Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 4, 2017 7:00am-8:01am GMT

7:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. new claims about the conduct of mps swirl around westminster. the conservatives suspend charlie elphicke and refer what are described as serious allegations about him to the police. the mp says he's done nothing wrong. and three labour mps all dispute complaints made about their behaviour towards women. we'll have the latest from westminster. good morning, it's saturday the 4th of november. also this morning: police in new york say they are investigating a credible rape allegation against harvey weinstein. new figures reveal that only half the uk's fixed speed—cameras are actually switched on. in sport, it's fantasy football time for over 50 teams living the dream in the fa cup, but there was no fairytale
7:01 am
end for non—league minnows hyde, who were given a football league education by the milton keynes dons. and matt has the weather. good morning. wet start to the weekend for some but things will get drier, brighter and colder through the day with a few showers in the north and west. full forecast coming up in the next 15 minutes. see you then. good morning. first, our main story. the conservative mp, charlie elphicke, has been suspended by the party after it said serious allegations had been passed to the police. the party didn't specify what the allegations were or who had made them. mr elphicke, a member of the commons treasury select committee, said the media had been told of his suspension first and he wasn't aware of the nature of the claims. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. new allegations are emerging ever more frequently. political parties accused by some
7:02 am
of a previous unwillingness to be open about allegations they themselves were aware of now want to be seen to be acting quickly. this is charlie elphicke, the conservative mp for dover since 2010 who this morning wakes up no longer a tory mp, at least for now. that's because last night the man in charge of discipline among conservative mps, the new chief whip julian smith, issued a statement: in practice, this means mr elphicke remains in the commons but for now isn't a conservative mp. charlie elphicke‘s anger about how he's been treated is clear. he said: he added: meanwhile,
7:03 am
the labour mp clive lewis has strongly denied an allegation of impropriety at the labour party conference in september. i don't, as a rule, at packed labour party conferences grope people's bottoms when i greet them. it's just not how i roll, it's just not what i do. this is a place gripped by trepidation about about what may come next. individuals fearful for their own reputations, others fearful for the very reputation of politics excels. others fearful for the very reputation of politics itself. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let's speak now to our political correspondent, emma vardy, who's in westminster. emma, political correspondent is,
7:04 am
mps, must be wondering when and where this is going to end? -- political correspondence. a fraught week at westminster, you get the sense there are years if not decades of allegations about sexual misconduct that's coming to light. an addition to that report, this week we saw michael fallon, the defence secretary, resigned, damian green and mark garnier are under investigation by the cabinet office, kelvin hopkins suspended from labour and last night we heard the former labour cabinet minister ivan lewis apologised for making women feel uncomfortable but didn't make any nonconsensual sexual advances. theresa may and jeremy corbyn are under pressure over this. theresa may has published a new code of conduct for the conservatives, set up conduct for the conservatives, set upa new conduct for the conservatives, set up a new hotline and there will be an independent figure to oversee complaints and there will be a
7:05 am
cross— party complaints and there will be a cross—party meeting on monday to establish an independent grievance procedure. you get the sense parties are braced for more allegations and more people coming forward and we don't know where this will end up. for now, thank you very much indeed. police in new york say they have a viable case against the hollywood producer harvey weinstein. the announcement came after actress paz de la huerta claimed that mr weinstein raped her twice in 2010. she is among dozens of women who have come forward since october to accuse the 65—year—old of sexual misconduct. he has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. david willis reports. recent weeks have seen a torrent of allegations against harvey weinstein. now comes the first word of a possible arrest. new york detectives following up a call to the department last week are investigating an actress's claimed that the former movie mogul raped her twice back in 2010. they say the woman's account is detailed and credible. we have an actual case here. we are happy with where the investigation is right now.
