as i say, feel they were better qualified for
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thisjob. it has. as i say, penny mordant was put about yesterday. she represents portsmouth which has military connections. it is a naval reserve. yes. and she would have been one of the female defence secretaries of any government so that would have been impressive forgeries are made. but you have to look at the wider implications of the decision. what theresa may has donein the decision. what theresa may has done in keeping davin as part of her very senior team, she has moved him into pa rt very senior team, she has moved him into part d a position where he is still very close to her, but he doesn't have much experience of defence so i imagine he will spend a lot of time trying to get on top of his new brief will stop she has moved up people in her whips office, so moved up people in her whips office, so she has promoted the deputy to the chief whip and she has brought esther mcveigh into the whips office for the first time. she was previously a minister so she has experienced being in government. so they are relatively small changes at they are relatively small changes at the bottom end, one big change at the bottom end, one big change at the top end, but still someone who is close to theresa may and remained loyal for the is close to theresa may and remained loyalfor the time being.
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is close to theresa may and remained loyal for the time being. michael fallon, dealt with quickly but his name will not disappear. this whole harassment issue is not going away. friends of his last night were saying he felt that it would be better jury saying he felt that it would be betterjury sign saying he felt that it would be better jury sign than saying he felt that it would be betterjury sign than wait for another allegation which may or may not come. they were saying he felt that perhaps there might have been something that happened ten or 15 yea rs something that happened ten or 15 years ago where his behaviour maybe wouldn't be seen nowadays as having been appropriate. we have to ask whether that means it was inappropriate at the time, whether it is inappropriate now, whether he felt it was inappropriate. we don't knows what the allegation might be. there are other west minster rumours today that there are some claims to come in the michael fallon story which could be worse. i have not heard those myself but some journalists say they have. we have to wait in the coming days to see what comes out about michael fallon to really understand why he felt he could not continue in his position as defence secretary, because it is clearly a job he loved and as we saw
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from his statement last night it was a difficult decision. thank you. breaking news, just hearing from the spanish state prosecutor, who has asked thejudge to spanish state prosecutor, who has asked the judge to issue a european arrest warrant for the outstayed cata la n arrest warrant for the outstayed catalan leader carles puigdemont. persecutors in madrid have asked that eight members of the catalan regional government be jailed over their role in the independence referendum. nine catalan officials have been named in spain's high court. now a european arrest warrant has been issued for carles puigdemont, last known to be in brussels. we will bring you more as we get it. aung san suu kyi has made herfirst visit to rakhine state since claims came to light of attacks on the province's rohingya muslims by the country's armed forces. myanmar‘s de facto leader reportedly told people to live peacefully, and that the government is there to help them. at least 600,000 rohingya people have fled to neighbouring bangladesh
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since the violence broke out earlier this year. 0ur editorjonathan head gave us more details about the trip. it was a brief visit, unannounced, last—minute come under heavy security. her message seems to have been very anodyne, suggesting people needed to learn to live with bonnard at the. —— leave with one another. they also said she should —— she also said they should trust the government. many rohingya is there feel very uneasy, saying they have been directly attacked and persecuted by the armed forces. you have to look at this visit is purely symbolic. she was taking with her one of the most wealthy tycoons in myanmar and that fits in with her belief that what the region needs is investment. she's trying to bring together a lot of the very wealthy tycoons in myanmar to produce a kind of reconstruction committee for
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rakhine state. she says what the state needs is development. it certainly has been neglected for many years. but none of these addresses the acute humanitarian crisis there. international agencies have very limited access. there are still thousands of wrecking years fleeing, even this week, into bangladesh. —— thousands of rohingyas. so there are massive problems that they haven't even started to address yet. theresa may willjoin her israeli counterpart benjamin neta nyahu tonight, to mark the centenary of the balfour declaration — when britain said it supported a national home forjewish people in what was then palestine. israel and jewish communities view the pledge as momentous — palestinians regard it as a historical injustice. 0ur middle east correspondent, yolande knell, reports. this museum exhibit in bethlehem shows the signing of a controversial
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letter which helped transform the middle east. its british foreign secretary arthur balfour, 100 years ago. and this is actually the same declaration over here where it says the government views with favour the establishment in palestine of a national home for thejewish people, but at the same time nothing shall be done which prejudices the rights of existing non—jewish communities. newsreel: a guardian of law and order... during the first world war, the ottoman empire collapsed and britain took control of palestine. it had a large arab majority but the jewish population was growing. when lord balfour visited in 1925, jewish residents welcomed him warmly. the balfour declaration is now seen as a major step in creating the modern state of israel in 1948. balfour's text was deliberately ambiguous.
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but palestinians were taught it sowed the seeds of their long—standing conflict with israel. the current lord balfour takes a special interest in the middle east and the centenary. i think we should commemorate it rather than celebrate it. i don't think we can celebrate while we have this friction. now the israeli prime minister is in london for the anniversary of the balfour declaration. but palestinians are angry. they feel the uk owes them an apology for what they see as an historical injustice. the uk has rejected the call, saying it will mark the occasion with pride. we will have more on main street
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this afternoon. the bank of england has put up interest rates for the first time in a decade. the base rate is now 0.5%, in a bid to curb inflation. gavin williamson has been appointed as the government defence secretary after michael fallon's resignation. the number of nurses and midwives wanting to work in the uk from the eu since the referendum is falling sharply. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. as we've been hearing, the bank of england has raised the base rate as expected to 0.5%. despite the uk's sluggish economic performance this year the bank of england voted seven to two to raise the rate. it's good news for savers but could raise mortgage costs for some borrowers. a rise in sales for supermarket morrisons — 2.5% for the last few months. the rise in like—for—like sales, which measures activity in stores that have been open for more than a year, shows the retailer's recovery is continuing. profits at bt dipped in the second quarter partly due to higher payments for sports rights
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and a slowdown in its global corporate services division. the company said other factors holding back profits included investment in customer service, and higher pension costs and business rates. away from the headlines, what people wa nt to away from the headlines, what people want to know, and there are two groups of people who want to know, borrowers and savers, what this means for them. people with standard variable or tracker mortgages might go up. there are... savers, yes, it is the good of a percent increase, not a huge amount of better than it used to be. with inflation at the rate of 3% it is not a massive win for them. we can hear more now from sally francis, a money expert. thank you joining us. a quick word on
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mortgages. with people and those types of mortgages that will see their payments increase, what can they do to safeguard themselves in they do to safeguard themselves in the future? people are worried that this is the trajectory of interest rates, it might continue to go up in the next few years. absolutely and now is the time to take control of your finances. when it comes to mortgages, if you want that stability and certainty and you are on one of those variable rate mortgages, look at getting a fix one. you can still get some of the cheap deals, they will not go away overnight. get fixed deals for two, five or more years. this is a small increase in the interest rate. 0n five or more years. this is a small increase in the interest rate. on a £100,000 mortgage people will see a £21 increase per month, so not hugely devastating. not at the moment but this could pave the way for further increases. so take
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action now so that you are then protected from that because if the base rate goes up in the future... it was at 0.5% for so long that a lot of people who are in their adult life managing their money, they were not prepared for the increases we could see, so it is about controlling it now, so you are protecting against the future. with sabres, yes, they will be seeing a little bit more in terms of the return on their savings, but not a huge amount. —— with savers. return on their savings, but not a huge amount. -- with savers. it has been pretty bad news for them for a numberof been pretty bad news for them for a number of years been pretty bad news for them for a numberof years and been pretty bad news for them for a number of years and they do have to work harder to get better rates. it isa work harder to get better rates. it is a case ofjuggling your money in various different rates elwood places. but the bank scheme that allowed banks to borrow cheaply is ending injanuary. allowed banks to borrow cheaply is ending in january. that allowed banks to borrow cheaply is ending injanuary. that coupled allowed banks to borrow cheaply is ending in january. that coupled with the base would increase could mean slightly better news, but as you say, it is not inflation beating, but it is a case of having tojuggle your money to get higher rates. thank you. how have the markets
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reacted ? thank you. how have the markets reacted? ftse is in green. sterling dropped a little at the news. we have known for a few weeks that this was possible. they priced that in. also looking to the trajectory we mention about rates possibly going up mention about rates possibly going up in the future. this company that owns the fixed odds betting machines, there shares are down 20% or so at the moment. it has been on the news that the government is looking at cracking down on that. yes, and glitches in their machines in asia. thank you. more later on. it is that time of year which hundreds of thousands of families look forward to, letting off some fireworks on bonfire night. yet despite the huge number of people across the uk who will enjoy displays safely at home, every year,
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a relatively small number of people do suffer burns. we met one such family in north devon. some of you may find the start of this report distressing. what are you doing... fireworks! bonfire night 2016 and like countless other children, 4—year—old maisie was watching the fireworks in her garden. but then, something went terribly wrong. the fifth one just shot straight across the field. it got stuck in maisie's scarf before it exploded and set the scarf on fire. i was trying to pull it out and when i was pulling it out it exploded and burn went on my hand. yes. you burnt your hand. maisie suffered severe burns and was taken from her nearest hospital to a specialist unit in bristol where she had several operations including skin grafts from her leg. she had five operations in the first week.
