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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 4, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. new claims about the conduct of mps swirl around westminster. the conservatives suspend charlie elphicke and refer what are described as serious allegations about him to the police. the mp says he's done nothing wrong. and three labour mps all dispute complaints made about their behaviour towards women. we'll have the latest from westminster. good morning, it's saturday the 4th of november. also this morning: police in new york say they are investigating a credible rape allegation against harvey weinstein. new figures reveal that only half the uk's fixed speed—cameras are actually switched on. in sport, it's fantasy football time for over 50 teams living the dream in the fa cup, but there
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was no knock—out punch from ricky hatton‘s non—league minnows hyde, who were given a football league education by the milton keynes dons. and matt has the weather. good morning. fairly wet start to the weekend for some but things will get drier, brighter and colder through the day with a few showers in the north and west. full forecast coming up in the next 15 minutes. see you then. good morning. first, our main story. the conservative mp, charlie elphicke, has been suspended by the party after it said serious allegations had been passed to the police. the party didn't specify what the allegations were or who had made them. mr elphicke, a member of the commons treasury select committee, said the media had been told of his suspension first and he wasn't aware of the nature of the claims. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. new allegations are emerging ever more frequently. political parties
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accused by some of previous unwillingness to open about allegations they themselves were aware of now want to be seen to be acting quickly. this is charlie elphicke, a conservative mp for dover since 2010 who this morning wa kes dover since 2010 who this morning wakes up no longer a tory mp, at least for now. that's because last night the man in charge of discipline among conservative mps, the new chief whip julian smith, issued a statement: in practice, this means mr elphick remains in the commons but for now isn't a conservative mp. charlie elphicke‘s anger about how he's been treated is clear. he said: he added:
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meanwhile, the labour mp clive lewis has strongly denied an allegation of impropriety at the labour party conference in september.” impropriety at the labour party conference in september. i don't as a rule at packed labour party conferences group of people's bottom is when i greet them. it'sjust conferences group of people's bottom is when i greet them. it's just not how i roll, it'sjust is when i greet them. it's just not how i roll, it's just not what i do. this is a place gripped by trepidation about what may come next. individuals fearful for their own reputations, others fearfulfor the very reputation of politics excels. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let's speak now to our political correspondent, emma vardy, who's in westminster. good morning. as we heard from chris, there's a clampdown, what politicians, there did asians, their
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standards, their code of conduct is coming under scrutiny now —— there applications. it feels like there's applications. it feels like there's a dark cloud over british politics at the moment —— their reputations. it's been a fraught week at westminster with allegation after allegation mounting up, you get the sense some years of sexual misconduct are now coming to light. in addition to what you heard in chris mason's report, of course, as a reminder we've seen the former defence minister michael fallon resign. there are two mac conservative candidate ministers, damian green and mark garnier under investigation after misconduct in the cabinet office, and the labour mp hopkins suspended, and there are denials and allegations going back and fourth. the parties are keen to be seen to be taking this very seriously. theresa may has published a new code of conduct for conservatives, there's a new hotline
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for complaints and an independent figure to oversee grievances and there will be a cross—party meeting on monday to establish an independent grievance procedure. but theresa may and jeremy corbyn are both very much under pressure over this. you get the sense party officials are struggling to keep up with the pace of allegations, nobody is quite sure what will come out next and some are saying this is somewhat reminiscent of the expenses scandal that rocked british politics in 2009. others are saying, take a step back, this is what we're seeing, a long overdue change in the culture of british politics. this morning parties are poised for other allegations to perhaps come out and nobody really knows exactly how long this will take to run its course and where it's going to go next. we'll be following it closely. emma, thanks very much. police in new york say they have a viable case against the hollywood producer harvey weinstein. the announcement came after actress paz de la huerta claimed that mr weinstein raped her twice in 2010. she is among dozens of women
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who have come forward since october to accuse the 65—year—old of sexual misconduct. he has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. david willis reports. recent weeks have seen a torrent of allegations against harvey weinstein. now comes the first word ofa weinstein. now comes the first word of a possible arrest. new york detectives following up a call to the department last week are investigating an actress's claimed that the former movie mogul raped her twice back in 2010. they say the woman's account is detailed and credible. we have an actual case here. we are happy with where the investigation is right now. mr weinstein is out of state. we would need an arrest warrant to arrest him. so right now we're gathering oui’ him. so right now we're gathering our evidence, we continue to do so every day. and some of hollywood's biggest names, among them gwyneth
