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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 5, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm anita mcveigh, the headlines at 5pm. the prime minister's deputy, damian green, strenuously denies claims pornography was found on a computer in his commons office in 2008. jeremy corbyn tells the bbc he was aware of allegations against labour mp kelvin hopkins before his shadow cabinet appointment. catalonia's sacked leader and four of his former ministers turn themselves in to belgian police — a judge must decided whether to execute european arrest warrants issued by spain. the investigative judge has to decide within 2a hours, which means that a decision has to be made no later than 9:17 tomorrow morning. president trump says no nation should underestimate american resolve — as he begins his asian tour injapan. the harvey weinstein scandal — michelle pfeiffer tells the bbc of her hopes the culture will change in hollywood. more than a dozen people
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are treated for minor injuries after fireworks malfunctioned at an event in wiltshire. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. theresa may's most senior minister has denied a claim that police found pornography on his computer during a raid on his office nine years ago. damian green, the first secretary of state, said the allegation made by a former police chief, bob quick, was "completely untrue" and a "political smear". he strongly denied that pornography was found and said police had never reported this to him at the time. mr quick, a former assistant commissioner in the metropolitan police —
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has told the bbc he stands by the claim and is to take part in a whitehall inquiry into allegations against mr green. our political correspondent susana mendonca reports the bad blood between the prime minister's deputy and this ex—police chief goes back a long way. eight years ago, damian green's parliamentary offices were searched as part of an inquiry into home office leaks during which he was briefly arrested. that inquiry was led by the then metropolitan police assistant commissioner bob quick. today, this claim in a national newspaper that a computer in that office had contained pornography. damian green's rebuttal was sharp and swift. he said this story is completely untrue. a disreputable, political smear. the police have never suggested to me that improper material was found on my parliamentary computer. mr green also said that the story had come from a tainted and untrustworthy source. he was referring to former assistant commissioner, bob quick, who has since told the bbc he stands
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by his account and he would give evidence tomorrow to a whitehall official investigating other allegations against mr green. it's the latest twist in the scandal that's seen a series of claims of improper conduct and sexual harassment engulfing westminster. this senior backbench conservative says part of the problem is that party systems are not set up to support potential victims. this is the problem that the whips office has. because their primary role is to make sure that government or opposition business goes through. but, of course, they have these other roles, which are incredibly important, which is the welfare of members of parliament, welfare of our staff. at the same time, though, they are trying to get government business through. there's a complete contradiction. and that has to stop. all the party leaders will get together tomorrow to discuss the prospect of a new system for reporting sexual harassment. the meeting tomorrow with the prime minister, we can talk about sanctions and whether if there's a case against an mp that they are are suspended in the first instance
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or there's an investigation and then they're suspended. and that needs to be due process, it needs to be transparent and clear. what's clear is that political parties across westminster have been tainted by recent allegations and they want to be seen to be doing something about it. and i spoke to susanna and asked her more about the disagreement between damian green and a former senior police officer in terms of finding out more of what actually happened, we may find out more tomorrow because we know bob quick will be giving evidence to this committee. which is already looking at damian green anyway because of allegations made by a journalist against him and they will be looking at that tomorrow. and this is going to form part of that and we may get more detail. certainly it shows from damian green's point of view, this potentially could be something that damages his career. for theresa may's government it is a massive issue, because he is the most senior minister that she has in her cabinet, he is effectively her deputy. she has really lost michael fallon,
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and so the idea that she could lose somebody else would be severely damaging for her government. and certainly damian green making that point, as far as he was concerned, he was never told about this pornography and he knows nothing about it. so what more is theresa may going to do with this? we know it is all the parties, it is notjust the conservatives have been affected by the issues of sexual harassment and sexual assault claims. what we understand is that tomorrow all the parties will be getting together to discuss some kind of procedure, a westminster wide procedure, for people that want to report they have been victims of sexual harassment. what is interesting, at westminster, unlike a company where you have a hr system and you can go to hr and tell them about sexual harassment, there is no system in westminster. so all of the parties want to move forward on that and set up something more substantial. as you mention this is notjust about the conservatives. jeremy corbyn has been talking more about how labour will deal with this, and that he knew about the allegations to the luton north
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mp kelvin hopkins before he was appointed to the shadow cabinet. and there has been a lot of discussion about this, because kelvin hopkins was appointed to the shadow cabinet despite the fact, as we understand, the whip‘s office, rosie winterton at the time, told the leadership that she had concerns about it because he had been reprimanded before because of an incident involving an activist. we understand that there were some inappropriate texts sent, those are the allegations, and inappropriate hugging. now, kelvin hopkins has denied all of this, saying it didn't happen as it has been played out. but certainly what we now know, is thatjeremy corbyn was told about the fact that kelvin hopkins had been reprimanded, but he appointed him anyway. he felt that at that time it had all been dealt with, and so there was no issue with it. yes, i was aware that he had been reprimanded and i was also made aware that that was the end of the matter.