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her mother shows me a video made by a relative that has been viewed online by a third of a million people. over the past four years, there has been a 53% increase in firework injuries treated in hospitals in england. the number has risen from 120 in 2013 to 184 last year. of those, children injured has gone from 28 to 82. it's a tiny fraction of those who enjoy bonfire night every year but stephanie says even one child burnt is one child to many. i have been a police officer for nine years and i have had three children. i've seen most things. not a lot fazes me but seeing your child in that much pain, it was absolutely horrific. a parliamentary debate in the summer discussed banning the sale of fireworks, to restricting them to organised displays. safety and animal welfare issues were raised. but there are legal restrictions
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on public sales and the threat of prison if fireworks are abused. balanced with a huge amount of their safe use, the government decided against a ban. the british fireworks industry says it is a responsible and heavily regulated one, with 16 new pieces of legislation since 2004. maisie will require more treatment as she grows. but this year her family planning attend a public display if she is happy to do so. but for all of them, fireworks will never be the same again. if people are determined to do them at home then let the kids watch them from inside. put a pane of glass between them and the explosives in the garden. what happened to maisie last year was a horrific accident that could happen to any child in any garden this year. it is not worth the risk. it has been 100 years since the
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russian revolution. to look back on the historic period, our correspondent has been travelling through russia for resume is of several special reports. he paid a 4000 bilejourney. he explained how it would take several years and a civil war before the bolsheviks gained control over the whole of russia. this man and the russian revolution have one thing in common, they are both 100 years old. born in 1917, he has survived three famines. he has fought four wars. in his lifetime, czarist russia and in soviet russia has fallen apart. how does a nation survived that kind of century? translation: because our people are strong and patriarch it, we love our
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motherland and are ready to dice it. his home is here, in the russian far east. here, china is closer than most of russia. and the cradle of the revolution is a world away, with more than 6000 kilometres east of st petersburg. —— we are more than 6000 kilometres east of saint petersburg. it would take the bolsheviks five yea rs it would take the bolsheviks five years and a brutal civil war before they conquered this area. soviet logy they conquered this area. soviet mythology painted the reds as triumphant heroes, the anti—communist white army deservedly crushed. but this version of history is crumbling. just like the battle side memorial to the red heroes here. and that is because the official view of the revolution has changed in russia. to those in power here today, red 0ctober changed in russia. to those in power here today, red october is no longer a national celebration. in russia,
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it is not only the future that is unpredictable. so is the past. that applies to the russian civil war, the russian revolution, to almost any period of this country's history. so often here, the past is rewritten according to who is in power. in this school museum, which is open to the public, they display guns and bayonets unearthed in the forests. they try not to take sides, red or, quite. but not everyone welcomes that. translation: the soviet union was not that long ago, so soviet union was not that long ago, so sometimes what we say now about the white army does not go down well with supporters of the ussr. back in his flat, the centre shows me the commendation he got from josef stalin. his view of the past is unlikely to change. revolution day
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is like my second birthday, because it is the birthday of the ussr. and that his unsha keable it is the birthday of the ussr. and that his unshakeable loyalty to a country which no longer exists. breaking news, we are hearing from southwark crown court in london that a 52—year—old man has pleaded guilty to fraud after he pretended his family had died in the grenfell tower fire to get £12,500 from the victim relief fund. the man faced five counts, originally pleading not guilty. he has been remanded in custody. the magistrates‘ court heard last month he had been living —— he claimed he had been living in the block and his wife and son had died in the blaze. he was given a hotel room, clothing, food, let‘s
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got items and cash after he went to the sports centre and claimed to have lost all of his possessions. more later. the weather. another lovely autumn day up and down the country. as we head into the evening and overnight, it looks like skies will become cloudy. we could see the spot of light rain and particularly across the and west of scotland. to the south of the country, where we see any clear spells, we are likely to see some mist and fog patches developing. quite dense cross the south—west. tomorrow generally looking cloudier with some light rain. watch out for the fog across southern and south—western areas to begin with. generally speaking, a cloudy one. but we could see a view holes in the cloud to lettings untried. across the north—west of the country, turning wet and windy. —— holes in the cloud to let in some sunshine. towards the weekend, these cold air
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spreads across the country. sunshine and showers at times. if you are heading out to any bonfire night weekends —— events at the weekend, sunday should be dry. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3pm. small change — but a historic moment — as the bank of england raises interest rates for the first time in 10 years. with unemployment at a 42—year low, inflation running above target and growthjust above its new, lower speed limit, the time has come to ease our foot off the accelerator. theresa may replaces defence secretary sir michael fallon with one of her most trusted aids gavin williamson — but who is he? do you meet the highest standards, mr williamson? do you meet the highest standards? spain‘s state prosecutor has asked a high courtjudge to issue a european arrest warrant for ousted catalan leader carles puigdemont. we‘ve got all the spot with hugh and
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a look at the england squad. three new faces in gareth southgate‘s england squad for the upcoming friendlies with germany in brazil. some notable exceptions as well, we‘ll have the details are little bit later on. and stav has all the weather. with bonfire night weekend coming up, it‘s going to be chilly. could be a few showers in the forecast on saturday night, i‘ll have all the details for you later on. thank you very much. fake news — you won‘t hear it here — but you will see it in the collins dictionary — as their word of the year. curragh this is afternoon live, i‘m
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simon mccoy. for the first time in 10 years the bank of england has raised its key base interest rate. it‘s up by a quarter of one per cent to 0.5%. it‘s not much — but with inflation running above target the bank said it was time to act. and there could be further rises on the way — good news for savers, but a prospect that will worry borrowers. here‘s andy verity. the bank of england may look exactly as it did the last time interest rates rose, but the economy doesn‘t. in the ten years since the peak year of the housing and credit bubble, the amount we produce and earn has barely grown and that means we are more vulnerable to inflation. there it is, 0.5%... with unemployment at a 42—year low, inflation running above target and growthjust above its new lower speed limit, the time has come to ease our foot a little off the accelerator. margy sullivan and her husband live in streatham in south london. soon after buying their house in 1988 the interest rate on the mortgage hit 15%.
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when rates dropped in the noughties, she took an advantage to repay more than she had to. she is now paying less than 2% and can easily cope with the rate rise. money has been cheap for a long time and i‘m very aware it could be going up for a long time. i‘m surprised it‘s taken this long for them to do it. paying off while it is cheaper means i have less to pay off now. after last hitting a peak before the 2008 crisis, interest rates dropped to what was then a record low and stayed there for seven years, only to drop again in the wake of the brexit vote. all they have done is taken back the quarter point cut they made last august after the brexit referendum when they were worried confidence might falter and spending might go down. they have taken their foot off the accelerator in terms of monetary policy but not much more than that. that prolonged period of ultralow
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interest rates may have helped keep the economy out of worse trouble but it‘s also have damaging effects, not just on savers. if you keep money ultracheap you encourage people to borrow more to buy assets like houses and that has pushed the prices of houses beyond the reach of many young people who would like to be able to afford their own home. while higher interest rates should make it more attractive to hold pounds, traders focused on warnings the next rise would not come soon. about half the country‘s families now on their own homes and only a minority of them have the mortgage. the bank of england is confident now inflation hit its peak last month and families will be able to cope with higher interest rate. andy verity, bbc news. joining me now is paul lewis, presenter of bbc radio 4‘s moneybox. welcome. we are leading on this not
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so much because of the amount of the rise but because it hasn‘t happened for ten years, the amount isn‘t that big. no, they hadn't gone up for ten yea rs, big. no, they hadn't gone up for ten years, so it‘s news in that sense. the amount is tiny, going up from a quarter of 1% to a half. which is where it was for most of the last ten years. historically these are tiny. believe it or not, i was doing figures about the average bank rate since 1694 when the bank of england was formed. how exciting. i can read it to you, put my glasses on. 4.7%, thatis it to you, put my glasses on. 4.7%, that is the average over the whole period. this century, the 20th century, over the last hundred years... last century... it was my century. for that period it was over 6%. so it‘s a tiny amount and it has
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a long way to go before we‘re back to anything like normal. psychologically a lot of us have in mind when we talk about high interest rates, figures which would seem interest rates, figures which would seem out of this world. 1596 in my memory. at that time, this is what is different now, at that time the base rate, bank rate, every time it went up, borrowing costs went up, savings rates went up, all linked together. when it went down, ditto, good news for everybody. because we‘ve had this long period of low rates, there has been dealing kitsch of the bank rate. and the ordinary rate you and i pay on mortgages, loa ns, rate you and i pay on mortgages, loans, get on our savings accounts. i don‘t think it follows we will see immediate and automatic crisis by even a quarter of 1% on those other things. all the banks will put their mortgages up. those of us on
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trackers. if you are linked to the bank rate, page two, three, four, five, 1% sometimes, of course it‘ll go five, 1% sometimes, of course it‘ll 9° up five, 1% sometimes, of course it‘ll goupa five, 1% sometimes, of course it‘ll go up a quarter of 1% immediately. it's go up a quarter of 1% immediately. it‘s a relatively small number of people, slightly bigger group, i think, on a variable rate mortgage. that will be up to the individual lender when and if they put the rate up. on lender when and if they put the rate up. 0na lender when and if they put the rate up. on a fixed rate, which most people are, one, too, maybe five yea rs, people are, one, too, maybe five years, that‘ll stay the same. when you come to remortgage, you will find it‘ll cost you more. two years from now we may have seen more rate rises, we don‘t know. from now we may have seen more rate rises, we don't know. those people for whom wages haven‘t gone up, any increase like this will affect even by £30 a month, affect their monthly outgoing. yes, a typical loan would be ten or £20 more if it follows the bank rate up per month. that is significant for people. when you ta ke
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significant for people. when you take out a mortgage now, not true in the past, but now, they test the affordability of it with you by looking at if you could afford it if rates were three percentage points higher. you should still be able to afford it if your circumstances have stayed the same but of course a lot of people circumstances haven‘t stayed the same. remortgaging will be more difficult and if rates go up again, if this is the first in a series of steps, it‘ll get more. again, if this is the first in a series of steps, it'll get more.|j a lwa ys series of steps, it'll get more.|j always get tweets saying you obsess about borrowers. let‘s talk about savers. there are more savers. about borrowers. let‘s talk about savers. there are more saversm you look at average savings rates, they are negligible, but look at best buy savings rates, they are not, you can get nearly one point... you can get 1.3%. it doesn‘t sound much, but it is a lot more bank rate on instant access savings. you could get 2% if you tie your money up the
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two years, even one yearjust about. we‘ve been seeing those rates creep up we‘ve been seeing those rates creep up over the last few months, partly in anticipation of this, but also because a lot of new players are coming in and they are trying to steal... steel is the wrong word. still the customers. don't want to see you arrested. steal the customers of big banks. they are offering good rates and i think we‘ll see those creeping up slightly and that will be a help to save us. we won‘t go back to the time of mortgages of 12% and savings rates of 10%, we won‘t see that... if ever. the calm, soothing voice. if you have got savings... i‘ll take up more of your time. if you‘ve got savings, move your money to a best buy account, if it languishes in an average account it‘s a waste of time, look up the best buy and move your money and savings. as ever, thank you very much. don‘t forget — you can let us know what you think tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive.
