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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 6, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. millions of leaked documents reveal how the powerful and wealthy, including the queen, secretly invest vast amounts of money in offshore tax havens. the so—called paradise papers show around £10 million of the queen's private funds were invested offshore. good morning. yes, a big problem. the global cost of tax avoided is estimated to be in the hundreds of billions of pounds. i will look at why that is. —— global cost of tax avoidance. good morning. this is monday, november six. ina morning. this is monday, november six. in a few minutes we will have the latest from america with the other main story this morning. 26 people, the youngestjust five
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yea rs, people, the youngestjust five years, are dead after gunmen opened fire at a church in texas. through the tears and through the sadness we stand strong, oh so strong that. party leaders will meet today to discuss the new complaints system for westminster staff as a growing number of mps are investigated for inappropriate behaviour. in sport, the arsenal manager says that referees are getting worse and worse after the bird defeat.” referees are getting worse and worse after the bird defeat. i am saving that molly and ajay. a stickley shocker as one of the favourites for the glitter ball trophy is sent home in one of the best dramatic dance off in the history of the show. a few cents not happy about that. matt has the weather for us. good morning. a widespread frost across the uk this morning but a sunny
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start and it may last all day long. i will let you know. good morning to you. first a main story. the people who manage the finances for the queen have defended their investment practices after the revelation that some of her wealth has been placed in two offshore funds. this follows a huge new leak of financial documents dubbed the paradise papers revealing how the wrist and —— rest and how she rich and powerful invest their money. the bbc does not know their money. the bbc does not know the source of the leak which contains 13 million documents. the vast majority of transactions did not involve any illegal activity. bermuda. were the law form at the heart of the biggest offshore leak in history has its head office. the queen of the head of state here but until now we did not know that some of her private money was invested in tax havens like this one. the private investment vehicle for the
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queen put £10 million, a small fraction of the overall investment, in offshore funds with $7.5 million of that in one fund in the cayman islands. in 2007 was asked to put £350,000 into investment projects including the purchase of two retailers. 0ne including the purchase of two retailers. one was the company that owns threshers that later went bust owning £70 million in tax and the other was bright house, the controversial rent to own retailer which was recently forced to compensate over a quarter of a million customers. i am pretty furious with those who advise her and that are bringing the reputation into disrepute. is so obvious that if you are looking after the money of the monarchy you have got to be cleaner than clean and you must never go near the dirty world of money laundering, tax avoidance, tax evasion or making money into the sways. we were told that all of the
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investments were fully audited and legitimate. the documents also reveal that donald trump's, secretary, wilbur ross, has business links with russian allies of vladimir putin. mr ross has a secret sta ke vladimir putin. mr ross has a secret stake ina vladimir putin. mr ross has a secret stake in a shipping company called navigator holdings. 0ne stake in a shipping company called navigator holdings. one of its major clients is a russian energy company. the associate of vladimir putin than isa the associate of vladimir putin than is a sanctioned shareholder. mr ross told is none of the funds he managed never had a majority of navigating —— navigated shares. more revelations are to come. steff is here to good morning to you. i suppose, why does this matter? it is the scale of the problem when you look at it. if you look at this wider than just the paradise papers, the treasury estimates that the global cost of tax avoidance is up to £180 billion. in other words, that is money not
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going to governments around the world or going to help governments pay for things like education, infrastructure, health services, any public spending. that is money that they are missing out on. the interesting thing about this is that the whole point of tax havens is that they provide a low tax for the super rich but they also provide secrecy. super rich but they also provide secrecy. it is really difficult to work out how much money is actually out there that governments are not getting for the public finances. that is the other part of this. although the treasury put an estimate on the figure it could be much higher than that. none of us know. it is important to remember that this is not illegal. people are not doing anything illegal by putting money in tax havens. it is a different thing, if that is important to remember. i will explain more about tax havens in 30 minutes. are so much in the documents as well. we are likely to see over the next few days more
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coming out. we will try and explain everything through the morning. were the main story this morning, 26 people including several children have been killed in a shooting during a service in texas. the attack happened at the first baptist church in the small town of sutherland springs. authorities say the youngest victim was just five yea rs the youngest victim was just five years old. the eldest was 72. the scene of america's latest mass shooting. a tiny church in a texas town. a sunday morning gathering that turned into a massacre. more than two dozen dead and many more injured. the ages of the victims range from five to 72. motive of the government is not known. we are dealing with the largest mass shooting in the state's history. there are so many families who have lost fa m ily there are so many families who have lost family members. fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. the
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tragedy, of course, is worsened by the fact that it occurred in a church, a place of worship, where these people were innocently gunned down. the gunmen fled the scene and was later found dead down. the gunmen fled the scene and was laterfound dead in his vehicle. it is unclear whether he shot himself or died of gunshot wound inflicted by a local resident who pursued the suspect, armed with his own rifle. this close—knit community has been left shattered and distraught. stay with us as we learn to deal with this... distraught. stay with us as we learn to deal with this. .. as people wait for news of their loved ones, many are overwhelmed by the scale of the tragedy. there is no words. this happens in new york, in big cities. no—one is safe. my father has already taught me how to get the gun from the safe and load it. if it can happen here, it can happen anywhere. president trump, who was on a tour of asia, condemned the shooting as an act of evil. through the tears and through the sadness, we stand
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strong. 0h, and through the sadness, we stand strong. oh, so strong. the shooting comesjust over one month strong. oh, so strong. the shooting comes just over one month after the deadliest mass shooting in modern us history when a gunman and las vegas killed 58 people. now, another community has joined the roll call. more lives lost and more families asking why us? as they struggle with their grief. we will have the latest on that throughout the morning for you. elsewhere, theresa may will meet party leaders today to discuss the new parliamentary complete system in response to the wave of allegations of sexual misconduct by mps. meanwhile, her deputy damian green will be interviewed today as part of the cabinet office investigation into claims that pornography was found on a computer in his parliamentary office. he strenuously denied all allegations against him. lets get more from our political correspondent whojoins lets get more from our political correspondent who joins from westminster. elenor, there is still so westminster. elenor, there is still so much to be discussed and they
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will be talking about specific measures today. what will they be. currently, each political party is responsible for its own disciplinary procedures. theresa may wants a new common grievance system that would cover everybody working in parliament and that would be independent of political parties. we heard in recent days that labour has pledged to bring in an independent body to assess claims of harassment. the conservatives have updated their code of conduct as well. but theresa may will say there needs to be a new culture of respect at westminster. that for too long the powerful have been able to abuse their power and their victims have felt unable to speak out. as you say, there will be continued focus today on theresa may's deputy damian green with bob quick, the former assistant commissioner of the metropolitan police saying he will tell a white all enquiries are nine years ago he found pornography on a computer in mr green's office. damian green has