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if he had been reprimanded do you think it is appropriate that he was then promoted to the shadow cabinet? he had been reprimanded, the case was closed and i thought it was reasonable, to appoint him even for short time, the cabinet. why has the case been reopened now? it has been reopened, there will be an investigation and that is ongoing. did you make the wrong decision to promote him at the time? i made the decision to put him into the shadow cabinet for a short time. i thought that was the right thing to do. now the case has been reopened and will be looked at again. he has been suspended from party membership, the decision i took immediately i heard about the latest revelations. with hindsight was it the wrong decision? i can't discuss hindsight, all i can say is that i based the decision on what happened at the time and he made a good contribution to the shadow cabinet while he was there.
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it is now a matter to be investigated and resolved. jeremy corbyn. and on the point of the various party whips and what they knew or didn't know, are there questions about all of that as well? there are, and they are all about what they are there for. party whips are there to instil discipline and to get mps to sing from the same hymn sheet in order to get legislation through. there is a suggestion that, certainly in the past, perhaps party whips have known information about certain mps and used that information to get them to stick to party lines, to discipline them. that is being denied by amber rudd who herself was a party whip. she was talking earlier about it and said that certainly there was no black book, there was no suggestion of that going on when she was party whip. but we have since heard from anna soubry who is a senior backbench conservative, who is basically saying
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that the whole system of party whips can't continue to work in the way it does. because if you are somebody who is claiming that you have been sexually harassed, you have to go to the party and the very fact that you're doing that, and they are also trying to protect the party's reputation, there is a contradiction there. a potential conflict—of—interest. and so this said the system doesn't work, and having these discussions about a westminster wide approach, they have also been talking about their own systems and bringing them up to date in terms of having different ways of people being able to report incidents of sexual harassment. a spokesman for the brussels public prosecutor gave a statement this afternoon — saying that five people have handed themselves in to belgian authorities. this morning the five persons that
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have been sought by the spanish authorities presented themselves at the federal police of brussels. they were taken into custody at 9:17am, so this morning. in the presence of their lawyers they were officially notified of the european arrest warrants. in compliance with this procedure, the brussels prosecutor's office will seize an investigativejudge in order to execute the european arrest warrants. the investigative judge can decide accordingly, refusal to execute the european arrest, arresting the people involved, releasing them under conditions or under bail. this afternoon, the persons involved will be heard by the investigative
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judge in this building. the investigative judge has to decide within 2a hours, which means that a decision has to be made no later than 9:17 tomorrow morning. earlier i spoke to our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. he explained what the next steps will be following today's dramatic events. what is happening right now is that those five figures, mr puigdemont and the four others, are being interviewed by the investigating judge. it is their opportunity to present their side of the case to the investigating judge. he will have the european arrest warrant sent from spain. mr puigdemont and his colleagues will have the chance to challenge that and say why they feel they should not be extradited back to spain, and what thejudge will have to do is make a decision, in the next 2a hours, so by tomorrow morning,
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whether to execute that warrant or not. so we should know quite soon whether the belgian authorities will go ahead with this. if they do, mr puigdemont and his colleagues can seek to challenge it through the courts. so there is a process beyond that decision by tomorrow morning at the latest. is that also a question mark over whether the charges brought by spain would be recognised by belgium? this is one of the issues that confronts the investigating judge of the minute, he will look at the european arrest warrant that has been sent and having heard the case the first decision will be whether to proceed with that warrant. the judge could throw it out, could hold mr puigdemont under arrest in the police station or could release him
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on bail while he proceeds with the case against him. we understand that mr puigdemont has said through his lawyers that whatever the decision, he will seek to challenge it if this goes ahead, through the belgian courts, through the appeals. a process that could take at least a month, probably more because there are layers of appeals that he could make and presumably at every stage he would want to challenge the legality of this. damian grammaticas. a number of young children were among 14 people injured at a fireworks display in wiltshire. last night's event at the antrobus hotel in amesbury was cut short after a display box malfunctioned, sending fireworks toward the crowd. ambulance crews treated 14 people for minor injuries. in a statement, the hotel said it was mortified by what happened and has apologised. police in london have arrested a 16—year—old boy on suspicion of grievous bodily harm after two acid attacks last week.
