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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 3, 2017 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, withjohn kay and mega munchetty. more allegations of sexual harassment in westminster. labour mp kelvin hopkins is suspended, as the party launches an investigation. michael fallon, who resigned as defence secretary, categorically denies new claims in today's newspapers that he made sexual comments to cabinet colleague andrea leadsom. good morning. it's friday, the 3rd of november. also this morning: a cut in the time it takes for new medicines to get from the lab to the patients. the government says it wants to reduce the approval process by four years. the ashes of the moors murderer, ian brady, are buried at sea after his body was cremated last week.
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who wins and who loses from the first rate rise in a decade? it's a little boost for savers, but an extra cost for borrowers, but only if your bank passes on the rise. i'll have the details. in sport, everton are out of the europa league, as arsenal progress, but it's a former manchester united player making headlines. patrice evra was sent off before his match for marseille, after apparently kicking a fan in the head. and matt has the weather. good morning. a faulty start full—time of us, but clear conditions at alexandra palace. it is of course a weekend of fireworks. will you get clear conditions? all of the details in 15 minutes. first, our main story. labour has suspended a former shadow minister from the party because of an allegation of sexual harassment. a party activist claims that kelvin hopkins, the mp for luton north, touched her inappropriately after a political event.
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let's speak to our political correspondent iain watson. what are the allegations against mr hopkins? the allegations, how they were handled, is important in this story. a young activist said she had a meeting with him and afterwards he helped her to tightly and subsequently she raised it at the house of commons —— hugged her. and she has after that he textured herb inappropriate lee, asking her personal questions like whether she had a boyfriend —— text her inappropriately. another was told she couldn't report these things anonymously. it looks like kelvin hopkins was reprimanded for his behaviour, but what seems to be concerning her now is he was subsequently promoted to the shadow
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cabinet. this is whenjeremy corbyn was in some trouble. some people wouldn't serve on his front bench. he appointed kelvin hopkins temporarily to do so but this was after he was reprimanded. she has complained again to the current chief whip nick browne and he has been suspended from the parliamentary labour party. in the meantime as well, if i could just ask you, sir michael fallon is on the front pages of several of the newspapers this morning. new allegations concerning him. what have you established ? allegations concerning him. what have you established? that's right. there are allegations in the mail and the sun. the suggestion is the leader of the house of commons andrea leadsom had some role in getting michael fallon sacked, it was the allegation is that he made sexually explicit comments to her. he categorically denies making those comments. the comments reported in the newspapers. in addition, she won't comment, so it's not quite clear whether these are indeed fresh
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allegations or simply gossip. i can tell you at westminster there are plenty of stories and rumours going around about what michael fallon may oi’ around about what michael fallon may or may not have done and the papers have picked up some of those. thank you very much indeed for now. we'll get reaction to this from jess phillips, who chairs the women's parliamentary labour party, at around 8:10am. it has emerged the ashes of ian brady have been buried at sea after his body was cremated last week. he died at the age of 79 in merseyside. the cremation is said to have taken place without any ceremony. his ashes then were placed in a biodegradable urn and dispatched at sea on thursday last week. plans to speed up the time it takes for new, life—changing medicines to reach patients have been announced by the government. the move follows pressure by pharmaceutical industry and medical charities who say patients are losing out. it could mean certian drugs
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being available up to four years earlier than normal, as our health editor hugh pym reports. medical research is producing exciting new drugs and treatments but there have been complaints that it takes too long for them to be approved for use by the nhs. the government says it wants to streamline the process in england so that new drugs for diseases like cancer and devices to help manage conditions like diabetes can be made available to patients more rapidly. under what is called the accelerated access pathway, the approval process will be cut from as much as 7 years, to three years. in april next year, five new drugs and treatments will be selected for fast track treatment. this number could be increased annually in future. at the moemnt there at various stages that any product, whether it's a drug or a device, whatever it is, has to go through in terms of regulatory approval or cost effectiveness and so on, commercial negotiations with the nhs.
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the idea is to bring them all together to run in parallel which will make the process operate much more quickly so that those things that really do have life changing impacts on people can be brought forward sooner. one charity said it hoped the scheme would go some way to ending bureaucratic delays and speeding up access to new drugs. the association of the british pharmaceutical industry said the government's policy was very welcome and should benefit thousands of patients, but no extra nhs money is being committed at this stage to spend on medicines — that could hinge on what's decided on the budget. hugh pym, bbc news. hsbc, tesco bank, clydesdale bank are among the banks who have passed on the first rise in interest rates in a decade to customers. ben's here with the latest details on who's immediately affected. good morning. we saw the interest rate rise by the bank of england, the first in ten years. more than ten years. but then the questions,
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when do mortgage repayments go up? it isa when do mortgage repayments go up? it is a familiar term. we've seen overnight that a lot of the big banks have raised the cost of borrowing for anyone with a mortgage. remember if you are on a fixed it doesn't affect you. as already a lot of criticism that they've been slow to put up the interest rate for savers because it has been a common picture. we've seen that savers have missed out while interest rates have been low and its big mortgage holders that have benefited from cheap borrowing costs. we've now seen that rate rises have gone up more than ten yea rs. rises have gone up more than ten years. a rises have gone up more than ten yea rs. a lot rises have gone up more than ten years. a lot of people have gotten used to rates going up because for so used to rates going up because for so long they've been going in one direction and that's down. so on an average mortgage, if you have one of about £150,000, it will probably cost you about £20 more every month, provided you are on a variable—rate mortgage some banks that have already put up rates are a clydesdale, first direct, hsbc,
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natwest and tesco. others have plans to start at the beginning of september, whether mortgage rates go up. again is the saving feature that is debatable. many say it is under review for the time being, but i think when they do go up some relief for those savers who haven't had any rises for quite a long time. twitter has launched an investigation after donald trump's personal account was taken briefly offline by a rogue employee. the social media giant said it was done by someone on their last day of work. earlier, our washington reporter laura bicker said president trump relied on twitter to help get his message across. for 11 minutes we got to see what a twitter world would be like without @donaldjtrump. it was out for about eight minutes at about eight o'clock and when it came to the page, when you went on to it, the message was
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simply, sorry, this page does not exist. twitter said it was investigating —— investigating and initially said it was human error. they said they have learned it was done by a customer service employee on their last day. a number of people are asking the question, how can one employee take down one of the most prolific twitter accounts and one in deed involving the us president? that's something certainly that twitter will have to a nswer certainly that twitter will have to answer for. meanwhile, donald certainly that twitter will have to answerfor. meanwhile, donald trump has continued with his prolific twitter habit this even in, it doesn't seem to have held him back. he has already spoken about the fbi and whether or not it is still great. he is also calling on the department ofjustice to investigate hillary clinton. imagine if he had woken up this morning and wasn't able to talk! how awful... how awful... how would we have known what was going on in the world? matt will have the weather soon.
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it was barmy last night! i ended up —— nearly ended up in the canal! i ran into a tree. another story... in front of a couple! they probably had a great laugh. if they are watching and have got photos, i'd love to see it. it's not often for a player to be sent off before the match starts. that happened last night when patrice evra went over to his own fans and there was an altercation. it appears he did lash out at a fan, the uefa are going to look into this. plenty to talk about in the europa league last night. we'll get to everton and arsenal in a moment, but before a ball was even kicked in the match between marseille and vitoria guimares, evra was sent off. the former manchester united defender approached a section
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of his own fans during the warm up. as tensions built between him and the fans, evra then appeared to kick a fan in the head. it's unclear what provoked the incident which is sure to be investigated now by uefa. five defeats in a row and now out of europe. it's not getting any better for everton. with caretaker manager david unsworth in charge, they lost 3—0 to lyon last night, so can't progress in the europa league. arsenal do go through after their goalless draw against red star belgrade. swansea striker tammy abraham says he can't describe the feeling after being called up to the england senior squad for the first time. he's one of three new young faces named by gareth southgate to face germany and brazil. and world number one rafa nadal continues his progress at the paris masters. he's through to the quarter finals today after beating pablo cuevas in three sets. that's it for now. but i've got some
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gems in the paperfor you soon. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. we were saying it's a bit chilly. how are you doing? he's got his gloves on. yes, it's that time of year again. a little bit cooler. good morning from alexandra palace. it was built in 1873. the home of tv in 1936. this glorious vista behind me will be eliminated the full extent this weekend —— eliminated. the fireworks festival is planned and has been ongoing for decades across alexandra palace's grounds, but this year is a massive festival, with a laser show and there will be a parade, a german beer fest as well. that's just one of hundreds of venues right across the uk which have been enjoying fireworks parties throughout the weekend. the big question is, will it be dry? will it be a damp squib
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01’ it be dry? will it be a damp squib ora it be dry? will it be a damp squib or a sparkle of a weekend? is morning, the forecast is a little bit foggy for some, especially towards the south—west. but for most it's a dry friday, with the few spots of rain here and there. chiefly this morning towards the north—west of scotland. the weak weather front is pushing north—west of scotland. the weak weatherfront is pushing on. a bit ofa weatherfront is pushing on. a bit of a breeze. elsewhere in scotland lots of cloud and the best of the sunshine to the north—east around aberdeenshire. cloud across northern england. and the cloud across the midlands and east anglia and wales will be thick enough for the odd spot of rain and drizzle. in the south—east, we should have some sunshine this morning. a couple of isolated fog patches. mainly further west we have dense fog around. allow yourself extra time for the morning commute as some of the fog could be around until mid—morning. a lot of fog in southern and eastern parts of wales. cloudy start for wales. grey and a few spots of rain. northern
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ireland, a lot of cloud to begin with. a couple of breaks, especially to the north and east. overall a fairly cloudy day. maybe later we could have some rain. we've got the weather fronts towards the north—west of scotland just edging its way southwards. the best of the brea ks to its way southwards. the best of the breaks to the east of higher ground. the best of the sunshine in southern parts of england, especially once you lose the fog. temperatures about 11- 14 you lose the fog. temperatures about 11— 1a degrees. if you've got any fireworks planned this even in most places will start dry, but into the night england and wales in particular will turn increasingly wet. heavy rain around to take us into saturday morning. that keeps things warmer in england and wales. clearer conditions for scotland and northern ireland. chilly to stop the weekend. the best of the weather in scotla nd weekend. the best of the weather in scotland and northern ireland and to the far west. a wet start in parts of england. mid and central england
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in particular. it could take all day for the reindler eventually clear from east anglia, but most places will dry up. sunshine will come out. cooler to the north and west. temperatures in single figures. over the mountains, some sleet and snow. that gives us the chance of showers if you are celebrating on saturday night. showers to the north and west. clearer conditions to the east after rain and that's the sort of story as we go into sunday as well. sunday, the big thing will be it's going to feel much colder. the wind will be a bit stronger as well and the showers are mainly to the north and west. a greater chance of showers in the east of scotland. after the wet start to saturday at least the sunday will be clear, but also cold. gloves and scarf death valley required! —— definitely required. but it looks like it will be a
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corker today! it is looking stunning. thanks very much. gorgeous view. isn't that lovely? did you make a nice link that? no, it was all in your head. you wouldn't do that with me. let's do that. one look at the papers. some of today's papers, categorically denied by sir michael fallon who resigned from the government. the claims in the papers are that he made some sexually inappropriate comments to his cabinet colleague, andrea leadsom. but he has categorically denied. and
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drawing a line under the westminster sleaze scandal. the post vacated by michael fallon. scientists in indonesia believe they found a new species of orangutan. we'll talk to the people involved. eight species ofape, including the people involved. eight species of ape, including us. we will explain it all a bit later. that is when i will turn to you, then. more political fallout here. the times saying theresa may is under fire. the daily telegraph's take on matters that she is for succession. he is seen as being a loyal theresa may follower and adviser. you said you have some gems in the paper. we are looking forward to the fa cup. the river is rising in truro. the
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river allan runs through truro and another river allen runs through the midfield of truro. for the true row fans, they are way down the leagues against charlton. the badges, unwanted badges? what do you do? you are not allowed to touch badges. i have had a badger problem. how do you tackle it? there is not much you can do. cricket club near sheffield they have the answer. they are asking the players to you related to buckets and place them on the pitch. i have heard about that. —— you're