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all the ways to contact us on screen right now. the chief whip gavin williamson has been appointed defence secretary, following the resignation of sir michael fallon. he stood down last night, saying his conduct had "fallen short" of the required standards, after allegations of inappropriate sexual behaviour. sir michael is the first politician to quit following recent claims of sexual harassment in parliament. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports from westminster. the man on the right is usually responsible for defending theresa may, especially from critics on her own side. now gavin williamson‘s job is to defend the nation. until this morning he was the chief whip, his task to keep tory mps in line and keep the prime minister in office. the prime minister‘s chief whip was swiftly replaced by this man, his deputyjulian smith. theresa may wanted to avoid a wide—ranging reshuffle but the question now is whether the rapid departure of the previous occupant of the ministry of defence might in turn lead to further resignations. i‘ve spoken to people
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today at westminster who are convinced other stories of sir michael fallon‘s asked if you could emerge and it was his inability to guarantee there would be no further revelations that seems to have ended his career, but are there other ministers who may have done something in the past that will be judged unacceptable today? and would that put them in the firing line? people need to recognise there is now a very strong set of rules about this kind of behaviour, we shouldn‘t pass it by and say that is a one—off. that has changed. i don‘t think necessarily you will see lots of ministers resign. the vast majority of people in parliament do not get up to this stuff. the leader of the scottish conservatives sees this as an even more dramatic moment. this is all about power, people
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higher up the tree exerting that power on people who are lower down the tree, people who are junior members of staff, activists, volunteers. it‘s not acceptable. members of staff, activists, volunteers. it's not acceptable. former parliamentary whip says changes are needed notjust to protect victims of harassment at westminster, but also mps who might be wrongly accused. there needs to be wrongly accused. there needs to be an independent body, i think, established, so people can have confidence in the system. justice doesn‘t just have confidence in the system. justice doesn‘tjust have to be done, it needs to be seen to be done. that includes not only protecting mps who are innocent, but condemning mps who are innocent, but condemning mps who are guilty. business as usual, that is the image minister wanted to betray when she met her israeli counterpart at lunchtime. the problems may be less dramatic of those of the middle east but moving
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and removing ministers hasn‘t made herjob at and removing ministers hasn‘t made her job at number ten and removing ministers hasn‘t made herjob at number ten any easier. as soon as herjob at number ten any easier. as soon as the appointment was announced there was mixed reaction on twitter. in the last few minutes we‘ve had another response from a tory mp, sarah wollaston. she has said there are times when offered a job it would be better to advise that another would be more experienced and suited to the role. which is an interesting contribution from a member of theresa may‘s team. let‘s go to vicki young. he joins me from westminster. apart from owning a pet tarantula, very little known about his defence experience. that's right, the reaction to his appointment has been definitely raised eyebrows, people saying it was a surprise, joking he appointed himself because whips normally have a role in carrying out smooth reshuffles. number ten says absolutely he was in the room,
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wasn‘t involved in all of that. this is certainly theresa may‘s decision. some questioning whether he has the experience, though he has been chief whip, it is very much about the polymer to discipline, not about running a department. it is still pretty young. a meteoric rise, we should say. all of the fallout from the first casualty of the scandal thatis the first casualty of the scandal that is dominating chat here at westminster. let‘s discuss this more. i‘m joined by westminster. let‘s discuss this more. i‘mjoined by george westminster. let‘s discuss this more. i‘m joined by george friedman, chair of the conservative forum. to me first of all about the resignation of michael fallon, was itan resignation of michael fallon, was it an overreaction? how is westminster and your party reacting? the prime minister and michael fallon have done the right thing, they have signalled her government will set the highest standards. i think all of us in public office have a duty to set high standards. in the highest office, the highest standards. they are absolutely right, we need to keep portion, we don't want men and women in the
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workplace feeling they can't talk to each other. there is no doubt some of this week there has been some mischievous labour party campaigning, targeting conservatives. the labour party can't really throw stones, this has been going on notjust here in parliament, but in offices and workplaces up and down the land. the reason it matters so much is for the reasons the prime minister set out in that inspiring speech on the steps of numberten. in that inspiring speech on the steps of number ten. she wants this government to be committed to tackling injustice, giving a voice to the voiceless and rooting out hidden prejudice. those practices that have held back people too often. some of that in parliament is to do with the speaker and leader of the house. this place needs reforming. historically it has been run like an old boys club which needs to change. there is a party issue. i agree with ruth davidson that this is a moment we should redouble our commitment to party renewal. i would urge the prime minister to take this as a moment,
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ta ke minister to take this as a moment, take those values she set out on entering numberten and take those values she set out on entering number ten and put them at the heart of a modern conservative party. we need to embody the values of the new generation of voters we seek to represent. with davidson talked about a clear out. some today expected maybe a wider reshuffle. it is well known patrick mcloughlin wa nts to is well known patrick mcloughlin wants to move on as party chairman. should theresa may be bolder?” think the party reform agenda is there waiting to be embraced. i‘ve been working with colleagues this summer after the election on a whole programme of renewal at central office. patrick is made clear he feels he‘s done his bit. i think this is a moment for the prime minister to set up those values she holds dear will shine brightly in a modern conservative party, notjust in government will she clamped down on bad behaviour, she make sure the conservative party embodies those values of tolerance, speaking for all, giving everybody a voice. there is an inspiring tradition in the
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conservative party, we need to see it embodied. the reaction to gavin williamson‘s appointment hasn‘t been all positive and he‘s a younger member of the party and some say he doesn‘t have the experience. member of the party and some say he doesn't have the experience. it's an electrifying appointment, nobody quite knows what goes on in the whips office. there are about to be questions. the focus will be, what is our position on defence. how will he get on top of the difficult agenda the ministry of defence is tackling? the prime minister wants to get the government back on track but the real issue is on track to what? are we going to deliver a brexit that works for the whole nation? will be reach out and signalled the next generation their values are ours? will we be a modern conservative party for a modern britain? that is the challenge we have to grip. the possibility of theresa may, obviously, as she seeks to bring in a new grievance
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procedure, in the house of commons, whether she will use that to do more when it comes to reform of her own party. these are the headlines this afternoon. the bank of england puts interest rates up for the first time in ten years. the governor hints that could be more increases to come. theresa may has appointed gavin williamson chief whip as the new defence secretary following the resignation of sir michael fallon. the spanish state prosecutor has requested a european arrest warrant for the ousted catalan leader carles puigdemont. gareth southgate includes three new names to being done squad for their upcoming friendlies with germany and brazil. swa nsea friendlies with germany and brazil. swansea striker tammy abra ham friendlies with germany and brazil. swansea striker tammy abraham called up swansea striker tammy abraham called up after five goals this season while on loan from chelsea. another chelsea loney, rueben loftus—cheek of crystal palace, is in, as isjoe gomez from liverpool. fixtures announced for the rugby world cup in japan 2019. england head coach eddie jones says they‘ll have no excuses,
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beginning with matches against tonga and the united states. in cricket england batsmen mark stoneman says he hopes there is a way back for ben stokes. the influential all—rounder was excluded from the upcoming ashes series after his arrest back in september. i‘ll have more no stories just after half past. —— more on the those stories. the state prosecutor in spain has asked a court to issue a european arrest warrant for the former catalan president, carles puigdemont, after he failed to attend a court hearing. mr puigdemont has travelled to belgium along with four members of his cabinet, saying the climate in spain wasn‘t good. they‘re facing charges of rebellion and sedition for trying to declare independence for catalonia from spain. two men have been charged with negligence following the deaths of three soldiers after an s—a—s selection march in the brecon beacons. lance corporal craig roberts, lance corporal edward maher and corporaljames dunsby died — after attempting the 16 mile march on the hottest day of 20—13. a coroner ruled parts of the planning and conduct
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of the march were inadequate. paul heaney has the details. reservists craig roberts, edward meir and james dunsby were trying to join the sas. a timed 16 mile march on one of the hottest days of the year. in the brecon beacons in the 2013. of course it was going to be tough, but neglect by the ministry of defence also played a part in their death. according to an inquest. the army later apologised. we are truly sorry for the mistakes the coroner identified today. we‘ve already made a number of changes to the exercise in terms of the way it is run in terms of our own investigations and those of the health and safety executive. in march last year the health and safety executive said the ministry of defence would have faced prosecution for what happened that day if it didn‘t have immunity. an independent body called the special prosecution authority initially
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decided not to pursue charges against individuals involved in the training exercise. that decision was challenged by relatives of the soldiers who died. we‘ve heard from one serving soldier and one who has since left the service, will face charges of negligence. the trial will take place in a military court. the director of special forces at the time said they pushed themselves beyond their ability to endure here, the process of possibly holding individuals to account for what happened that day continues more than four years after their deaths. there‘s been a sharp decline in the number of nurses from european union countries wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says there was a drop of nearly 90 per cent in new registrations for eu nurses, compared to the same period the year before. the department of health says an increase in training places will compensate for the fall. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has the details.
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around one in every 20 nurses and midwives working in the uk was trained in the eu. many are from spain, portugal, poland and romania. but according to new figures, the numbers are declining. the nurses and midwives‘ regulator, the nmc, says in the year to september 2016, more than 10,000 joined the uk register. but this year that fell dramatically, to around 1000. and the number of eu nurses already working here who decided to give up their uk registration rose by 67%. it‘s a worrying trend, and for those who are responsible for thinking about what we need in the future, so the nurses and midwives we need in the future to care for us, they‘ll obviously look at this and think what can we do to reverse that trend. in the aftermath of the referendum a campaign was launched to support eu staff in the nhs, but today‘s figures suggest that‘s not been enough reassurance and many eu nurses are no longer keen to work in the uk.
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there‘s a shortage of nurses across the world. they‘ve got a choice and with that level of uncertainty what we‘re seeing is that our nurses are beginning to leave us to work elsewhere and that‘s really difficult for us here, i think. those who represent nhs hospital trusts and others say nurse recruiters have been concerned about the situation for some time. the vast majority of hospitals are telling us they are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit from overseas. the numbers will come as a concern, but unfortunately not a surprise to them. many of them are still going out to europe and the rest of the world to recruit nurses and doctors from overseas, but it‘s becoming increasingly challenging at the moment. nurse leaders have described the sudden lack of interest from eu nurses in working for the nhs as alarming. it‘s estimated the nhs is already 40,000 nurses short, but the government has said it‘s ensuring the nhs has the staff it needs through a 25% increase in nurse training places. sophie hutchinson, bbc news.
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iman falsely claimed his wife and son had died in the grenfell tower disaster to get money from the victim relief fund. he was remanded in custody and will be sentenced on the 15th of december. the chief executive of tesco, dave lewis, has been giving evidence at the trial of three former executives at the supermarket. they‘re on trial on fraud charges, in connection with an alleged multi—million pound accounting scandal. earlier our business correspondent emma simpson sent us this update from outside southwark crown court. today we had the boss of britain‘s biggest retailer taking to the stand asa biggest retailer taking to the stand as a witness for the prosecution, coming face—to—face with his three former senior executives who are on trial for alleged fraud and false accounting. we spent the morning
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learning about the chronology of events leading up to the moment when dave lewis learned about this huge gap, or black hole as it has been described, in the company accounts. dave lewis, remember, only started thisjob three weeks dave lewis, remember, only started this job three weeks earlier having been parachuted in to try to turn tesco around. things were so bad he volunteered to start earlier than planned. it was a very unusual situation and he said. we heard about a series of scheduled meetings with the tesco executive committee, which one of the defendants, chris bush, the former uk md, attended to. it wasn‘t until september 19 when dave lewis learned about the so—called legacy paper, which revealed the £246 million hole, or
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improperly recognised income. dave lewis told the court he was shocked and surprised you‘d never experienced anything like this before. what was new, he said, was the proposition that £246 million of income had been included in the first half of the year. on the basis of this paper, it was deemed to be questionable. it was quite clear having read it it needed to be taken very seriously indeed. the three defendants deny the charges and the trial continues. theresa may willjoin benjamin theresa may willjoin her israeli counterpart benjamin neta nyahu tonight, to mark the centenary of the balfour declaration — when britain said it supported a national home forjewish people in what was then palestine. israel and jewish communities view the pledge as momentous — palestinians regard it as a historical injustice. 0ur middle east correspondent, yolande knell, reports. this museum exhibit in bethlehem shows the signing of a controversial letter which helped transform the middle east. it‘s british foreign secretary arthur balfour, 100 years ago.
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and this is actually the same declaration over here, where it says that the government views with favour the establishment in palestine of a national home for the jewish people, but at the same time nothing shall be done which prejudices the rights of existing non—jewish communities. newsreel: a guardian of law and order... during the first world war, the ottoman empire collapsed and britain took control of palestine. it had a large arab majority, but the jewish population was growing. when lord balfour visited in 1925, jewish residents welcomed him warmly. the balfour declaration is now seen as a major step in creating the modern state of israel in 1948. balfour‘s text was deliberately ambiguous. but palestinians are taught that it sowed the seeds
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of their long—standing conflict with israel. the current lord balfour takes a special interest in the middle east and this centenary. i think we should commemorate it rather than celebrate it. i don‘t think we can celebrate while we have this friction. now the israeli prime minister is in london for the anniversary of the balfour declaration. but palestinians are angry. they feel the uk owes them an apology for what they see as an historical injustice. the uk has rejected the call, saying it will mark this occasion with pride. yolande knell, bbc news, jerusalem. a mysterious void — the size of a holidayjet — has been found inside the great pyramid of giza, a discovery which egyptologists
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believe could finally shed light on how the ancient tombs were constructed. the gap — which is about one hundred feet long — was found using a scanning process which can sense density changes inside large rock structures. it‘s not known why the cavity exists or if it holds anything of value because it‘s not accessible. i‘m grabbing my black & decker and heading to the airport right now. the dictionary publisher collins has announced its word of the year — see if you can guess what it is: the fake news. fake news. fake news. this is fake news. little bit of fa ke this is fake news. little bit of fake news. you are fake news. fake news. bbc news, that‘s another beauty. if you hadn‘t guessed already — the word (or phrase) of the year is ‘fake news‘. it‘s been given a boost by president trump, who has adopted it. collins say use of the term has risen by 365% since 2016. a little later we‘ll be joined by manchester street poet argh kid to hear his thoughts about how he uses new words in his work.