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two delivery drivers on mopeds were sprayed with a corrosive substance in separate attacks in walthamstow and tottenham in north east london. a 14—year—old boy who was arrested on friday has been released under investigation. the royal college of psychiatrists says the number of unfilled consultant posts in england has doubled in the past four years. the college says the shortage is alarming, and has led to increased waiting times and lower standards of care, as ben ando reports. good health, it's said, is a matter for both body and mind. but some with mental health difficulties are having to wait months to see a consultant psychiatrist. that, according to figures from the royal college of psychiatrists, is because in england one in ten of those jobs are not filled. it is a scandal that if you need to see a consultant psychiatrist you can't. if you had cancer you would see a cancer specialist quite quickly, within a couple of weeks.
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if you needed an operation you would see a surgeon. it's not right that people with mental health problems don't get to see a psychiatrist when they need one. in wales, the number of unfilled consultant psychiatric posts stands at 9%, in scotland it's marginally better at 6%, while in northern ireland, just 2% ofjobs are vacant. the department of health says it knows it needs more clinicians, especially in the light of an increase in demand for mental health services. that's why it's expanding doctors' training places by 25%. it says that's the largest single increase ever. but training a psychiatrist to co nsulta nt level ta kes more than a decade. while mental illness is moving up the health agenda, it will be some time before the supply of psychiatrists can match the increasing demands. ben ando, bbc news. the prime minister's deputy, damian green, strenuously denies
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claims pornography was found on a computer in his commons office almost a decade ago. jeremy corbyn told the bbc he was aware of allegations against labour mp kelvin hopkins before his shadow cabinet appointment. catalonia is sacked leader and four former ministers turn themselves into belgian police, a judge must decide whether to execute european arrest warrant is issued by spain. social media giants must do more to stop child sexual exploitation and the home secretary has said. new government figures show a rise in the number of indecent images of children being reported to the police amber rudd says the companies have a moral duty to go further and faster in tackling abuse. technology
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fa ns faster in tackling abuse. technology fans say they are doing their utmost to keep young users say. —— safe. donald trump has arrived in asia — with a warning that no nation should underestimate americas resolve. the president's first stop on his tour , which is expected to be dominated by the crisis over north korea's nuclear programme — was an airbase near tokyo, where he addressed us and japanese troops. rupert wingfield—hayes‘ report from tokyo contains some flash photography. under bright sunny skies, air force one touched down at yokota air base just outside tokyo. with a military band playing hail to the chief and a stage flanked by fighter jets, president trump was given a rock star welcome by 2,000 us troops stationed here in japan. and then, he got to don a military jacket. president trump could have landed at tokyo airport and been met by prime minister shinzo abe. it is significant that instead,
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for this first stop on his asian tour, he's chosen to land here at a us military base and to address us military personnel. got a lot of stuff coming. when he spoke, it was of america's overwhelming military might. and without naming the country directly, this veiled threat to north korea's dictator kim jong—un. no—one, no dictator, no regime and no nation, should underestimate, ever, american resolve. every once in a while in the past, they underestimated us. it was not pleasant for them, was it? it was not pleasant. minutes later, marine 0ne whisked the president to another of his favourite places, a golf course. there, waiting to welcome him, prime minister shinzo abe. these two are now such close friends, mr abe had special hats made up for the occasion. "donald and shinzo", it reads, "make alliance even greater".
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not the most catchy slogan but you get the point. then it was time to hit the fairway. mr abe has deliberately cast himself as donald trump's number one friend in asia. and, today, he got his pay—off. president trump lavished praise on him and japan calling it a treasured partner and crucial ally. on monday, the us president will fulfil another long—held ambition, an official welcome from japan's emperor. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. the heir to the throne in saudi arabia has overseen a major purge in the country's leadership. ii princes, four current ministers and dozens of former ministers have been detained. crown prince mohammed bin salman is the head of a newly—established anti—corruption committee — and he appears to have sidelined a number of powerful figures. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner reports.
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saudi arabia has been shaken by two shocks within hours of each other. first, missiles were fired by rebels in yemen. they reportedly reached the capital riyadh before they were shot down. this is a big step, they are using ballistic missiles, long—range missiles, likely from iran to put pressure on the saudi arabian government which has been bombarding yemen figures now. next in an unrelated move came the news that several prominent princes including serving ministers had been detained in a sweeping anti—corruption purge led by the crown prince mohammed bin salman. the heir to the throne has been moving fast to consolidate his growing power while spearheading a modern reform programme. this move will now give him nominal control of all the country's security forces but at the same time the removal from office of several well known figures is sure to upset some more conservative elements. saudi arabia is a deeply tribal society and not
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used to sudden change. it's currently conducting a war in yemen, another against so—called islamic state and a boycott of qatar. what is clear is that the mohammed bin salman regime is struggling very much. he's trying to consolidate power and this attack on the capital is an embarrassment, to say the least. these are risky times in the desert kingdom. frank gardner, bbc news. some tv companies based in britain may have to move overseas in the event of a so—called ‘hard brexit‘. that's the view of the commercial broadcasters association, which represents international media networks such as disney and discovery. here's our business correspondent, joe lynam. eurosports, the discovery channel and disney tv are some of the world's most popular channels and they all have their european headquarters in london, allowing them to broadcast over the eu.