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paltrow and angelina jolie, came forward to accuse harvey weinstein of sexual harassment. he issued a statement emphatic lee denying any allegation of nonconsensual sex. he's now under investigation here, in los angeles and in the uk as well. like ripples in a pond, the accusations of misconduct against men of wealth and influence appeared to be growing rapidly. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. netflix has cut all ties with kevin spacey, who plays the lead role in one of its most successful programmes, house of cards. the company said it would no longer be involved in the series if the actor continued to be part of it. the announcement came after mr spacey faced allegations of sexual misconduct from a string of men. a spanishjudge has issued
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european arrest warrants for the sacked catalan leader carles puigdemont and four of his allies who went to belgium. the five failed to attend a high court hearing in madrid on thursday when nine other ex—members of the regional government were taken into custody, facing charges of rebellion, sedition and misuse of public funds for pursuing catalan independence. mr puigdemont has said he will not return to spain unless he receives guarantees of a fair trial. the white house has attempted to downplay the findings of a major climate change report compiled by 13 us federal agencies. the report said it was extremely likely, meaning with 95% to 100% certainty that global warming is manmade, mostly from carbon dioxide through the burning of coal, oil and natural gas, contradicting senior trump officials. us president donald trump kicks off an 11—day trip to asia this weekend, taking in south korea, japan and china. it will be the longest tour of asia by a us president in 25 years. before setting out he visited hawaii's pearl harbor to see a us battleship sunk by japanese bombers in the second world war, and received a security briefing from the us pacific command on issues including north korea's nuclear programme. only around a half of fixed speed cameras in the uk are actually switched on, according to figures
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obtained through a freedom of information request. the data reveals that at least four police forces have no fixed speed cameras at all, and 13 have fewer than half actively catching speeding drivers. alan clayton reports. for motorists caught out by them, they infuriate and bring a hefty fine. safety campaigners argue speed cameras are lifesavers. new research suggests only around half of the luminous boxes throughout the uk are operational. the press association sent a freedom of information request to all of the 45 forces asking how many fixed speed cameras they had and how many were active. the 36 which responded had a total of 2838 cameras, of which only 52% we re of 2838 cameras, of which only 52% were working. forces in cleveland, durham and north yorkshire said none of their fixed speed cameras were
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active. while northa nts of their fixed speed cameras were active. while northants said it turned its cameras off six years ago but left them in place to deter speeding. those than replied said they used mobile speed cameras and regularly reviewed which cameras were turned on. i suspect in this case there thinking that the yellow boxes are there, they're sending out the message that motorists ought to be recognising about risky roads, but they're also increasingly looking to more advanced technology such as average speed cameras, or indeed better engineering of the road, which might have a more beneficial affect. the national police chiefs council said the decision to use cameras was an operational matter and that all forces have individual responsibility for their use of the cameras. alan clayton, bbc news. i don't know if you would be able to speedin i don't know if you would be able to speed in this car but you would be wanting to take as long as you could to show off. it was fit for the king of rock n roll but how would it look
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in your driveway? it would look good in yours, naga. it would look good in yours, naga. it is pink, just your colour! elvis presley's pink 1957 cadillac is up for sale at auction and after 30 years in a museum. what price would you put on it, not the piano, on the car? that is whitney houston's piano, that's worth a lot. it's expected to sell for $2 million. whitney houston's grand piano, which was given to her as a gift by her husband bobby brown, is also going under the hammer, along with a nightgown that once belonged to jackie kennedy. that is a haul of hollywood delights. all going under the hammer. you would dent the car if it really went under the hammer but it will be going under auction very soon. let's look at the papers. lots going on on the front pages, the allegations swirling around westminster on many of the front pages. the times is looking at fallon. apparently number 10 has
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been presented with details of an alleged sexual assault by michael fallon hours before his resignation. it must be said he has said the claim isn't true and it is libellous. he has said, "i've already accepted i've behaved inappropriately in the past but i've never physically assaulted anybody those great. that inappropriate behaviour he acknowledged is the reason why he resigned. but what might have happened in the hours before the resignation to cause it? yesterday there were allegations that andrea letson, the leader of the house of commons, had gone to theresa may and said that mr fallon made comments to her that she didn't approve of some years ago. the telegraph and the daily mail are suggesting there's party politics and leadership politics and career politics behind this, claiming that fallon was scheming to have andrea letson sacked over brexit and that's what made her go to the prime
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minister. so hard to know exactly what's going on in this. as we reiterate, michael fallon says he has done nothing wrong. andrea letson hasn't commented on whether she made the allegations in the first place. she has declined to comment. the guardian is looking at the cost of brexit, remember that, that's still going on, households will face increases of £930 in annual shopping bills if britain walks away from brexit talks without a trade deal. we haven't talked much about brexit over the last few days, it's all been about mps and their personal and professional lives rather than policy. we will be covering more on it from westminster through the morning. time to look at matt with the weather. a glorious sunrise. grey clouds. to begin with but the