7:06 am
mr weinstein is out of state. we would need an arrest warrant to arrest him. so right now we're gathering our evidence, we continue to do so every day. when some of hollywood's biggest names, among them gwyneth paltrow and angelina jolie, came forward to accuse harvey weinstein of sexual harassment he issued a statement emphatically denying any allegation of nonconsensual sex. he's now under investigation here, in los angeles and in the uk as well. like ripples in a pond, the accusations of misconduct against men of wealth and influence appeared to be growing rapidly. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. netflix has cut all ties with kevin spacey, who plays the lead role in one of its most successful programmes, house of cards. the company said it would no longer be involved in the series if the actor continued to be part of it. the announcement came after mr spacey faced allegations
7:07 am
of sexual misconduct from a string of men. a spanishjudge has issued european arrest warrants for the sacked catalan leader carles puigdemont and four of his allies who went to belgium. the five failed to attend a high court hearing in madrid on thursday when nine other ex—members of the regional government were taken into custody, facing charges of rebellion, sedition and misuse of public funds for pursuing catalan independence. mr puigdemont has said he will not return to spain unless he receives guarantees of a fair trial. the white house has attempted to downplay the findings of a major climate change report compiled by 13 us federal agencies. the report said it was extremely likely, meaning with 95% to 100% certainty that global warming is manmade, mostly from carbon dioxide through the burning of coal, oil and natural gas, contradicting senior trump officials. trump kicks off an ii—day trip to asia this weekend, taking in south korea, japan and china. it will be the longest tour of asia by a us president in 25 years. before setting out he visited hawaii's pearl harbor to see a us
7:08 am
battleship sunk by japanese bombers in the second world war, and received a security briefing from the us pacific command on issues including north korea's nuclear programme. 0nly around a half of fixed speed cameras in the uk are actually switched on, according to figures obtained through a freedom of information request. the data reveals that at least four police forces have no fixed speed cameras at all, and 13 have fewer than half actively catching speeding drivers. alan clayton reports. for motorists caught out by them, they infuriate and bring a hefty fine. safety campaigners argue speed cameras are lifesavers. new research suggests only around half of the luminous boxes throughout the uk are operational. the press association sent a freedom of information request to all of the 45 forces asking how many fixed speed cameras they had and how many were active. the 36 which responded had a total of 2838 cameras, of which only 52% were working. forces in cleveland, durham and north yorkshire said none of their fixed speed cameras were active. while northants said it
7:09 am
turned its cameras off six years ago but left them in place to deter speeding. those that replied said they used mobile speed cameras and regularly reviewed which cameras were turned on. i suspect in this case they're thinking that the yellow boxes are there, they're sending out the message that motorists ought to be recognising about risky roads, but they're also increasingly looking to more advanced technology such as average speed cameras, or indeed better engineering of the road, which might have a more beneficial affect. the national police chiefs council said the decision to use cameras was an operational matter and that all forces have individual responsibility for their use of the cameras. alan clayton, bbc news. you wouldn't want to speed in this,
7:10 am
you would want to prolong your journey so everyone had the time to ta ke journey so everyone had the time to take it in. it was fit for the king of rock n roll but how would it look in your driveway? elvis presley's pink 1957 cadillac is up for sale at auction and after 30 years in a museum. it's expected to sell for $2 million. do you want it? i have it on reserve for you for christmas. maybe that's not your style, how about music? whitney houston's grand piano, which was given to her as a gift by her husband bobby brown, is also going under the hammer, along with a nightgown that once belonged to jackie kennedy. i would look good in that. i would look good in thatlj i would look good in that. i think so. i would look good in that. i think so. there are a variety of dresses to choose from. i will swap the car for the nightgown for christmas. as long as you have the money! mike will have the sport later and matt will have the sport later and matt will have the all—important weather for this bonfire weekend. after a week of allegations, we're starting to get details on how the political parties will deal with sexual assault and harrasment claims.
7:11 am
the conservatives say they'll force all elected officials and their staff to sign a new code of conduct. labour says it will appoint an independent organisation to offer help and support to those affected. we're joined now by jasmin beckett, she sits on labour's ruling national executive committee and had written tojeremy corbyn calling for a review on how the party dealt with claims. thanks very much for that coming in. a week of allegations, did you think it would be like this by the end of this week and still so much uncertainty about what's to follow? no. when the first thing came out we we re no. when the first thing came out we were in an nec meeting and we had just finished talking about the sexual harassment policy, which we had been working on all day, and discussing it for approval and then this started coming out and when the first came out, bex bailey, and she
7:12 am
told us about her experiences, it was then inevitable that other people would feel able to come forward. bex bailey said she was attacked, she was raped a few years ago as a labour party worker. you have e—mailed jeremy corbyn calling for an independent investigation, have you had any response? yeah. i was really happy yesterday that he and mcnicol, the party general secretary, gave a response to that and they have put things in place —— ian macnicol. they are launching an independent investigation into the bex bailey case in particular. we've now got a 24—hour hotline for those that want to come forward and give any of their experiences and make any complaints, we are making that much more apparent, and looking at training and maybe looking at the tentative measures. one of the issues that have come out, and we
7:13 am
discussed this this week, the speed at which all politicians have reacted to these allegations or rumours 01’ reacted to these allegations or rumours or complaints. bex bailey was one of those who made her concerns very clear and they were passed through and they weren't acknowledged. what do you think... how do you think that reflects on the labour party? i think it'sjust really important now that we move forward. these past experiences are the reason why we're in this position now and why we realise there needs to be strong action on this. we have a party of 500,000 members now and it's really crucial we are acting quickly whenever these things come forward, not only to protect those that have had these experiences but also to protect anyone else from having those experiences. you mentioned labour was setting up this independent way of people being able to complain but it is labour setting up that independent process, i wonder