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but their place could be jeopardised if britain quits the eu without a comprehensive trade deal. broadcasters say they can only wait a few more months before being forced to move thousands ofjobs to other eu countries. we estimate that nearly one in four jobs in the uk broadcasting sector works exclusively or in part on international channels. on top of that you have well over half a billion a year investment going in wages, overheads and all the technology that it takes to get a channel on to air. there are 2,300 tv channels in the eu of which 1100 are based in the uk. of those, 650 are aimed exclusively at eu audiences. the broadcasting watchdog 0fcom says brexit is the single biggest issue facing the industry, and the government said it was working to get the right deal for a sector which makes an important contribution
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to our thriving creative industries. joe lynam, bbc news. mark pollock's track record of overcoming adversity has inspired people all over the world. he won two commonwealth games rowing medals, and after losing his sight, he became the first blind person to trek to the south pole. and when he was left paralysed by a fall, he vowed that he would find a way to walk again. now, with the help of cutting edge robotic technology, that ambition is gradually becoming a reality. mark is using what he's learnt, to help others, including the former jockeyjonjo bright. 0ur northern ireland correspondent chris page has been to meet them. successful sportspeople stretch themselves to the limit. mark pollock and jonjo bright are no exception in that sense. but now, they are pushing the scientific boundaries in search of a cure for paralysis. mark was a commonwealth games rowing medallist.
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after losing his sight, he became the first blind person to trek to the south pole in 2009. the next year, he fell from a second—storey window and was paralysed from the waist down. but he wasn't going to shirk his biggest challenge yet and has become a global pioneer in using robotic legs and electrical stimulation of the spine. i suppose here, we're operating at the intersection where humans and technology collide. it is a terrible start, paralysis, but it has an exciting future. adversity has brought mark and jonjo bright together. jonjo bright was a promising amateur jockey and then had a spinal injury after being thrown from a horse. he has refused to accept he will never walk again.
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he is up on his feet three times a week thanks to physio. it allows me to stand and walk, as your body has been designed to do. at no point do i ever feel better than i do after i have been walking in the exoskeleton... my blood pressure feels good, my muscles feel nice and loose. mentally it is healthy for you as well. after his accident five years ago, jonjo bright became more aware of what mark had been doing. throughout the world there are the people, there is the technology and the science. i believe it can beat paralysis. mark's team are trying to bring it all together. i think that is great. has mark's story been an inspiration to you? to everyone, i think. now, with the support of his new friend, mark's charitable foundation is building on the research carried out on mark himself by funding trials for other people. the charity's annual
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fundraiser, run in the dark, is taking place in 50 cities worldwide in mid—november. if i could see you walk i would take it every time. that's not the case. but what i am trying to do is to explore a way of finding a cure for paralysis. along the way we are meeting scientists working on this. if you take the blindness and paralysis out of it, it's an exciting time right now. step—by—step and inch by inch, they are making new ground in their quest. it is a story of determination, hope, and strength. chris page, bbc news. cycling enthusiasts have gathered in prague for an annual festival celebrating historic bicycles. as part of the events, cyclists raced penny farthing bikes. tim allman reports. meet the members of the czech velocipedists club,
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claimed to be the oldest sporting club in europe. every year the men and women, although mostly men, come to this park in prague to remember simpler times. a slower pace of life, riding their penny farthings. music: the pushbike song by the mixtures there is a spot of racing, albeit at a fairly sedate pace, there is also some formation display cycling. the riders may hark back to the 19th century but this event is more recent than that. translation: it started as a race, that tradition was born in 1993 when prague hosted the world championship of historic bicycles. we had some broken arms and concussions so we decided it was better to go more slowly and enjoy the ride in the autumn. and enjoy they did.