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that‘s in the next half an hour here on afternoon live. let‘s catch up with the weather. another lovely autumn day up and down the country, sunshine around, as we head into the evening and overnight, looks like skies will become cloudy. we could see the odd spot of light rain here and there. particularly across the north and west of scotland. to the south of the country where we see clear spells, we‘re likely to see mist and fog patches developing. again could be quite dense across the south—west. tomorrow generally looking cloudy and we could see light rain here and there. watch out for the fog across southern and south—western areas. generally it will be cloudy. we could see a few holes in the cloud to allow for sunshine. across the north—west of the country, turning windier and wetter. temperatures again into double figures. pretty mild for the time of year. as we head into the weekend, this plunge of cold air
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spread right across the country. sunshine and showers at times. if you‘re heading out to bonfire night event at the weekend, saturday night could see showers, sunday night should be drier. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the bank of england has announced that it is raising interest rates for the first time in over ten year, with the cost of borrowing increased from a 0.25% to 0.5%. with unemployment at a 42 year low, inflation running at below target and growth just above inflation running at below target and growthjust above its... the time has come to ease fought a little off the accelerator. the former chief whip gavin williamson has been appointed as the new defence secretary, replacing sir michael fallon, who resigned yesterday. prosecutors in spain have have asked a high courtjudge to issue european arrest warrants for the deposed catalan leader carles puigdemont and four members of his sacked cabinet — they failed to appear at a court hearing in madrid today,
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having travelled to belgium. figures show that the number of new nurses coming to work in the uk from other european countries has fallen by almost 90% in the past year. we have the sport now. i normally ask for a question to be sent to me and you have sent it. it says, what is happening in the world of sport? it is funny that you ask. we will be talking about gareth southgate‘s england squad. he has some new places in there. —— new faces. he has a squad that lacks experience. the exactly does in a moment. elsewhere, a fantastic result for the people of houston. their team, the people of houston. their team, the astros, has won the world series for the first time in the history. catch up with england ahead of the
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ashes series as well. and tell us more about what else is happening in the world of sport. i think happening in the world of sport. ithinki happening in the world of sport. i think i will start with the england squad. england have called up three uncapped players for the friendlies against germany and brazil later this month. swa nsea swansea striker tammy abra ham swansea striker tammy abraham is included, despite only making ten top—flight appearances. five goals, though, so that has been deemed enough by southgate, the 20—year—old on loan from chelsea. ruben loftus—cheek is also on loan from chelsea with —— chelsea with crystal palace. joe gomez of liverpool rewarded for some strong displays. however, the squad may be more notable for the absentees. no place for daniel sturridge, alex 0xlade—chamberlain or chris smalling. ashley young, though, is recalled, he has not played for england since september of 2013,
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while rose and jamie badu return after injury. —— jamie vardy. the match schedule has been announced for the 2019 rugby world cup injapan. wales will start against georgia, while scotland kick off against ireland. however, england‘s head coach, eddie jones, says his side have the perfect start. he thinks they‘ll have no excuses if they fail to mount a meaningful challenge against tonga and the united states. it is a great start for us. you have to win the four games anyway, but france and argentina at the end are great for us. we have a real variety in the cities we are playing in, which will be stimulator for the players and great for deep fans. —— for the fans. england batsman mark stoneman says he really feels for ben stokes and still hopes he can still play a part in the ashes series in australia.
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stokes won‘t be selected until further notice, after his arrest following an incident outside a bristol nightclub in september. england‘s opening tour match against a western australia 11 starts on saturday in perth, with the first test on 23rd november. it is very fortunate, what occurred, andi it is very fortunate, what occurred, and i feel it is very fortunate, what occurred, and ifeel for it is very fortunate, what occurred, and ifeelfor him. it is very fortunate, what occurred, and i feel for him. i it is very fortunate, what occurred, and ifeel for him. i hope there is and ifeel for him. i hope there is a way back. 0bviously, once things get settled over there. it would be great if he could have some part in this tool. most importantly, though, that he is well and comfortable in himself. —— that he could have some pa rt himself. —— that he could have some part in the tour. english golfers florentina parker and georgia hall are in contention at the abu dhabi 0pen. 8—under par, four shots behind south africa‘s lee—anne pace. hall‘s impressive round of 67 included six birdies and only one dropped shot. there was reason to celebrate for the people of houston, just months after hurricane harvey devastated the us city. their team, the astros, have won baseball‘s world series for the first time, beating the la dodgers in the deciding game. 0ur reporter was there.
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this team‘s motto has been "earn history", this season, and that is what they have done tonight. they have been out la dodgers‘ home turf to win their first ever world series. some of them have tears streaming down their faces. since they were kids playing baseball in the backyard, they drew —— they dreamed and of getting here. some of the best players in the game never get the chance to play in a world series but these guys have done it. they have achieved history and now they can go and soak it all up. the people of houston have had a tough time and we are so pleased for them now. we have not won in 56 years. when we get back it is going to be a great feeling. that is why we wear our patch on ourjerseys, to show that city how much we love them. a roller—coaster of emotions for the players and these guys, too. they rode every moment in these stands while around them was a sea
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of blue from the la dodgers. now these fans are going back to houston to party with the astros. some very happy astros fans there. that is all the sport. more in the next hour. in the wake of sir michael fallon‘s resignation, and the wider allegations of inappropriate behaviour circulating around westminster, the scottish conservative leader, ruth davidson, says it‘s time to break with the culture in politics, when powerful people "use positions of power to demand things from others". we need a clear house on this one, not just we need a clear house on this one, notjust individual parties but parliament itself. we have seen bullying allegations between members of staff, allegations of impropriety between elected officials and others. it is all about power,
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people further up the tree exerting that power and people love it down. people who like junior members of staff, activists, volunteers. that is not acceptable. i stand with my collea g u es is not acceptable. i stand with my colleagues in westminster to ensure we ta ke colleagues in westminster to ensure we take this opportunity to make it happen. when we talk about the need for a new broom, does that apply to the tory party all parties? this is an issue for all parties and all institutions like parliament. we have already had guidelines put forward here from the presiding officer with cross—party support. i think that is positive. we are seeming change in the house of commons. andrea leadsom has said we need change there. that is all party structure and parliament as well. it cannot be the case that there is an ability to exert power and influence over people that on yourjunior members of staff or volunteers and get away with it. that has to stops. a man accused of causing the deaths of eight people in new york
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by mowing them down in a truck has been charged with terrorism offences. anh nhu nguyen —— sayfullo saipov, a 29—year—old from uzbekistan, is said to have been inspired by the islamic state group. here sayfullo saipov appeared in a wheelchair. it was said his inspiration for the attack was clear. he said he was inspired by the isis videos he watched and he‘d been planning this attack for two months. the attack ended —— been planning this attack for two months. the attack ended -- the attack ended when sayfullo saipov crashed into a school bus. he had planned to stay on his killing spree all the way to brooklyn bridge. investigators descended on his house
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in newjersey. this is about an hour from new york city. last night this place was disrupted, police coming here to apartment nine, when sayfullo saipov and his young family are believed to have lived. the police are merged with bags of evidence. they will be looking to see if there was anything to linking directly to isis. neighbours expressed shock. it is crazy that anyone could do such a thing. for a city no stranger to acts of terror, this was a moment to remember and to show resilience. meanwhile, resident trump has called for the death penalty for sayfullo saipov. ina for the death penalty for sayfullo saipov. in a tweet, donald trump said that sayfullo saipov had asked to hank and islamic state flagged up
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in his hospital room. aung san suu kyi has made herfirst visit to rakhine state since persecution of rohingyas. at least 600,000 reindeer people have fled to neighbouring bangladesh since the violence broke out earlier this year. —— rohingya people. the visit was unannounced and under heavy security. she was suggesting people need to learn to live with one another. the problems are very deep—rooted in rakhine state. she also said they should trust the government. most of the rohingyas there feel very uneasy, saying they have been directly attacked and persecuted by the armed forces. you have to look at this visit as achilles of bullocks. interestingly,
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she was taking with her one of the most wealthy tycoons in myanmar, and that fits in with her belief with what the region needs his investment. she‘s trying to bring together many of the wealthy tycoons in myanmarto together many of the wealthy tycoons in myanmar to reconstruct development in the state. she says that will ease the conflict. but none of that addresses the acute commander terry and crisis there. international agencies still have many people there. there are still rohingyas clinging to bangladesh this week and yet no one is addressing the problem of rehousing the displaced. so there are massive problems that they haven‘t even started to address yet. it is that time of year which hundreds of thousands of families look forward to, setting off fireworks. yet despite the thousands
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of people enjoying safe fireworks displays at home, every year a few people do suffer burns. some of you may find the start of this report distressing. what are you doing... fireworks! bonfire night 2016 and like countless other children, 4—year—old maisie was watching the fireworks in her garden. but then, something went terribly wrong. the fifth one just shot straight across the field. it got stuck in maisie‘s scarf before it exploded and set the scarf on fire. i was trying to pull it out and when i was pulling it out it exploded and burn went on my hand. you burnt your hand. maisie suffered severe burns and was taken from her nearest hospital to a specialist unit in bristol where she had several operations including skin grafts from her leg.
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she had five operations in the first week. her mother shows me a video made by a relative that has been viewed online by a third of a million people. over the past four years, there has been a 53% increase in firework injuries treated in hospitals in england. the number has risen from 120 in 2013 to 184 last year. of those, children injured has gone from 28 to 82. it‘s a tiny fraction of those who enjoy bonfire night every year but stephanie says even one child burnt is one child to many. i have been a police officer for nine years and i have had three children. i‘ve seen most things. not a lot fazes me but seeing your child in that much pain, it was absolutely horrific. a parliamentary debate in the summer discussed banning the sale of fireworks, to restricting them to organised displays. safety and animal welfare issues were raised.
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but there are legal restrictions on public sales and the threat of prison if fireworks are abused. balanced with a huge amount of their safe use, the government decided against a ban. the british fireworks industry says it is a responsible and heavily regulated one, with 16 new pieces of legislation since 2004. maisie will require more treatment as she grows. but this year her family are planning to attend a public display if she is happy to do so. but for all of them, fireworks will never be the same again. if people are determined to do them at home then let the kids watch them from inside. put a pane of glass between them and the explosives in the garden. what happened to maisie last year was a horrific accident that was a horrific accident but it could happen to any child in any garden this year. it is not worth the risk.