7:14 am
whether people will have faith in it and confidence in it if they have a grievance that within politics, we know how competitive and difficult politics can be, that they will be really treated independently?” really treated independently?” really hope that something we can go with moving forward. 0bviously really hope that something we can go with moving forward. obviously the independent investigation is just into the bex bailey case at the moment but one of the things i'm calling for as i said on the nac and the equalities committee in particular is to look at future complaints as well —— nec. particular is to look at future complaints as well -- nec. as a young person in politics, i don't know if you want to be an mp going forward , know if you want to be an mp going forward, but when you see what's been happening and the allegations, what does that make you think about being involved in this? it really saddens me to be honest. i've been involved for six years since i was 15, so these are people coming forward who i've gone through the party with so it saddens me and it makes me look at whether i want to go into that in the future. as long
7:15 am
as we can take a positive step forward now, i hope we can get young people who want to get involved in politics a positive view of that. it's been spoken about that it's a generational thing and through the yea rs generational thing and through the years people have adjusted their behaviour. have realised what is acceptable, in terms of men and women interacting. does it feel that westminster is a good few steps behind decent society? we've got to behind decent society? we've got to be clear that sexual harassment was never acceptable and i think that's one thing at the moment we are saying, ten years ago it was fine. it was never find. saying, ten years ago it was fine. it was neverfind. it'sjust saying, ten years ago it was fine. it was never find. it's just that... it's been brushed under the carpet. that's what the allegations are with many of the cases. it was ignored or pushed aside. so in a way it was just seen as what goes on. that isn't acceptable. it's really sad
7:16 am
andi isn't acceptable. it's really sad and i think that's why we are now in and i think that's why we are now in a much better position to deal with this, because society, and as we've seenin this, because society, and as we've seen in hollywood, knows that this type of behaviour isn't acceptable. but does westminster?” type of behaviour isn't acceptable. but does westminster? i hope this scandal will make westminster think about it. i don't think in the past it has seen this as fully unacceptable. thank you. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. you have worn a special tie for us! a closer look. hopefully there will be some sparkling displays out there tonight and hopefully the weather will play ball as well. the day will turn brighter, but also colder, after what has been a very wet start for some. this is the view a short time ago in leicestershire from our weather watcher. not a great start. but things will improve. the colder air brings clearer conditions. you
7:17 am
will notice the extensive cloud across the uk at the moment and it is in england where we have the heaviest and most persistent rain. suffolk and towards kent, not too much rain at the moment. it will turn more weight around lunchtime. central and eastern england will have further persistent rain. drying out in the west. a couple of showers into mid—morning. there will be some brea ks into mid—morning. there will be some breaks in the cloud bit of sunshine coming through. and and northern ireland. here, a few showers and a chilly breeze, which will strengthen through the day. showers become more abundant for the north and west in northern ireland. a couple of showers in the western parts of england and wales between the sunnier moments and eventually those sunnier moments and eventually those sunnier moments and eventually those sunnier moments will work in the east of england, although we will hold on to the cloud. a bit of rain in the parts of norfolk and suffolk. note temperatures, it gets colder. up note temperatures, it gets colder. up to nine degrees as we finished the afternoon. inner west you will
7:18 am
probably need something waterproof this evening. —— in the west. eastern england should be dry and clear. temperatures will drop further steer overnight. we could have some frost into sunday morning and across—the—boa rd temperatures into single figures. some frost in eastern parts of england. a cold start to sunday, but in eastern areas much brighter. still showers around in much of england and northern scotland. heavy thunder and snow on higher ground. showers fewer in number through the day, at a few more towards the north sea coast later. for many sunday afternoon will be dry and clear. chilly in the breeze. for tomorrow even in, —— evening, much cooler. showers fewer. frost forming in scotland. that will lift as the cloud pushes into the night and into monday morning, but elsewhere across england and wales frost will gradually developed. for
7:19 am
some of you monday morning will have a frosty start and there will be some oscillating temperatures through next week. some days will be cold, some will be mild. back to you. thanks very much. we are talking about water from lea ks we are talking about water from leaks out of the uk pipe network. 3 billion litres of water leaks is a p pa re ntly billion litres of water leaks is apparently enough, this is the kind of fa ct apparently enough, this is the kind of fact you love, to fill more than 1200 olympic sized swimming pools. that's a scary fact! despite efforts by water companies in england and wales to plug the amount of water lost, it's an issue which doesn't look like it will be draining away soon, as breakfast‘s tim muffett has been finding out. disruptive... all the roads are blocked off and traffic was impossible. and expensive. people can't come to the shop because we have the flood. when water leaks the impact can be huge. it took four
7:20 am
months to repair this road in birmingham last year. sometimes they are easy to spot. underground they can go undetected for months or yea rs. can go undetected for months or years. this is a new approach to a very old problem. we've got the drone attached to a really sensitive thermal camera that's going to be flying the length of the pipe, where we need to trace the leak. this is a demonstration, but anglian water will next week begin trialling a new way of finding leaks, with heat detecting drones in the air, a mix of hydrogen and nitrogen will be pumped into pipes. by putting the gas inside the pipe can then see that outside the pipe as if it were a meeting from a pinprick in a balloon and we can see the gas inside the soil. that's much more easy to pick up on a thermal imaging camera than say the escaping water. images of pipes will be carefully analysed. it is hoped the tiniest of lea ks analysed. it is hoped the tiniest of leaks will be picked up over thermal cameras on the drawings. it's a far