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sunshine eventually breaks through. it turns bright through the day and a bit colder. the colder air is with the speckled cloud to the north—west. you can see the cloud we have at the moment. it's here a cross england and wales that we have the wettest weather. not a great start to the weekend. the rain is pushing eastwards. parts of east anglia and down to kent, a lot of rain over the next few hours. the worst of the wet weather into the afternoon. in the midlands and other parts of central england, not a pleasa nt parts of central england, not a pleasant morning. the rain easing off in the south—west and north—west england by about 9am, with a couple of showers still around. brighter conditions for scotland and northern ireland to stop the weekend, but a few showers to the north and west which could become heavy later. sleet and snow to higher ground. eventually the cold air pushes across much of england and wales. rain eventually clearing away from east anglia by the time we get to
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mid—or late afternoon. a few showers, even with the sunshine in the west. temperatures fall away. only single figures in northern and western parts. so chilly evening for any fireworks displays. wendy of showers in western areas. eastern areas are clearer. showers into the north and west into sunday morning. clearer skies across eastern england and eastern scotland. a chilly night. these are the temperatures in towns and cities. some rural parts below freezing. it will make for a chilly start tomorrow morning. many eastern areas are brighter. western areas seeing showers. they continued in many parts, including the midlands. later in the day down the eastern coast there could be a couple of showers. overall a lot of dry weather on sunday and fewer showers. it feels colder in the breeze. if you have your fireworks display tomorrow, only a couple of
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showers around, but it will turn cold quickly. developing quickly in scotla nd cold quickly. developing quickly in scotland and slowly easing from the west overnight. but it turns chilly across england and wales to take us into monday morning. in fact as we start the new week many across england and wales will wake up to a touch of lost around on the grass and other cars as well. a lovely start to monday. scotland and northern ireland, brightness giving way to wind and rain. overall, nothing unusual for this time of year. just a little bit chilly, especially by night. you are wearing your fireworks tie. idid! it's really good! it's really good! it's the little details that count. all of the sport later. first, let's checkin all of the sport later. first, let's check in with the first family of horseracing. they are synonymous
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with the jump season at the cheltenham gold cup. as the national hunt calendar begins, the family is gearing up for another winning season. we've been talking about the secret of their success. first light and as the jump season gets under way there is a sense of anticipation for racing ‘s first family. ted, ruby and katie walsh no glory could lie ahead and it is here at their yard that the plans are forged. there are dreams of the winners at cheltenham and entry but it is here in the yard that hard work is done to prepare the horses like this one for the course. with the morning's work done, it's time for breakfast. all of the horses are backin for breakfast. all of the horses are back in and you don't really know if something is any good. it is time to kind of find out what you have for the rest of the season. and the
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family knows a thing or two about what makes a good horse. happy on, trained by ted, groomed by katie and ridden by ruby. it clear the fence as the winner grand national 17 yea rs as the winner grand national 17 years ago. katie then went on to finish third in 2012 on sea bass. a race that still captivates them. everyone genuinely at that start said, you said it, you have a chance of winning this! i'll tell you what it was. you were thinking you had no chance! now 38, ruby walsh has ridden over 2000 winners and broken a lot of bones along the way. some think he feels is simply an occupational hazard. there are loads of different things in the world that people do that are high risk. when theyjoin the army and navy.
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your spleen, that ruptured, but you don't need it, so we just took it out and moved on. throughout it all standing behind his children is a proud father. i couldn't have dreams when they were two kids growing up that they would have achieved what they have achieved. i got as much kick out of them winning as i would have training them. it is parenting, you know what i mean. a new season awaits with all its twists and turns, but no matter what the walsh family's enduring love for their sport is a racing certainty. no room on that breakfast table for any more trophies, it's absolutely packed. packed with muffins! now it's time for the film review, with mark kermode and jane hill. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. good to have you back. what have we been watching? so we have kenneth branagh‘s take on murder on the orient expression. killing a sacred deer, the latest from yorgos lanthimos. and the bad mums are back in bad mom's christmas. it's that time of year. it is. let's start with murder on the orient express. it had just a bit of publicity, i think people probably know it is out. you would be hard—pressed to avoid it. the story has been on the big screen and small screen before, most famously as an early 70s version, so this is the new version directed by kenneth branagh who also stars as hercule poirot, the belgian detective with the most unbelievable twin layered moustache. the moustache should get
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a billing of its own. he is travelling from istanbul to calais, on the titular train. he has to get somewhere, but once he gets on the train, something is going to happen. there is a virtual cluedo board of famous people. so we have derekjacobi as the butler, willem dafoe, damejudi dench, michelle pfeiffer as a widow and johnny depp as a gangster. something bad is going to happen. here is a clip. well, hello. eyes linger any longer, i'll have to charge rent. i'll pay. 0h. have another drink. are you insulted? hm. disappointed.