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more on this interest rates. the bank of england has raised interest rates for the first time in a decade in a bid to curb inflation. they are now at 0.5%. gavin williamson has been named as the new defence secretary — following the resignation of sir michael fallon. and... spain‘s state prosecutor has asked a judge to issue a european arrest warrant for the deposed catalan president carles puigdemont and four of his former ministers. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the bank of england has raised the base rate as expected to 0.5%. it‘s the first rate hike for a decade since the financial crisis. despite the uk‘s sluggish economic performance this year the bank of england voted 7 to 2 to raise the rate. it‘s good news for savers but could raise mortgage costs for some borrowers. a rise in sales for supermarket morrisons — 2.5% for the last few months.
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the rise in like—for—like sales, which measures activity in stores that have been open for more than a year, shows the retailer‘s recovery is continuing. profits at bt dipped in the second quarter partly due to higher payments for sports rights and a slowdown in its global corporate services division. the company said other factors holding back profits included investment in customer service, and higher pension costs and business rates. and interest rate rise of 0.25% is not a lot, because some others remember rates far higher not that long ago. yes, lots of us remember 15-17%. long ago. yes, lots of us remember 15—17%. even a year ago, before the referendum, rates were 0.5%, and they were cut to 0.25% at the results. it is not unprecedented. tom stevensonjoins us, and
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investment director. why was it necessary , investment director. why was it necessary, then, to cut rates from 0.5to necessary, then, to cut rates from 0.5 to 0.25%? necessary, then, to cut rates from 0.5 to 0.2596? it is easy to say with hindsight that it was not necessary, andl hindsight that it was not necessary, and i think history has shown that it probably was a bit of a panic measure, but you have to throw yourself back a year ago to the immediate aftermath of the eu referendum. the bank of england was concerned about the impact it would have on the uk economy, so they felt it was the prudent thing to do. messi in terms of the trajectory, and that is what a lot of investors are talking about today, there is concern about the rate at which rates will rise, however, the bank of england says it will be gradual. yes, in some ways this is a watershed moment. it is the first rise ina watershed moment. it is the first rise in a decade interest rates have doubled today from 0.25 20.5%.
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but i think it is more a symbolic rise than something more substantial beginning. if look at what the bank of england is saying about the health of the economy and the level of interest rates, but it think will be necessary to curtail inflation, in reality what we are looking at is more elegant no more than maybe another two 0.25% rises over the next two years. that is really slow. interest rates will stay low for longer. and we saw sterling drop on the news. why is that? on the face of it, a bit surprising. you would expect interest rates rising to lead to the pound rising, and in fact the reverse has happened. the reason why the reverse has happened is because of the comments about the health of the economy, the comments are all concerns about the battle brexit negotiations. the bank of england
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has shown today that it is worried about the health of the economy, and that's bad news for the pound. thank you. so what do the markets make of this? ftse 100 you. so what do the markets make of this? ftse100 is in green. what we had just been talking about was what was interesting today, the pound cropping, partly because it was anticipated for some time in the last few weeks mark carney signalling interest rates would go up. but also this trajectory we are talking about as rates go up, investors are worried about that and in future the health of the economy and whether those two things will tally. thank you. it has been 100 years since the russian revolution. 0ur correspondent has been travelling through russia for a series of special reports, beginning his 6000 kilometre journey in saint petersburg. he explained how it would take several years and a civil
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war before the bolsheviks established control over the whole of russia. man speaks russian this man and the russian revolution have one thing in common — they are both 100 years old. born in 1917, he has survived three famines. he has fought four wars. in his lifetime, czarist russia then soviet russia have fallen apart. how does a nation survive that kind of century? because our people are strong and they are patriotic, he says, we love our motherland and are ready to die for it. his home is here, in the russian far east. here, china is closer than most of russia. and the cradle of the revolution is a world away — we‘re more than 6000 kilometres east of st petersburg. it would take the bolsheviks five years and a brutal civil war before they conquered this area. the decisive battle was near here.
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soviet mythology painted the reds as triumphant heroes, the anti—communist white army deservedly crushed. but this version of history is crumbling. just like the battle site memorial to the red heroes here. and that is because the official view of the revolution has changed in russia. to those in power here today, red october is no longer a national celebration. in russia, it is not only the future that is unpredictable — so is the past. that applies to the russian civil war, the russian revolution, to almost any period of this country‘s history. so often here, the past is rewritten, reinterpreted according to who is in power. in this school museum, which is open to the public, they display guns and bayonets unearthed in the forest. they try not to take sides, red white.
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—— red or white but not everyone welcomes that. he speaks russian the soviet union was not that long ago, says this teacher, so sometimes what we say now about the white army does not go down well with supporters of the ussr. back in his flat, the centenarian shows me the commendation he got from josef stalin. this man‘s view of the past is unlikely to change. revolution day is like my second birthday, he says, because it is the birthday of the ussr. and that his unshakeable loyalty to a and that is unshakeable loyalty to a country which no longer exists. "fake news", it‘s a phrase that‘s been consistently in the headlines and synonymous with a particular twitter feed across the pond.
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now, it‘s been named word of the year by dictionary publisher collins. it is the fifth year that collins has highlighted a trending word or phrase, with previous winners including "brexit" and "geek", but can you remember the year of these new entries? yuppie — is a young person who has a well—paid job and likes to show that they have a lot of money by buying expensive things and living in an expensive way. alcopop — an alcoholic drink that tastes like a soft drink. metrosexual — a man who spends a lot of time and money on his appearance, and often his home. joining me now from salford is the performance poet david scott. this whole thing about language, how nude is a word need to be to get into a dictionary like this? it is a
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reflection of society and the mainstream. with fake news, it is down to the donald trump presidency, that has been all over the media over the last 12 months. that is what brings it to get put in the dictionary. words like metrosexual, once they are in they seem to be there to stay. they do not seem to bea there to stay. they do not seem to be a passing fad. i think every generation has their own version of a word. i heard you talk about the abuse but now in this generation it is probably hipsters, language is a lwa ys is probably hipsters, language is always evolving. and you go around schools, you must hear words you have not heard before? definitely. for me it is as much a learning experience going in a to learn a language. i always learn a new language. i always learn a new language from the students. the first thing i get them to do is create their own slang dictionary, so create their own slang dictionary, soi create their own slang dictionary, so i always know what they are
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talking about, as about, as well as them understanding what i am saying. shakespeare, if you delivered that two stu d e nts shakespeare, if you delivered that two students nowadays, it may as well be in a different language altogether. in the last few months, what sort of words are you regularly hearing in schools that you think may one day be words we are regularly using? there is one that was closed to —— close to making it into the dictionary. also there is paingting, which refers to a really nice looking person. you have mentioned fake news already. but one man has quite an influence, if you can get that into a dictionary. definitely. yes, he says it a lot in the white house and that is why it
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is in the dictionary. thank you. how is this for a sore head? a chinese guest at a swiss hotel spent nearly £8,000 on a dram of vintage scotch, but did he get what he paid for? the most important thing is to tell mrjuncker, because i think he should be the first person he gets the result. —— the most important thing is to tell this man. we discussed the results with him and i also gave him the money back. he
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wasn‘t disappointed. he was not angry. if he‘s not angry at our hotel, then everything is good for him. sorry about the music there. what i wa nt to sorry about the music there. what i want to know is who spends £7,600 on a drink? the man from beijing is one of china‘s highest earning online writers. so now you know. let‘s look at the weather. a lovely autumn day up and down the country. into the evening and overnight, skies become cloudy. we could see the odd spot of light rain and particularly across the north and particularly across the north and west of scotland. to the south of the country, with clear spells, likely to see mr and fog patches developing. it could be denser crosses at west. tomorrow, generally looking cloudier with light rain.
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watch out for that fog across southern, south—western areas. generally a cloudy one but we could see some sunshine. across the north—west of the country, turning windier and wetter. the temperatures again into double figures. as we head on into the weekend, this colsaerts spreads right across the country. it will feed in sunshine and showers at times. —— this cold air spreads across the country. sunday night should be drier. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at four... small change, but a historic moment, as the bank of england raises interest rates for the first time in 10 years. with unemployment at a 42 year local inflation running above target and growth just above... the time has come to take our foot off the
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accelerator. theresa may replaces defence secretary sir michael fallon with one of her most trusted aides, gavin williamson — but who is he? do you meet the highest standards, mr williamson? spain‘s state prosecutor has asked a high courtjudge to issue a european arrest warrant for ousted catalan leader carles puigdemont. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. yes, gareth southgate opts for youth in his latest squad. also coming up, the weather? absolutely. i have got their heads up for the weekend whether. join me later for that. also coming up... the world‘s most expensive dram of whisky — or was it? we will be speaking to an expert about how it was a fake. hello, this is afternoon live.