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innate in to buckets. —— urinate. maybe this is the answer.“ innate in to buckets. —— urinate. maybe this is the answer. if you put your your rotting why fronts into the ground... —— your rotting under way. then you can work out how fertile your land is. —— your rotting underpants. then you can work out how fertile your land is. the badges are not going to like that, are they? clean underpants? any underpants. can you bring some sanity to this conversation?” any underpants. can you bring some sanity to this conversation? i will bring us back to earth with a bumper. the story that is dominating all the business papers. yesterday's interest— rate all the business papers. yesterday's interest—rate rise. all the business papers. yesterday's interest— rate rise. many all the business papers. yesterday's interest—rate rise. many people trying to work out how it works for them. the pound falls. the governor
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of the bank of england. warning that rates will start going up but they will go slowly. it's about 1% by the year 2020. normally, when you get an interest— rate year 2020. normally, when you get an interest—rate rise, you expect the pound to get a bit a boost. a similar picture on the front of the guardian but —— the guardian business pages. lifting rates in the first time in a decade. and that the tibet in the united states. janet yellen, the chair of the federal reserve being replaced byjerome powell, who will be one of the most important financial figures in the world. now, the pyramids. just explain this. they had discovered a
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secret void on the pyramids. explain this. they had discovered a secret void on the pyramidsm explain this. they had discovered a secret void on the pyramids. it was therefore thousand 500 years ago. after a ll therefore thousand 500 years ago. after all sorts of rumours? —— a500 yea rs after all sorts of rumours? —— a500 years ago. maybe they buried some of those rotting why —— those rotting underpants. yes, indeed! let's move on from that. good morning! today a bill tabled by labour mp jim mcmahon, will be debated in parliament. he wants the voting age to be lowered uk wide, as well as political education to be taught in schools. graham satchell has been to cardiff to find out what people there think. how old is old enough to vote in an
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election? 18 is probably right. 16 is too young. 18, yes. ijust don't think they've got the experience with politics at 16. the argument for lowering the age can vote to 16 is well rehearsed and goes like this. if you can get married at 16 join the armed forces and work and pay taxes, why can't you vote at 16? many young people are frustrated. it's unbelievable how we've been ignored. jobs for example, many won't employ somebody with no experience. how can you expect young people to work when you won't get them a job? young people need to make that change. to 16 -year-olds have enough life experience to vote? it doesn't come down to that, it comes down to your opinions, what do you need out of live —— life in the
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government? are they responsible enough to take care of themselves? then why not have the choice to vote with our future? cajole, how old we re with our future? cajole, how old were you when you were first elected? i was 18 and that was as a community councillor. jolie 's is one of the youngest councillors in wales but he doesn't support lowering the age. -- jill williams. 16 is too young. i questioned myself. you can be wise and young and ignorant and old? absolutely, but 18 is the right age. we are not just voting for me and myself, we are voting for our communities and countries. we need to take that seriously. mps in asp —— westminster are voting whether to lower the age. in wales, they have already had that consultation. next week, the wells are shaped —— the welsh assembly is
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likely to say the voting age will be lowered to 16 per local elections. it is 16 in the isle of man and jersey and the channel islands and the age has been reduced to 16 in scotland. 16 and 17 —year—olds turned out in huge numbers at the scottish referendum and they can vote in local elections and scottish parliament elections. who first really does matter. if the electorate is dominated by over 65 is, then parties are going to cater for the over 65 ‘s. that is rational self—interest on their behalf so you could argue that finding ways to get parties to engage with younger people, hitting younger people to engage in the political process will actually rebalance british politics. the conservative government in westminster is opposed to lowering the voting age that is the tide turning? in scotland and soon in wales, 16 and 17 —year—olds will $0011 wales, 16 and 17 —year—olds will soon be able to vote. let us know what you think about
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that. we will have some clever people on the catch with us. we'll have the people from the q! programme. banners as the q! elves. —— they are known as. did you know? what do all tanks in the british army have? they have tea making facilities. and did you know that octopuses spend 3% of their time just tidying up, they are very neat. tidying up? chances are you are over
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the age of 28. because only 1% of people who buy marmalades are under the age of 28. more trivia to come. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. mps will debate later, on proposals for tighter rules on how patients can be restrained in mental health units and hospitals. it's become known as shayni's law after 23—year—old olushayni lewis died in 2010 while being restrained at a psychiatric hospital in south london. campaigners hope new rules will make hospitals more accountable and improve training for staff. a murder investigation has started after a teenager was stabbed police were called last night to betts park. the boy was found with multiple stab wounds and pronounced dead at the scene. there have been no arrests. uber has employed a security guard in north west london to clamp down on drivers parking illegally
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and discarding bottles of urine in residential streets. it follows months of complaints from residents in willesden junction about anti—social behaviour. the taxi—hailing app launched an investigation after being inundated with complaints about its drivers littering and monopolising private parking zones. to come out in the morning and you can find bottles of your in the gutter and kids running around, my kid is there, he is in preschool, i can't park outside my house because the parking is taken up by hoover drivers. let us look at the travel. onto the trains — a crane being used for overnight engineering works has damaged overhead cables at welwyn north. some trains are diverting via hertford north: and virgin trains east coast, no service kings cross to stevenage great northern: replacement bus
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running to stevenage m25 clockwise — the qeii bridge is closed because of a crash on the bridge involving a car and a lorry. traffic is being diverted through one of the dartford tunnels. queues in both directions for several miles. we are starting today with some dense patches of mist and fog. we have a met office weather warning in force. some travel disruption, you can keep up—to—date with the travel team. the mist and blog will clear about 11 o'clock in the morning. we will see highs today or 1a, 15 degrees. a touch milder than it was yesterday. fairly light as well. this evening and overnight, if you
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are doing fireworks, we should get away with it. fairly mild but a fairly wet night of weather. a train is set to stay with us on and off until saturday afternoon when it start to clear way eastwards. it should be dry or mostly dry. there could still be a few showers hanging around. quitea could still be a few showers hanging around. quite a cold night on saturday, possibly one or two down bonfires but it should be clear for fireworks. sunday is looking chilli and maybe one or two showers. a chilly westerly wind. as hello. this is breakfast, withjohn kay and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: it affects one child in every classroom, but it can take more than two years to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
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we're finding out how delays affect those with the condition. it was the hollywood love story that led to liverpool. peter turner tells us the true story of his relationship with the film star gloria grahame in the last years of her life. it's now been made into a film. and the discovery of the tapanuli orangutan has scientists very excited. we're talking to one of the primate experts who helped identify the new species. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. labour has suspended a former shadow minister from the party because of an allegation of sexual harassment. a party activist claims that kelvin hopkins, the mp for luton north, touched her inappropriately after a political event. there has been no comment yet from mr hopkins. labour says it "ta kes all such complaints extremely seriously and has robust procedures in place".
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sir michael fallon has denied new allegations about his conduct. allegations made by the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, had complained about lewd remarks he made in a meeting and this was instrumental in him leaving hisjob. sources close to sir michael said he categorically denied the report. mrs leadsom has declined to comment. we will get reaction to this later from the chair of the women's parliamentary labour party. it's emerged that the ashes of ian brady have been buried at sea after his body was cremated last week. the moors murderer died in may at the age of 79 at ashworth high security hospital in merseyside. court documents show that the cremation took place in southport without any ceremony. brady's ashes were then placed in a weighted, biodegradable urn, driven to liverpool marina and dispatched at sea on thursday last week. plans to speed up the time it takes for new, life—changing medicines
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to reach patients have been announced by the government. the pharmaceutical industry and charities welcomed the news, saying it's a step in the right direction. from next april, a panel of experts will select certain drugs for fast—tracking each year, which could mean they are available up to four years earlier than they currently are. at the moment there are various stages that any product, a drug or device or whatever, goes through in terms of regular three approval and cost effectiveness and so on. commercial negotiations with the nhs. the idea is to bring them all together to run parallel, which means those things that do have life changing implications can be brought forward quicker. banks are deciding whether to raise their interest rates for the first timea their interest rates for the first time a decade. a number of banks have already raised the cost of some mortgages. lloyds bank, arkley is
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bank and halifax are reviewing their rates. —— ba rclays. bank and halifax are reviewing their rates. —— barclays. banks are not obliged to pass on increases to save rs obliged to pass on increases to savers or to borrowers. eight catalan government ministers have spent their first night in custody after us by niche judge refused to grant them they'll —— spanish. it was relating to their attempt to make catalonia independent. protests took place against the detention. this report contains some flashing images from the start. in the police vans are eight men and women who a week ago ran catalonia's government. now, taken to a prison in madrid. they face serious charges, including rebellion against the spanish state. ajudge denied them bail. as the news filtered through, their supporters gathered outside the regional parliament in barcelona.
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angry... ..and in shock. the government they elected, now behind bars. can you believe it, in a democratic country, that these things happen, again? we don't understand. we are very, very sad, deeply sad, deeply sad, and terrified. madrid argues it has no influence over today's decision taken in the courts, but these activists and people across catalonia sympathetic to the pro—independence cause say that claim is absurd. many people across spain and in catalonia are also outraged, but at the politicians who have pushed things so far. this woman tells us they have floundered spain's laws. she is so worried she might move abroad. so a new chapter to this
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cata la n abroad. so a new chapter to this catalan crisis. and every day, under the surface here, divisions more entrenched. the nhs is failing thousands of children because it is taking too long to diagnose attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a new report by the adhd foundation. it affects one child in every class on average in the uk, but nearly a third of those children waited two yea rs or third of those children waited two years or more to be diagnosed. the department of health says it updated guidance for doctors last year to try to make it easier to spot the condition. twitter says it is investigating how donald trump's account was deactivated for 11 minutes yesterday. mr trump has more than a0 million followers. people we re than a0 million followers. people were told the page doesn't exist. twitter soon said in a statement that his account was inadvertently
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deactivated due to human error by an employee. they say they are investigating and making sure this doesn't happen again. how would he have coped for those 11 minutes? we will never know. he is back online now. i wonder if he ever tweets about football. he has tweeted about the nfl, but i don't think he has much interest in british football. echoes last night of 1995, that famous kung fu kick on a crystal palace fan that ended in a nine—month ban. we will wait to see what happens to patrice evra. we still don't know all of the details but the beaches are out there and he was actually sent off before the match kicked off. i can't find any example of that at the moment, in send off before the first whistle has gone. was it a red card? it is rare to get one before the game.
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very rare! you would think a manager would pull a player off anyway after that. yes, he probably wasn't going to play. plenty to talk about in the europa league. former manchester united defender patrice evra was sent off for marseille before a ball had even been kicked in portugal. the defender approached a section of his own supporters during the warm up, it's unclear what provoked the altercation with some of the fans. after some pushing and shoving, evra then appeared to kick a fan in the head. uefa willno doubt be looking at the incident. staying with the europa league and this season isn't getting any better for everton. a 3—0 defeat to lyon knocked them outlast night and they've now lost five matches in a row. with caretaker boss david unsworth in charge, they conceded three second half goals to the french side. morgan schneiderlin was sent off on a miserable evening for everton. it is disappointing and all the hard
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work that we've shown throughout nearly 70 minutes just goes out the window, doesn't it? so it is disappointing, but we've got to pick ourselves up. we've got to pick ourselves up. we've got to pick ourselves up. we've got to pick ourselves up really quickly. by contrast, arsenal are already through with two games to spare. they drew 0—0 at home to red star belgrade last night. jack wilshere had their best chance in a game without very many. a point though is still enough to see arsene wenger‘s side into the last 32. it's been a successful few months for england's youth teams with world cup success for the under 20s and 17s and some of the young english talent has been given a chance in gareth southgate's latest england squad tammy abraham, who has been courted to play for nigeria, has been called up after impressing for swansea. ruben loftus cheek has also been named, as has liverpool defender joe gomez and southgate says if they can do it against brazil and germany. they can do it against anybody.