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some men have a good look. all they have to do is keep their mouths shut and they can take home any prize they want. still, the mouth opens. he sniffs mm... i don't know why i'm laughing. i don't think i am meant to! you are. there is lot of scenery chewing. i mean, there are scenes of hercule poirot, you know, eating chocolate, enjoying it and so are the cast. they are sinking their teeth into the scenery. a murder is committed. everyone is a suspect. everyone is shocked, but everyone has secrets and therefore everyone has to be interrogated. what i like about this, and i did like it, is firstly it is old fashioned entertainment. i remember seeing the ‘74 version and with this i knew the story, i know some people won't — and if you don't you are in for a treat because it's a real swiss watch kind of constructed mechanism.
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but the whole thing takes place on the train, and it's shot in 65mm. the camera sashays up and down the train, outside and inside. occasionally you get these wonderful overhead shots. there is a sequence in which we discover the victim's body. it is like they have gone to every possible end to make the most visually of this confined space. occassionally some of the exterior shots look a little like bit like the polar express. but what i liked about it was the cast, they all get what kind of movie they are in. they are playing ripe characters, it is all very thumbnail sketches. branagh is clearly enjoying himself enormously. he likes the character of poirot. there is this central thing of poirot is a perfectionist, he is a bit obsessive, he keeps trying to straighten people's ties, and at one point he says, i see the world as it should be and i can't relax
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if something is out of kilter. you have to go into this thinking it is an agatha christie, there is... does it need to be remade? it looks beautiful but i don't know... does that matter? i thought it was big screen entertainment, like a variety show, the train becomes a stage, we have all these famous stars come on, do their bit — i really enjoyed it. i went in feeling trepidatious, smiled all the way through and despite the fact i know the plot, i thought its revelations were handled well. i know some critics have been sniffy about it. ijust think it's a good, solid piece of old fashioned entertainment. and it looks good. it looks really good, that is not a little thing. 0k. the killing of a sacred deer. i mean, i have seen the trailer so many times and i am terrified just by the trailer. that really looks good, but terrifying. yorgos la nthimos has worked in black comedy,
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social satire before. this is something more disturbing. colin farrell is a heart surgeon, he has a perfect life. he has a glamorous house and two lovely children. he has a strange relationship with an awkward teenager called martin, who turns up at work and bothering him at work. at first he seems to be innocent but then he starts to look like a young norman bates. there's a little touch of we need to talk about kevin. the story is becoming a weirdly surreal revenge drama. so you start laughing, as you often do with his films, then it starts moving into the territory of the shining. there are cameras creeping through corridors, strange ovwerhead shots. we look to some extent towards a film like haneke's funny games, so painful to watch. the thing i like about it, and yorgos lanthimos would like too, i spent the film not knowing where it was going. yes, it's a horror movie on one
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level, on one level it's saw for the upmarket, art house crowd. on another level it's a strange distance black comedy. you never quite relax into it. i felt very uneasy and i've thought a lot about it since i saw it and i think that's a recommendation. ok, is there going to be a recommendation for bad mom's christmas? i haven't thought about it a lot. three women decide to rebel against the tyranny of being a super mum, largely with the help of swearing and alcohol. along comes christmas, this time they rebel against the tyranny of the most stressful season of the year. here is a clip. i'm just like a giant stress ball from november to new year's. ijust want to enjoy christmas again. yeah... well, then let's do it. what? guys, what is wrong with us? have we learnt nothing? we are mothers, and if things are not going our way, then what do we do?
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we hide in the bathroom. no. we don't, we don't do that. we stand up and we fight back. yes. so, if we want to do christmas our way this year, then we're going to do christmas our way. i laughed during that clip. when i saw the first one, i went in thinking... i had low expectations and i enjoyed it. in the case of this same thing, i went along thinking i enjoyed the first one and it was nothing like as funny, partly it is not as funny because this time the bad mums are having to deal with their own bad mums, so it's almost like three separate stories. that said, i counted how many times i laughed and i laughed seven times. i have this thing which is a six laugh rule. if you laugh six times it's officially a comedy. yes, it is all over the place, it doesn't make sense, it doesn't have anything like the joyous simplicity of the first one, but i kind of laughed. i liked the characters, it's very very much a retread of the only thing, once again,
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the solution involves alcohol and swearing, but i would be lying if i said i didn't laugh. well, that's christmas! best out is a rerelease? so the remake of wages of fear — it did really badly 40 years ago and nobody got to see it. now it's back in a restoration and it is one of the most brutal, gruelling, muscular, visceral american action movies of the 19705. it is an extraordinary piece of work, you need to see it on the big screen. you need to seek it out because it's coming out on blu—ray on monday. if you get a chance to see this film projected. score by tangerine dream, i know you're a fan, it's a brilliant cinema experience. i was about to say i'm going to borrow your blu—ray, but actually you're saying watch it on the big screen? blu—ray is great, but need to see it on a big screen, this is a film they worked out, two—years in the making, and then it came out and it came out the same time as star wars,
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and the audience decided they didn't want a gruelling visceral thriller. that, you know, a story that starts at a point of no hope and goes downhill from there. 0k. dvd for anyone who wants to stay in? it comes at night, it's a chiller. it's not a horrorfilm. it's a story in a near future in which a virus has attacked mankind. a family are hiding in a cabin the woods. it's all about it comes at night, but actually the danger is from within. it's about people turning on each other, distrusting each other, paranoia, it has a lot to say about the modern political landscape and it's not a film that relies on gory shocks, it has an atmosphere of creeping dread. i have brought a dvd along that i'm going to give to you as your homework, because you are going to like horror films in the very near future! you have said woods, cabins and paranoia. you do that to me deliberately. in a subtle way!