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and no doubt come the same time next year when the leaves turn golden they will return. the gentlemen and even the odd lady of the czech velocipedists club, doing what velocipedists do. tim allman, bbc news. their artwork transformed the way london was depicted — with their foggy victorian landscapes. now, the works of impressionists like monet and pisarro are being displayed at tate britain. it's the first large—scale exhibition to chart the stories of french artists who sought refuge here during the franco—prussian war. wendy hurrell has been taking a look. without fog, london would not be beautiful, said claude monet. at the turn of the 20th century, he tried obsessively to capture the ever—changing swirls. he had 100 canvases on the go at one
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time in his savoy hotel suite. you know, this is how we see london now. they have transformed the way in which we see london. but as a young man, his first stay in the capital was less positive. monet didn't have any money, he came with his wife. she is depicted here looking very depressed. they did not speak english either, which did not top. he was one of many young french artists who came here and painted these scenes, exiles from the franco—prussian war. when they arrived they were not well known at all, their works were rejected by the royal academy of arts and they could not find a single british buyer. yet they set out onto the streets with their easels painting the scenes around them, claude manet in hyde park. it was forbidden to walk on the grass in parisien gardens so it stretches the imagination. if you look carefully that are possibly two people walking on the pathway.
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pissaro worked in the suburbs. this avenue hasn't changed much, and apart from the tarmac you could easily recognise the scene. while they were observing our society the exiled artists formed their own community around leicester square, soho became known as the french ghetto, they were missing their bohemian bars in paris so they used to gather at places like cafe royale which still exists today. fog and scaffolding shred the big ben tower just like in the 1870s. for budding impressionists, london's weather softened the edges, blue and the sharp lines. the way in which claude manet painted fog inspired other iconic pictures which marks the birth of impressionism. wendy hurrell, bbc news.
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inafew in a few minutes, viewers on bbc one willjoin us for the news with kate silverton. first, the weather. for many of us, it has been a cracking autumn day. there have been some showers as well — this beautiful rainbow off the coast of north yorkshire. he was the satellite picture from earlier — exte nsor satellite picture from earlier — extensor shunned shine —— expensive sunshine. where we have clear skies, it will get cold very quickly. —— expensive the potential for one or two showers
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across lincolnshire and norfolk. it will be generally fine across central and western areas of england and wales, just one or two showers. going through the night, most of the showers will fade away. with clear skies, it will continue to be cold, especially in central and eastern areas, where even the towns and cities will be close to freezing. in the countryside, low temperatures of down to minus six celsius. things turning milder by monday morning across the west. this frontal system is not in any rush, moving very slowly, but it will thicken the cloud in western areas as we go through the day and it will bring patchy rain. any heavy rain confined to the north west of scotland. further east, a bright day after a chilly start. early fog lifting quickly leaving spells of sunshine. nine celsius in norwich, but milder out west. the milder air is being drawn up ahead of this frontal system. it will turn windy ahead of
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the front as well. as this band of rain moved east through the first pa rt rain moved east through the first part of tuesday, cold air will tuck into the back of it, potentially turning rain to snow over the high ground in scotland. the band of rain moves erratically to the east on tuesday, brighter skies behind, then a return to colder conditions. plenty of ups and downs in the weather, continuing into wednesday and thursday. wednesday will be a crisp autumn day, thursday bringing rain moving to the south and east. about material found nine years ago was completely untrue and a political smear. was completely untrue but bob quick, the former metropolitan police assistant commissioner says he stands by his claim and will give evidence to a whitehall inquiry tomorrow. by his claim and will give evidence also tonight: by his claim and will give evidence the former catalan leader carles puigdemont hands himself in to belgian police after spain issues an arrest warrant. president trump touches down in tokyo and tells us troops, "no dictator should underestimate american resolve".