7:21 am
cry from the traditional method of finding leaks that still widely used. what are you listening for? i'm listening for water escaping out of the pipe under pressure, which will make a wishing to sound. some lea ks a re will make a wishing to sound. some leaks are caused by corroded pipes, sometimes low temperatures and ground movement are to blame. it's a very old—fashioned piece of technology, isn't it? it gives you an idea that there a leak in the vicinity of where you are working. it doesn't pinpoint exactly where. you attempt to tackle the problem have been welcomed by the consumer council for water, have been welcomed by the consumer councilfor water, which have been welcomed by the consumer council for water, which represents customers. what they see is big companies make a lot of profit, wasting water, and that really winds customers up. next month the consumer council will publish its annual report on leaks across england and wales. there are about 196. england and wales. there are about 1%. there is a lot of progress after prioritisation, but that progress has now stopped. some companies have
7:22 am
improved leakage rates and different criteria are used to measure progress, but when it comes to cubic metres of water lea ks progress, but when it comes to cubic metres of water leaks per kilometre of pipe, worst performers are united utilities in the north—west of england, then south staffordshire water and in last place thames water. its leakage rate is over twice the national average. all three companies told us that reducing leakage was a priority and that more resources were being committed to tackling the problem. but with more than three early in litres leaking from uk water pipes each day, the challenge would be draining away any time soon. —— won't be. 3 billion litres a week! i still can't get over that figure. naga? yes. normally i would be quite grumpy because it is the fourth of november and usually we try not to
7:23 am
talk about the c—word, christmas, too early. but this year we are going to break the rules and is for good reason. we want to tell you about an idea to have a reverse advent calendar. the thinking behind it is that instead of you or your children having a treat a day in december, you give something. emma bradley is championing the idea along with her daughter, erin. good morning. also with us isjo curry, from the charity changing lives. how does this work? you give, but obviously not into the advent calendar. how did you start this? we started our hamper off and we are doing it this month so it has plenty of time to get to a charity. we are doing it in november. everyday we are finding something and popping it into our hamperand are finding something and popping it into our hamper and then we are going to give it to one of our local
7:24 am
charities and it will put a smile on somebody‘s face. charities and it will put a smile on somebody's face. so we are looking at the kind of stuff. a hairbrush, it is obviously brand—new. what things do you think are good to putin? what things do you think are good to put in? was it his children like you who will be receiving these gifts. —— because it is. who will be receiving these gifts. -- because it is. toiletries, toys and food. that's the thing, it's got to be practical, but also in terms of thinking about who is receiving these presents as well. that's exactly right. sometimes the people in our hostel, it is families fleeing domestic abuse, and they don't have time to pack all of their toys, so we are asking people to put oi'i toys, so we are asking people to put on “— toys, so we are asking people to put on —— in extra pillows. toys, so we are asking people to put on -- in extra pillows. there a telescope. we are also thinking about the adults. that's why there
7:25 am
are female hygiene products, there's deodorant, toothbrushes, toothpaste, or the kinds of things we take for granted. they are necessities, but we are making sure they are in there as well. naga was saying we try not to talk about christmas too early, but you say you are doing this in november. it does in the buildup christmas give you a sense of giving and not just receiving. christmas give you a sense of giving and notjust receiving. it changes the culture of christmas. absolutely. i brought my children up to think about others. they go to play school and we are very much about the thing and this is our way of remembering what the real meaning behind christmas is and giving, as well as receiving. itjust helps the children to focus on those in our local community. in practical terms, how does this work? so a box is put together, like this, and then you ta ke together, like this, and then you take it to a charity? that's right. we operate across the north and in the midlands they can be dropped off
7:26 am
at any of our projects. but if you aren't in those areas i don't doubt that other charities would really welcome this sort of initiative. the idea is that then families can give presents. so it's something that would easily fall by the wayside if they are struggling financially. you put the wrapping on as well?” they are struggling financially. you put the wrapping on as well? i do. it's good for the charities if we don't wrap gifts because then the charities will need to check what's been received to make sure it is age—appropriate and so on. i've spoken to a local charity, so i know the demographics of the family we are supporting this year. but i put wrapping paper in and a pair of scissors and sellotape, so that mum can wrap those presents. or dad. or dad. and give them to the children. we arejust dad. and give them to the children. we are just enabling a mum dad. and give them to the children. we arejust enabling a mum or dad to be able to give this christmas and it is about their family, not ours. you said a couple of times about
7:27 am
your community and local charities. how important is it for you that this is something happening where you live, on the doorstep? for me that's important because i think it helps the children have a bit more empathy and understanding, that it could be other children that live not far away from us. poverty isn't exclusive. the matter where you live there's always somebody in need. i tell the children it would be something that just happening tell the children it would be something thatjust happening for a short time. we never know what's around the corner and how easy it can be. so for me it's important to help our local community. have you spoken to yourfriends help our local community. have you spoken to your friends about this? no. because perhaps they might think this is a good idea. do you? do you enjoy doing it? yeah. what do you like about it? because it makes people happy. that's what life is about, really, if we canjust people happy. that's what life is about, really, if we can just help eve ryo ne about, really, if we can just help everyone smile a bit more. thanks
7:28 am