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that subtle paranoia that i so love. thank you. it is my early christmas present. it is a delight. thank you very much. try harder next week. a reminder, you can find all our previous programmes on the iplayer as well. that's it for this week. i've got a fun week ahead! thanks for watching, enjoy your cinema going. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: he conservative mp, charlie elphicke, has been suspended by the party after it said serious allegations had been passed to the police. the party didn't specify what the accusations were, or who had made them. mr elphicke, a member of the commons treasury select committee, said the media had been told of his suspension first, and he wasn't aware of the nature of the claims. three labour mps have disputed complaints made
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about their behaviour towards women. clive lewis, kelvin hopkins and ivan lewis all deny any wrong doing. labour has announced a raft of measures it says will make sure complaints are dealt with independently. police in new york say they have a viable case against the hollywood producer harvey weinstein. the announcement came after the actress paz de la huerta claimed that mr weinstein raped her twice in 2010. she is among dozens of women who have come forward since october to accuse the 65—year—old of sexual misconduct. he has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. netflix has cut all ties with kevin spacey, who plays the lead role in one of its most successful programmes, house of cards. the company said it would no longer be involved in the series if the actor continued to be part of it. the announcement came after mr spacey faced allegations of sexual misconduct from a string of men. a spanishjudge has issued european arrest warrants
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for the sacked catalan leader carles puigdemont and four of his allies who went to belgium. the five failed to attend a high court hearing in madrid on thursday, when nine other ex—members of the regional government were taken into custody. mr puigdemont has said he will not return to spain unless he receives guarantees of a fair trial. the white house has attempted to downplay the findings of a major climate change report, compiled by 13 us federal agencies. the report said it was extremely likely, with 95% to 100% certainty, that global warming is manmade, mostly from carbon dioxide through the burning of coal, oil and natural gas. that contradicts what senior trump officials have claimed. us president donald trump kicks off an 11—day trip to asia this weekend, taking in south korea, japan and china. it will be the longest tour of asia by a us president in 25 years. before setting out he visited hawaii's pearl harbor to see a us battleship sunk by japanese bombers in the second world war, and received a security briefing
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from the us pacific command on issues including north korea's nuclear programme. only around a half of fixed speed cameras in the uk are actually switched on, according to figures obtained through a freedom of information request. and at least four police forces don't have any fixed speed cameras at all. alan clayton reports. the forces said they also use mobile cameras and regularly review which of the fixed cameras are switched on. mike is here with the sport. how are you? very good. a special day, the first round proper of the fa cup, some teams have already played in six rounds to get to this dream occasion. the nonleague teams, the teams you might not have heard of
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before, even a team ten years ago that was a pub team. we will talk more about shaw lane association. the first round sparked into life last night, but not in the way it was supposed to as a flare burned into the artificial pitch at the home of non league hyde. there was to be no upset here, as league one mk dons went ahead through aiden nesbitt and ended up easy winners. there were also surprise wins for league two sides, port vale and notts county. to one of my favourite stories of the cup. so far has been shaw lane association, who were playing as a pub team less than a decade ago. they're from barnsley and have been promoted five times in the past six years but will still start as big outsiders against league two mansfield. there's no pressure on us. the pressure's on mansfield. there the
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football league side. we're a small clu b football league side. we're a small club in barnsley, nobody knows about us club in barnsley, nobody knows about us and it's the fa cup, it's the romance of the fa cup, it's all the cliches you can think of, giant killings, david versus goliath, it's everything, and it happens, you know? the rampant wolves will take some stopping in the championship it seems. their big summer spending is paying off and they're now four points clear at the top. roman saiss, and leo bonatini with the goals that beat fulham, who haven't won in four games now. it's five years since wolves were last in the premier league. the former manchester united defender patrice evra has been suspended by his club marseille while uefa investigate him after he kicked one of his supporters in the head on thursday night. it happened during the warm—up for marseille's europa league game against the portuguese side vitoria guimaraes. evra, who's 36, could face a lengthy ban. after the scotland game, england are back in action at 9am uk time, and they'll be hoping to bounce back from their opening game defeat against australia by beating lebanon. scotla nd
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scotland are bottom of their pool having already lost against tonga in their opening match. after the scotland game, england are back in action at 9am uk time, and they'll be hoping to bounce back from their opening game defeat against australia by beating lebanon. but the lebanese are on the crest of a wave, above england in their group after a stunning win over france last weekend, which even surprised ahead coach. the problem with our team given they're not all professional, or not used to playing 80 minutes and having to concentrate for 80 minutes, i thought the tough part was going to be the last ten minutes but they talk about the lebanese spirit and passion and it shone