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you are always finding that balance of when to put young players in, how many to put in, but i think we have to start it get them ahead. everyone has been excited by what happened this summer. i think it's time to start to feed back into the team. —— feed that. the fixtures for the 2019 rugby world cup have been announced. it looks like they are in a bath. this was a warmup exercise. a bit of water polo i think. they are really pleased with what they've got for the world cup in 2019. they will start playing against the likes of tonga before they face the french and argentina. wales will start against georgia while scotland kick off against ireland. england open against tonga in what eddiejones has called a "the perfect draw". elsewhere the champions new zealand
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will play south africa in their opening match. premiership rugby wants the season following that world cup to be extended to ten months, but the england and leicester centre manu tuilagi has called those plans "ridiculous". the idea is to reduce the overlap between domestic and international rugby, but tuilagu thinks it will result in more injures. he's still recovering from the latest in a series of injury setbacks. nowadays everyone is big and eve ryo ne nowadays everyone is big and everyone is fast and the collisions are much harder, so i think the risk is higher. but ijust can't believe they are trying to even think of extending it. two english golfers are within four shots of the lead at the ladies open in abu dhabi. georgia hall and florentina parker sit on eight under par going into today's third round. hall made five birdies yesterday in an impressive round. south africa's lee—anne pace continues to lead on 12 under par. and world number one rafa nadal has continued his impressive form
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by reaching the quarter finals of the paris masters. he faced an unpredictable opponent in uruguay‘s pablo cuevas as this shot between the legs proved. look at that, a bit of magic. nadal was far too good and took it to three sets but came through to set up a last eight tie with filip krajinovic. he has been unstoppable. it's been easier. good to see. theresa may will meet with other party leaders on monday to discuss plans for tackling sexual harassment within westminster. it follows a week that has seen allegations of inappropriate behaviour made against mps on both sides of the house. if you look at the front pages of today's papers, there are more
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claims, counterclaims and denials. so how much has the growing scandal damaged our trust in politicians? colin talbot is a professor in government at both manchester and cambridge universities and is with us now. good morning. have you ever known a time like this? unfortunately, yes. iam old time like this? unfortunately, yes. i am old enough to remember the scandals in the john i am old enough to remember the scandals in thejohn major government when we had a series of sex scandals around the party then. it has happened before. i think trust in politics has gone down generally, notjust in the uk but across generally, notjust in the uk but a cross m ost generally, notjust in the uk but across most western democracies. but clearly this sort of thing doesn't help. how do members of the public ta ke help. how do members of the public take this information and digestive in terms of... because so much is being denied and we have to be very careful about which allegations have been made by whom and to whom, how does the public... how is it able to judge its politicians? it's very difficult. the problem is that what
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we see in the headlines is obviously the scandals and problems, the controversies. what we don't see is the majority of politicians getting on with theirjobs and behaving perfectly fine. the effect i think on the public is going to be reinforcing some of the prejudices that already exist regarding politicians being in it for themselves, all drinking and doing other things that they shouldn't be doing, rather than getting on with actually running the country. what can politicians do to make as trust them again, as a breed, if you like, a species? the main thing is institutional reforms in both political parties and parliament, to make sure that if people want to complain and it is mainly women complaining about male behaviour, if there is an avenue for them to complain they can do that without necessarily getting the sack or feeling that their careers will be blighted and that's clearly what's been missing in all of this. there's been missing in all of this. there's been no way for people to complain outside of either party structures
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or they are complaining to the person who employs them. then what happens? is there to be a big clear out? as the application, that these complaints will come through, rightly so, but then so many are guilty, so to speak, of inappropriate behaviour. what's to be done? we don't know who is guilty of what yet. there are a lot of allegations. there is a question of degree as well. we have to be careful about distinguishing between some things which are clearly criminaland some things which are clearly criminal and ought to be prosecuted and things which are much more minor. the michael fallon issues, it is very unclear exactly what's gone on in that case. and he has categorically denied the allegations. yes. the main thing is having clear standards around what is and isn't acceptable behaviour. we haven't had that in terms of anybody saying what the standards ought to be. i don't think the excuse that is being used by some people, that this is the older
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generation, is viable. i'm 65. iwas around when first feminist wave took place in the 19705. so were all of the5e place in the 19705. so were all of these guys and they should know better. to be fair, this is about feminism, it'sjust better. to be fair, this is about feminism, it's just about appropriate behaviour. you know how to behave i5 appropriate behaviour. you know how to behave is the assumption. so all mp5 5hould. they should. the reason i made the point about feminism i5 because this is when a lot of this behaviour i55ues came to the fore in the 19705. i remember it well, i was in manchester at the time. it corrected a lot of things that should never have been happening. so using that as an excuse now for mp5 who are in their 605, 5aying, oh well, i'm from an older generation, it doesn't stack up. the problem for voters and democracy is once you have these allegations it is difficult to reclaim popular support, the damage is done. the message from the major —— john major
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government is parties generally get public support on a couple of levels. there is this idea that they are competent at managing the country and if you lose that confidence, partly because of the 5ex confidence, partly because of the sex scandals and partly because of the economy, once it's gone it's gone and it is difficult to bring back. what does that mean for theresa may? she is in serious danger. she has made a series of m ista kes danger. she has made a series of mistakes and the latest one is to be the appointment of williamson at the department of defence because... not because he is necessarily wrong but because he is necessarily wrong but because clearly it is unpopular amongst conservative mp5. so i think she is in serious trouble. notjust her, but there's a real danger for the conservatives that they are seeing as being generally incompetent because of this sort of mess we've got. cabinet ministers
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are squabbling amongst themselves. that doesn't go down well with the general public. thank you very much for joining general public. thank you very much forjoining us. we can show you live shot westminster now. it is three light of this time of the morning. only a short matter of time before a start again. thanks to that, john. a nice, bright morning. it will. matt has his big gloves on. good morning. it's a lovely light morning here. beautiful sunrise. behind morning. it's a lovely light morning here. beautifulsunrise. behind me, stunning site at alexandra palace. that whole frontage will be full of light as we go through this weekend. massive fireworks festival taking place. others will be looking this
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way. a beautiful view behind me. a big fireworks display taking place. 100,000 people expected. just one of hundreds of venues up and down the uk celebrating guy fawkes night. you will want a dry forecast. i can't promise everywhere. this sky will be fairly clear in the villas that —— the visibility should be good. if you take a look at the forecast, some dense fog around. other parts of southern england, we have some dense fog patches. a bit of brain to the north—west of scotland. a bit of a breeze. while is a lot of cloud, is where we have a lovely, sunny start. the crowd keeping temperatures up. a few breaks here and there across parts of northern england. much cloudier than yesterday. the cloud thicken up the
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odd spot of rain. most will be dry. southern counties, some sunshine. some dense fog patches. take a bit of extra time for your commute. affecting the south—east of wales. fairly cloudy with dampened drizzly weather. northern ireland, largely do. the far north—west, highlands and islands of scotland, a lot of dry weather. the best of the sunshine, eastern scotland and across southern counties of england. it shapes up to be quite a pleasant day. most other pouts around ten, 13 celsius. into this evening and overnight, england and wales. some very heavy rain around. a rumble of thunder towards the south—east
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corner. scotland and northern ireland, drier. here, cool conditions into the weekend. for saturday, scotland and northern ireland, sunshine and occasional showers. brighter weather moving into western parts of england and wales. some heavy rain around. rain clearing its way eastwards. it could ta ke clearing its way eastwards. it could take until the end of the day before it is eventually gone from parts of norfolk and suffolk. temperatures dropping through saturday. it's going to be a chilly evening. if you are off to any fireworks displays on saturday night. eastern areas should be dry and clear. breeze developing. but these will be on sunday. sunshine and showers again. not quite as frequent in west. many eastern areas, staying dry and sunny. again, quite chilly. temperatures struggling to get into double figures in many of you. if
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you are off to any fireworks displays, grab gloves and hat and a scarf. i also grab a hot water bottle and shove it up m. you should of had were dashed shove it up my coat. i could do one ——i could do with one on my feet. do you really? whenever i am a hot water broadcast, i do that. now you know what is going on. and you can get those toe warmers you put on your feet. overnight, banks have been deciding whether to raise their interest rates, after the bank of england increased the cost of borrowing for the first time in a decade. it then easier. it makes a difference if you are a borrower or
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receiver. all of this could come as a shock to many. there is a whole generation of homeowners who have not experienced a rise in their monthly payments. "in the numbers. it shows that borrowers on the whole have done pretty well. the average rate loans and mortgages has fallen from 8% ten years ago to that, just a.5% by today. the average 2— year fixed rate mortgages down from over 6% to about 2%. all that means that homeowners have saved hundreds of pounds every year. it's a familiar tale. savers have lost out. the amount of interest paid on any savings, a% to less than half a percent. will yesterday's rate rise bring some relief for savers and how badly will boral was the huge? richard, good morning. the bank is finally done it, the bank of england
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has raised rates. the first time in over ten years. why have they done it. a few key economic indicators. gdp growth was stronger than expected. unemployment, a2— year low. a little bit of caution in the outlook. they have signalled this pretty well for the last few weeks. the market has reacted. about 90% chance of this happening. if things continue as we expect, we will make this decision. a bit to the upside in the here and now. although this is just in the here and now. although this isjust a small in the here and now. although this is just a small increase, it is psychologically important. it could bea psychologically important. it could be a few more. they were pretty clear in their expectations. a bit more subdued than the market expected. they signal about two rises. i think
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that's a fairly measured pace. i look at this as they reversed the emergency rate cut but they did. it's a little bit of wait and see. the market is expecting the next rise to be late 2018. it will be welcomed to homeowners. they have never seen welcomed to homeowners. they have never seen interest—rate rise. there is definitely a group of homeowners have never seen that interest—rate rise. i think one of the things that is really important, since 201a, lenders have been stress testing. they do that around about the 7% level. the point is, this should be manageable for most people. they might need to make an adjustment. the sort of numbers we are talking about, £150,000, about £19 a month extra. and i think this is really
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important, about 60% of mortgages today are fixed rates. if you took one out recently, that number is higher. those payments would change. when people get to the end of that deal, they might even be able to secure a much better rate. five yea rs secure a much better rate. five years ago, you are maturing now, you could see a reduction of about 2%. that is boral is. what about savers? some relief for them but the big question, how quickly will the banks actually raise the amount of money they pay an interest? savers have had it really tough. it's important to look back since the start of the year. the market has heated up. on fixed rates through the air, 0.a%.