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robustly denied these claims are saying they are part of a political smear. i think that whatever new procedures at the group of party leaders agree today, they won't, in themselves, stemmed the flow of potentially damaging allegations here at westminster. state media in saudi arabia say her a prince and several other high—ranking officials have been killed in a crash close to the border with yemen. the prince was a deputy governor and the son of the country's former crown prince. it is not yet known exactly why his aircraft crashed. police in devon say they have made a breakthrough in a 20—year—old murder investigation. 14—year—old kate was attacked as she walked her neighbour ‘s dog near her home in exeter in 1997. police now believe that her killer may have been wearing bright orange work overalls after discovering fivers on her body and her clothing. from today, some nhs palette, patients
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will be able to access gp consultations via video calls on their smartphone 2a hours a day. the royal colleges warning that some patients could be left behind and complex conditions may be misdiagnosed. but the team behind the project say will bring health consultation with and as up—to—date into the 21st century. if you were watching sigley last night you may be sort of kind of aware that was a shock result. aston mary was voted off the show. it was a favourite of the bookmakers but he and his partner failed to impress the judges. they were given just a four by onejudge. their judges. they were given just a four by one judge. their fans... judges. they were given just a four by onejudge. theirfans... i think the fans are angry because it put them to the bottom two.|j the fans are angry because it put them to the bottom two. i had friends who have done the schober
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four and they told me i would have fun from start to finish. they were not lying. everything from this lady to every single person here, you guys, to every single person here, you guys, claudia, all of you. you are amazing. i have spent so much time, learned so much and made some amazing friends. i have had the best time. my children have not watched it yet. they are not at awake yet so it yet. they are not at awake yet so it is fine... apologies if we spoiled it for anyone. i don't know what we will do, really. it was all over! they have been shocked before, in strictly. here's the best male does a dancer by some distance. but it is about the voting to give the fa ns it is about the voting to give the fans did not vote itjust will not happen. there a conspiracy theories out there as well saying it is all being an effective... who knows? but talk about sport. i guess there is one thing that is irrefutable at the
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moment. no debate about how well manchester city are playing. they are flying at the moment. and one quy: are flying at the moment. and one guy, kevin, he has been in scintillating form. that have opened up scintillating form. that have opened up an 8—point gap now at the top of the table. between first and second it is the biggest of the gap has ever been in the premier league era at this stage of the season. some of the comments are interesting after the comments are interesting after the victory yesterday over arsenal, coming from wenger who is quite critical of the standard of refereeing. and he accused raheem sterling of cheating. he was not happy. he came in for criticism as well. city eight click points clear at the top but the comments of wenger drew criticism yesterday after he claimed the standard of refereeing was getting worse by the season. this was the incident that angered him. if robert stirling dived for a penalty. he thought that
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one was offside. elsewhere, chelsea defeated manchester united. dalmarnock are talked up a much—needed victory in this cottage premiership. —— kilmarnock. back—to—back tour wins after victory in the turkish open. and mark selby has successfully defended his international snooker champ —— championship title in china. well done to him. he has found some form, hasn't he. he certainly is flying. we will see you let's catch up with the weather. looks misty behind you? misty for one or two but a spoiler alert this morning, if you've left it to get up early this morning, not giving yourself that bit of extra time, you may be in for a shock. some will be scraping the car clear of frost.
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cold night last night, got down to -6 cold night last night, got down to —6 in cold night last night, got down to —6ina cold night last night, got down to —6 in a boring in aberdeenshire, widely in eastern scotland, much of england and eastern wales, a frost to start your monday morning commute. not as frosty in western scotla nd commute. not as frosty in western scotland and northern ireland, here through the night we see the cloud push in and temperatures on the rise, some cloud pushing to eastern scotla nd rise, some cloud pushing to eastern scotland but the clear skies elsewhere, maybe frosty but a crisp start. dense fog through the midlands towards southern england, that will be gone by mid to late morning and then dry for most but the cloud will thicken into western parts of england and wales with some rain possible. the same in eastern scotla nd rain possible. the same in eastern scotland and northern ireland but the big story for the wettest weather will be western scotland although here the highest temperatures will be 12 in the afternoon. for the evening commute home, turns chilly quickly across parts of south—east england and east anglia, where you got the clearest skies. maybe a brief frost here through the coming night but further west, staying much milder. turning
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windy for the evening in south—west england, wales and north—west england, wales and north—west england, showers continuing to come in through the evening. wetter in parts of north—east scotland and a few showers possible in southern scotla nd few showers possible in southern scotland and northern ireland but the highlands and islands remain wet into the evening and heavy rain mixed in with the rain band that will push south and east through the night. strong and gusty winds before it arrives and as the rain starts to fall, the wettest weather in northern ireland and parts of scotland, finishing the night in western wales. as it clears from northern ireland, could be a frost in the west as we start tuesday morning. cold in the south—east and far north—west to start tomorrow morning. the morning commute will be different, scotland thoroughly wet in eastern areas and heavy rain developing in the morning rush—hour in wales and parts of western england. that rain spreading to the midlands in the lunchtime period and almost reaches east anglia and the south—east but largely dry, only a
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few showers. sunny conditions developing in the west but colder air working its way in. that colder air working its way in. that colder air could turn some of the rain to snow in the scottish mountains and it will make it feel chilly to start tuesday the. a slice of milder air in east anglia and the south—east, but most will have cold weather to start wednesday, some frost around but a window of fine weather ahead of the next band of rain, which will spread in on wednesday night. wednesday could be cloudy in east anglia and the south—east, the threat of rain, depends how quickly the weather front gets out of the way, wetter in the highlands and the islands, a repeat of today, some will have drier weather. this week will have drier weather. this week will be topsy—turvy, one—day wet, one—day dry, and at times chilly as well. thanks very much. let's have a look at the papers, the weather makes the front page of the daily express, the perfect triangle of weather and royals on the front page. —10 polar
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winds and snow as the weather bites this week. a row over £10 million of the queen's fortune invested offshore and the shooting in texas is at the top of their front page this morning. the guardian have pages of what's been revealed in these new papers, that's their front page. accused of exploiting. they are called the paradise papers, there are so many hundreds of thousands of e—mails and data that they are all going through at various different news organisations, panorama and the guardian being one of them. times, we have been speaking about nhs starting smart phone consultations and the texas story on the front page and the paradise papers. a picture of a veteran car crossing westminster bridge as part of the london to brighton. westminster bridge as part of the london to brightonlj westminster bridge as part of the london to brighton. i was in that
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car, i was in a bus with carol taking part, beautiful day, great fun. i hoped you would be in one of these! i had a period style costume. we need to see a picture. it is out there. i should be paying more attention! not in the newspapers but we had great fun. this is the front page of the mail, the queen dragged into £10 million offshore tax row. she is the star of stranger things, a young girl, only 13, making huge waves in various things in hollywood. we don't often use the star but there you go. this is their accusation about what happened at strictly last night. shirley dallas gave aston a five. happened at strictly last night. shirley dallas gave aston a fivem wasn't just shirley, was shirley dallas gave aston a fivem wasn'tjust shirley, was it crazy what else you looking at? —— was it? we are going to talk about the