very much and good luck with the box you are putting together. good luck with all of the charity work you are doing. that was a great excuse for tinsel! we will give you that back and you can give it to the charity. thanks very much. coming up on breakfast: from the chase to university challenge, when it comes to quizzes jenny ryan's got one of the best brains in britain. she'll be here to tell us the secret to becoming a professional quizzer and testing our general knowledge too. stay with us. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: he conservative mp, charlie elphicke, has been suspended by the party after it said serious allegations had been passed to the police. the party didn't specify what the accusations were, or who had made them. mr elphicke, a member of the commons treasury select committee, said the media had been told of his suspension first, and he wasn't aware of the nature of the claims. three labour mps have
7:29 am
disputed complaints made about their behaviour towards women. clive lewis, kelvin hopkins and ivan lewis all deny any wrong doing. labour has announced a raft of measures it says will make sure complaints are dealt with independently. police in new york say they have a viable case against the hollywood producer harvey weinstein. the announcement came after the actress paz de la huerta claimed that mr weinstein raped her twice in 2010. she is among dozens of women who have come forward since october to accuse the 65—year—old of sexual misconduct. he has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. netflix has cut all ties with kevin spacey, who plays the lead role in one of its most successful programmes, house of cards. the company said it would no longer be involved in the series if the actor continued to be part of it. the announcement came after mr spacey faced allegations of sexual misconduct from a string of men. a spanishjudge has issued
7:30 am
european arrest warrants for the sacked catalan leader carles puigdemont and four of his allies who went to belgium. the five failed to attend a high court hearing in madrid on thursday, when nine other ex—members of the regional government were taken into custody. mr puigdemont has said he will not return to spain unless he receives guarantees of a fair trial. the white house has attempted to downplay the findings of a report which goes against the trump administration's view on climate change. the study, compiled by us government scientists, said it was extremely likely, with 95% to 100% certainty, that global warming is man—made, mostly from carbon dioxide through the burning of coal, oil and natural gas. president donald trump kicks off an 11—day trip to asia this weekend, taking in south korea, japan and china. it will be the longest tour of asia by a us president in 25 years. before setting out he visited hawaii's pearl harbor to see a us
7:31 am
battleship sunk by japanese bombers in the second world war, and received a security briefing from the us pacific command on issues including north korea's nuclear programme. 0nly around a half of fixed speed cameras in the uk are actually switched on, according to figures obtained through a freedom of information request. the data reveals at least four police forces don't have any fixed speed cameras at all. we've all tried to impress the boss when we're in a newjob, so spare a thought for this poor pup. rocky, a 7—month—old border collie, herded a whole flock of sheep into his farmer's house after a gate was left open to their pen. that's an achievement in itself. the farmer came in to find them huddled up farmer came in to find them huddled up in her house. i think the dog did
7:32 am
a good thing, did what it was meant to do. rocky saw a door, a load of sheep, they needed to go from one place to the other, he did it. on thinking about rosalind's carpet, i don't know how long they were in there but it would have been very messy indeed. would have been cold outside so rocky did well. keep the gate shut in future. it would be interesting to hear stories about mishaps on the first day of work from our viewers. if you can, get in touch with us. a former newspaper editor, i broke his arm playing football in the first week i was there. not good. i knew you would have a story. if you have a story, get in touch. let's move to the fa cup, a special day for 5h teams playing in the first round of the fa cup proper and this is why this competition is unique. hide united had a striker called tom pratt playing for them
7:33 am
last night, his day of glory on bbc, he finished the game and did a night shift at a warehouse, he is still there, good morning! —— hyde. shift at a warehouse, he is still there, good morning! -- hyde. he must be exhausted. imagine if they had won? could have been even worse. they didn't quite win. the first round sparked into life last night, but not in the way it was supposed to as a flare burned into the artificial pitch at the home of non league hyde. there was to be no upset here, as league one mk dons went ahead through aiden nesbitt and ended up easy winners. there were also surprise wins for league two sides, port vale and notts county. to one of my favourite stories of the cup, the rise of shaw lane association, who were playing as a pub team less than a decade ago. they're from barnsley and have been promoted five times in the past six years but will still start as big outsiders against league two mansfield. there's no pressure on us. the pressure's on mansfield. there the football league side. we're shaw lane association, a small club in barnsley,
7:34 am
nobody knows about us and it's the fa cup, it's the romance of the fa cup, it's all the cliches you can think of, giant killings, david versus goliath, it's everything, and it happens, you know? the rampant wolves will take some stopping in the championship it seems. their big summer spending is paying off and they're now four points clear at the top. roman saiss, and leo bonatini with the goals that beat fulham, who haven't won in four games now. it's five years since wolves were last in the premier league. at the moment they are on course for a return again. the former manchester united defender patrice evra has been suspended by his club marseille while uefa investigate him after he kicked one of his supporters in the head on thursday night. it happened during the warm—up for marseille's europa league game against the portuguese side vitoria guimaraes. evra, who's 36, could face a lengthy ban. not the best start for an ashes tour
7:35 am
for england's former captain alastair cook, he was out for a duck second ball in a warmup match against a western australia cricket association xi against a western australia cricket association x! in perth. stoneman and vince rescuing england. we are 18 days away from the first ashes test. scotland have been dismantled by new zealand in their second rugby league world cup pool match in christchurch. they lost 74—6, with the kiwis scoring fourteen tries in a dominant performance. the result leaves scotland bottom of their group, having already lost against tonga in their opening match. england are back in action at 9am uk time, and they'll be hoping
7:36 am