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when the government spoke, there has been rate rises. we raised rates on the number of products. the building sites have done a lot to protect savers. each bank or building site will review that decision and come out with an announcement. we've seen a number come out. if you put your savings rates up... part of what we do as savings rates up... part of what we doasa savings rates up... part of what we do as a building society, we are owned by members —— members. a couple of weeks ago, we put our rates up. we could see some expectation. it's good to talk to you. we will talk about that a little bit later. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm claudia—liza armah. a murder investigation has started after a teenager was stabbed to death in bromley. police were called last night to betts park. the boy was found with multiple stab wounds and pronounced dead at the scene. there have been no arrests. mp5 will debate later, on proposals for tighter rules on how patients can be restrained in mental health units and hospitals. it's become known as shayni's law after 23—year—old olushayni lewis died in 2010 while being restrained at a psychiatric hospital in south london. campaigners hope new rules will make hospitals more accountable and improve training for staff. uber has employed a security guard in north west london to clamp down on drivers parking illegally and discarding bottles of urine in residential streets. it follows months of complaints from residents in willesden junction about anti—social behaviour. the taxi—hailing app launched an investigation after being inundated with complaints about its drivers littering and monopolising private parking zones. you come out in the morning
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and you can find bottles outside your doorstep and in the gutter and kids running around, my kid is there, he is in preschool, i can't park outside my house because all the parking is taken up by uber drivers. let us look at the travel. onto the trains — a crane being used for overnight engineering works has damaged overhead cables at welwyn north. some trains are diverting via hertford north. and virgin trains east coast, no service kings cross to stevenage great northern — replacement bus running to stevenage. m25 clockwise — the qeii bridge is closed because of a crash on the bridge involving a car and a lorry. traffic is being diverted through one of the dartford tunnels. queues in both directions for several miles. lets have a check on the weather now
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with elizabeth rizzini. we are starting today with some dense patches of mist and fog. particularly southern home counties. we have a met office weather warning in force. some travel disruption, you can keep up—to—date with the travel team. on bbc radio london. the mist and blog will clear about 11 o'clock in the morning. we will see highs today or 1a, 15 degrees. a touch milder than it was yesterday. fairly light as well. this evening and overnight, if you are doing fireworks, you should get away with it. some rain spreading in. fairly mild but a fairly wet night of weather. that rain is set to stay with us on and off until saturday afternoon when it starts to clear its way eastwards. it should be dry or mostly dry.
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there could still be a few showers hanging around. quite a cold night on saturday, possibly one or two down bonfires but it should be clear for fireworks. sunday is looking chilly and maybe one or two showers. a chilly westerly wind. hello, this is breakfast, withjohn kay and naga munchetty. more allegations of sexual harassment in westminster. labour mp kelvin hopkins is suspended, as the party launches an investigation. michael fallon, who resigned as defence secretary, categorically denies new claims in today's newspapers that he made sexual comments to cabinet colleague andrea leadsom. good morning. it's friday, the 3rd of november. also this morning:
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the ashes of the moors murderer, ian brady, are buried at sea after his body was cremated last week. a cut in the time it takes for new medicines to get from the lab to the patients. the government says it wants to reduce the approval process by four years. who wins and who loses from the first rate rise in a decade. a little boost for savers but extra costs for borrowers, but only if your bank passes on the rise. i'll have the details. in sport, everton are out of the europa league as arsenal progress, but it's a former manchester united player making headlines. patrice evra was sent off before his match for marseille, after apparently kicking a fan in the head. and matt has the weather. good morning. a light mist here outside alexandra palace. dense fog in other parts of england and wales to start friday.
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most will be dry, what will that last into the weekend? the fireworks will be out for many. i will let you know whether your weekend celebrations will be a bit of a damp squib ora celebrations will be a bit of a damp squib or a weekend sparkler. labour has suspended a former shadow minister from the party because of an allegation of sexual harassment. a party activist claims that kelvin hopkins, the mp for luton north, touched her inappropriately after a political event. let's speak to our political correspondent iain watson. what are the allegations against mr hopkins? the story is about a couple of things. allegations but also crucially how allegations were handled. the allegations in the telegraph, by the young activist, are simply that she invited him to speak at the university of essex, a political event, four years ago and after that he hugged her too
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tightly. she then met him at the house of commons at his instigation, she says she asked in personal questions like whether she had a boyfriend and then texted her inappropriately, commenting on how lovely she was, and wishing he was young enough to be her boyfriend. we haven't been able to contact kelvin hopkins, last night or this morning, so he hasn't commented, but the reason i say it is crucial how these allegations are handled is because she says she complained at the time to the then chief whip of the labour party. she alleges she was told she couldn't continue with the complaint anonymously. nonetheless it looks as though mr hopkins was reprimanded at the time and, despite that, he was then subsequently promoted to the shadow cabinet. this was whenjeremy corbyn was having trouble filling the frontbench posts. kelvin hopkins was an ally ofjeremy corbyn and he was an ally ofjeremy corbyn and he was nominated for the —— he nominated him for the leadership. it
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said he shouldn't have been promoted the frontbench because these allegations were known at the time the current chief whip has been spoken to about this and is now kelvin hopkins is suspended from the parliamentary labour party. and more allegations on a couple of the papers this morning about sir michael fallon, who of course resigned a couple of days ago. what have you found out about that? there seems to be a couple of parts to this story as well. 20 of rumours about michael fallon. in effect, a couple of the newspapers are suggesting that he made sexually explicit and inappropriate remarks to the leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom, some years ago. he categorically denies doing so. ago. he categorically denies doing so. nonetheless, at the suggestion also that she played a key part in his downfall, that she was effectively pushing for him to be removed as defence secretary. she won't comment on those allegations they but i have to say if
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machiavelli was alive today he would be pretty shocked! you have a busy department at the moment. thanks very much. it emerged the ashes of the moors murder ian brady were spread at sea last week. core documents say the cremation took lace without any ceremony. his ashes were placed in a weighted urn, driven to liverpool marina and dispatched at sea on thursday last week. the bbc has learned priti patel held a series of meetings in israel to discuss government this is without telling the foreign office. the meetings took lace over two days in august while she was on holiday in israel. no civil servants were present, but she was accompanied by a leading pro is really conservatives lobbyists. downing street says priti patel has done nothing wrong. plans to speed up the time it takes for new, life—changing medicines to reach patients have been
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announced by the government. the move follows pressure by pharmaceutical industry and by medical charities which say patients are losing out. it could mean certian drugs being available up to four years earlier than they are currently, as our health editor hugh pym reports. medical research is producing exciting new drugs and treatments but there have been complaints that it takes too long for them to be approved for use by the nhs. the government says it wants to streamline the process in england so that new drugs for diseases like cancer and devices to help manage conditions like diabetes can be made available to patients more rapidly. under what is called the accelerated access pathway, the approval process will be cut from as much as seven years, to three. in april next year, five new drugs and treatments will be selected for fast track treatment. this number could be increased annually in future. at the moment there at various stages that any product, whether it's a drug
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or a device, whatever it is, has to go through in terms of regulatory approval or cost effectiveness and so on, commercial negotiations with the nhs. the idea is to bring them all together to run in parallel which will make the process operate much more quickly so that those things that really do have life changing impacts on people can be brought forward sooner. one charity said it hoped the scheme would go some way to ending bureaucratic delays and speeding up access to new drugs. the association of the british pharmaceutical industry said the government's policy was very welcome and should benefit thousands of patients, but no extra nhs money is being committed at this stage to spend on medicines — that could hinge on what's decided on the budget. hsbc, tesco bank, clydesdale bank are among the banks who have passed on the first rise in interest rates in a decade to customers. we saw the interest rate rise by the bank of england, the first in ten years. a p pa re ntly
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apparently the banks don't have to pass on, so apparently the banks don't have to pass on, so it depends whether you have been affected. tell us more, ben. it is so interesting. they are quick to pass on the rise, but not so quick to pass on the rise, but not so quick to pass on an extra bit of interest if you've got any savings. it's that sort of battle that's been going on between borrowers and savers. savers have seen going on between borrowers and savers. savers have seen record low interest rates. but borrowers have had quite a good time of late. interest rates have been so low for so interest rates have been so low for so long it has meant it has been cheap to borrow. we've got an indication of which banks are doing what overnight. we've heard clydesdale, first direct, tesco bank, they've all put up their mortgage rates in response to the bank of england increase. many of the others are considering what they do next. i think there will be higher borrowing costs in december. this only applies to people who are ona this only applies to people who are on a tracker or standard variable
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rate mortgage. if you've got a fixed rate mortgage. if you've got a fixed rate deal your payments won't change. city will be an extra £20 a month if you are on an average mortgage of about £150,000. it won't bea mortgage of about £150,000. it won't be a huge amount but it will add up over the course of the year. on the other hand those savers who have missed out for so long, we know a couple of them will raise how much they pay on any savings, but others are now considering it under review. so we have to wait and see whether we have an increase in interest rates for savers. but remember this isa rates for savers. but remember this is a surprise for many people. many homeowners will not have seen a rise in interest rates. it's a whole generation. people who have had a fixed rate deal and have never seen an increase. so it will take people an increase. so it will take people a bit of time to get their head around it, but slowly and steadily the warning from the bank of england is that rates may start going up but we will hit about 1% by 2020. thanks very much. eight catalan government ministers have spent their first night in custody after a spanish judge
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refused to grant them bail. they're facing charges related to their attempt to make catalonia independent from spain. tens of thousands of catalans staged a protest against their detention. a warning for you, this report from our reporter tom burridge contains flashing images from the start. in the police vans are eight men and women who a week ago ran catalonia's government. now, taken to a prison in madrid. they face serious charges, including rebellion against the spanish state. ajudge denied them bail. as the news filtered through, their supporters gathered outside the regional parliament in barcelona. angry... ..and in shock. the government they elected, now behind bars. can you believe it, in a democratic country, that these things happen, again?