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for the first time in a decade, interest rates have gone up. they‘ve returned to 0.5%, rising by 0.25%, as the bank of england seeks to control inflation. there could be further rises on the way. the bank of england may look exactly as it did the last time interest rates rose, but the economy doesn‘t. in the ten years since the peak year of the housing and credit bubble, the amount we produce and earn has barely grown, and that means we‘re more vulnerable to inflation. there it is, 0.5%... with unemployment at a 42—year low, inflation running above target and growthjust above its new lower speed limit, the time has come
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to ease our foot a little off the accelerator. margy sullivan and her husband live in streatham in south london. soon after buying their house in 1988, the interest rate on her mortgage hit 15%. an extension and repay more than she had to. she is now paying less than 2% and can easily cope with the rate rise. money has been cheap for a long time and i‘m very aware that it could be going up at any time. i‘m surprised it‘s taken this long for them to do it. paying off while it is cheaper means i have less to pay off now. after last hitting a peak before the 2008 crisis, interest rates dropped to what was then a record low and stayed there for seven years, only to drop again in the wake of the brexit vote. all they‘ve done is taken back the quarter point cut they made last
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august after the brexit referendum, when they were worried that confidence might falter and that spending might go down. they‘ve taken their foot off the accelerator a little bit in terms of monetary policy but not much more than that. that prolonged period of ultralow interest rates may have helped keep the economy out of worse trouble, but it‘s also have damaging effects, not just on savers. if you keep money ultracheap, you encourage people to borrow more to buy assets like houses, and that has pushed the prices of houses beyond the reach of many young people who would like to be able to afford their own home. while higher interest rates should make it more attractive to hold pounds, traders focused on a warning that the next rise would not come soon, and the pound slipped. about half the country‘s families now on their own homes and only a minority of them
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have the mortgage. and only a minority of them have a mortgage. the bank of england is confident now inflation hit its peak last month and families will be able to cope with higher interest rate. andy verity, bbc news. while the increase is good news for savers, it means millions of mortgage holders will see their monthly payment rise. our business correspondent theo leggett has been looking at how homeowners could be affected. when interest rates rise, millions of homeowners are affected, but not everyone will feel the impact straightaway. 46% of people with mortgages are on some form of variable rate. they will bear the brunt of the increase. the 54% on fixed rate deals won‘t see their costs go up straightaway but they will do eventually, when the fix comes to an end. an increase of a quarter of a percent will add £15 per month to a typical £125,000 variable—rate mortgage. that might not sound like much, but for some homeowners it can make a huge difference. people like lynn,
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the owner of this house. she‘s struggled financially since a car accident stopped her from working. i‘m literally living... i wouldn‘t say on the breadline but very, very close and any hike in interest or supermarket bills affects me instantly. but other homeowners can afford to be more pragmatic. 0bviously with four children and a mortgage children and a mortgage already, if they do go up i would be concerned. at the moment it's a case of trying to get the deposit, and more on your savings will help us out of it. while the rise may be bad news for some homeowners, who will pay more on their mortgages, it is good news for savers, who stand to get a better return from their investments. according to some analysts, this may be the first of several rate rises. i don‘t think the increase will be that significant now, but the likelihood is, we will get a series of increases,
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maybe two or three over the next two or three years, so it will start to have a more material impact on our everyday lives. after ten years without any interest rate rises, today‘s decision by the bank of england is highly symbolic. but the size and speed of future increases are what will be preoccupying borrowers and savers for months to come. 0ne tweet bought my eye, and it‘s from danny peace theirs. he says... joining us now is david buik, a market commentator at panmure gordon. is it isita is it a disaster? simon hughes is forgotten, he has been out of the mainstream of that area for some time. the run—up of the pound, by
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modern—day standards, is pretty considerable. this is in anticipation of mark carney putting the rates up. they‘re all cynics, every last one of them, so they all 90, every last one of them, so they all go, thank you very much for that, i'll go, thank you very much for that, i‘ll take the profits. that‘s all it is, profit—taking. it‘s no more than that, reflected in the same thing by the ftse earning nearly 60 points immediately afterwards, all because of dollar related stocks. so people making a quick buck basically? yeah. mark carney saying, take our foot off the pedal, the message itself can be self—fulfilling ? off the pedal, the message itself can be self-fulfilling? they may be wrong but i have got this down as one down and off. you don't think there will be any more? no. he's much more concerned about unsecured lending, which has gone up 10% in
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the last five years to a dangerous level, where people say, i will pay some town. people using creditjust to get by? to live, exactly right. and inflation, if the pound is around 1.30, inflation will be nearer 2% 33% this time next year. the reason i don‘t think there can be any further interest rates, whilst the bank of england has such a negative stance towards brexit and the potential damage that it will do to the economy and the fact that people‘s disposable income is lower thanit people‘s disposable income is lower than it has been for some time, lower than the level and an inflation, in that climate how on earth can you possibly put interest rates up in that climate? if he‘s proved to be wrong by april next year and the economy is actually
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buzzing, then he‘s got a very strong case, but not until then. buzzing, then he‘s got a very strong case, but not untilthen. if buzzing, then he‘s got a very strong case, but not until then. if the talks progress positively, which is still possible... unlikely! but then it isa still possible... unlikely! but then it is a new ball game? it is but as we stand at the moment, with the real feeling of unrest, we stand at the moment, with the realfeeling of unrest, and people saying there are serious obstacles to cross over the next six months, you cannot say that the uk economy, and in their measured economy, is creaking. now, idon‘t and in their measured economy, is creaking. now, i don‘t happen to believe that. we had record levels on the ftse 250 yesterday. 0ur small and medium—sized enterprises are doing really well, and this is great news. with one eye on what's happening in the world of politics,
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it‘s that word uncertainty again — is that going to creep up? it's more than creeping up, we are staring at it in the face. what happened yesterday to michael fallon, and we suspect the business is unfinished in that area, huts theresa may in a precarious position. as we come to negotiate the toughest thing we have had in this country since world war ii i think she‘s not in a good place at all. people don‘t like uncertainty. we‘re very lucky that 62% of our stocks in the ftse—100, which is where our pensions come from, are valued in dollars or euros. the chief whip, gavin williamson, has been appointed defence secretary, following the resignation of sir michael fallon last night. sir michael is the first politician to quit following recent claims of sexual harassment in parliament.
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0ur political correspondent iain watson reports from westminster. the man on the right is usually responsible for defending theresa may, especially from critics on her own side. now, gavin williamson‘s job is to defend the nation. until this morning he was the government‘s chief whip, his task, to keep tory mps in line and keep the prime minister in office. the prime minister‘s chief whip was swiftly replaced by this man, his deputy, julian smith. theresa may wanted to avoid a wide—ranging reshuffle but the question now is whether the rapid departure of the previous occupant of the ministry of defence might in turn lead to further resignations. i‘ve spoken to people today at westminster who are convinced that other stories of sir michael fallon‘s past behaviour could emerge and it was his inability to guarantee there would be no further revelations that seems to have ended his career, but are there other ministers who may have done something in the past that will be judged unacceptable today? and would that put them
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in the firing line? people need to recognise that there is now a very strong set of rules about this kind of behaviour, we shouldn‘t pass it by and say that was just a one—off. that has all changed. i don‘t think that necessarily you will see lots of ministers resign. the vast majority of people in parliament do not get up to this stuff and do behave pretty well. but the leader of the scottish conservatives hinted at the need for a wider clear—out. this is all about power, people higher up the tree if that in that power on people who are more junior. that is not acceptable. and a former parliamentary whip says changes are needed, not just to protect victims of harassment at westminster but also mps who might
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be wrongly accused. there needs to be an independent body i think established, so that people can have confidence in the system. justice doesn‘tjust have to be done, it needs to be seen to be done. and thatjustice includes not only protecting innocent mps but also condemning mps who are guilty. business as usual, that‘s the image the prime minister wanted to portray when she met her israeli counterpart at lunchtime. her problems may be less dramatic than those of the middle east, but removing and moving ministers hasn‘t made herjob at number 10 any easier. iain watson, bbc news. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster. what does this appointment tell us? many conservatives say this shows that she is weak, they say she should have been bolder. some say he doesn‘t have any experience of running a department. he doesn‘t know anything about defence, they say. so, lots of raised eyebrows.
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the problem with any kind of reshuffle, even a limited one like this, you will get three people who are happy but dozens who have been overlooked who might have thought they could have been a good defence secretary, and hasn‘t happened. , so these things are always a potential problem. but many will say that he has proved himself to be very good at his previous, who is there is no reason why he can‘t be a very good defence secretary. a bit out of the frying pan, though, isn‘t it? defence secretary. a bit out of the frying pan, though, isn't it? yeah, i think that‘s the thing. when you‘ve got a minority government, the exit legislation which is running into trouble, all of these things, and potentially a sex scandal breaking, you need a chief whip who really knows what they are doing. 0f whip who really knows what they are doing. of course his pt has stepped up doing. of course his pt has stepped up to assume that role. but i think the fallout from michael fallon‘s resignation —— his deputy — is going
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to carry on. there is a difference of opinion within the party about how to deal with that. one mpi spoke to thinks this is a chance for theresa may to be bold and to get across that modernising message.” think the prime minister and michael fallon have done the right thing. they've signalled that her government is going to set the very highest standards and i think all of us highest standards and i think all of us in public office have the duty to do that, and in the highest office, the highest standards. people like ruth davidson have called for a clear out, saying that things really have to change, notjust here but in other administrations as well. she says there has to be something done about the way that the culture is here, and that‘s why michael fallon had to go. and some are predicting that others will have to go as well. but that is not what everybody thinks. i very much regret michael fallon‘s decision. 0bviously, thinks. i very much regret michael fallon‘s decision. obviously, in the current climate it‘s important to make sure that we have at
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westminster and across the whole country women being treated with respect and people being treated with respect. but actually government right now has got some big tasks ahead of it, with exit and the domestic agenda, and that‘s got to be our priority. so, there are some who are concerned about what they call a witchhunt, that this place here will be painted in a bad light and they say it is not necessarily worse than other places. the question now is whether theresa may can now move forward with this. she has a meeting with other party leaders on monday about bringing in a new grievance procedure. but nobody quite knows where this is going to lead. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... interest rates have on up by 0.25%. kevin williamson has been named as the new defence secretary. in sport,
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gareth southgate includes three uncapped players in his england squad for the friendlies against germany and brazil. tammy abraham and ruben loftus—cheek art in as well as joe and ruben loftus—cheek art in as well asjoe gomez. and ruben loftus—cheek art in as well as joe gomez. england and ruben loftus—cheek art in as well asjoe gomez. england have been handed a favourable draw in their opening matches of the 2019 rugby world cup. they start against tonga and then face the united states. eddiejones saying they and then face the united states. eddie jones saying they will and then face the united states. eddiejones saying they will have no excuses if they don‘t win. and mark stoneman says he still hopes ben stokes will have a part to play in the ashes. there‘s been a sharp decline in the number of nurses from european union countries wanting to work in the uk. the nursing and midwifery council says there was a drop of nearly 90% in new registrations for eu nurses, compared to the same period the year before. the department of health says an increase in training places will compensate for the fall.
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0ur health correspondent sophie hutchinson has the details. around one in every 20 nurses and midwives working in the uk was trained in the eu. many are from spain, portugal, poland and romania. but according to new figures, the numbers are declining. the nurses and midwives‘ regulator, the nmc, says in the year to september 2016, more than 10,000 joined the uk register. but this year, that fell dramatically, to around 1,000. and the number of eu nurses already working here who decided to give up their uk registration rose by 67%. it‘s a worrying trend, and for those who are responsible for thinking about what we need in the future, so the nurses and midwives we need in the future to care for us, they‘ll obviously look at this and think what can we do to reverse that trend? in the aftermath of the referendum, a campaign was launched to support eu staff in the nhs, but today‘s figures suggest that‘s not been enough reassurance, and many eu nurses are no
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longer keen to work in the uk. there‘s a shortage of nurses across the world. they‘ve got a choice, and with that level of uncertainty, what we‘re seeing is that our nurses are beginning to leave us to work elsewhere, and that‘s really difficult for us here, i think. those who represent nhs hospital trusts and others say nurse recruiters have been concerned about the situation for some time. the vast majority of hospitals are telling us they are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit from overseas. the numbers will come as a concern, but unfortunately not a surprise to them. many of them are still going out to europe and the rest of the world to recruit nurses and doctors from overseas, but it‘s becoming increasingly challenging at the moment. nurse leaders have described the sudden lack of interest from eu nurses in working for the nhs as alarming. it‘s estimated the nhs is already 40,000 nurses short, but the government has said it‘s ensuring the nhs has the staff it needs through a 25% increase in nurse training places.