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paradise papers so i have looked at other things, good news for people who could get a pay rise today. the financial times picks up on the fact more than 3600 companies will start to pay employees a minimum of £8 defied an hour or £10 20 in london and this is because of the voluntary living wage coming into force today -- £8 20 living wage coming into force today —— £8 20 an hour. it's one the living wage foundation have recommended as the right living wage. it's a voluntary campaign but 3600 companies signed up for it so thatis 3600 companies signed up for it so that is good news. john? we expect news on slaven bilic's future at we st news on slaven bilic's future at west ham, defeat at the weekend, in the relegation zone, we think he's on his way out. who is going to save the club in this dire moment? apparently david moyes, who was in charge of sunderland and then led them to the championship and west ham fans not happy that this is meeting their ambition by replacing bilic with moyes. interesting to see
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what comes out because we know the chairman is meeting with bilic, interesting to see what happens, especially because of the reaction from the fans. they won't be happy about the prospective appointment of david moyes. lots of people were watching strictly and also watching blue planet? they could see through the top of the head of this jellyfish? | the top of the head of this jellyfish? i feel a bit like that in the morning. we spoke to one of the producers yesterday, not yesterday, last week, about the amazing filming and she told us about this incident when they were down hundreds of metres under the sea and they were attacked by sharks. they said the sharks were nibbling at the side, the antenna, they had to make sure everything was nailed down, but not nailed down, you know what i mean. very terrifying! fang truth, did you
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see that last night? yeah. so scary looking, aren't they? —— tooth. see that last night? yeah. so scary looking, aren't they? -- tooth. my dreams are so vivid. i had a dream that everyone in the world had transparent jelly heads like that everyone in the world had transparentjelly heads like that fish. 0ne transparentjelly heads like that fish. one final thing to show you, you know sometimes when you see the face of somebody famous in a piece of toast or something like that?” don't like that. this is jade robinson of tainan weir who found, wait for it, donald trump in his dog's ear. incredible. why is he looking in there in the first place to find it? —— time and we're. looking in there in the first place to find it? -- time and we're. may be some kind of waxy clear out. i think it was beagle's head in a beagle's here. -- ear. there are more than 350,000 mobility
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scooters on britain's pavements travelling up to eight mph but their users have no formal training, which you might not be surprised to hear. in 201a you might not be surprised to hear. in 2014 there were more than 200 accidents related to them in england and wales, nine of which were fatal. psychologists at nottingham trent university are working to develop a video that can improve safety. here's transport correspondent richard westcott. wagons' roll. a unique id‘s view from a mobility scooter and you'd better watch out. ten minutes around nottingham is more like an obstacle course than a shopping trip. we're going through a big crowd of people and clearly noticeably people on their phones and not really looking, is that normal? yeah. he saysjust as... yeah. i do it as well, go on my phone. everyone does. users like
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jamie say they get abused as they drive around. i've had people threatened to throw me out of the scooter and make me walk and obviously i can't do that because i got injured in the army, so this is the only way i can get around, in my electric wheelchair. a third of a million britons use a mobility scooter. there are hazards everywhere but the people driving them get no advice on dealing with some pretty big dangers. now psychologists at nottingham trent university are working with the road safety trust to develop a new training video that could help. they've recruited a team of volu nteers they've recruited a team of volunteers and some special find terrific equipment. as well as the cameras on the scooters themselves, the volunteers are going to be given these laser eye tracking glasses, its £50,000 worth of equipment so they can tell exactly where the driver is looking. the dots you can
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see follow their eyes as they negotiate the streets. the psychologists will then analyse the data to help them design the safety video. long-term benefits would be that scooter users have improved safety in terms of getting involved in less incidents or accidents, but also that scooter users feel more confident in using a scooter in various different situations. scooter use has been shown to have a number of psychological benefits, so reduced isolation and increased independence, improved self—esteem, quality of life. scooter crash figures are patchy, but there were around 200 recorded accidents in 2014, including nine fatalities. surveys suggest far more go unreported. but scooters also change lives. it's like having a new pair of legs basically. without this i couldn't get around the shops, i
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couldn't get around the shops, i couldn't go into shops, i couldn't go shopping, i couldn't go and meet my friends. i can travel distances on this that even if i was walking with my crutches i couldn't walk. new training video should help cut accidents and maybe ease some of the tension between scooter drivers and pedestrians. richard westcott, bbc news, nottingham. let us know what you think about that. our main story this morning, paradise papers all over the front pages, and also we will bring you the latest throughout breakfast on this shooting in texas yesterday in a church where 26 people were killed and many more in hospital are trying to recover and we will be live there in about ten minutes. also including young children. we will bring you up to date with those details. still to come this morning, john is in lincoln for the launch of a new charter to protect our ancient forests. good morning. good morning to everyone for a very atmospheric
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but cold lincoln castle, matt was talking about scraping windscreens, you need to scrape your eyes this morning it is so cold! this magnificent looking poll, i hope you appreciate how wonderful it is, it is made of oak and it contains a charter, there are ten of these across the country and it's to mark the new charter for woodlands 800 yea rs the new charter for woodlands 800 years since the original one was drafted in 1017 and it's held at lincoln castle and we will show you it later. the inscription says natural treasures inwards wooden leaves, imagine a wooden starts with one small seed, we are stronger together, people and trees. more about that later and we will tell you what the plan is for not only protecting our ancient woodlands now but to plant more trees for the future. more from lincoln castle later in the show after the news, travel and weather were you're watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news.
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teresa may will meet party leaders today to discuss a new parliamentary complaints system in response to a wave of allegations of sexual misconduct by mps. her deputy, the first secretary of state, and as hford first secretary of state, and ashford mp damian green will be interviewed as part of a cabinet office investigation. it's been expanded to include claims pornography was found on one of his parliamentary computers in 2008, which he strenuously denies. more than 6,000 people have signed a petition calling on east sussex county council to end its campaign to improve school attendance. those behind the petition say the council's get a grip campaign is aggressive and insulting. the authority says parents will be fined for unauthorised absences, including taking holidays in term time, and says children should attend school even if they have a minor cough or cold. in a statement, the council acknowledged the campaign had been controversial but said
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they won't flinch from addressing this extremely serious issue. hundreds of dangerous drivers across the south east have been filmed and caught over the past two years by an unmarked police lorry according to figures released by highways england. earlier this year, kent police released pictures of lorry drivers using mobile phones, reading and even watching a film at the wheel. in the latest statistics one driver in surrey was filmed boiling the kettle on his lorry dashboard. surrey police are appealing for witnesses following a serious collision involving a car taking part in the london to brighton veteran car run. around 400 cars built before 1905 took part in the run yesterday. one person travelling in a vintage benz had to be airlifted to hospital and five other people were treated for their injuries following the collision at reigate hill. gritting lorries in the south east have been out for the first time this winter after temperatures fell below freezing overnight.