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this time, he finds the net. manchester city extend their lead at the top of the premier league good afternoon. theresa may's most senior minister has denied a claim that police found good afternoon. has denied a claim that police found theresa may's most senior minister has denied a claim that police found pornography on his computer during a raid on his office nine years ago. damian green, the first secretary of state, said the allegation made by a former police chief, bob quick, was "completely untrue" and a "political smear". he strongly denied that pornography was found and said police had never reported this to him at the time. mr quick, a former assistant commissioner in the metropolitan police — has told the bbc he stands
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by the claim and is to take part in a whitehall inquiry into allegations against mr green. our political correspondent iain watson reports. he is one of theresa may's most senior and most trusted ministers, but damian green's reputation is under threat. he's already being investigated by whitehall officials over allegations he acted improperly towards a young journalist, claims he denies. and now, an allegation that pornography was found on a computer in his house of commons office nearly ten years ago. this claim dates from 2008, when his office was raided by police, investigating leaks from the home office. these two have never seen eye to eye since then, bob quick was the man in charge of that investigation, and the main, though not the only source, alleging that pornographic material was found. there is no suggestion that any of the material was
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illegal. damian green is a staunch ally of the prime minister, and her close friend, her deputy in all but name. and he is hugely influential behind—the—scenes here in downing street. during important cabinet committees, not least on brexit. he is notjust fighting for his reputation, he is battling hard for his political life. so, in a robust statement, damian green said, "this story is completely untrue. a disreputable political smear. the police have never suggested to me that improper material was found on my parliament to computer." and bob quick‘s success at the metropolitan ——and bob quick‘s successor at the metropolitan police has told the bbc he had knowledge of the pornography allegations. but bob quick says he stands by his story and will present evidence to the whitehall enquiry to damian green tomorrow. this conservative mp believes that's the correct process, and allegations from a confidential police investigation should never have been made public. what we are having in relation
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to damian, who i said should have been suspended, so there was a proper enquiry, this would have formed part of the enquiry. instead, we are pretty much having trial by the newspapers, and this is not acceptable. but allegations of wrongdoing aren't confined to one political party. jeremy corbyn answered questions for the first time on why kelvin hopkins had been appointed to his shadow cabinet after he was reprimanded over claims of improper behaviour. he had been reprimanded. the case had been closed. i thought it was reasonable to appoint him , albeit for a short time, to the shadow cabinet. does damian green's political career
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remain dependent on the findings of this enquiry? he will try to refute these allegations staunchly. i don't get the impression he is preparing to resign. the remit of the enquiry has been expanded. when that former police officer gives evidence tomorrow he won't be giving damian green a positive character reference. theresa may will be worry about his future and other things, too. for example, one mp denouncing another. dan poulter has been accused of behaving inappropriately in the past. he rejects those allegations as well. if you want to put a positive gloss on all this, perhaps this is having an impact at westminster and new systems are working, because it was said that complaints about dan poulter in the past were ignored, but under a new system, they are being investigated. theresa may will want to get other
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party leaders to agree to these procedures right across the board. thank you very much. the heir to the throne in saudi arabia has carried out a major purge of the kingdom's political and business leadership. moves on two stills of crown prince a new anti—corruption body, headed by crown prince mohammed bin salman, detained 11 princes, four sitting ministers and dozens of ex—ministers. the kingdom's information ministry said the bank accounts of those arrested would be frozen. a boy of 16 has been arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm by police investigating acid attacks on two people in london last week. two delivery drivers on mopeds were sprayed with a corrosive substance in separate attacks in walthamstow and tottenham. a 14—year—old boy who was arrested on friday has been released under investigation. the home secretary has said large social media companies must do much more to stop child sexual exploitation. new government figures show a rise in the number of indecent images of children being reported to the police.
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amber rudd says that companies have a "moral duty" to go "further and faster" in tackling abuse. technology firms say they're doing their utmost to keep young users safe. us president donald trump has begun a marathon tour of asia with a thinly veiled warning to north korea that "no dictator" should underestimate american resolve. mr trump made the comments as he arrived injapan where he addressed us and japanese troops, vowing to defend freedom. our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes was there. his report contains some flash photography. under bright sunny skies, air force one touched down at yokota air base just outside tokyo. with a military band playing ‘hail to the chief', and a stage flanked by fighterjets, president trump was given a rock star welcome by 2,000 us troops stationed here in japan. and then he got to don a military jacket.