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sophie hutchinson, bbc news. prosecutors in spain have have asked a high courtjudge to issue european arrest warrants for the ousted catalan leader carles puigdemont and four members of his former cabinet who travelled with him to belgium. they failed to appear at a madrid court hearing earlier, and mr puigdemont has been pictured in brussels today. mr puigdemont‘s lawyer in belgium said he would cooperate with the court. but he added that the climate in spain was "not good". a man has pleaded guilty to two counts of fraud after pretending his family had died in the grenfell tower fire. 52—year—old anh nhu nguyen from south—east london falsely claimed his wife and son had died in the disaster to get more than £12,000 from the victims‘ relief fund. he was remanded in custody and will be sentenced on 15th december. two men have been charged with negligence following the deaths of three soldiers after an sas selection march in the brecon beacons. lance corporal craig roberts, lance corporal edward maher
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and corporaljames dunsby died after attempting the 16—mile march on the hottest day of 2013. a coroner ruled parts of the planning and conduct of the march were inadequate. paul heaney has the details. reservists craig roberts, edward maher and james dunsby were trying to join the sas. a timed 16—mile march on one of the hottest days of the year in the brecon beacons in the 2013. of course, it was going to be tough, but neglect by the ministry of defence also played a part in their death, according to an inquest. the army later apologised. we are truly sorry for all the mistakes that the coroner identified today. we have already made a number of changes to the exercise in terms of the way it is run as a result of our own investigations and those of the health and safety executive. in march last year, the health
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and safety executive said the ministry of defence would have faced prosecution for what happened that day if it didn‘t have immunity. an independent body called the special prosecution authority initially decided not to pursue charges against individuals involved in the training exercise. but that decision was challenged by relatives of the soldiers who died. today, we‘ve learned one serving soldier and one who has since left the service will face charges of negligence. a trial will take place in a special military court. the director of special forces at the time said they pushed themselves beyond their ability to endure here, the process of possibly holding individuals to account for what happened that day continues more than four years after their deaths. home—grown british programmes are under serious threat due to a
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potential £500 million shortfall over the next decade according to the bbc director—general. and there is more news from the old vic following the allegations against kevin spacey. 0ur correspondent joins me now. let‘s talk about the 0ld joins me now. let‘s talk about the old vic first and kevin spacey? so, we got in contact with the charity commission, because the old vic is a charity. as well as the kevin spacey foundation, which he was heavily involved in during his directorship at the old vic. they have told us that they have contacted the charity‘s trustees to seek clarification on the matters arising from some serious sexual misconduct allegations against kevin spacey. and to assess if there is a regulator reach need for the commission to step in. they say this isn‘t a formal investigation and they are just asking the question and that they will pursue it in due
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course. now, lord hall is saying he wa nts course. now, lord hall is saying he wants another golden age of podcasting, but he says there are real problems? hallam he's saying that there is a big money gap, £500 million, over the next ten years, which could pose a problem for some of the most popular shows on british television. he‘s talking about shows like strictly, which is one of the most popular every weekend. it draw nearly 10 million viewers at the weekend. and blue planet ii, which got more than 10 million. he says it is because of online giants like apple and others who are using very high end production and expensive production, which places like the bbc can‘t afford to do. so there could be a problem in the future. let‘s not forget that tony hall did start this year by saying that he
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wa nted start this year by saying that he wanted the iplayer to reinvent the way that people watch tv online. he wa nted way that people watch tv online. he wanted it to reinvent for a new generation, hence why people are now having to register so that the bbc i suppose can keep track of what people are watching. doctor foster being one of those — 9 million people tuned into the second series on iplayer alone. so i guess he‘s hoping that this shortfall won‘t affect the production is that they put on the iplayer. the chief executive of tesco, dave lewis, has been giving evidence at the trial of three former executives at the supermarket. they are on trial on fraud charges, in connection with an alleged multi—million pound accounting scandal. the boss of britain‘s biggest retailer taking the stand as a witness for the prosecution, with three of sterz, spent
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morning learning the morning learning—arbeutrthe of the merning learning—arbeuethe of events leading up to chronology of events leading up to the moment when dave lewis learned about this huge gap, or black hole, in the companies accounts. dave lewis remember only started this job three weeks earlier, having been parachuted in to try to turn tesco around. things were so bad he volunteered to start earlier than planned. was a very unusual situation, he said. we heard about a series of scheduled meetings with the tesco executive committee, which one of the defendants attended. dave lewis told them to alert him if they had any significant financial or reputational issue for the group. it wasn‘t until september the 19th when dave lewis learned about the so—called legacy paper, which revealed a £246 million hole. dave
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lewis told the court that he was shocked and surprised, he had never experienced anything like this before. what was new, he said, was the proposition that £246 million of income had been included in the first half of the year, but on the basis of this paper it was now deemed to be questionable. it was quite clear that having read it, it needed to be taken very seriously indeed. the three defendants deny the charges, and trial continues. collins says the use of the term "fake news" has risen by 365% since last year. we asked you whether you could remember the year of these previous winners. .. and what about those metrosexuals. ..
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thanks to those of you who sent me your suggestions for those. let‘s have a look at the weather. is that today? yeah, this is today, this is the highlands, can you believe it? stunning pictures. it has been so sunny in scotland, a massive contrast to yesterday. this next one is foryou... contrast to yesterday. this next one is for you... we've got some dogs! this was in leeds. a lot of people are planning parties for tomorrow night and for saturday as well? exactly. if you‘re going to make plans to go out on sunday then it will probably be drier. saturday there could be a few showers but it‘s going to be cold.
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there could be a few showers but it's going to be cold. yeah, here is the satellite picture from earlier on. there has been some sunshine across the south but it has been pretty grey across wales and the midlands. the met office have issued a yellow warning for some dense fog patches across the south—west of england. through across the northern half of skies across the northern half of the uk, with temperatures falling away quite quickly. encroaching in to the north and the west, one or two showers. temperjulys, around the upper single figures in the south, but some really chilly spots
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across scotland, with a touch of frost. across scotland tomorrow there will be a lot more cloud around. one ortwo there will be a lot more cloud around. one or two showers into western wales. there could be some holes in that cloud across the midlands. double—figure values in the south. but it is all change into the south. but it is all change into the weekend. it‘s very wet for saturday, and then we have arctic aircoming down saturday, and then we have arctic air coming down from greenland and spreading across most of the uk by the time we reach sunday. saturday, we‘ve still got slightly milder air across the south and the south—east, but with the rain it won‘t feel like that. that spreads further, ten or 11 in
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the south, these values containing a wintry mix in the north too. turning colder as we head towards the weekend. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the bank of england has announced that it is raising interest rates for the first time in over ten years — with the cost of borrowing increased from 0.25 to 0.5%. with unemployment at a 42—year low, inflation running above target and growthjust above its new, lower speed limit, the time has come to ease our foot off the accelerator. the former chief whip gavin williamson has been appointed as the new defence secretary, replacing sir michael fallon, who resigned yesterday. prosecutors in spain have have asked a high courtjudge to issue european arrest warrants for the deposed
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catalan leader carles puigdemont, who is in belgium. eight sacked catalan ministers have beenjailed by a spanishjudge over their push for independence. figures show that the number of new nurses coming to work in the uk from other european countries has fallen by almost 90 % in the past year. sport now on afternoon live withjohn... a historic night in baseball? absolutely, the astros won the world series for the first time in their history. a special moment for the city as a whole following the flooding hurricane harvey. we have great pictures of some the fans soaking up the game last night. and some new faces for the england squad? unsurprising after the success the youth teams are enjoying ata success the youth teams are enjoying at a national level. england have called up three uncapped players for the friendlies against germany and brazil later month. swansea striker tammy abra ham is included, despite only ten top—flight appearances — he‘s currently on loan from chelsea
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as is ruben loftus—cheek, the midfielder who is currently with crystal palace — he‘s also included and there‘s a new face in defence with the inclusion of liverpool‘s joe gomez this is the squad in full. a new face in defence with the inclusion of liverpool‘s joe gomez. this is the squad in full. ashley young has been recalled. also notable for a number of absentees, no daniel sturridge, alex 0xlade—chamberlain or chris smalling. the groups for the 2019 rugby world cup have been announced. wales will start against georgia while scotland kick off against ireland. england open against tonga. head coach eddiejones says his side have ‘the perfect draw and will have no excuses if they don‘t mount a meaningful challenge...‘ i think it is a great start for us. you‘ve got to win the four games
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already. but france and argentina at the end, it‘s great for us. we are playing in some great cities. a real variety in the cities that we play for which will be stimulating for the players and the fans. england batsman mark stoneman hopes ben stokes can still play a part in the ashes series in australia. the all rounder wasn‘t selected after his arrest following an incident outside a bristol nightclub in september. england‘s opening tour match is against a western australia 11 on saturday in perth, with the first test on 23rd november. very u nfortu nate very unfortunate what has occurred. i feel for very unfortunate what has occurred. ifeel for him. very unfortunate what has occurred. ifeelfor him. i very unfortunate what has occurred. ifeel for him. i hope that very unfortunate what has occurred. i feel for him. i hope that there very unfortunate what has occurred. ifeel for him. i hope that there is a way back and when things get settled, it would be good if he can have some part on the tour. but most importantly, that he is well uncomfortable with himself. english golfers florentina parker and georgia hall are in contention at the abu dhabi 0pen. they‘re eight under—par, four shots
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behind south africa‘s lee—anne pace. hall‘s impressive round of 67 included six birdies and only one dropped shot. and just months after hurricane harvey devastated houston, the city has reason to celebrate after the astros won baseball‘s world series for the first time, beating the la dodgers in the deciding game. nick marshall—mccormack was there. this team‘s motto was "0wn history". they‘ve done that night, beating the dodgers at the dodgers stadium, these guys have tears streaming down theirface these guys have tears streaming down their face because since they were kids, they dream to getting here. some of the best players in the game never get the chance to play in a world series but these guys have done it, they have achieved history and now they can soak it all in. the
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people of houston have gone through a tough time. we've never won, 56 years is our championship. it will be fun. i wish we were there to feel it, when we get back we will feel it, when we get back we will feel it, we wear the patch because of how much we support them and how much they support us. we cannot wait to bring the championship back to them. the players, these guys, the fans, they have every moment in the stands, and while around it, there isa stands, and while around it, there is a sea of blue, these guys have stayed strong, and now they are going back to party. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to james burridge in cambridge for look east. he is talking about a fund to help
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cancer patients, we will be with him ina cancer patients, we will be with him in a moment. victoria graham is in plymouth. it's it‘s coming too fast, christmas, isn‘t it? it‘s coming too fast, christmas, isn't it? i'll it‘s coming too fast, christmas, isn‘t it? i‘ll be with you in a moment! let‘s go to james. a family in cambridge are helping to pay for pioneering cancer treatments, especially for children suffering from cancer? yes, this is the heart—wrenching story of the broughton family from cambridge. for a number of years they went through the horror of having to see their son, thomas, died from a brain tumour. as a result of that, he was diagnosed just before his second birthday and his treatment was seriously intense, 77 doses of chemotherapy, 18 anaesthetics, nine operations. but it was the painful side—effects that were the problem and it happens to one in four
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children with this kind of brain tumour. that‘s what the family have been campaigning for ever since his death in november 20 15. what been campaigning for ever since his death in november 2015. what kind of difference has the fund—raising had on other children suffering from other problems? they set up this fund in his memory which has raised £50,000 and is trying to ensure that children do not suffer these horrendous side—effects during their treatment. by taking a simple blood test at the beginning, they can tell the child‘s genetic make up and which drugs they can tolerate. tonight, we‘ve gone to a special laboratory at addenbrooke‘s hospital in cambridge which is trying to discover whether a drug will save a child‘s life or harm it. they have 28 children taking part in the trial which will rise to 100. the early signs are very encouraging. plenty more tonight, thank you very much. and victoria graham, christmas is coming, is it yourfavourite and victoria graham, christmas is
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coming, is it your favourite time of year? i think so, the reason why so many people watch bbc spotlight in the south—west, and there is a very loyal audience, because of the hard journalism... and the fact that we like to have fun. let me introduce you to bertie the blue nose reindeer. he came to us from age uk, and we got him, but not with the licence fee money! he‘s got nothing to do with the story tonight but it‘s a tinge of christmas! we are running a piece about grottoes, and we wa nt running a piece about grottoes, and we want to introduce you to steve holder, he has the perfectjob, surrounded by fairy lights, tinsel, reindeer, like bertie the bluenose raeder, every day of the year. 365 days of the year he makes christmas grottoes and he is fulfilling a childhood dream. as a child he would go round these grottoes and think, that‘s what i want to do for a
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living! adding some christmas on spotlight tonight, if you want to get away from the doom and gloom of the news, you can watch on the iplayer. and, i‘ve got a little present for you, simon. bertie iplayer. and, i‘ve got a little present foryou, simon. bertie likes to get presents for whoever comes along... thank you, peter. like! it's along... thank you, peter. like! it‘s an ipad! we couldn‘t find a piece of paper or a pad of paper, we will send it over, we are very organised! victoria with a new co—host, much more cheerful then is it just co—host, much more cheerful then is itjust on who is normally with you? i married the grinch. he is here! you‘re watching afternoon live. if you‘d like to catch up with more of those news nationwide stories, go to the bbc iplayer. thanks to victoria and james farage. theresa may willjoin her israeli counterpart benjamin neta nyahu tonight, to mark the centenary of the balfour declaration — when britain said it supported
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a national home forjewish people in what was then palestine. israel and jewish communities view the pledge as momentous — palestinians regard it as a historical injustice. 0ur middle east correspondent, yolande knell, reports. this museum exhibit in bethlehem shows the signing of a controversial letter which helped transform the middle east. its british foreign secretary arthur balfour, 100 years ago. and this is actually the same declaration over here where it says the government views with favour the establishment in palestine of a national home for thejewish people, but at the same time nothing shall be done which prejudices the rights of existing non—jewish communities. newsreel: a guardian of law and order... during the first world war, the ottoman empire collapsed and britain took control of palestine. it had a large arab majority but the jewish
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population was growing. when lord balfour visited in 1925, jewish residents welcomed him warmly. the balfour declaration is now seen as a major step in creating the modern state of israel in 1948. balfour‘s text was deliberately ambiguous. but palestinians were taught it sowed the seeds of their long—standing conflict with israel. the current lord balfour takes a special interest in the middle east and the centenary. i think we should commemorate it rather than celebrate it. i don‘t think we can celebrate while we have this friction. now the israeli prime minister is in london for the anniversary of the balfour declaration.