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they've targetted the key routes to prevent ice and frost forming. local authorities have been criticised in the past for their preparations for cold conditions. last month kent county council put its fleet of 65 gritters through a dry run ahead of the winter season. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's a very cold start out there this morning, perhaps the cold est of out there this morning, perhaps the coldest of the autumn so far as temperatures widely down at zero and below. a widespread frost it is cold, yes, but we do have plenty of sunshine. we haven't got much in the way of cloud to speak of an the wind also today is very light but despite those factors it's not going to feel too warm. we're looking at a maximum of ten at best. as we head into the evening it will be clear at first but gradually cloud increasing from the west. it's not going to be as cold as it was last night, frost free, temperatures in some spots not
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even dropping from today's maximum. the minimum between nine and 12. a more mild start tomorrow, a grey one, showers at first and a band of heavy rain sweeping through as we head into tuesday. sunshine returns but it will feel chilly as we head into wednesday. that's it from us, we'll see you in half an hour's time. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's on monday sixth november. coming up on breakfast today — millions of financial documents showing where the rich and powerful invest their money overseas have been leaked to media organisations around the world. steph will be here to explain more. there is currently no compulsory training for britain's 300,000 mobility scooter users. we'll hear about the cutting edge technology now being used to improve scooter safety and as the award winning series which looks into the secret lives
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of 4— and 5—year—olds makes its return, we'll talk to one of the experts analysing their behaviour. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the people who manage the queen's finances have defended their investment practices after the revelation that some of her wealth has been placed in two offshore funds. it follows a huge new leak of financial documents, dubbed the ‘paradise papers‘, revealing how the rich and powerful invest their money in tax havens around the world. the bbc does not know the source of the leak, which contains more than 13 million documents, mostly from one finance firm based in bermuda. iam i am furious with those who advise her and bring her reputation into disrepute. is so obvious that if you
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are looking after the money of the monarch a you need to be cleaner than clean and you must never go near the dirty world of money laundering, tax avoidance, tax evasion or making money in dubious ways. we have more information on the paradise papers on our website and there will be a deeper investigation on panorama tonight. 0ver investigation on panorama tonight. over 20 people are being killed at a shooting at a church in texas, in the small town of sutherland springs. authorities say the small as was just five years old and the old est as was just five years old and the oldest was 72. there is currently no indication as to the motive of the government. president donald trump, ona tourof government. president donald trump, on a tour of asia condemned what he called the act of evil and said americans would pull together. our hearts are broken. but in dark
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times, and these are dark times, such as these, americans do what they do best. we pull together. we join hands, we lock arms. and through the tears and through the sadness we stand strong, oh, so strong. al asia correspondent stephen mcdonnell is with president trump on his tour of asia. hejoins us now trump on his tour of asia. hejoins us now from tokyo. here he is on a big tour and he needs to talk about a shooting in america. you can imagine he has flown overnight from hawaii, he arrives here, has a huge day yesterday and the n—word starts coming through at four a.m. 0f day yesterday and the n—word starts coming through at four a.m. of this mass shooting. he is up and monitoring events. i must say, president trump is looking tired as he delivers those messages, those
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thoughts. but that is what he has been talking about, saying prayers. in terms of motivation, he says that london was struggling with mental health issues to do this, possibly, was one explanation for why this terrible shooting happened. uri, it is not the message he wanted to to be delivering to be. he wanted to talk about free straight and dealing with north korea's nuclear weapons. instead he has this terrible tragedy to deal with. theresa may will meet party leaders today to discuss a new parliamentary complaints decision in response to waves of allegations about sexual misconduct. her deputy will be interviewed today as part of a cabinet investigation into claims that pornography was found on his computer in his parliamentary
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office. he strenuously denies all allegations against him. police in devon say they have made a breakthrough in the 20—year—old murder investigation. 14—year—old kate bushell was attacked as she walked her neighbour's dog near her home in exeter in 1997. police now believe her killer may have been wearing bright orange work overalls after discovering fibres on her body and clothing. from today, some nhs patients will be able to access gp consultation with and is via video calls on the smart phone, 24 hours a day. the royal college of gpsis warning that some patients could be left behind and complexes conditions they be misdiagnosed. the team behind the project say it will bring health consultations into the 21st century. if you were out celebrating bonfire night last night, did the fireworks display compared to this special one from liverpool? a crowd of 50,000 gathered on the banks of the river mersey —
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which was lit up in spectacular style for the river of light festival, in a special show which was put on by the same company that organises london's new year's eve celebrations. that is quite spectacular. i did not see it, but there you go. i went to see it, but there you go. i went to see the one in sheffield on saturday night. i have some of the worst pictures of fireworks ever taken. my daughter asked me to take some... they are so bad. there is smoke everywhere, there are people's heads in a. of all people, i thought you would tower above most.” in a. of all people, i thought you would tower above most. i was trying to be arty and it went terribly wrong so to be arty and it went terribly wrong so they have all been deleted. after the start of the manchester city this season you think we would talk about them this morning which, we are, they have had a wonderful start. that it's all about the
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moaning of wenger who was critical about the standard refereeing yesterday and about raheem sterling who he thought had died —— dived for a penalty. will see the incident. manchester city fly in both wenger not happy. manchester city manager pep guardiola said his side were "amazing" but arsenal manager arsene wenger blasted the standard of refereeing, after city won 3—1 at the etihad. a word that somewhat underestimates the performances of this guy, kevin de bruyne, who started and finished city's first. this is what made wenger angry. he accused stirling of diving to win a penalty. a sergio aguero penalty made it 2—0. arsenal pulled a goal back, gabrieljesus rounding off the victory for the hosts. i believe it was no penalty. it was provoked a penalty by sterling. we know that he dives well. the goal
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was offside. i am quite absurd to close at 21 we were winning the game and it looked like we could score. manchester united slipped further behind their city rivals after losing 1—0 at chelsea. alvaro morata scored the only goal of the match — his seventh in the league this season. chelsea remain fourth in the table. the spurs said the feeding crystal palace was more important than defeating real madrid. everton are out of the relegation zone after coming from two goals down to beat watford. leighton baines‘ late penalty put them 3—2 up. there were 12 minutes of injury time and watford had a penalty of their own but tom cleverley missed it. it was a first win in charge for everton's caretaker manager david unsworth. villagers suspected —— expected to
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meet the chairman today and stepping down as manager. kilmarnock chalked up a much needed victory in the scottish premiership it was their first win under manager steve clarke. adam frizzell was on hand to seal a 2—1victory at hearts. it was hearts third defeat in a row, while kilmarnock move out of the relegation zone. justin rose is making a late bid to finish the year as europe's number one golfer. he's chalked up back to back tour wins after winning the turkish airlines 0pen yesterday. rose was level with belgian nicolas colsaerts on the final hole but sank this birdie putt to clinch victory. i think this is the first time i have gone back in my career. is good to carry this form from one tournament to another. even though i am not playing, it is an important
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week for me. i am going to catch up with my coaches, my physiotherapist and some work. a chance, but it is so and some work. a chance, but it is so good and then come back and give it my best. mark selby has successfully defended his international championship title after beating mark allen in the final in china. the world champion survived a late comeback from northern ireland's allen, but selby held on to win by ten frames to seven and take his 13th career ranking title, as well as collecting a cheque for £150,000. finally, shalane flanagan became the first american woman for 40 years to win the new york marathon. flanagan was a popular winner of her first major marathon as she comfortably beat the defending champion mary keitany. geoffrey kamworor from kenya won the men's race, holding off compatriot wilson kipsang in a close finish. you can imagine that it would be a tense time in new york after the terror attack last week. it is wonderful. i was there last year. did you run? i was not going to