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we don't understand. we are very, very sad, deeply sad, deeply sad, and terrified. madrid argues it has no influence over today's decision taken in the courts, but these activists and people across catalonia sympathetic to the pro—independence cause say that claim is absurd. many people across spain and here in catalonia are also outraged, but at catalonia's pro—independence politicians who have pushed things so politicians who have pushed things so far. brickell tells us they have flouted spain's laws. —— roquelle. she is worried she might move abroad. so a new chapter to this cata la n abroad. so a new chapter to this catalan crisis and everyday, under the surface here, divisions more entrenched. twitter says it is investigating how
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donald trump's account was the —— deactivated for 11 minutes yesterday. people were told his page didn't exist. twitter says the president's account was inadvertently inactivated due to human error by a twitter in full year. it later clarified it was that person's last day in the job at twitter. intriguing! how to tell the president that! we will talk to matt later. and of course we will have the sport in about 20 minutes. slow and complicated delays in diagnosing adhd are putting children in the uk at risk, according to a report out this morning. the adhd foundation found that nearly one third of children waited
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two or more years to be diagnosed and most felt it wasn't recognised asa and most felt it wasn't recognised as a real condition by gps, school staff and specialists. joining us this morning our two people who know all about the effect of late diagnosis. zoe diagnosed herself three years ago after finding out that her son also had the condition. she isjoined by dr tony lloyd from the adhd foundation. thanks for coming in. so you were diagnosed three years after dylan. explain the timeframe. diagnosed three years after dylan. explain the timeframelj diagnosed three years after dylan. explain the timeframe. i took my son to an appointment... mental health services? yes, child mental health. he turned around and said, zoe, please go and get seen. you have adhd. isaid, really? it was please go and get seen. you have adhd. i said, really? it was like old moment. first time ever that it made sense. so you are pleased with that diagnosis? i was pleased to
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know why i had been struggling all my life. it helped me understand myself a lot more. when you say struggling, give us some examples of what struggles you were having.|j never finished what struggles you were having.|j neverfinished on what struggles you were having.|j never finished on anything, what struggles you were having.|j neverfinished on anything, going from this to that, struggling with friendships, i struggled with school, struggled with authority, lots of things like that. it is interesting because for an adult to be diagnosed obviously later in life is often the case that you hear children being taken to the gp, saying there is a problem. is it easierfor saying there is a problem. is it easier for children saying there is a problem. is it easierfor children to be saying there is a problem. is it easier for children to be diagnosed? it is still difficult and can take up it is still difficult and can take up to two years, in terms of waiting for a diagnosis. but for adults in many parts of the country there is no adult service and i think what is particularly challenging, zoe and iowa talking about this earlier, is
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when children get to their 16th birthday they can be discharged and there's no place for them to transition to. more adults are coming forward and we've removed some of the stigma and people understand what it is. more adults are coming forward, as i did myself, and believe that explains a lot. statistics suggest that on average there is a child in every class to have —— has adhd but many are awaiting a long—time to be diagnosed. when that diagnosis comes, as it did for your son, what difference did it make for him and what he is able to do? and treatment? the only treatment offered and that was available was medication, which did help a lot. it enabled him to actually be schooled for the first time. he was able to concentrate and absorb what was being taught. social etiquette was a lot better as well. he wasn't so intrusive with his friends. so it
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helped in that sense, but still long—term we still were just on the medication brute and that's it. —— route. the flipside is some people think adhd is naughty kids. they just need to sit down and concentrate. you laugh and a lot of people still think that. there's also the concern that medication is too readily given. statistically that's incorrect. it is estimated that's incorrect. it is estimated that 5% of the childhood population have adhd, but in the uk less than 396 have adhd, but in the uk less than 3% are diagnosed and less than 1% are predicated. the national institute of clinical excellence says treatment should be multimodal. in the same way that if you have another chronic condition you are given information and skills so parents can make sure their child is healthy and achieve their potential. but in actual fact in most parts of
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the uk medication is the first and only line of treatment that clinicians make available. to actually not many people... not many trusts in the uk are following those guidelines. we were talking about delays in diagnosing children. you have waited your life pretty much to be diagnosed and there must be people watching this morning, listening to you, thinking, maybe that sounds like me. what do you think? across all ages, what would you like to see happen? on every level. the understanding by gps of adhd. they are our first line. a lot more investment needs to go into understanding. i don't feel gps have time to get it. the amount of time you're able to spend with a gp is not of them to come up with possible adhd. they do not have that
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time and resources. having it's quite difficult for them. how are you doing? we are doing all right. every day is a different day. it's good. they you the sharing family story. —— thank you. this is central london. but the london, westminster and the sun. look at that. glinting up the thames. a beautiful view. matters at alexandra palace. the sun is shining. good morning. a bit chilly. nothing desperately cold. doesn't this at the building looks stunning? eliminated in the sunlight. illuminated with an amazing light show as the fireworks
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festival ta kes amazing light show as the fireworks festival takes place through the coming weekend. all eyes will be in this direction. it is going to be a marvellous avintia. for many, across the country, taking place to celebrate guy fawkes. the crucial thing is, will the wetherby on your side? for many of you, may well be. a few hiccups along the way. —— will the weather be on your site? elsewhere across southern england aside from london, dense fog patches. most started right. the best of the brakes on the cloud to scotland. eastern areas, aberdeenshire, but elsewhere, temperatures up the many overnight. a few breaks across northern england. a lot of cloud. the odds spot of light rain in drizzle. prior to the south. it's here we've to content with some of fog patches. where you do have the fog, that fog
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may take a while before it finally ships. maybe a little bit of drizzle in parts of wales. you can also see the odd shower passed through northern ireland. let's take a look through the day. the mist and fog usually clears across the south. a lot more cloud around compare that to many of you. eastern parts of scotla nd to many of you. eastern parts of scotland will continue to see some good spells of sunshine. temperatures may be up a little bit. most notable, where the sun is out. a big change the england and wales. increasingly wet. heavy through the night. scotland and northern ireland, sky is clear. some showers pushing in later on. the coolest conditions into saturday morning.
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england and wales, not quite as chile. a thoroughly wet start through parts of england. the rain clearing from the west. but as you can see, the north and west, the sunshine comes out. heavy with hail and thunder. some sleet and snow as well. temperatures in single figures. if you are celebrating with fireworks, the bonfires on saturday night. after a wet day and some damp bonfires, it should break clear. sunday, breezy day across the board. showers in the north and the west. eastern areas should fare reasonably well. a much better day compared with saturday. a bit of sunshine as well. into sunday evening, many majors get away. because the temperatures have dropped, check
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because hedgehogs might have taken shelter underneath shrubs at home. should you be able to vote in parliamentary elections at the age of16? i parliamentary elections at the age of 16? i wonder what many 16 —year—olds would make of the scandals we have been discussing. perhaps they would like the chance to make a difference. and we are talking about how you reinvigorate politics. graham satchell has been to cardiff were a conversation is taking place. how old is old enough to vote in an election? 18 is probably right. 16 is too young. 18, yes. ijust don't think they've got the experience with politics at 16. the argument for lowering the age people can vote to 16 is well rehearsed and goes like this.
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if you can get married at 16, join the armed forces and work and pay taxes, why can't you vote at 16? many young people are frustrated. it's unbelievable how we've been ignored. jobs for example, many won't employ somebody with no experience. how can you expect young people to work when you won't give them a job? young people need to make that change. do 16—year—olds have enough life experience to vote? it doesn't come down to that, it comes down to your opinions, what do you need out of life and the government? are they responsible enough to take care of themselves? then why not have the choice to vote with our future? joel, how old were you when you were first elected? i was 18 and that was as a community councillor. joel williams is one of the youngest councillors in wales but he doesn't support lowering the age of voting.
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16 is too young. i questioned myself. you can be wise and young and ignorant and old? absolutely, but 18 is the right age. we are notjust voting for me and i, we are voting for our communities and countries. we need to take that seriously. mp5 in westminster are voting whether to lower the age for general elections. in wales, they have already had that consultation. next week, the the welsh assembly is likely to say the voting age will be lowered to 16 for local elections. it is already 16 in the isle of man and jersey and the channel islands and of course, the age has been reduced to 16 in scotland. 16— and 17—year—olds turned out in huge numbers at the scottish
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referendum and they can vote in local elections and scottish parliament elections. who votes really does matter. if the electorate is dominated by over—655, then parties are going to cater for the over—655. that is rational self—interest on their behalf so you could argue that finding ways to get parties to engage with younger people, getting younger people to engage with the political process will actually rebalance british politics. the conservative government in westminster is opposed to lowering the voting age that is the tide turning? in scotland and soon in wales, 16— and 17 —year—olds will soon be able to vote. city have been getting in touch. jack says yes. carroll says it 16
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—year—olds are likely to vote, they we re —year—olds are likely to vote, they were less likely make mistakes. the 16 —year—olds would not make m ista kes 16 —year—olds would not make mistakes because they would have to live with the consequences for longer. a lot of people are negative. joe says they would only vote if there was an app on their phones. margaret says, my kids would not know what to do and they are not experienced enough to know. keep your balls coming through. —— keep your thoughts coming through. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning we'll have the clever brains behind the q! a murder investigation has started after a teenager was stabbed to death in bromley. police were called last night to betts park. the boy was found with multiple stab wounds and pronounced dead at the scene. there have been no arrests. mp5 will debate later, on proposals for tighter rules on how patients can be restrained in mental health units and hospitals.
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it's become known as shayni's law after 23—year—old olushayni lewis died in 2010 while being restrained at a psychiatric hospital in south london. campaigners hope new rules will make hospitals more accountable and improve training for staff. uber has employed a security guard in north west london to clamp down on drivers parking illegally and discarding bottles of urine in residential streets. it follows months of complaints from residents in willesden junction about anti—social behaviour. the taxi—hailing app launched an investigation after being inundated with complaints about its drivers littering and monopolising private parking zones. you come out in the morning and you can find bottles of urine outside your doorstep and in the gutter and kids running around, my kid is there, he is in preschool, i can't park outside my house because all the parking is taken up by uber drivers. let's have a look at the travel situation now. onto the trains — a crane being used for overnight engineering works has
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damaged overhead cables at welwyn north. some trains are diverting via hertford north. and virgin trains east coast, no service kings cross to stevenage great northern — replacement bus running to stevenage. m25 clockwise — the qeii bridge is closed because of a crash on the bridge involving a car and a lorry. traffic is being diverted through one of the dartford tunnels. queues in both directions for several miles. we have a met office weather warning in force. some travel disruption, you can keep up—to—date with the travel team. on bbc radio london. the mist and blog will clear about 11 o'clock in the morning. we will see highs today or 1a, 15 degrees. a touch milder than it was yesterday. fairly light winds as well. this evening and overnight, if you are doing fireworks, you should get away with it.
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some rain spreading in. fairly mild but a fairly wet night of weather. that rain is set to stay with us on and off until saturday afternoon when it starts to clear its way eastwards. it should be dry or mostly dry. there could still be a few showers hanging around. quite a cold night on saturday, possibly one or two down bonfires but it should be clear for fireworks. sunday is looking chilly and maybe one or two showers. a chilly north—westerly wind. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, withjohn kay and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. labour has suspended a former shadow minister from the party
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because of an allegation of sexual harassment. a party activist claims that kelvin hopkins, the mp for luton north, touched her inappropriately after a political event. there has been no comment yet from mr hopkins. labour says it "ta kes all such complaints extremely seriously and has robust procedures in place". sir michael fallon has denied new allegations about his conduct. allegations made by the leader of the commons, in a meeting and this was instrumental in him leaving hisjob. sources close to sir michael said he categorically denied the report. mrs leadsom has declined to comment. the moors murderer‘s ashes have been
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buried at sea. - decades on buried at sea. five decades on ian brady's body has been unceremoniously buried at sea. there was no music and flowers are not allowed. these were the condition set by the high court, which stepped in because of fears his remains would be on weulé éessgéttsreé'sn'thefféeersjlg e." gm reich! was. ”5 .-. g was sent ! g was sent to l g was sent to prison in killed. reidy was sent to prison in 1966 for murdering three people. —— brady. later he admitted to killing a 16—year—old and a 12—year—old. he died of natural causes in may this year, but in the early hours of wednesday the 26th of october ian brady's remains were sealed in a waited on and sent to the bottom of the sea —— weighted urn. the bbc has learned priti
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lezzeel ’ ' the bbc has learned priti 5235: meetings israel % present but she f' a 1' if f ' t" ., ,. present but she z" a c0mplete w ., ,. pro is - conservative . . .’f;""_.. .. ii ”if street sa 5 she lobbyist. downing street says she has done nothing wrong. plans to speed up the time it takes for new, life—changing medicines to reach patients have been announced by the government. the pharmaceutical industry and charities welcomed the news, saying it's a step in the right direction. from next april, a panel of experts will select certain drugs for fast—tracking each year, which could mean they are available up to four years earlier than they currently are. at the moment there are various stages that any product, a drug or device or whatever it is, goes through in terms of regular —— regulatory approval and cost effectiveness and so on. commercial negotiations with the nhs. the idea is to bring them all together to run in parallel, which makes the process run quickly,
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which means those things that do have life changing implications can be brought forward sooner. banks are deciding whether to raise their interest rates for the first time a decade. hsbc, tesco and clydesdale have already raised the cost of rolling on some mortgages. lloyds bank, barclays and halifax are reviewing their rates. yesterday the bank of england put their rates up to 0.5% from 0.25%. banks are not obliged to pass on increases to savers or to borrowers. eight catalan government ministers have spent their first night in custody after a spanish judge refused to grant them bail. tens of thousands of catalans staged a protest against their detention over charges relating to their attem pts over charges relating to their atte m pts to over charges relating to their attempts to make catalonia independent from spain. the judge said the ministers might flee the country or destroy evidence if they we re country or destroy evidence if they were released. the nhs is failing thousands of children because it is taking too long to diagnose attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a new report
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by the adhd foundation. it affects one child in every class on average in the uk, but nearly a third of those children waited two years or more to be diagnosed. the department of health says it has updated guidance for doctors last year to make it easier to spot the condition. hardly an hour goes by without some sort of tweets coming from the white house, from donald trump's account. but overnight for 11 minutes it all stopped. his account was deactivated. anyone searching for mr trump on the social networking site, he has a0 million followers, were told this page does not exist. twitter issued an explanation, saying the president's account was deactivated accidentally due to human error. it later clarified that it was the employee's last day in thejob. i wonder what mr trump's response
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would have been! was he asleep during those 11 minutes, or was it a crucial time of the day? i don't know. he is back online now. maybe he has an alert that rings if a tweet hasn't been sent. a diplomatic crisis! something that has been tweeted a lot about last night. it was 1995 when a crystal palace fan was kicked. this incident happened before the game started. patrice evra could be in trouble. it is almost unheard of for a player to be sent off before i game begins. it's unclear what the incident. the defender approached a section of his own supporters during the warm up, it's unclear what provoked the altercation with some of the fans. after some pushing and shoving, evra then appeared to kick a fan in the head. uefa willno doubt be looking at the incident.