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through. the ashes tour is under way, not the first test but the warmup is out of the way and you want to get your bad moments out of the way first. it's not been the best start to an ashes tour for england's former captain alistair cook because he was out for a duck second ball in the warm—up match against a western australia cricket association x! in perth. i we are 18 days away from the first ashes test. in england 198four. stoneman and vince rescuing england. ——198—4. england seam on top, four wickets down. —— are seeming. england's women are also in action down under this morning, they're taking on a cricket
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australia women's xi. glasgow warriors fans, eight pro 14 games, eight wins. their latest victory came over leinster last night and it included one of the tries of the season. just look where nikola matawalu receives the ball. from there the fijian sets off, bypassing the leinster defence one by one and just as it seemed he'd scored a memorable solo try he let nick grigg finish thejob. the teamwork secured a bonus point. elsewhere scarlets beat benetton and munster thrashed the dragons. are you impressed, naga? very impressed, but what i'm worried about is the leinster team because their manager must go, how on earth could you let that happen?m their manager must go, how on earth could you let that happen? it was so quick, wasn't it? theyjust fell around him. but between you you would think you could stop him. how
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many players, seven or eight? falling like flies. now before we go here's britain's tour de france champion chris froome as you've never seen him before. no, he's not a yellow lawrence of arabia, but he could possibly have a career in martial arts movies after he stops racing bikes. this was the pre—race entertainment ahead of the saitama criterium injapan. is that a bit of wushu? one yellow jersey to another. as you can see, ninja froome is clearly not a man to be messed with after displaying his considerable skills with a throwing star. a p pa re ntly apparently that's the official word, throwing a star. don't try that at home. how about trying this? no, don't! imagine a wake board or surf board and put an engine on it, you have jet surfing, a sport that only came to the uk in the summer. it's catching on though, and semi—pro british rider anya colley will race for medals at the motosurf world cup off naples in italy this weekend. before she left i revved the engines alongside her in training.
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at the cutting edge of a new way to walk on water, britain's number one jet server anya colley who's made history this season competing in the motosurf world cup. a bit of a mix between serving, wait boarding and then anything with a throttle. if you done biking, if you've done cars, if you've done anything and you like speed you will be good at it. you've got to lean your whole body over to get it to turn good with the speed. anya and indeed the whole of the uk are playing catch up in this latest motorsport. we only got involved a couple of months ago we re got involved a couple of months ago were for the first time a leg of the world cup series was posted on these shores with 48 riders from around the world competing at why guston in bedfordshire. the sport had originally started in the czech republic when an inventor experimented by putting a lightweight engine into a surfboard.
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it has since spread to all corners of the planet. until now to get across this like on a whiteboard i'd need a boat to tony watt if i was at sea on a surfboard i would need some waves, but now all the power is beneath my feet. —— wakeboard —— tony. at first beneath my belly, because that throttle is very sensitive. u—turn by leaning your body, that seems quite straightforward. and if you lean you goa straightforward. and if you lean you go a bit faster and eventually you try and stand. you can actually go and have a boat and a driver and a watcher, i can actually go out and enjoy it any time i want and the beauty of the board, you can actually take it anywhere. it's like nothing else you've ever tried before. it gives you a real thrill that you're out there mac and a real sense of freedom. finally we're standing, i'm on my feet and we're
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burning along and my feet... with the board is only weighing 19 kg, the board is only weighing 19 kg, the top speed is over 40 mph. but it feels so much faster. the engines run on biofuels which break up in the water. a good job really when we swallowed so much of it, initially at least, although the younger beginners were far cooler. that was well awesome. the speed, the balancing, like, you've really got to balance on it. it's kind of hard to balance on it. it's kind of hard to keep your balance. but it's awesome when it's going fast. it's now hoped more beginners around the uk will get a chance to try and carved like anya as she targets a medal in the last leg of the world cup series this weekend off italy. the word on the series is anya only started competing this summer but already she is challenging the best in the world from eastern europe, and whether she'll get a medal this
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time, the last race in the world cup series today off italy, maybe next season she could win it. this has taken off very quickly. it is great fun, it is really an adrenaline rush. when you're learning, as you get faster the board rears up at the front and then you have to get your balance and it kept making me off. that looked quite fun in its own weight. you always underplay how well you do but you did brilliantly. thanks bromance, naga, iwill well you do but you did brilliantly. thanks bromance, naga, i will pay you later —— its own do we need a wetsuit outside when we are walking around? that could be an interesting look! i think you could do that anywhere. a wetsuit will probably come in handy. not a great start in some parts of the uk. it is an improving day, turning brighter and also colder. clearer skies. speckled cloud here. a massive swathe across the uk at