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start but i finished. it is a long story. you completed it. well done. but not in those kind of times, let's be clear about that. 26 people have been killed in a mass shooting at a church in the texan town of sutherland springs. the gunman, who was later found dead in his car, opened fire during a service at the first baptist church on sunday morning. the attack comes just over a month since the worst mass shooting in modern american history when 58 people were killed by a gunman at a concert in las vegas. nannette kilbey—smith is a journalist in sutherland springs. shejoins us now. thank you she joins us now. thank you very much for your time and joining us. can you tell us anything else about the shooting? when you have been at the shooting? when you have been at the scene for many hours. yes. it is
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probably the single worst tragedy we have ever experienced and it really is quite incomprehensible. the community is just in complete shock at this time. what have relatives and friends been telling you about what happened ? and friends been telling you about what happened? basically that it was just... they did not understand what was happening, initially, and it is still very difficult to process what did unfold. no—one really had a chance, who was inside the church, as we have been given to understand from the circumstances. and we still know nothing of the motive of the individual who went into the church on sunday. what we have seen, so at the incredible stories about the community rallying around and as it
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shall being held already. even though it is a terrible and awful event, the community has come together. yes. the community has come together. the wider community as well. we had emergency responders and first responders from very far afield and an outpouring of support and love and prayers from notjust the local community is a from around the local community is a from around the world. that aspect has been quite heartwarming, to know that the love and support is there. we have had passed is coming from across the state, basically. —— we have had clergy coming from across the state, basically, to offer support. do police know any more about why this attack took place? a motive is yet to be established or officially established at this point in time. it is still an active crime scene there and it will be processed
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overnight and into tomorrow.” there and it will be processed overnight and into tomorrow. i am sure, you are probably having this debate yourself at the moment. 0nce again, this will raise a question about gun laws in america. is that happening? at the moment that conversation isn't on the ground here, i'm sure it is in the wider communities, as a lwa ys it is in the wider communities, as always in the wake of such tragedies, that conversation will be raised. it will be discussed and debated again. but right now and write here is not the time or the place for that conversation. nannette, thank you so much for your time this morning, nannette kilbey—smith, a journalist in sutherland springs, where, on sunday, someone went into a church and shot 26 people, some of them really young children, the youngest was five, the oldest was in their 70s and a number of people are being looked after in hospital at the
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moment as well. we will keep you up—to—date on that situation on brea kfast up—to—date on that situation on breakfast through the morning and we are also talking about the paradise papers, these documents that have released lots of information. also matt has the details of the weather. very chilly, a clear start to many parts of the country but it is cold. me show you some of the latest temps across the uk, —4 in parts of aberdeenshire —— let me. temperatures in a good part of england and eastern wales, at or below freezing. a frosty but clear morning. the clear skies have led to mist and fog, especially in the midlands and southern england, the fog quite dense but temperatures rising in western scotland and northern ireland, under this cloud, which will spread outbreaks of rain and only the odd shower in northern ireland and parts of scotland. the west wettest weather will be in the highlands and islands. the sunniest will be in central and eastern england but not especially warm,
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single figures for many. lifting in the west but the breeze will pick up and by the end of the day cloud into western england and wales. look at the journey home after work, after the journey home after work, after the frosty journey in the journey home after work, after the frostyjourney in we could see temperatures dropping enough for a brief touch of frost in east anglia and the south—east, the sky is still clear but more cloud and breeze in devon, cornwall, wales and the north—west of england and these areas will be prone to some showers and maybe some in the western midlands. uyghur see some rain from cloudy skies in scotland, the wettest will be over the highlands and islands and by this stage for the evening commute the wettest weather will be in the north—west in donegal. that will work across northern ireland tonight, heavy bursts, some wet weather and some bursts, some wet weather and some bursts of heavy rain in scotland and by the end of the night notjust wet but windy, into the western fringes of england and wales. with clear skies in east anglia and the south—east, a touch of frost, and the skies clear in northern ireland tomorrow, a touch of frost. for
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many, a milder start tomorrow, cloudy and in parts of southern and eastern scotland, wetter. wet for the morning rush—hour in wales, south—west england and north—west england and some of the rain will be heavy, gusty winds with it, working its way through the midlands, north—west england and central and southern england into the afternoon, never quite reaching east anglia and the south—east but in the north and west, tomorrow, after a cloudy and wet start for some, it will be sunny but with a few showers. clearer but colder conditions work to all but east anglia and the south—east as we go into the first part of tuesday night and the weather fronts it's there. for most a ridge of high pressure means with cold air in place a frost for many as we start wednesday, the exception could be east anglia and the south—east where it could be cloudy, cold and damp all—day. wet and windy in western scotla nd all—day. wet and windy in western scotland and northern ireland later in the day but for most, a bit of sunshine after that frosty start. more throughout thank you very much, see you later.
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we've been hearing about calls for action to be taken to restrict the use of tax havens this morning after details were leaked of offshore investment funds of the rich and powerful including the queen. there is so much information and steph is here to look at what is happening and why it's happened and what it means. tax havens, what are they and why might someone in the uk use them? they are places around the world, not just countries they are places around the world, notjust countries but some areas of this, but they offer low taxes, or in some cases zero taxes. people can put their money there and welfare and assets and pay lower tax than they were in the country they are a resident, so they are lucrative especially for the superrich, not really for people with smaller wealth because by the time you've
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paid the management fees you are down. there are lots of areas that offer this, some places you have heard of like gibraltar, bermuda, the cayman islands but also closer to home you've got places like the isle of man, jersey and guernsey. people who put their money in these assets... their assets in these countries, they avoid paying taxes in their home country, one criticism is they avoid paying tax here. but the tax havens do well from them because obviously they can build a services sector around it and that can help their local economy. you can help their local economy. you can see why tax haven countries do it. you understand the criticism but it. you understand the criticism but it isn't illegal, is it, that's the interesting point? it's interesting because we're talking about tax avoidance, not tax evasion, which is obviously something entirely different and that is illegal. 0ne of the reasons why the superrich like them so much is they provide
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secrecy, like them so much is they provide secrecy, it's not just like them so much is they provide secrecy, it's notjust the criticisms morally, it's about the transparency. and the countries themselves, the tax havens, have been criticised for the ideas around corruption that they might have and also issues on weak regulation. but as you say, it isn't illegal and it's really important to remember that. we're talking about the avoidance, not the evasion, and we spoke to a tax evasion expert on this, djourou more, who is a tax barrister, who gave us more information on it. everytime somebody avoids tax, they do two things, they limit the ability of the state to fund those public assets that taxes fund, and they also push up the tax that everyone else who is not evading tax, or avoiding tax, everyone else who is not evading tax, oravoiding tax, has everyone else who is not evading tax, or avoiding tax, has toupe. the key question is how much, is there a
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number on how much tax might be avoided? it's hard to work out because the reasons why these tax savings are so attractive is because they are so secretive so it's difficult to work out how much. but people have been trying to work it out and one figure suggests that the cost of tax avoidance could be something between £75 billion and £180 billion. that is a lot of money. that money could potentially be used by governments around the world for things like healthcare, education, infrastructure and the point, it's not necessarily the legalities around it, it's the moral question, people who are earning money in countries but they aren't paying tax that you or i might pay. thanks very much. we are trying to get information on what's being said and what it means for all of us. there's more analysis and detail from the paradise papers on the bbc news website. and there'll be fresh revelations tonight on panorama, here on bbc one at 9pm tonight.