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he didn't get to play any part in that match against portugal. staying with the europa league and this season isn't getting any better for everton. a 3—0 defeat to lyon knocked them outlast night and they've now lost five matches in a row. with caretaker boss david unsworth in charge, they conceded three second half goals to the french side. morgan schneiderlin was sent off on a miserable evening for everton. it is disappointing and all the hard work that we've shown throughout nearly 70 minutes just goes out the window, doesn't it? so it's disappointing, but we've got to pick ourselves up. we've got to pick ourselves up really quickly. by contrast, arsenal are already through with two games to spare. they drew 0—0 at home to red star belgrade last night. jack wilshere had their best chance in a game without very many. a point though is still enough to see arsene wenger‘s side into the last 32.
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we have been hearing recently how good england's younger players are, so good england's younger players are, so why not give them a chance? that's what gareth southgate has done. tammy abraham said words couldn't describe his feelings. how old is he? 19. ruben loftus cheek has also been named, as has liverpool defender joe gomez and southgate says if they can do it against brazil and germany. they can do it against anybody. you're always finding that balance of when to put young players in, how many to put in, but i think we have to start it give them a head. everyone has been excited by what happened this summer. i think it's time to start to feed that into the team. it's good they are getting a chance. tammy abraham is did fantastically
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last year. can you explain a game, i always get confused. the under 17 squad... they have to be under 17. but he wasn't part of it. it won't be long before they bring in either younger players! i know some primary players who are good! well, they are signed up at the age of seven or eight. do you want to see some rugby in of seven or eight. do you want to see some rugby - in the bath? see some rugby players in the bath? all right! or in all right! orina all right! or in a pool... they are in the papers this morning. england's rugby stars playing a bit of water polo. the water looks black! i'm sure it's just the lighting. talking about their pools, this is their draw of 2019. i see what you did there! notjust a pretty face. they have a great draw. they will face tonga. before that they face france and argentina. wales start with yourjob and
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scotla nd wales start with yourjob and scotland kick—off with ireland. yes, england open against tonga, what eddiejones called england open against tonga, what eddie jones called the england open against tonga, what eddiejones called the perfect pool draw. elsewhere the champions new zealand will play south africa in their opening match. two english golfers are within four shots of the lead at the ladies open in abu dhabi. georgia hall and florentina parker sit on eight under par going into today's third round. hall made five birdies yesterday in an impressive round. south africa's lee—anne pace continues to lead on 12 under par. finally, i think 2017 will be remembered as the year that rafael nadal returned. it is so lovely to see him back. so impressive. he has had so many injuries. his impressive form has continued at paris masters. he is now in the finals. he faced a pretty tricky opponent. uruguay‘s pablo cuevas — this shot between the legs proved.
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nadal was far too good and took it to three sets but came through to set up a last eight tie with filip krajinovic. the atp finals later this month. the world number one. there we go. see you in one hour. thanks very much. there's a violent knife crime committed in england and wales every 14 committed in england and wales every 1a minutes. that's one of the shocking statistics uncovered by the bbc for a series of special reports this week. so many shocking pictures and statistics. we have been asking who the people are behind these crimes and how the victims rebuild their lives. the bbc special correspondent has been looking at the reality behind those numbers. we will have a chat with him in a moment. but have a look at his report. early in evening, tottenham, north london, and the mopeds closing. —— close in. it was four men on bikes who went on
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to the pavement. we saw them come here and within seconds they've taken this here and within seconds they've ta ken this man's here and within seconds they've taken this man's bike. my bike and my phone. calm down... in fact, we counted five bikes. two on the pavement, three on the road. at the lights they surround the delivery rider. he jumps off his bike. what you can't see is the knife in his hand. amazing and shocking pictures this week on bbc news. our special correspondentjoins us from our london newsroom. good morning. the pictures have been quite unbelievable. the axis you've had in these pieces. how widespread have you discovered that knife crime is in the uk today? just take the
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mopeds incident you saw. that's just one example. but just mopeds incident you saw. that's just one example. butjust this year in london alone there have been 17,000 mopeds crimes. of course they all have knives but a lot of them have weapons and that driver lost everything. he's not on the most money in this country, he works every alloy he can, but he didn't know how he would eat that day and that's just one victim here. again, that's just one victim here. again, that statistic, every 1a minutes there's a knife crime across england and wales. more than 30 south —— 37,000 knife crimes in the past 12 months. that's an astonishing figure and police have told us that when you take mopeds crimes the average age of those involved is just 15 and that gives you a sense of the sort of people involved in this. during the months we spent making this report, when we spoke to young people who carried knives we asked why they do it and they say it makes them feel safer. they say because somebody else is also carrying a
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knife. you can see how the cycle of violence goes on and on. it's not just knives, you spoke about gun crime as well in some of these pieces and you've spoken to victims. let's see a clip of the mum of someone let's see a clip of the mum of someone who was shot in a playground in london in september this year. this just feels like one, big nightmare. one day that's just continuous and all i know is that when i wake up every morning it is one dame or without him. i got a call telling me my son had been shot ina park. call telling me my son had been shot in a park. —— one day more. that's not normal. that's not how we should be living in society today and if things like that are happening we need to look at what we can do to change this. you can see and feel the anger within her as she deals with this herself. i can tell watching you on these pieces that you were shocked unaffected by some of the things you saw and heard? you
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can't not be. two days after cory was shot i went down to the place where he was shot, he was shot in the back of the head, and it is right next to a playground. this was a 1a—year—old boy. his mum didn't wa nt to a 1a—year—old boy. his mum didn't want to go on camera, but she felt compelled to do it. she wanted to say to people, this could be anyone's child. she wanted people to sit up, take notice and something to be done about it. of course gun crime is not on the same scale as knife crime, but it is rising across england and wales. it's up to the 7% and something which is really striking by the statistics we found is that one in six of the big them is that one in six of the big them is in london over 12 months were aged 17 and under, so there's a profile building, a picture. younger people involved in extreme violence. we wa nted people involved in extreme violence. we wanted to get up close and speak to people who were involved. what came up again and again is that people told us guns were easy to get
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hold of and the people carrying them we re hold of and the people carrying them were involved in drug dealing. he spoke about some of the possible solutions and some of the things that are maybe not working. the third report into police stop—and—search powers, friends of the 17—year—old who was stabbed to death in london were spoken to.l barge of young people are coming to mess up the area and create this. sta b mess up the area and create this. stab each other or whatever. tensions are high around here. basically they were driving through, slowing down and watching us. so we stopped them under section 60. as long as we have reasonable grounds. why do you think you were stopped? because we are four black youths in a nice car. is that stop-and-search succeeding? the metropolitan police say they are taking thousands of
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weapons off the streets. they say it is invaluable and they say there are fewer stop and searches now. and there are fewer complaints. but you just need to look at that peace and you get the sense there is a divide between the police and communities. they need to reach out to them to try to bring this problem down of byla nd try to bring this problem down of byland crime. again and again we we re byland crime. again and again we were told by people that they do not trust the police and wouldn't call them if they were a victim of a crime. we tried to speak to the metropolitan police for this series of reports and get an interview with the commissioner but he didn't want to be interviewed. the police federation said their rank officers are facing a greater threat, greater, now than ever before. —— rank and file officers. they say there are 20,000 fewer officers on there are 20,000 fewer officers on the streets now since 2010. thank you very much indeed. i know you spent months working on it and it has allowed us to see things we
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often talk about but don't understand or c. if you want to watch more of that you can watch the special report on knife and gun crime on the bbc news at ten's website. morning at alexandra palace but it is cold. your big clubs have gone. it must be warming up a bit. the gloves are off on the scarf will be soon but good morning from alexandra palace. many will be here for fireworks displays that will the weather be drier? let us get on the weather be drier? let us get on the weather forecast. the weather be drier? let us get on the weatherforecast. the big problem this morning, for some of you, into south wales and the south—west midlands, some dense patches of fog. mid—to—late morning. there is some rate in the forecast. the north—west highlands, a few splashes this morning. edging slowly southwards.
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conditions here this morning, a lot more cloud. that has kept the temperatures dropping away. that cloud could be big enough for a few splashes of rain. it will stay dry. the sunshine and the south—east. as isaid the sunshine and the south—east. as i said this morning, dense patches of fog. it will take a while to shift. a few spots of rain in drizzle and wales. most places starting your friday dry, as is northern ireland. to take you through the day, in the north—west highlands, eastern scotland will stay dry with some sunny shoot the —— sunny spells the aberdeenshire. more sunshine developing across southern counties of england. a slightly by today the nest —— then yesterday. temperatures around 1a or
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15 degrees. temperatures generally into 10—13 for many. england and wales, quite wet. some heavy and persistent rain developing across many parts. northern ireland, a bit clearer and colder. certainly into the start of the weekend, sunshine and showers to scotland and northern ireland. some sleet and snow. lots of rain to england to begin with. slowly brightening up. temperatures into double figures for the south—east corner of the country. the north and west, down into single figures. the colder air pushes in four also if you are celebrating some of the bonfires and fireworks, a few showers to the north and west. it will feel chilly in the breeze. the chilly breeze becoming more
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established. showers the northern and western parts. many central and eastern areas of the day. temperatures only in single figures. if you are watching the fireworks, the scarves in the gloves will be required. 0f required. of course, hedgehog tips. check the bonfires for hedgehogs. treacle toffee to the bonfire. what? for hedgehogs? the hedgehogs, bras. —— not the hedgehogs, for us. we can show you live shot westminster now. it is three light of this time of the morning. overnight, banks have been deciding whether to raise their interest rates, after the bank of england increased the cost of borrowing for the first time in a decade. it makes a difference if you are a borrower or receiver.