to bounce back from their opening game defeat against australia by beating lebanon. but the lebanese are on the crest of a wave, above england in their group after a stunning win over france last weekend, which even surprised ahead coach. the problem with our team given they're not all professional, or not used to playing 80 minutes and having to concentrate for 80 minutes, i thought the tough part was going to be the last ten minutes but they talk about the lebanese spirit and passion and it shone through. a great story. the former new zealand international robbie hunter—paul is part of the bbc punditry team and hejoins me now. was its pricing for you how easy it was in the end? —— it surprising. scotla nd was in the end? —— it surprising. scotland got unlucky, on the back end of a heavy defeat against tonga last week, they came up against a white hot new zealand team. new zealand are proving a point at the moment, some teams have gone to
7:37 am
other nations, they are saying they don't need those players and they are good enough. which leads us on to talk about lebanon, what a story, we associate cities like brisbane with rugby league but not beirut. how did this rise happen, where did it start? there's a huge lebanese community in sydney, so that's where the crux of it comes from, but there are some nice stories out of how the lebanese players emigrated with families to australia. that's where they are really getting that saturation. because so many nrl players and high—ranking professional rugby league is art of lebanese descent, you now have this groundswell in lebanon itself. the prime minister or president of lebanon tweeting saying congratulations because they had their first congratulations because they had theirfirst win against congratulations because they had their first win against france last week. a big coup because the french recognise they are one of the
7:38 am
heavyweights in rugby league. should england fans be worried this morning? probably not. england are that good. be under no illusion, they lost to australia last week, they lost to australia last week, the scoreline flattered australia, england have a lot of growth and they are coming together and they have one of the best coaches in the world if not the best. your tempting fate now. what happened last week, why did they do so badly in terms of the result against australia? why did they do so badly in terms of the result against australia7m why did they do so badly in terms of the result against australia? it was the result against australia? it was the first half, the rabbit in the headlights thing, they spent 35 and it's defending but in the second half after so much defence they dominated australia. with england they have so much potential, that happens in a world cup, your team gets better and your combinations come together and this is why the game against lebanon is so important because it gives time for your combinations in the right places, the spine, the halves, move the big
7:39 am
boys around. england has arguably the best forward pack in the world cup. this gives them an opportunity to fight for their place and that's what you want, internal competition, everybody biting at each other‘s heels. can you tell me, you've been in the changing room when the manager has come in and given you and the team a thrashing. we call it the spray. really? this is rugby union, i know they are different. very similar cultures, though. can you tell me what would have been said in the changing room after this tried? this was in the glasgow warriors match last week, amazing try. this is what happened. he takes it from his own line basically but look how many tackles he evades. this is from an artificial pitch, i don't know if that makes a difference but the players are diving at shadows. he's not
7:40 am
shellfish because he doesn't try to score it himself. if that was me i would have held onto the ball and had my name written in the papers the next day —— selfish. i would never have passed the ball. what with the spray have been like from the leinster manager? it's hard to coach against individual brilliance like that and it is hard to coach it. depending on which room you work in... something broke down earlier than the guys that fell off the tackles. —— you were in. the defensive reception is what happened and that's what needs to be picked up and that's what needs to be picked up on. they should have tackled him in goaland up on. they should have tackled him in goal and they would have got the ball back. i need to take you to my house and watch the rugby with me to explain it all, that's what i need. 9am this morning he'll be on bbc. england play lebanon. lovely story. really united the religion in that country, all playing on the same pitch in rugby league. good luck
7:41 am
today. 9am, england against lebanon on bbc two. don't leave robbie hanging. i did, didn't i? not the graeme souness handshake, that was really painful last week. do you like surfing, do you do a bit of surfing, wake boarding? i don't know if you have seen this in new zealand, a surfboard or a wake board but it has got an engine on it. it's catching on though, and semi—pro british rider anya colley will race for medals at the motosurf world cup off naples in italy this weekend. robbie looks like he doesn't approve of this whatsoever. it breaks all the rules, you take nature out of it. have a look. at the cutting edge of a new way to walk on water, britain's number one jet surfer anya colley, who's made history this season competing in the motosurf world cup. it's a bit of a mix between surfing, wakeboarding and then anything with a throttle. if you done biking, if you've done cars, if you've done anything
7:42 am
and you like speed you will be good at it. you've got to lean your whole body over to get it to turn good with the speed. anya, and indeed the whole of the uk, are playing catch up in this latest motorsport. we only got involved a couple of months ago were for the first time a leg of the world cup series was hosted on these shores with 48 riders from around the world competing at wyboston in bedfordshire. the sport had originally started in the czech republic when an inventor experimented by putting a lightweight engine into a surfboard. it's since spread to all corners of the planet. until now to get across this lake on a wakeboard i'd need a boat tow me or if i was at sea on a surfboard i would need some waves, but now all the power is beneath my feet. or at first beneath my belly, because that throttle is very sensitive. you turn by leaning your body, that seems quite straightforward. so now we're leaning,
7:43 am
the nextjob is to go a bit faster and eventually you try and stand. you can actually go out on your own. you're not relying on having a boat and a driver and a watcher, i can actually go out and enjoy it any time i want and the beauty of the board, you can actually take it anywhere. it's like nothing else you've ever tried before. it gives you a real thrill that you're out there and a real sense of freedom. finally we're standing, i'm on my feet and we're burning along on my feet... with the boards only weighing 19kg, the top speed is over 40mph. but it feels so much faster. the engines run on biofuels, which break up in the water. a good job really when we swallowed so much of it, initially at least, although the younger beginners were far cooler. that was well awesome.