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the moment is producing the wettest weather across england. some heavy and persistent rain at the moment pushing eastwards. not a huge amount of rain in suffolk and kent. it will be wet in the afternoon here. elsewhere, lots of surface water around. lots of surface water in the west and a few showers by nine o'clock. the cloud showing signs of breaking up. it will feel cool. the wind already working on across scotla nd wind already working on across scotland and northern ireland. a better chance of some morning sunshine. showers in the north and west will become heavy. sleet and snow on high ground. by the weather pushing on across wales and much of england into the afternoon. it takes until the end of the afternoon, maybe sunset, before the cloud and rain will pull away from parts of east anglia. most finished the day reasonably well, turning colder. they're in mind the chill tonight if you are heading out to any fireworks
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displays. northern and western areas most are displays. northern and western areas mostare in displays. northern and western areas most are in the showers. eastern parts most likely to be dry. with the clear skies is where the coldest weather will be. frost in some parts of eastern scotland. not far off it in eastern england as well. in the sunday, —— into sunday a cold start. brighter in eastern parts of england. showers in western england, wales, northern ireland and northern scotland. again wintry over high ground. showers becoming fewer through the day. eastern coast of england would have an afternoon or evening shower. more sunshine around tomorrow afternoon. dry, but feeling chilly in the wind. that will be a feature for the firework displays tomorrow and temperatures will drop quickly. definitely dress warm if you are heading to any firework displays. dropping below freezing by midnight across much of scotland and you will have a frost. monday will
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bea you will have a frost. monday will be a chilly start across england and wales in particular. touch of frost around. the best of the brightest weather on monday will be for england and wales. turning cloudier and went through the day, but not as windy in scotland and northern ireland. topsy—turvy autumn weather continues. that's autumn though, isn't it? it is. nothing unusual. don't panic, it will all be fine! we'll be back with the headlines at 7am but first it's time for click if it feels like the weather is getting weirder, well, that's because it is. in many parts of the world,
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meteorological records seem to be tumbling virtually year after year. and as gets more erratic and extreme, the need for accurate forecasts becomes vital. this is the bbc‘s weather centre at new broadcasting house. this is where they take their best guess at what the next few days are going to look like. we kind of take it for granted, these days, but as you would expect, there's an awful lot of numbercrunching that goes on, which is what ben is doing right now. hi, ben. hi, spencer. you might recognise ben, he's on the telly! ben is taking raw data from the met office on this screen and turning it into something more akin to what we see on the tv. it all goes to make up that familiar weather map that we know and love. and for the uk, each 4km square gets its own individual forecast from the met office. other services can provide an even more granular forecast. but swing around to africa and it's a very different story.
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here we're working at much lower resolution. the squares here are only 25 kilometres across. one of the reasons is because data is particularly thin on the ground here. now, over the coming month or so, we're going to be looking at how technology is changing this continent. and to start ourjourney, dan simmons has travelled to tanzania to meet a chap who used to work here, but who is now on a mission to improve the forecast for africa. sub—saharan east africa is lush. the soils are rich. it's the end of a very wet rainy season. too wet for some farmers, who saw their crops rot. angus and asha farm in lushoto. they tell me climate change has made it difficult to predict the seasons. they've gone from drugs to flood in recent years, and lost harvests in both.
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next door, peter's been planting jeska, type of runner bean which can take as little as six weeks to grow. in september to october, the rainfall are very harsh. it rush the topsoil to down there. but last season, he lost his entire crop to sudden, heavy, early rains. the farmers here know what they are doing, theyjust don't quite know any more what the weather's up to. former bbc weather presenter and keen gardener, peter gibbs, wants to do something about that, and he's found a pretty neat way to explain it to me. i think you're like this, though. all right. the big reveal... oh, wow! oh my word! look at this!
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is that grand or what? that is huge! that goes on forever, doesn't it? it just. .. yeah. this gives you some idea of the scale of africa. the drop here is about 1,000 metres from where we are. no, no, no, that is close enough! that's not... from the west usambara mountains, where we're standing, down to the masai plain. we're looking at an area here of just hundreds of square kilometres. lots of weather going on. you can see clouds building over in the distance. most of its farmed as well... exactly. there's lots of people living out there, but no weather station you can see. so how do you do a good forecast here without that information? that's incredible. you know, back in the uk, you would have, at least, half a dozen, perhaps 15 weather stations in that sort of area. so you can see the problem. so the satellites can't do it. because we have satellites, don't we? the satellites can do a bit of it.