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let us know what you think about that one, you can get in point, contact via the usual means. —— you can get in contact. the magna carter, signed in 1215, is one of the most famous documents in british history, setting out a list of basic rules about how the country would be run. what may be less well known is that two years later another historic article was signed, the charter of the forest, allowing public access to the royal woodlands. and now, 800 years later, there's a new charter. breakfast‘s john maguire is at lincoln castle. good morning. good morning. i'm impressed you knew the exact time the magna ca rta impressed you knew the exact time the magna carta was drafted. we are at lincoln castle, a cold morning but an atmospheric place here, it's been a castle since something like the 11th century, william the congress built this place and there we re congress built this place and there were roman castles or fortifications here previous to that. we're talking about this tree charter poll, ten of
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these across the uk, they will represent this new charter that is being unveiled today for the first time, 800 years to the day since that first charter of the forest was drafted. the idea to give people access to trees. this is more about protecting our history and the future of forests. we can speak to map from the woodland trust and professor brenda lewis. matt, we are looking at the charter, it's an impressive document, we've seen the old one in the vault, what are you trying to achieve? this has been a real labour of love. standing protectively around it. notjust because it's a beautiful piece of calligraphy by patricia lovett, but also this has been the result of three years of hard work that started from an understanding that trees and woods were at a crisis point in the uk and it's an invisible crisis, people aren't aware of it, they look around and they see trees and they think things
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are fine but we are the least wooded country in europe, 13% coverage, an average of 37% across the eu, so we're really falling behind. there's lots of other issues threatening the future of trees and words so we need action to be taken and we need something people can get behind to allow them to take action before the crisis point gets to a point where we can't reverse it. i suppose we are always up against the need for houses and jobs and the need for transport infrastructure and perhaps of trees, forest, ancient woodlands suffer as a result? yeah, but they don't have to. trees are notjust about our history but they are good for the environment, we enjoy having them around, they are good for landscaping, places with trees people feel better about so they are good for our well—being. people feel better about so they are good for our well— being. this charter has been reissued as it were 800 years after the original charter of the forest, which was one of the great first bill of rights for
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people really do give them back their rights to the forest when people really relied on it for everything they needed. thanks very much indeed, lots more to talk about later. we were talking earlier that similarto later. we were talking earlier that similar to the magna carta, the original charter in 1217 was a blueprint for other countries that followed that model right around the world. perhaps this updated 2017 version may well have the same impact notjust version may well have the same impact not just in version may well have the same impact notjust in the uk but perhaps even further afield. talk to you later. before you go, quite a few of our viewers are saying what is behind you, this beautiful sculpture, looks a bit like a plunger. it does, doesn't it, with the plinth at the bottom, made of oak, there will be ten of these across the uk, i don't know what they will do about the bases but often sculptures and architecture, modern buildings, get nicknames may be the viewers have come up with a nickname for this. they always
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deliver the goods. thanks very much for that! it does, the base is the problem. maybe they will look at the base. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. there's been a derailment this morning near wimbledon station involving a south—western passenger train heading towards london. as yet there have been no reports of any injuries, nine fire engines and ambulances are attending the scene and of course will bring you more on that when we get it. the london living wage is set to rise today from it's current rate of £9.75 an hour. the wage is based on the amount an individual needs to earn to cover the basic costs of living. a full time worker on the london living wage currently earns around £95 a week more than those on the government minimum wage. a thousand employers in the capital have voluntarily signed up to the initiative.
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the rise will be announced later this morning. the housing charity st giles trust says it will no longer place homeless people in private accommodation in the capital because of falling standards and cramped conditions. they say the homeless are often forced to use their housing benefits to pay for tiny rooms in crowded houses. landlords are demanding over £1,000 a month for renting out minute rooms, some as small as 10m sq. we have stop housing people in london because we feel ethically we can't support them any longer. when we're being asked to house people in the private sector in converted garages, it's wrong. the roofs you're talking about an fit for purpose but they're the only things around. and you can see more on that story on inside out london. that's tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the road, there are the usual
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delays building up northbound at the blackwall tunnel. in battersea plough road is closed for repairs to a burst water main between lombard road and york road. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's a very cold start out there this morning, perhaps the coldest of the autumn so far as temperatures widely down at zero and below. a widespread frost but we do have plenty of sunshine. we haven't got much in the way of cloud to speak of and the wind also is very light. despite those factors it's not going to feel too warm. we're looking at a maximum of ten at best. in of ten at best. the suburbs somewhat cooler. as we head into the evening it will be clear at first but gradually cloud increasing from the west.
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it's not going to be as cold as it was last night, frost free, 8—9. a more mild start tomorrow, a grey one, showers at first and a band of heavy rain sweeping through as we head into tuesday. sunshine returns but it will feel chilly as we head into wednesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. millions of leaked documents reveal how the powerful and wealthy, including the queen, secretly invest vast amounts of money in off shore tax havens. the so called paradise papers show around ten milion pounds of the queen's private funds were invested offshore. it's a big problem — the global cost of tax avoidance is estimated to be up to £180 billion. i'll be looking at why it matters. good morning, it's monday
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the sixth of november. in a few minutes we'll have the latest from america with this morning's other main story. 26 people are dead — the youngestjust five years old — after a gunman opened fire at a church in texas. president trump condemned the shooting as an ‘act of evil‘. through the tears and through the sadness, we stand strong. 0h, through the tears and through the sadness, we stand strong. oh, so strong. party leaders will meet here today to discuss a new complaints system at westminster as a growing number of mps investigated for inappropriate behaviour. in sport, wenger says referees are getting
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worse and worse. he said the raheem sterling dived to win a penalty and that another goal was offside. aced him extra glow shocker as one of the favourites for the glitter ball trophy is sent home in one of the most dramatic dance off in the history of the show. and the weather, matt? it certainly is chilly out there. a shocker for some and you will need some extra time this morning. widespread fraud —— fold and a patchy start for some. —— widespread fog. first, our main story. the people who manage the queen‘s finances have defended their investment practices after the revelation that some of her wealth has been placed in two offshore funds. it follows a huge new leak of financial documents, dubbed the ‘paradise papers‘, revealing how the rich and powerful invest their money in tax havens around the world. the bbc does not know the source of the leak, which contains more than 13—million documents, mostly from one finance firm based in bermuda.
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the data was originally sent to a german newspaper who then passed it on to other publications. the vast majority of transactions did not involve any illegal activity. here‘s our economics correspondent andy verity. bermuda. where the law firm at the heart of the biggest offshore leak in history, appleby, has its head office. the queen is the the head of state here but until now we did not know that some of her private money was invested in tax havens like this one. the duchy of lancaster, the private investment vehicle for the queen, put £10 million, a small fraction of the overall investment, in offshore funds with $7.5 million of that in one fund in the cayman islands. in 2007, it was asked to put £350,000 into investment projects including the purchase of two retailers. one was the company that owned threshers that later went bust owning £70 million in tax and the other was brighthouse,
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the controversial rent—to—own retailer which was recently forced to compensate over a quarter of a million customers. i am pretty furious with those who advise her and that are bringing her reputation into disrepute. it is so obvious that if you are looking after the money of the monarchy, you have got to be cleaner than clean and you must never go near the dirty world of money laundering, tax avoidance, tax evasion or making money in dubious ways. we were told that all of the investments were fully audited and legitimate. the documents also reveal that donald trump‘s commerce secretary, wilbur ross, has business links with russian allies of vladimir putin. mr ross has a secret stake in a shipping company called navigator holdings. one of its major clients is a russian energy company. the associate of vladimir putin is a sanctioned shareholder. mr ross told us none
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of the funds he managed ever had a majority of navigator shares. more revelations are to come. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell is outside buckingham palace for us this morning. nicholas, has there been any reaction from the palace? now. absolutely none. the palace regards this as a matter for the duchy of lancaster and they told panorama that its investment are legitimate. a few of them with overseas funds and they have pointed out that the queen voluntarily pays an equivalent sum to income tax for the income on a private estates from the income on a private estates from the duchy of lancaster. it is not a question of tax avoidance in this
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case alleges the question of judgement on behalf of her financial advisers. it is a reputational issues of the association of this investor with an investment activity that many people would regard as doubtful and not something that the queen ‘s money should be involved with. i am sure there will be some meetings and questions being asked within buckingham palace this morning. we will speak to an mp about this later on and we will get a bit more detailfrom stephanie later on and we will get a bit more detail from stephanie and later on and we will get a bit more detailfrom stephanie and nicholas later. our other main story this morning: 26 people, including several children, have been killed in a shooting during a church service in texas. the attack happened at the first baptist church, in the small town of sutherland springs. authorities say the youngest victim was just five years old, the eldest was 72. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has more. the scene of america‘s latest mass shooting. a tiny church in a texas town.