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president trump could have landed at tokyo airport, and been met by prime minister shinzo abe. it's significant, that instead, for the first stop on his asian tour, he has chosen to land here, at a us military base, and to address us military personnel. we've got a lot of stuff coming... when he spoke, it was of america's overwhelming military mind. ——overwhelming military might. and without naming the country directly, this veiled threat to north korea's dictator, kim jong—un. no one — no dictator, no regime and no nation — should underestimate, ever, american resolve. every once in a while in the past, they underestimated us. it was not pleasant for them, was it? it was not pleasant. minutes later, marine one whisked
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the president to another of his favourite places, a golf course. there waiting to welcome him, prime minister shinzo abe. these two are now such close friends, mr abe had hats made up especially for the occasion. "donald and shinzo", it reads, "make alliance even greater." not the most catchy slogan, but you get the point. then it was time to hit the fairway. mr abe has deliberately cast himself as donald trump's number one friend in asia. and today, he got his payoff. president trump lavished praise on him and japan, calling it "a treasured partner and crucial ally." on monday, the us president will fulfil another long held ambition, an official welcome from japan's emperor. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news in tokyo. the former catalan leader,
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and four of his ministers, who fled to belgium when the spanish government took direct control of catalonia, have surrendered to the police in brussels. warrants for the arrest of carles puigdemont and the others were issued on friday, they've been charged with rebellion and sedition. gavin lee reports. ca rles carles puigdemont handed himself in the belgian authorities, was arrested and placed into custody along with four other former separatist ministers. the five persons that are sought by the spanish authorities presented themselves at the federal police brussels. spain wants carles puigdemont extradited to face charges of sedition and rebellion against the state for declaring independence illegally. his lawyer says they will appeal and attempt to stay in belgium. barcelona today —
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another protest, but now with a different focus. several thousand gathered to cover the city walls with posters demanding the release of other separatist ministers already in prison and facing the same charges. i am here because i support being able to discuss this freely without violins and justice getting —— violence and injustice getting —— violence and injustice getting in the way politics. in the park next to the parliament, sunday life continues as usual. along those —— sympathy for ca rles life continues as usual. along those —— sympathy for carles puigdemont was in short supply. but what awaits him if he is forcibly returned to spain? one senior judge him if he is forcibly returned to spain? one seniorjudge tells me the charges are amongst the most serious. carles puigdemont says there is an unfairjudicial system, that the system is too closely linked to politics — would you say? the system can be slow, but not
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unfair. in general, ourjudges are radical independents. over a week ago, separatist ministers were celebrating after voting illegal for unilateral independence for catalonia here at the catalan parliament cup match but now, eight of those ministers are in prison in spain. carles puigdemont and four other ministers are fighting extradition, too, and that could be a long process. but time is short when it comes to returning catalonia to democracy. there will be elections here in six weeks, but will the former leaders be in prison 01’ will the former leaders be in prison or in exile? with all the sport, here's olly foster at the bbc sport centre. there's just no stopping manchester city, they are still unbeaten this season and their premier legaue lead is up to eight points for now after a 3—1
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win against arsenal one other result from today's four matches saw tottenham beat the bottom of the table crystal palace. david orsntein reports. sergio aguero — the embodiment of manchester city boss might rise, now their all—time leading scorer, and integral to their hopes this season. perhaps not as integral, however, as kevin de bruyne. the belgian again showing why is with the opener against arsenal. after half—time, it was two. monreal‘s attempt on sterling punished. that took the clu b tally sterling punished. that took the club tally to 179 for aguero. no sooner club tally to 179 for aguero. no sooner off the bench than finding the net for lacazette. the revival was short lived, gabrieljesus riding on cue to keep that —— to keep city in control. in the early
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kick—off, tottenham returned to the scene of their stunning midweek victory against real madrid, but they struggled to recapture that form against crystal palace, wilfried zaha form against crystal palace, wilfried za ha wasting form against crystal palace, wilfried zaha wasting a glorious chance to put the visitors ahead, and his manager knew it. the argentine keeper made a couple of key saves which proved all our vital when a period of rugged play was ended with a rasping finish by son. palace remain rooted to the bottom. two other matches are underway. chelsea have just taken the lead against manchester united. 1—0 there. elsewhere, watford lead everton1—0. there were nine more first round ties in the fa cup todat. no major upsets from the non—league sides. but woking from the national league held league one bury to a 1—1 draw thanks to this header from jamie philpott. non—league guiseley also drew against league two accrington.
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the scotland captain danny brough has been sent home from the rugby league world cup along with two of his teamates. they were refused permisssion to board a flight because they were two drunk. ——they were too drunk. it followed a heavy defeat to new zealand. there was another rceord defeat for wales. they lost 72—6 against fiji and can't now qualify. papua new guinea scored a late try to seal a gripping 111—6 world cup win over ireland in port moresby. justin rose has won back—to—back tournaments. he clinched the turkish open by a single stroke today with a birdie putt on the last. he is
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closing in on fellow englishman tommy fleetwood at the top of the rankings, with just two tournaments left to play this season. the bbc sport website has details of the english men and women's cricket teams. you can also catch up with every girl scored this weekend. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we are back with the late news at ten o'clock. now on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. 5th this is bbc news. ——this is bbc news. the hollywood actress michelle pfeiffer has spoken for the first time about the sexual abuse scandal in hollywood. a series of revelations have followed the publication of allegations against the film producer harvey weinstein. michelle pfeiffer said many women in the industry were now talking about the issue. she was on the the andrew marr show with british actress olivia coleman to promote their new film, murder on the orient express. it's a hugely enjoyable film.