7:44 am
the speed, the balancing, like, you've really got to balance on it. it's kind of hard to keep your balance. but it's awesome when it's going fast. it's now hoped more beginners around the uk will get a chance to try and carved like anya as she targets a medal in the last leg of the world cup series this weekend off italy. talk about a spray. that's a spray! in rugby it is when you get a good telling. i wonder if matt's in a good mood this morning. fireworks happening. that was a stupid question, you are always in a good mood. but the weather isn't! the weather is not in a good mood this morning in eastern england. good morning. this is the scene in nottinghamshire. this is the scene just outside glasgow. the sunshine
7:45 am
is breaking through! clear whether on its way, but also cold weather that will be with us by the end of the day. this cloud is thick. east midlands, lincolnshire, down to east anglia, lots of rain. parts of suffolk, essex and kent, the rain will work its way back later. across western areas the cloud and rain we've had so far will ease back to a couple of showers. we will start to see sunshine breaking through. notice the drop in temperature in scotla nd notice the drop in temperature in scotland and northern ireland. a few sunny spells in eastern higher ground. showers could be heavy today, even snow over high ground. more showers across western areas. much of eastern scotland should be fine and slowly brightening up in eastern england. it may take until the evening before clear skies
7:46 am
pushing the east anglia and the south—east. good news for those heading to the fireworks displays in the east. it should be largely dry tonight. just a couple of isolated showers. more showers in the west. you need something warm and something waterproof. especially with the breeze. showers keep going through the night in the north and west. with clear skies eastern scotla nd west. with clear skies eastern scotland and eastern england, temperatures dropped. closed were frost to start sunday. a better start in eastern england. many parts of the east and scotland staying dry through the day. in the west, showers around in the day. they will ease off into the afternoon and through the afternoon a couple of showers towards the north sea coast. but most will be dry, with good sunny spells. that leads us into a cool evening. if there are any displays tomorrow, most of you will be dry, but it will be very chilly. a frost developing in scotland.
7:47 am
0vernight we will have a frost developing parts of central and eastern england as well. that's how it is looking. more details later. thank you! we'll be back with the headlines at 8am, but first it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. has bbc news been too sympathetic to those wanting catalonia to be independent of spain? was newsnight right to label its special this week the problem with men? first, the week's news has again by dominated by accusations of sexual impropriety and inappropriate behaviour. we discussed on this programme a fortnight ago complaints that the allegations against harvey weinstein had dominated the agenda to excess. now we've heard the same charge in relation to the latest slew of cases now focussed firmly on westminster.
7:48 am
theresa may wants a new code of conduct to protect those working for mps from sexual harassment. a woman tells the bbc how a senior labour party figure persuaded her to drop allegations of rape by a party member. tonight at ten: the defence secretary michael fallon has resigned following allegations of inappropriate conduct. the allegations made against michael fallon, which prompted his resignation as defence secretary, and the attention given to it by bbc news, prompted this anonymous telephone message. hello, i'm phoning to complain about this continual witch hunt on people being sexual predators. more worrying things are going on in the world. i agree that serious sexual predators should be in the noteworthy news item, but somebody putting their hand on your knee is not. that phrase used there, witch hunt, was picked up by other viewers, including tom parkinson,
7:49 am
who e—mailed: and eleanor in london asked: newsnight tackled this fraught topic with a special edition on wednesday, subtitled, to the dismay of some viewers, the problem with men. good evening. tonight, we want to reflect the new national conversation about an age—old problem. sex, power, abuse and allegation. have the rules changed? are we redefining what we're prepared to put up with and how do
7:50 am
we feel about calling people guilty in such a vocal public way? edward talbot was one of the viewers who got in touch to respond to the programme, writing: the political crisis in spain started just over a month ago, with the 1st of october referendum on self determination in catalonia. that saw a yes vote of 90%, but was boycotted by many of those opposed, and the spanish government said the vote and the idea of independence was unconstitutional. last friday, the regional government declared an independent republic and madrid promptly dismissed the entire catalan cabinet, dissolved the regional parliament and appointed the spanish deputy prime minister to run the region temporarily. the sacked catalan president, carles puigdemont, has been ordered to appear in court, accused of rebellion, and has said he won't return from belgium without a guarantee of a fair trial. bbc news has been following the twists and turns of this saga. this is the people facing down the police.