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all of this could come as a shock to many. there is a whole generation of homeowners who have not experienced a rise in their monthly payments. research shows that borrowers on the whole have done pretty well. the average rate loans and mortgages has fallen from 8% ten years ago to that, just a.5% by today. the average 2—year fixed rate mortgages down from over 6% to about 2%. all that means that homeowners have saved hundreds of pounds every year. it's a familiar tale. savers have lost out. the amount of interest paid on any savings, a% to less than half a percent. will yesterday's rate rise bring some relief for savers and how badly will boral was the huge? richard, good morning. the bank is finally done it, the bank of england has raised rates. takeit
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take it back to what it was before the brexit vote, it is a significant moment? there are 2.5 million people who have not experienced this. we need to be mindful of those individuals, many will be able to manage this. it's only a small increase but we've been given an indication that there will be limited yet gradual increases. mark carney has said possible to further increases. an increase over a period of of years. high inflation, but with some people, theirfinances might become a bit unmanageable. we know that rates were cut to get through the worst of the financial crisis. we are also used to putting things on to the credit card. we
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have heard a lot from both the bank of england and the ica, particularly in relation to credit card lending. £200 million worth of consumer credit. that is an eye watering figure. lots of people are drawing on credit. it's a question as to whether or not that will be sustainable. it's that marginal increase, isn't it? the banks are thinking about where they raise rates. we are not talking about 11% such as in the 19705. but it will affect people when it adds up. we don't want to be alarmist. lots of people will be able to manage it. the point to remember is, there are a whole group of people who are
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living on fine margins. they are struggling to make ends meet. the economy is quite tough for them. it's those individuals this might be a turning point for. if you are paying more your mortgage, what you do? they will help you understand if you have any doubts. they will talk you have any doubts. they will talk you through your finances. they keep explaining all of that. jane tarlee, thank you very much. more feel on this story just after eight o'clock. crucially, if you are a saver, where you might find more interest on those savings. you do love facts, don't you? yes, i do. we have the q! elves coming in later. you will like them? the q! elves of the people who come in getting the research for the
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programme. that trivia you don't know. how big do you think a lo bster‘s know. how big do you think a lobster‘s brain is? know. how big do you think a lobster's brain is? a bit smaller than a lobster's head?” lobster's brain is? a bit smaller than a lobster's head? i don't know. see the tip of the ballpoint pen, thatis see the tip of the ballpoint pen, that is how big it is. that is a fa ct. that is how big it is. that is a fact. do they eat treacle toffee? these are some of the facts. one of the dili -- these are some of the facts. one of the dili —— brilliant things is that when aspirin was introduced as a headache remedy, people did not understand how it was supposed to be used and they stuck the tablets to their heads. hoping it would calm down their headache. that is brilliant. you rub ointment on your body. i'm trying to be nice to the people. that is fine. world's largest pet rabbit. ergo, bigger, bigger. it eats a000 carats a year.
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a big bunny rabbits. more facts from the q! elves coming up later. time to get the news, travel and later. i will explain about the hedgehogs. and treacle toffee. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. a murder investigation has started after a teenager was stabbed to death in bromley. police were called last night to betts park. the boy was found with multiple stab wounds and pronounced dead at the scene. there have been no arrests. mp5 will debate later, on proposals for tighter rules on how patients can be restrained in mental health units and hospitals. it's become known as shayni's law after 23—year—old olushayni lewis died in 2010 while being restrained at a psychiatric hospital in south london. campaigners hope new rules will make hospitals more accountable and improve training for staff.
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uber has employed a security guard in north west london to clamp down on drivers parking illegally and discarding bottles of urine in residential streets. it follows months of complaints from residents in willesden junction about anti—social behaviour. the taxi—hailing app launched an investigation after being inundated with complaints about its drivers littering and monopolising private parking zones. you come out in the morning and you can find bottles of urine outside your doorstep and in the gutter and kids running around, my kid is there, he is in preschool, i can't park outside my house because all the parking is taken up by uber drivers. let's have a look at the travel situation now. onto the trains — a crane being used for overnight engineering works has damaged overhead cables at welwyn north. some trains are diverting via hertford north. and virgin trains east coast, no service kings cross to stevenage and great northern —
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replacement bus running to steve na g e. m25 clockwise — the qeii bridge is closed because of a crash on the bridge involving a car and a lorry. traffic is being diverted through one of the dartford tunnels. queues in both directions for several miles. lets have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. we are starting today with some dense patches of mist and fog. particularly southern home counties. we have a met office weather warning in force. some travel disruption, you can keep up—to—date with the travel team. on bbc radio london. the mist and blog will clear about 11 o'clock in the morning. we will see highs today or 1a, 15 degrees. a touch milder than it was yesterday. fairly light winds as well. this evening and overnight, if you are doing fireworks, you should get away with it. some rain spreading in. fairly mild but a fairly wet night of weather. that rain is set to stay with us on and off until saturday afternoon when it starts to clear its way eastwards.
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it should be dry or mostly dry. there could still be a few showers hanging around. quite a cold night on saturday, possibly one or two down bonfires but it should be clear for fireworks. sunday is looking chilly and maybe one or two showers. a chilly north—westerly wind. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast, withjohn kay and naga munchetty. more allegations of sexual harassment in westminster. labour mp kelvin hopkins is suspended, as the party launches an investigation. michael fallon, who resigned as defence secretary, categorically denies new claims in today's newspapers that he made sexual comments to cabinet colleague andrea leadsom. good morning, it's friday 3rd november.
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also this morning... it's emerged the ashes of the moors murderer, ian brady, have been buried at sea following fears they could be scattered on saddleworth moor near his victims. a cut in the time it takes for new medicines to get from laboratory to patients. the government says it wants to reduce the approval process by four years. who wins and who loses from the first rate rise in a decade? it's a little boost for savers, but an extra cost for borrowers but only if your bank passes on the rise. i'll have the details. in sport, everton are out of the europa league, as while arsenal progress but it's a former manchester united player making headlines. patrice evra was sent off, before his match for marseille, after apparently kicking
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a fan in the head. also this morning, a new breed of orangutangs is discovered — we'll speak to one of the researchers behind the research. and matt has the weather. we are at alexandra palace this morning, the scene of fireworks this weekend. drive for many with good morning. first, our main story. labour has suspended a former shadow ministerfrom the party because of an allegation of sexual harassment. a party activist claims that kelvin hopkins, the mp for luton north, touched her inappropriately after a political event. let's speak to our political correspondent iain watson. bog in the south—west.
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bog in the south-west. will the dry weather last into the weekend? all the details coming up. let's talk about the allegations. what have you been able to find out? the allegations are in the daily telegraph. the activist said, what happened in 2013, kelvin hopkins hacked her rather too tightly, too intimately. he sent her a suggestive text message. the crucial thing is it was said she make complaints couple of years ago to labour party officials, the then chief whip rosie winterton. it turns out that helen hopkins was reprimanded. despite the reprimand he was subsequently promoted to the labour front bench temporarily as shadow culture secretary. jeremy corbyn had trouble filling some of his posts. many mp5 had voted for no confidence in him and mr hopkins was an ally. she believes it was wrong to promote him to that position at the time and he has now been suspended from the parliamentary labour party while an investigation takes place by the current chief whip, nick brown. sir
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michael fallon who resigned as defence secretary couple of days ago, more allegations about him on the front pages of two of the morning papers. he is said to have made lewd comments to his cabinet colleague, andrea leadsom will stop he categorically denies making any of those comments. he categorically denies making sexually explicit comments, very specific comments, to andrea leadsom some years ago. but, allegedly, he made further comments. again we have no proof of this. he categorically denies it. there are two parts to this story as well. it was alleged in the newspapers that not only has he been accused of making these kind of comments but, in addition, andrea leadsom paid a key pa rt in addition, andrea leadsom paid a key part in removing him as defence secretary clearing way for the former chief whip. she will not comment on those allegations. the fictional house of cards has nothing on westminster, it? thank you. we
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will talk about this in a few minutes' time possible get reaction from jeff phillips, who chairs the parliamentary labour party. the moors murderer, ian brady, has been cremated and buried at sea. the high court stepped in last month to ensure that his ashes were not scattered on saddleworth moor, where brady buried at least four of his victims. sean dilley reports. five decades on from crimes that shocked the country, ian brodie's body has been unceremoniously buried at sea. there was no music and flowers were not allowed. these concessions were set by the fire thatis concessions were set by the fire that is neither the high court. it was here that ian brady and myra hindley buried the victims they tortured and killed. brady was sent tortured and killed. brady was sent to prison in 1966 for murdering john gilbride, lesley ann downey and a 17—year—old. he'll set admitted killing pauline reade and keith
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bennett, whose body has never been found. he died of natural causes in may of this year. his body was collected from the royal liverpool hospital and taken by police escort to southport crematorium. at 230 in the morning his remains were sunk in the morning his remains were sunk in the liverpool marina. the bbc has learned that the international development secretary, priti patel, held a series of meetings in israel to discuss government business without telling the foreign office. the meetings took place over two days in august while ms patel was on holiday in israel. no civil servants were present but she was accompanied by a leading pro—israeli conservative lobbyist. downing street has said that ms patel did nothing wrong. plans to speed up the time it takes for new, life—changing medicines to reach patients have been announced by the government. the move follows pressure by the pharmaceutical industry and medical charities which say that patients are losing out. it could mean certain drugs will be available up to four years earlier than they are currently. our health editor hugh pym reports.
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medical research is producing exciting new drugs and treatments but there have been complaints that it takes too long for them to be approved for use by the nhs. the government says it wants to streamline the process in england so that new drugs for diseases like cancer and devices to help manage conditions like diabetes can be made available to patients more rapidly. under what is called the accelerated access pathway, the approval process will be cut from as much as seven years, to three. in april next year, five new drugs and treatments will be selected for fast track treatment. this number could be increased annually in future. at the moment there at various stages that any product, whether it's a drug or a device, whatever it is, has to go through in terms of regulatory approval or cost effectiveness and so on, commercial negotiations with the nhs. the idea is to bring them all together to run in parallel which will make the process operate much more quickly so that those
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things that really do have life changing impacts on people can be brought forward sooner. one charity said it hoped the scheme would go some way to ending bureaucratic delays and speeding up access to new drugs. the association of the british pharmaceutical industry said the government's policy was very welcome and should benefit thousands of patients, but no extra nhs money is being committed at this stage to spend on medicines — that could hinge on what's decided on the budget. hugh pym, bbc news. eight catalan government ministers have spent their first night in custody after a spanish judge refused to grant them bail. tens of thousands of catalans staged a protest against their detention, over charges related to their attempt to make catalonia independent from spain. thejudge said the ministers might flee the country or destroy evidence if they were released. high street banks have been deciding overnight whether to raise their interest rates after the first increase in a decade by the bank of england. ben's here with the latest details on who's immediately affected. it is always this lag. it always
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seems that mortgage rates go up pretty sharpish but the savings rates seem to be under review for quite a time. they are. we are looking at what banks are doing what they are under no obligation to pass on the interest rate rise from the bank of england. there are indications that some mortgage rates will go up. remember this relates to the standard variable rate, or to any tracker rate you have which follows the bank of england forced if you are on a fixed rate that does not effect you —— affect you for now. savers are not really getting any return on savings and they'll be looking for when their rate goes up. a lot are currently under review for substantive der will raise its
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savings rates. —— santander. even though the rate only went up by a small proportion, taking it back to half a percent, i think it is psychologically important because it suggests the bank is thinking we can get back to more normal policy when it comes to things like interest rates. get the economy off the life—support machine slowly and steadily. the forecast is we will be looking at 1% in interest rates by 2020. for people who have never seen an interest rate rise, for a £150,000 mortgage, what are we looking at? —— £2a0 year. we have got so used to money being really cheap. the bank of england has warned we are so indebted personally put up taking out a bigger mortgage because it is cheap to repay it. when interest rates start to increase it could cause problems. we
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will carry on talking about this. we'll be taking money advice questions on facebook live after this. right now? we will do that right now. so people can choose to watch you or us? they will choose me, obviously. we will see about that. see you later. twitter says it's investigating how donald trump's account came to be deactivated for 11 minutes yesterday. those searching for mr trump, who has more than a0 million followers, were informed "that page doesn't exist" message instead. twitter soon issued an explanation saying the president's account "was inadvertently deactivated due to human error by a twitter employee." it clarified later on that employee was on the last day of their employment at twitter. so, how much ofan employment at twitter. so, how much of an accident it was, we do not
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know. the identity of that twitter employee is yet to be revealed. the world talks about donald trump and what he puts on twitter and then the world talks about it when he cannot put anything on twitter and disappears from twitter. the weather a little later on. more now on our lead story this morningm labour's suspension of the luton north mp, kelvin hopkins, following allegations he sexually harassed a party activist. it follows a week in which a number of mp5 on both sides of the house have been accused of inappropriate behaviour. let's speak tojess phillips, who chairs the women's parliamentary labour party and joins us from our london studio. thank you very much your time with us thank you very much your time with us this morning was your reaction to the suspension of kelvin hopkins?” think the party has acted within the policies and procedures we have now.