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a sunday morning gathering that turned into a massacre. more than two dozen dead and many more injured. the ages of the victims range from five to 72. the motive of the gunman is not known. we are dealing with the largest mass shooting in the state‘s history. there are so many families who have lost family members. fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. the tragedy, of course, is worsened by the fact that it occurred in a church, a place of worship, where these people were innocently gunned down. the gunmen fled the scene and was later found dead in his vehicle. it is unclear whether he shot himself or died of a gunshot wound inflicted by a local resident who pursued the suspect, armed with his own rifle. this close—knit community has been left shattered and distraught. stay with us as we learn to deal with this... as people wait for news of their loved ones, many are overwhelmed
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by the scale of the tragedy. there is no words. this happens in new york, in big cities. no—one is safe. my father has already taught me how to get the gun from the safe and load it. if it can happen here, it can happen anywhere. president trump, who was on a tour of asia, condemned the shooting as an act of evil. through the tears and through the sadness, we stand strong. oh, so strong. the shooting comes just over one month after the deadliest mass shooting in modern us history when gunman in las vegas killed 58 people. now, another community has joined the roll call. more lives lost and more families asking why us? as they struggle with their grief. we will be live on taxes with the
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very latest for use later in the programme. “— very latest for use later in the programme. —— live in texas. theresa may will meet party leaders today to discuss a new parliamentary complaints system in response to a wave of allegations of sexual misconduct by mps. meanwhile her deputy, damian green, will be interviewed today as part of a cabinet office investigation into claims that pornography was found on a computer in his parliamentary office. he strenuously denies all allegations against him. 0ur political correspondent, eleanor garnierjoins us from westminster. elenor, what are proposals they are disgusting? each party is responsible for its own disciplinary procedures at the moment the theresa may and other parliamentary leaders agree there needs to be some sort of common grievance system that covers eve ryo ne common grievance system that covers everyone who works in parliament and is independent of the lytic all parties. we know that in the —— recent days, labour has pledged to bring in an independent body to
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investigate claims of harassment. theresa may today will call for a new culture of respect at westminster saying that for too along those in power have been able to abuse their power with their victims feeling unable to speak out. her deputy, damian green, will remaina her deputy, damian green, will remain a focus today. that is because we heard over the weekend that the former assistant commissioner of the metropolitan police has said that he will tell a whitehall enquiry that he discovered pornography on a computer in mr green‘s offers nine years ago. mr green strenuously denies those allegations, saying they are part of allegations, saying they are part of a political smear. whatever arrangements and new procedures are agreed by the political leaders, they will not in themselves stem this continuing number of allegations that could be potentially damaging at westminster. the deposed catalan leader has been
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released from custody by a judge in belgium. he entered squadron ministers surrendered themselves to police after the spanish government issued an eu wide warrant for their arrest. they have been told they are not allowed to leave the country and are expected to appear in a belgian court over that course of the next two weeks. police in devon say they have made a breakthrough in a 20 year of murder investigation. 14—year—old kate bushell was attacked as she walked a neighbour ‘s dog near her home in exeter in 1997. police believe that her killer may have been wearing bright orange overalls after discovering fibres on her body and her clothing. from today, some nhs patients will be able to access gp consultations via video calls on smart phones, 24 hours a day. the royal college of gps is warning that some patients could be left behind and complex conditions may be misdiagnosed. the tea m conditions may be misdiagnosed. the team behind the project say this will bring health consultations into the 21st century. if you like dan‘s
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children... if you are like dan‘s children... if you are like dan‘s children and have not yet seen strictly, this is a spoiler alert. it was a big scot —— shock last night as aston was voted off. the star and his partner failed night as aston was voted off. the star and his partnerfailed to impressjudges with star and his partnerfailed to impress judges with this viennese wa lt impress judges with this viennese walt is. that craig only gave them a four. i had friends who have done the show before and they told me i will have the most amount of fun and start to finish. they were not lying. everything from this lady to every single person in here, the judges, claudia, all of you, these amazing people i get to see and spend so much time with. i learned so spend so much time with. i learned so much and i have made so many friends did it it has fuelled a conspiracy theory. we have so much
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news to bring you this morning. turning out to another of our main story is. a month after the deadliest shooting in the history of the country, americans are now mourning the loss of life by one with a gun. 26 people, including several children, have been killed in a shooting during a church service in texas. the attack happened at the first baptist church, in the small town of sutherland springs. opened fire during a service at the first baptist church on sunday morning. darren goedha rt lives nearby and joins us on the phone. can you tell us what happened. what did you see? when we got there there we re did you see? when we got there there were people all around. sheriffs, police, the sheriff department was now trying to control the traffic and control what they could. they
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we re and control what they could. they were bringing people out and the only thing could do is sit outside and comfort those who were nearby, who were needing someone just to touch them and comfort them and pray with them. that is what we did. explained to us, this happened in a church, didn‘t it? explained to us, this happened in a church, didn't it? yes, it did. i understand you do not go to that church that your daughter did. does she know people who would have been better? i knew people, my daughter knew people. we did not recognise any wonder we personally and new but we knew from the community, you see them at the store and the gas station and places like that. give us station and places like that. give us your station and places like that. give us your assessment on station and places like that. give us your assessment on the impact on your community. i understand it is a
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small place, isn‘t it? yes it is. i think there‘s a population of 600, that sounds about right. we‘re a peaceful town. god—fearing town. for something like this to happen here isjust taking eve ryo ne this to happen here isjust taking everyone by storm. you just can‘t understand how something like this could happen here. darren, from what we understand, obviously there‘s still news coming out about this, someone may have still news coming out about this, someone may have given chase to the gunmen? we really don't know anything about that. —— gunman. i know there was a clip or something like that. personally all we know is we went to the church and we tried
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to comfort those outside the church. darren, give us your thoughts as well, every time this sort of thing happens, in the uk we talk about america and gun control, what are your thoughts on that? about that, i would rather stay with what was going on and what happened. gun control is another issue. we need to re— strengthen in our community and bring these lives back together and heal our community, bringing the church back up from this devastation. i‘m going to leave that up devastation. i‘m going to leave that up to someone else. darren goedhart, up to someone else. darren goedha rt, appreciate up to someone else. darren goedhart, appreciate your time, thanks for talking to us on bbc breakfast. 0n bbc breakfast.