7:51 am
these are riot police who have been drafted in from other parts of spain. but their heavy—handed tactics today appear to be making deep divisions in this region worse. all around here, catalans are singing their national anthem. the national anthem they now believe belongs to their independent republic, separate from the spanish state. there are so many questions. what will the spanish government now do? but for now, this crowd just wants to celebrate. no doubting the passion of this crowd. belting out "long live spain" along barcelona's main boulevards. these are catalans who don't want independence, who reject the independence declaration made last week. it's been a complex and often confused dispute, and some viewers have detected
7:52 am
what they feel is a lack of balance in coverage. a spaniard living in lancaster, pilar garcia—sanchez, thought: while an m nardini told us: and paul summers wondered: well, to discuss this now, i'm joined by andrew roy, who's world editor for bbc news. thank you for coming on newswatch. most of the viewers who did complain said the bbc had been too favourable to the pro—independence side, how do you respond?
7:53 am
we haven't been. we've been physically in both locations, in madrid and barcelona, so we can put both points of view. 0ur correspondents have always been careful to get pro and anti clips from protesters and politicians into their pieces. we've been trying throughout to be absolutely rigorous in being impartial and objective and putting both sides of the argument. i think the concern is that the headline coverage, which is how most viewers encounter the story, they feel has given the impression that this has been a violent state crackdown on a popular independence movement and that's not fair. i think that's incorrect as well. there was violence at the very beginning round the illegal referendum, we reported that the referendum was illegal, we showed what was happening in the polling stations. we also reported afterwards the disparity in figures about the numbers arrested, people injured by both sides. since then, there hasn't been much violence, there has only been
7:54 am
a series of rallies in madrid and barcelona, both pro and anti independence, and we've been reporting that, reporting what the politicians have been saying, and giving both sides air time. do you think you did enough to explain why the referendum was illegal? we've put online an awful lot of explainers. we've got pieces about the constitution of spain, we have got pieces about the devolved powers of catalonia, we have the history of the two sides in this dispute. if your audiences are saying they still don't understand it maybe we need to do more, but we've certainly gone out of our way to try to explain what is a complex situation and anyone who wants more depth, that's all available online. the trouble is, audiences, i think reasonably, can say we can't be expected to go hunting for every piece of background online, the bulletins are what a lot of people watch and that is what they are complaining about.
7:55 am
and perhaps in reports that tend to be two or three minutes long, it becomes simplified as a tale of right and wrong. we haven't been doing just two or three minutes on this story, we've been doing much, much more than that throughout the whole dispute, and like i say, we have also been pointing out here is a correspondent in madrid, here is a correspondent in barcelona, we're giving you both sides of the story. we've done historical explainers on air, we've also brought in the issues about the economics around this independence movement and whether it would or wouldn't work, so we've tried as hard as we can to get across to the audience the complexities of it in a reduced television bulletin, but this issue has had an awful lot of air time. i think there's a particular challenge for television when you get passionate, colourful demonstrations wanting change, compared to what can seem a relatively grey argument, the government that wants to keep things the same. does that leave viewers inevitably with an unbalanced impression? you saw from those clips, that the people who are in favour
7:56 am
of unity are just as passionate and waving just as many flags, confusingly similarly coloured to the catalan flags, but they are as passionate in putting their views across. we covered those rallies, we covered them when they are in barcelona and when they are in madrid. and we also go out into the crowd and get the voices supporting the rallies and also the voices down the sides of the rallies, who are possibly not supporting that point of view. so we do try to get the balance across, but also within the bulletins pieces we do. andrew roy, thank you. before we go, a little more of your reaction to how the bbc covered the news this week. on friday morning, one of the stories getting the headline treatment was this. and president trump's twitter account is closed for 11 minutes by a member of staff on their last day. moira merryweather had this response: and andrew garner agreed
7:57 am
with that: and finally, we mentioned last week complaints that bbc news should not have concerned itself with the trivial though amusing tale of president macron's dog urinating in a fireplace during a meeting at the elysee palace. well, we've had some feedback about that feedback, including this from liz stewart: and that's all from us, thank
7:58 am
you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or even appear on the programme, you can call us on 0370 0106 676 or e—mail us. you can find us on twitter and do have a look at our website. that's all from us, we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello — this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin.
7:59 am
new claims about the conduct of mps. the
8:00 am

9 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on