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when the complaint of this nature is made, while an investigation has been launched, the party member is suspended. members of parliament do not have impunity to live beyond the rules of the party membership. this is where we are. what do you know about him being promoted after a complaint about his behaviour? this is what appears to have happened. that is quite worrying. that is quite worrying. i know that ava, the young woman who has made the complaint, did previously speak to the chief whip and asked for certain actions to be taken, warnings to be taken. that was done. i have spoken to her and know she was pleased and felt solidarity from rosie winterton, then the chief whip, but is not now. what is a little bit worrying is that after those complaints were made, that kelvin
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was then promoted. what do you think that says about the labour party and its leadership? it has yet to be found out what it says. i'm sure it will form part of any mitigation into what happened. what is your opinion? to be honest, it is probably more clock up than conspiracy. what it potentially says is it was considered not to be that serious and that it had sort of been dealt with. personally i would never promote some body who had any sort of misdemeanours against their name with regard to young activists of any gender. we will have to wait and see. looking at the labour party in particular, allegations are spread across the house, across all parties. i want a dog back claims that becks bailey was discouraged by a party official from that becks bailey was discouraged by a party officialfrom reporting that becks bailey was discouraged by a party official from reporting a rape at a labour event in 2011. it
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just seems, i do not understand why the labour party or its leadership is not effectively handling serious complaints. the truth of what happened to her which was six years ago, the person she told, she didn't make an official complaint, the person she told didn't have the proper training, the culture within all political parties is not really to know what to do with these things. i think in most organisations, if somebody reported it to you, without process , somebody reported it to you, without process, people don't know what to do and we've got to be careful that we don't look for scalps of individuals who were not properly trained. there is a culture that needs to and i'm —— change, and i know bex bailey very well and i know she wants a culture to change so that what happens to her can never happen. i don't think that what happened to her in the labour party
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isn't exactly the same if she was in another party like the conservatives of liberal democrats. it is not my intention to say that at all but if somebody said to me, i've been attacked by anyone, i knew, in an organisation, might first instinct isa organisation, might first instinct is a decent human being would be to tell someone in power who could do something about it, irrelevant as to whether or not the duty of care or experience has been even all the right training. we voted for mp5 to look after us, the cost of this company and you're telling me that because certain people haven't been trained ina because certain people haven't been trained in a party, it's because certain people haven't been trained in a party, its access the ball to not report this? -- it a cce pta ble ball to not report this? -- it acceptable to not report this? what is the victim didn't want you to tell them? would is the victim didn't want you to tell them ? would you is the victim didn't want you to tell them? would you then break her confidentiality? we do not know what has happened. actually, i do know. what i know is that culturally, in all sorts of organisations, people don't know how to handle these things. the labour party is culpable
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andi things. the labour party is culpable and i am not here to let them off the hook, i will push them co nsta ntly the hook, i will push them constantly to the hook, i will push them co nsta ntly to im prove the hook, i will push them constantly to improve their processes but i think we have to be very careful before we sit there and say, i would have done the right thing, because often, as somebody who worked all over the world, people are not doing the right thing. on the wider level, as these allegations emerge across all parties, where do you draw the line? word of the line between sexual harassment and flirting, or being overfriendly, harassment and flirting, or being over friendly, how harassment and flirting, or being overfriendly, how do harassment and flirting, or being over friendly, how do you draw the line between assessing the behaviour and having a code of contact?” think for me, the important line is where there is a power imbalance. where somebody flirting, the person who is the target of that, people really do know, actually. it's not true that you cannot have a laugh and joke with somebody, you know in and joke with somebody, you know in a relationship where the power imbalances. for me, i think it's
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very easy to draw in parliament with mp5 and staff who work in parliament. if this behaviour went on in school, would that person be disciplined, would they be fired? the answer to lots of the things that have been said is yes but for some reason, we don't have the same rules. thank you very much for your time, jess phillips, mp and chair of the women's parliamentary labour party. another week where westminster has been under the spotlight, negative headlines, it's lovely to be able to show you that picture of london eye and parliament and the westminster bridge in the autumn sunshine. matt is at alexandra palace with a cell is also shining. —— where the sun is also shining. warming up nicely, and a stunning location and we are heading into bonfire night on
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sunday, and the stunning backdrop will be the canvas for an amazing light and laser show, part of the festivities taking place through the weekend. a big fireworks festival, there will be fireworks choreographed to music, done by dj yoda, a massive parade and an amateur onyx and —— animatronic puppets, and lots of other things. let's look at the weather. there is some fog in the south—west, any rain will be in the north—west of scotla nd will be in the north—west of scotland in particular. a week weather front pushing in at the moment which will move southwards and eastwards, east of scotland has and eastwards, east of scotland has a sunny start, a chilly start but temperatures rising. a lot more cloud compared to yesterday, it will stay grey through east anglia, the odd spot of rain and drizzle. the
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southeast has sunshine come and also fog towards the south—west. when you have got the fog, it is dense and it will be a few hours before it clears, maybe until lunchtime. it is dry through south west and wales, the odd spot of drizzle over the hills, and northern ireland could see one or two passing showers but for the vast majority of the time it isa dry for the vast majority of the time it is a dry morning. through the day, the rain in the north—west of scotla nd the rain in the north—west of scotland will edge southwards and eastwards, nothing desperately heavy, best of the breaks to the east of scotland and the best of the brea ks east of scotland and the best of the breaks in the cloud are in the south—east of england. temperatures into the mid—teens, a pleasant stay. into the evening and overnight, england and wales, what a difference, it is set to turn very wet, significant rain across many areas which will be heavy and persistent and last into the start
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of saturday across much of england. northern and eastern scotland will see clearer conditions, chilly start, sunshine and heavy and thundery showers into saturday. the rain eventually clearing on saturday from the far east late in the day but it will feel rather chilly in the developing breeze. temperatures single figures in the north and west of the country. if you're salivating with fireworks on saturday night, it will be clear skies and sunshine, clearer conditions in the east. sunday, a cold wind across the youth, and throughout the weekend there will be heavy and thundery showers, many parts in eastern areas will finish dry and clear on sunday should be good for the fireworks displays on sunday. that's how it's looking here in alexandra palace. back to you now. from north london to the rainforest
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and mountains of indonesia. the discovery of a new species of great ape living in the mountain forests of indonesia has caused great excitment amongst scientists. the ta panuli orangutan were identified after researchers carried out dna analysis. there are nowjust 800 left which makes them the most endangered great ape in the world. joining us now is professor serge wich, a primate biologist from liverpool john moores university, who worked with scientists from the university of zurich to help identify the species. yes, it's been a large collaboration, researchers from zurich, indonesia, australia, to get this puzzle together. how did you solve this puzzle? did you see it in the jungles and say, that's different, or how did it works? no, it was a long process. it was first
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seen it was a long process. it was first seenin it was a long process. it was first seen in the jungle 20 years ago and slowly over time, people went more to the area and learned more about them, there was a research site set up them, there was a research site set up to find faecal samples, record their calls, and eventually through a tragic accident get hold of a skull that we could use to measure to compare it to other species. we say this has just been discovered, but you say it was seen 20 years ago? the population was, but it ta kes a ago? the population was, but it takes a long time to get all of the data together to compare, one population to another population, and that took 20 years. so what makes this now recognised as a new species? there's a morphological difference of the skull looks different, and there are genetic make—up is very different, it's an ancient line of orangutans which is
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closely related to the ones on borneo, rather than the ones on sumatra. for those of us who just think that an orangutan is an orangutan is an orangutan, why does it matter that you found a new species, why should we care? we want to preserve biodiversity and species. so if we can define them as new species, those are the units that we can try to conserve. there are 800 of them, how much, what is the risk of them becoming extinct? as such a small number? the risk is fairly high if a few things don't change. they're already in a forest area that is unconnected, there is hunting in the area which needs to be stocked through awareness programmes, and there's agricultural activity, large hydroelectric schemes planned, so a lot of work needs to be done by the sumatra conservation programmes with the
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indonesian government and others to try and make that not happen.” suppose they are our cousins, the great apes. howling are we to them? humans and orangutans split along time ago —— how close are we to them? humans and orangutans split along time ago but we are still close to gorillas and orangutans. so that make them more interesting to people. so what happens next with more research with these orangutans? the next steps are to try and get more data on the morphology, and to work on the conservation efforts. if we don't do that, we lose the species and we cannot study them for some of the most academic questions. do you suspect there are more species out there? notjust orangutans but all kinds of species of creatures that we don't know about yet. there are, probably, yes,
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there's still so much in this day and age that we don't know and that's terribly exciting for many biologists and other people. there's still a lot of unknown things out there. it takes 20 years to work on establishing a species, is there any works going on at the moment that you're aware of other another species that we could perhaps be hearing about? not on the great ape side. it's quite a rare thing for this to happen? yes, the last great ape was described in 1929 so it's pretty rare. i'm glad that after all that scrabbling around on the floor of thejungle that scrabbling around on the floor of the jungle looking for faecal matter over 20 years, it's paid off, imagine if you would have have not have found anything! thank you for your time. we will have the summary of the news and the sport, mp5 are preparing to abate the voting age later so we are asking, what do you think about being able to vote at the age of 16?
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if you can get married and fight for your country, should you be able to vote in parliament treat elections? we have had lots of people getting in touch, older people saying they don't like the idea. just like yesterday, a foggy start to the day in the south of england and south wales. the fog will clear away. it might take to lunchtime before most of it clears. for many it would be a cloudy day. once the fog clears in the south there will be sunny spells breaking through the elsewhere fairly cloudy with outbreaks of rain affecting the far north—west of scotland at times some of the rain moving into the north west of wales and the south—west as well. temperatures will be about ten to 15 celsius. this evening, if you are going to a fireworks event, not are going to a fireworks event, not a wash—out by any event. lots of dry weather. any rain will be across wales, the north west england and scotland. overnight the rain will
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become more extensive and heavier. this weather system is developing heavy rain in central and eastern areas by the early hours of saturday morning. during saturday the rain will gradually spread away eastwards. behind it there will be brighter skies and sunshine with showers coming into the north and west. those will turn wintry. it might take to late afternoon before the rain clears away from the south and the ease of turning chile in the north—west. temperature single figures. —— it will be chilly. if you're going to a fireworks event on saturday evening it will be mostly dry. many of us will have noticed the chillier air on saturday. on sunday the cold air is with us. a brisk, north—westerly wind making it feel particularly chilly. there could be a few showers in scotland, wales and the south—west of england for the plenty of dry weather was
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sunny spells. at best eight, nine celsius in the north and 11 degrees further south. that is it from me goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and david eades. firing on all cylinders. apple's boss celebrates another set of huge profits and says there's better still to come. live from london, that's our top story on friday the 3rd of november. with huge queues for the new iphone, which has just gone on sale, apple is on course to become the world's first listed billion dollar company. also in the programme... the new banker in chief is jerome powell. as donald trump picks a new chair for the us federal reserve, we'll assess what it means for the rest of the world. and this is the situation in europe
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as the markets have opened.
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