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you have the great reveal, which is that thing on kenneth branagh‘s face. what did you think when you first saw it? i thought, what is that thing on kenneth... no, ithought, this is is extraordinary. and i thought, i don't know how i'm going to act with this. it was quite something. he also... he never looked more handsome. it suits him, doesn't it? it suits him. it is like this vast grey marmoset sitting on his face. ican't remember the exact words now, but agatha christie says it's meant to be... the most magnificent moustache in england, i think. that's it. yes. so it's got to be big, hasn't it? it's serious. can i ask you both about your characters? is about mrs hubbard — she's a socialite, she's brittle, she's on hunt for a husband... is she the person that you think agatha christie might have wanted to be herself? well, some have said that she exemplifies maybe the inner loneliness of agatha christie.
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travelling alone was very dangerous, in some way scandalous, for a woman travelling alone. well, hello. eyes linger any longer, i'll have to charge rent. i'll pay. and miss schmidt, sitting there observing silently the whole way through. you are judi dench‘s handmaiden, which is quite a role to take on, butjust tell us a little bit about that. i think kenneth branagh said he cast you because he wanted somebody who could be silent, and yet you couldn't help observing all the time. he cast me because he wanted someone to be silent? yes. it's like he'd never met me at all. apart from bits where you speak very good german. 0h, thanks very much. it took an awfully long time to learn that. i'm not sure a german would say such nice things, but thank you. i sat next tojudi dench all day, holding a dog. it was heaven.
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and this is all about master—serva nt, or mistress—serva nt relationships, which agatha christie was fascinated by. who is in control? is it the servant all along who is somehow controlling her countess? i'd like to say yes, but i don't think so. i think it's very much the countess, on this occasion. michelle, for quite a long time, it has been said that hollywood is not very good, or hasn't been very good, at roles for women over a0. and i know that meryl streep and jane fonda have campaigned on this, and i wonder if it is now beginning to change. in films, i'm not so sure. ifeel like more in television. i think there are more and more interesting parts for women of all ages. and in film, i'm actually not convinced so much. i think meryl does all the really great parts for women over a0. that's a kind of rule, isn't it? it's a very male dominated industry, going through a terrible crisis, the harvey weinstein business. you yourself, you've been a big actress there for 20 years or so —
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did you know about this stuff? did you have any experiences yourself? you know, i never worked with harvey. i've had some experiences. i have to say, since all this has come out, there really hasn't been one woman that i talked to who hasn't had an experience, and itjust goes to show you how systemic the problem is. i know i'm having conversations with women i've known my whole life, and we've never discussed this, and it's coming out. do you think this is going to change the atmosphere for younger women coming into the industry, that men are going to think? i think all the men are thinking... yeah. there's a lot of reflection going on with men and women. you know, i was actually thinking myself, thinking back and thinking, well, you know, where is that line between, oh, i got hit on, and, i was inappropriately, you know... ? is it about power, basically? well, i think that when you're in a position of power, and you're in a position
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to intimidate someone, i think then it becomes... those cases were young women in their 20s. it seems like it's women in their young 20s. younger. they are purposely targeted. so, we've been talking about the queen of crime, agatha christie — let's turn to the queen of england, in that case, because you've just been announced as the new queen in the crown. what happened when you heard about the crown? you presumably got a phone call saying you've got the gig- it was on the speakerphone in the car with my husband, and we'd recently finished watching the crown, and my agent said, would you go and meet... it's a secret... and she was trying to be subtle. atiara... and trying to be subtle. and i went, the crown?! the crown?! oh, my god, yes. and my husband was silently clapping in the background, so we were quite excited. i was very excited.
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i'm excited. thanks. thank you, both, very much. thank you. after a crisp autumn day for the majority, things i think —— things are going to get chilly. the temperatures will plunge under clear skies tonight. a frost will develop early on, chilly for bonfire night celebrations, particular lay in central and eastern areas. —— particularly. heavy rain through tomorrow will be confined to north—west scotland. further east, a chilean frosty start, the odd fog patch, then we will see plenty of sunshine. still chilly across east anglia, but northern ireland up to 13 celsius. the rain moves slowly east through monday night and into tuesday. the rain will continue to move to the east during tuesday,
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clearing the leave a dry, bright and cold day on wednesday. this is bbc news. breaking news... as we go on air, the first results are being released of a special investigation into the offshore tax secrets of some of the world's richest and most powerful people — it follows a leak of documents known as the paradise papers. the bbc panorama programme has discovered that millions of pounds of the queen's private money is invested in offshore funds based in the cayman islands and bermuda by her private estate, the duchy of lancaster. the revelation comes from a cache of more than 13 million secret documents — one tax expert says it's likely to embarrass buckingham palace. the papers also disclose how donald trump's commerce secretary has business links with russian allies of president putin who are subject to us sanctions. and the spotlight
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