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the satellites can pick up some of the clouds we can see, but can't estimate the rain how much rain one of these shower clouds can produce. you need those measurements of the ground. was the other parameters, like temperature, humidity, and pressure... you know, it's like any commuter programme, garbage in, garbage out. peter's advising a start—up, kukua, that wants to pepper africa with these. fully automated, self—reporting low—cost weather stations. they can be monitored from anywhere, looking up to africa's extensive mobile cell network. kukua placed their first station last year and will have more than 100 operating by christmas. so what do we get on our fully automatic weather station? well, we've got a bucket up here, which measures the rainfall. there's a little seesaw device in there which goes backwards and forwards for every drip that comes through. that tells us how quickly the rain is falling, as well as how much rain is falling. an anemometer a bit of giving us
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the wind speed and direction by the vane there at the very, very top. this is the solar panel, which powers the whole thing and is also rather cleverly used to tell us how much sunshine we're getting. just behind it in this hive kind of affair is the temperature gauge. it also measures humidity and it's stuck in there so it can't be affected by direct sunlight or more heat coming from the ground, which is dissipated by this housing. all of that data has to be collected by a panel round at the back, which is sent to this communications unit. it has a sim card that works in every african country. what some of us would do for one of those... and then it uses this transmitter to send it all back to base. that goes back to europe, and then from the guys in europe, they will produce a model, which will give people back here a more accurate weather forecast. it's already making a difference.
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farmers like peter get daily text alerts, giving them a steer as to what to expect. and this farmer told us his texts have helped him decide when best to add fertilizer and pesticides. we can actually make a massive difference to the farmers themselves. up to 80% yield increases. that would be the difference between eating to stay alive and sending your children to school. and it's not just the personal impact. health agencies can use improved forecasts to better predict outbreaks of malaria or cholera. and insurers want to know if they need to pay out on policies. this information gap is holding the continent back. the coco belt in west africa is shifting. multinationals want to know which way and by how much. and it'll be selling on the big data kokua collect that will help pay for what's looking like a pretty big job. well, across the whole of africa at the moment, there are around 500, just 500, reliable
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reporting weather stations. to get good coverage, you need to get up to something like 20,000. from my point of view, after my years in meteorololgy, i think it's fantastic that i feel i can make use of that experience, to actually make a difference to people's lives. that was dan simmons with peter gibbs in tanzania. we'll have more reports from the african continent later this month on click. microsoft boasts its new xbox one x is the most powerful games console in the world! they've stopped short of calling it the most powerful console in the galaxy, i suspect they're saving that accolade for the machine comes after this one.
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but there's good reason for all this talk of power, and that is down to what lurks under the hood of this console. it has an eight core processor running at 2.3 gigahertz, a six teraflop gpu,12gb of memory and a 4k blu—ray player thrown in for good measure. this means that the machine can throw out 4k 60 frames per second graphics in hdr. stunning... what those numbers and specs mean is that this box is capable of producing much sharper, crisper and more detailed graphics than the old xbox one s, which had a maximum resolution of 1080p, which is eye—offending high definition, as it's now probably now know. look at this porsche that i'm driving in forza. i've managed to crash it and scrape it of a couple of times, and you can see every single dent and ding that i've put in the car, every single little bit of chipped paintwork.
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it really is very detailed. the one x can play games made for the older xbox, but some titles will be enhanced, like rise of the tomb raider here, which boasts upgraded 4k graphics and a higherframe rate, which makes everything look smoother. these enhancements won't be standardised, though. microsoft says it is up to developers to choose how they will use the brunt the one x provides. this new digital virtuosity is great if you own a 4k tv. but if you are using a hd screen, the one x can give you a graphics bus, as well, making games look better than they would on the old machine. but how do they achieve this? witchcraft? or more precisely, super sampling, a technique that allows all the detail and information in a 4k image to be scaled down to fit into a 1080p screen, which, i suppose, is a form of silicon sorcery.
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apart from prettier visuals, the new machine should enjoy faster load times and, unlike its 4k console rival, the ps4 pro, the one x has a 4k blu—ray play fitted as well. so the box does more stuff than the ps4 pro, but it's also more expensive than the ps4 pro as well. microsoft is keen to see this in the world's most powerful console, but it is also the most expensive, at £449. and i think that might be the biggest hurdle that the xbox one x has to overcome, its price. and, as the games the machine plays are essentially the same as those on its least powerful older sibling, the one s, this console is probably appeal only going to appeal to those with spare cash burning a hole in their pocket, or those with a 4k tv on which to watch the prettier pictures the console produces. that casts gloom over everything, doesn't it, lads? what a drag he is!
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thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. new claims about the conduct of mps swirl around westminster. the conservatives suspend charlie elphicke and refer what are described as serious allegations about him to the police. the mp says he's done nothing wrong. and three labour mps all dispute complaints made about their behaviour towards women. we'll have the latest from westminster. good morning, it's saturday the 4th of november. also this morning: police in new york say they are investigating a credible rape allegation against harvey weinstein.
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