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but palestinians are angry. they feel the uk owes them an apology for what they see as an historical injustice. the uk has rejected the call, saying it will mark the occasion with pride. we will be talking more about interest rates which is our main story here, because the bank of england has raised the key interest rates for the first time in a decade ina bid rates for the first time in a decade in a bid to curb inflation. it is now an open 5%. —— now at 0.5%. gavin williamson has been named as the new defence secretary — following the resignation of sir michael fallon. and.. spain‘s state prosecutor has asked a judge to issue a european arrest warrant for the deposed catalan president carles puigdemont and four of his former ministers. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the bank of england has raised the base rate as expected to 0.5%. it‘s the first rate hike for a decade since the financial crisis.
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despite the uk‘s sluggish economic performance this year the bank of england voted seven to two to raise the rate. it‘s good news for savers but could raise mortgage costs for some borrowers. a rise in sales for supermarket morrisons — 2.5% for the last few months. the rise in like—for—like sales, which measures activity in stores that have been open for more than a year, shows the retailer‘s recovery is continuing. profits at bt dipped in the second quarter partly due to higher payments for sports rights and a slowdown in its global corporate services division. the company said other factors holding back profits included investment in customer service, and higher pension costs and business rates. this interest rate rise puts us to where we were before the brexit boat, the bank brought them down then, didn‘t they? boat, the bank brought them down then, didn't they? it was not .596
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then, didn't they? it was not .596 then, and they brought it down to 0.25%. we have seen that reversed, we have been talking about how mortgage rates have been affected and savings will increase a little but it isn‘t very much. and savings will increase a little but it isn't very much. morrisons have their sales up? they are doing quite well, this is the eight quarters where they‘ve managed to increase sales, they the best performer out of the traditional is... they are doing quite well because, do you remember is talking about how the traditional supermarkets have to fight off the discount stores lidl and aldi? they are doing it by introducing more competitive prices but increasing their quality range, they have added nearly 1000 products to their quality the best range. and
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playtech‘s shares are down significantly? yes, they are behind sun bingo, and they are behind fixed terminal betting stations, they have seen a terminal betting stations, they have seen a fall of 20%. they haven‘t said whether it is directly because of what we had earlier this week about the government lowering those odds from about £2 to 100. you could spend £100 in 22nd or something, a lot of people are getting in trouble? yes, they are not commenting on that, but the likes of william hill, they are the crux of their revenue. lucy 0‘caroll, chief economist at aberdeen standard investments. lucy, thank you forjoining us. interest rates, something that is interesting that we haven‘t necessarily covered quite a bit today, the fact that if we are in a
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situation where we see a down turn, the bank of england do not have a huge amount at all to help that situation. increasing rates could help them? it's an interesting angle to take. it is true that if the economy turns down over the next couple of years, these rate rises that we have had today do not give the bank much room to reverse. they‘ve got other things they could try and do, we introduce quantitative easing, come up with some solutions, and essentially there isn‘t a lot of room for the bank. if you think back a decade, we had interest rates at 5%, and at that point there was more room for the bank to cut if they needed to. mark carney said that productivity hasn‘t grown that much in the last
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few years, and we will see a new era where wage rises will not be on the cards and productivity will not go back to precrisis levels, according to him? yes, it is a crucial point, with productivity being weak, and brexit coming along, firms not investing as much in the past with the labour market being more restricted than in the past, it will not take much growth in the economy to start sparking inflation pressures . to start sparking inflation pressures. what mark carney was telling us today is that you may find yourself in a situation where growth rates do not look as good as they did five or ten years ago but we are still seeing modest interest rate increases. thank you. let's have a look at the markets now... and the ftse is interesting, from the bank of england? ending on a positive note there, the sterling dropped which wasn‘t entirely unexpected. the race was factored
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m, unexpected. the race was factored in, mark carney signalled that might be the case that rates will go up. the pound goes up traditionally when interest rates go up because you get more for your money by holding sterling. the trajectory is that if rates go up, continually, over the next two years, what effect it will have and that is why we see a drop. thank you. an international team of scientists, including scientist from liverpool, have discovered a new species of ape, from sumatra and indonesia. it is the third species of orangutan. 0ur science editor has been looking at the findings. the rate of mountain forests of sumatra are home to our closest ape relatives. the first population here was discovered
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20 years ago but has been hiding a scientific secret, this is the tapanuli orang—utan. a species new to science. up until now, it's thought that there were just two species of orangutan. but this new study is showing that there are actually three. a tiny population has been hidden away and isolated by hundreds of thousands of years of revolution. early dna analysis suggested that these animals were peculiar compared to other sumatran apes. scientists embarked on a study looking at what they ate and their unique calls. years of painstaking genetic comparisons enabled scientists to reconstruct the animals revolutionary history. the final piece of the puzzle was tiny but consistent differences between the sumatran and this, the tapanuli orang—utan skull. the sumatran and this, the tapanuli orang-utan skull. it's an amazing
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breakthrough, there are only seven and anyone that is added to a very small list is spectacular. with just 800 individuals, this species will go straight onto the critically endangered species list. logging, mining and plans for a hydroelectric dam are threats to its habitat. it‘s hoped that adding this ape to the scientific textbooks will help to ensure its survival. so, how would you feel if spent nearly 8,000 pounds on a dram of vintage scotch — and then you found out it well, wasn‘t. that‘s exactly what happened to a chinese millionaire in a swiss hotel — but how did the mistake come about? £7,600 for a £7,600 fora dram... £7,600 for a dram... and we can now
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talk to whisky consultant charles maclean, who‘s in edinburgh. it seems excessive, is a dram worth that anywhere? the price is worth what someone is prepared to pay for it. i'm what someone is prepared to pay for it. i‘m glad to hear that it was drunk rather than just stuck on the sheh drunk rather than just stuck on the shelf and i think the fraud was perpetuated because the fraudster assumed the bottle would simply be put into a collection, and never opened. the mistake was they went public and pictures went everywhere and somebody spotted a discrepancy between the cork and the label? it's very interesting, i‘ve been involved ina number of very interesting, i‘ve been involved in a number of these things where there have been discrepancies between the cork label and the liquid but it is the liquid which has caught them out on this occasion. could you spot the difference between a £1000 and a £7,000 dram, if you drunk it blind?
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no, that‘s the wrong way to express it. this is being sold as a whiskey, but clearly the bottle has been refilled. there are tests that can be done, scientific tests, which can tell you what the age of the liquid is, not precisely that it can tell you if it was made before or after 1945. all organic materials after 1945. all organic materials after 1945 have traces of radioactivity. so they can absolutely say whether or not. you can find out whether it isa or not. you can find out whether it is a malt whiskey or blended whiskey, relatively speaking, the quantities of the whiskey that have gone into it. my guess is that the bottle was an original bottle but it was filled with rubbish. from what i remember, it was a blend rather than a single malt. let's speak first of
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all to sandro bernasconi, he‘s the man who unwittinley sold the offending whisky. you thought it was an 1830 single malt, what happened? this guest said that he wanted a dram? it was a chinese guest in our bar, he wanted to try the whiskey. you poured it, then what happened? we gave him the two centilitres for that amount of money. he enjoyed his evening but after a few days some people told me that this bottle could be fake. what is your reaction? we tested the whiskey, and we would see what happened. we tested it, and it‘s possibly from the 1970s. so, it is a fake whiskey. how many people come into your hotel
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and spent £7,600 on a drink of any sort? that was the first two came and drank these expensive whiskeys. did he enjoy it? yes, he said it was a great evening and a good whiskey. the bits that he remembers. i wonder, has he got his money back? yes, once we got the results we let him know first. iflew yes, once we got the results we let him know first. i flew to asia and brought him the results and also gave him his money back. his reaction was really nice. he is not angry, here‘s not disappointed, he told me that it was a nice evening in the hotel and he really enjoyed it. from here, everything is good. those bottles behind you, are you concerned that anything else is fake or would it be a one—off?
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concerned that anything else is fake or would it be a one-off? that was the only one from the 19th century. some experts told me that from the 19th century you have to be very careful. it's very good of you to talk to us about it. thank you for your time. so, that‘s all from your afternoon live team today, next, the bbc news at five. a look at the weather now. here is stav. a lovely day, a lot of sunshine around. there could be the odd spot of rain here and there, especially in the north and west of scotland. to the south of the country, there are clear spells and we are likely to see mist and fog patches developing, dents in the south—west. tomorrow, it looks cloudy and we could see some light rain here and there. watch out for the folk in southern and south—western areas to begin with. it will be cloudy but we could see
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some holes in the cloud and some sunshine, and in the north—west, it will be windy and wet. temperatures into double figures but foremost, my old for this time of year. at the weekend, this cold air spread right across country. there are sunshine and showers. if you are heading to bonfire events at the weekend, saturday could see some showers but sunday night should be drier. today at 5, the bank of england raises interest rates for the first time in a decade. the bank‘s monetary policy committee says the rise, to 0.5%, is part of its fight against inflation, and there could be more to come. consistent with our mandate, and consistent with supporting the economy, that requires about two
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more interest rate increases over the next three years. while it‘s good news for savers, many homeowners with variable mortgages will face higher bills. any hike in interest or supermarket bills affects me instantly. i think they are so low at the moment, i'm not too worried about it. at the moment it's a case of getting a deposit, and with the deposit, interest rates are going to make that better. we‘ll be talking to a former member of the monetary committee who‘s been very critical of the today‘s rise.
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