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on that story as well, lee mccall, the bbc north america correspondent, has quoted something from donald trump, who said this isn‘t a gun situation, it‘s too soon to go into that —— aleem maqbool. you can see why, as you saw there, for some people at the heart of it, they are mourning the loss of loved ones and friends, but there‘s a wider debate about gun control once again in the us, as there was after las vegas last month. word president trump is ona tourof last month. word president trump is on a tour of asia at the moment but this is what he‘s having to talk about that. -- president trump. more on that after 7:30am. if you are getting up this morning you will notice it is a a frosty start, one place we are reporting from this morning islington, a beautiful sunrise, you can see the crispy leaves and you might need to get your scraper out this morning. -- is. spectacular this morning. matt has the details. —— is lincoln.
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temperatures in lincoln around freezing at the moment, the same in hampton court, this sums up the weather story for many, dense fog around in parts of central and southern england in particular and of course that widespread frost. cold est of course that widespread frost. coldest conditions of the autumn so farfor coldest conditions of the autumn so far for some, coldest conditions of the autumn so farforsome, 7am, coldest conditions of the autumn so far for some, 7am, temperatures coldest conditions of the autumn so farfor some, 7am, temperatures at the lowest in richmond in north yorkshire, widely across england, eastern wales and eastern scotland, temperatures at the moment at or below freezing. ice scraper time but as you saw in lincoln, a lovely sunrise or many, the exception being western scotland and northern ireland, the cloud has spilt in overnight lifting the temperature but a grey day to come and a wet one as well, the highlands and islands in particular. a few splashes of rain in northern ireland and the rest of scotland in the afternoon and later in the western fringes of england and wales but most will have a dry day and still fairly sunny in the midlands and eastern england in
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particular. temperatures only peaking around eight or nine, even with the sunshine. your morning commute is a frosty one and your journey home will be dry and clear in some parts of eastern england, especially east anglia and the south—east, but a frost forming once again in the countryside, not quite as widespread or severe as last night. towards the west, the temperatures are still in double figures for the journey home, more cloud in south—west england, wales and the north—west, a breeze blowing as well and a few splashes of rain into the isle of man and parts of southern and eastern scotland will be dry, the same in northern ireland and the wettest weather in the highlands and western isles. through the night that shifts. the breeze picks up, that lifts some frost where it forms, but thoroughly wet for a time where it forms, but thoroughly wet fora time in where it forms, but thoroughly wet for a time in parts of scotland and northern ireland with heavy bursts of rainfringing northern ireland with heavy bursts of rain fringing into the isle of man, north—west england, the west of wales and cornwall as we start tuesday. coldest in east anglia and the south—east and western parts of northern ireland, where it will be a sunny day tomorrow, but for the
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mewling commute tomorrow, southern and eastern scotland very wet and heavy bursts in wales, western fringes of england and the midlands as we finished the morning into the afternoon. a few splashes of rain in east anglia and the south—east but most east anglia and the south—east but m ost pla ces east anglia and the south—east but most places will stay dry through the day, increasingly cloudy. the mildest will be here as we finished the day but west of this rain band, which will fall as snow in the scottish mountains, afternoon showers. they will then pushing for many as we go through tuesday night but this weather front doesn‘t want to move. into wednesday morning, fairly cloudy, east anglia and the south—east, that weather front may shift a bit quicker but at the moment it looks like it will stay in place with patchy light rain and drizzle turning lighter. northern ireland will stay dry and sunny after a frosty start on monday. a bit of frost, a bit of rain and a bit of frost, a bit of rain and a bit of frost, a bit of rain and a bit of sunshine, a typical autumn day. there are more than 350,000 mobility
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scooters on britain‘s pavements and high streets, travelling up to 8mph, but their users have no no formal training. in 2014, there were more than 200 accidents related to them in england and wales, nine of which were fatal. psychologists at nottingham trent university are working to develop a video that can improve safety. here‘s more from transport correspondent richard westcott. wagons roll. a unique driver‘s eye view from a mobility scooter and you‘d better watch out. ten minutes around nottingham is more like an obstacle course than a shopping trip. we‘re going into a big crowd of people and clearly noticeably people on their phones and not really looking, is that normal? yeah. he saysjust as... yeah. i do it as well, go on my phone. everyone does. users like jamie say they get abused as they drive around. i‘ve had people threaten to throw me
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out of the scooter and make me walk and obviously i can‘t do that because i got injured in the army, so this is the only way i can get around, in my electric wheelchair. a third of a million britons use a mobility scooter. there are hazards everywhere but the people driving them get no advice on dealing with some pretty big dangers. now psychologists at nottingham trent university are working with the road safety trust to develop a new training video that could help. they‘ve recruited a team of volunteers and some special find terrific equipment. as well as the cameras on the scooters themselves, the volunteers are going to be given these laser eye tracking glasses, its £50,000 worth of equipment so they can tell exactly where the driver is looking. the dots you can see follow their eyes as they negotiate the streets.
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the psychologists will then analyse the data to help them design the safety video. the long—term benefits would be that scooter users have improved safety in terms of getting involved in less incidents or accidents, but also that scooter users feel more confident in using a scooter in various different situations. scooter use has been shown to have a number of psychological benefits, so reduced isolation and increased independence, improved self—esteem, quality of life. scooter crash figures are patchy, but there were around 200 recorded accidents in 2014, including nine fatalities. surveys suggest far more go unreported. but scooters also change lives. it‘s like having a new pair of legs basically. without this i couldn‘t get around the shops, i couldn‘t go into shops, i couldn‘t go shopping, i couldn‘t go and meet my friends. i can travel distances on this that
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even if i was walking with my crutches i couldn‘t walk. a new training video should help cut accidents and maybe ease some of the tension between scooter drivers and pedestrians. richard westcott, bbc news, nottingham. thank you very much for all your comments on that. we‘re going to go to the news where you are in a moment but back to that beautiful shot, a a frosty start this morning. lincoln cathedral on sunrise, it just looks absolutely fabulous. i'm going to throw out a random fact, not sure it‘s entirely true, i think it was once the tallest building in england. was it? i have a vague memory of it being the highest cathedral in the country but it could be entirely incorrect, i will try to verify that while we enjoy this picture. it is frosty there and in other places as well and matt
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will have the weather in about 20 minutes. i should listen to the old broadcasting adage of no facts, no mistakes, but i decided to branch out this morning. there is the son close up for you as well! dan will check his facts while we get the news, weather and travel where you are this morning, see you in a couple of minutes. good morning from bbc london news. we start with major disruption on the trains this morning. there‘s been a derailment this morning near wimbledon station involving a south—western passenger train heading towards london. passengers were tweeting itjust left wimbledon when the last carriage shook violently and derailed before 6am. as yet there have been no reports of any injuries. the london fire brigade has said it has sent nine engines to the scene. we will bring you more on that when we get it. there are severe and minor delays on
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the circle line, hammersmith & city and the overg round. the circle line, hammersmith & city and the overground. anyone heading out on the tube is asked to check before they travel. delays are expected all day. 0n the road, there are the usual delays building up northbound at the blackwall tunnel. more travel news in the next half an hour. the london living wage is set to rise today from it‘s current rate of £9.75 an hour. the wage is based on the amount an individual needs to earn to cover the basic costs of living. a full time worker on the london living wage currently earns around £95 a week more than those on the government minimum wage. 1,000 employers in the capital have voluntarily signed up to the initiative. the rise will be announced later this morning. the housing charity st giles trust says it will no longer place
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homeless people in private accommodation in the capital because of falling standards and cramped conditions. they say the homeless are often forced to use their housing benefits to pay for tiny rooms in crowded houses. landlords are demanding over £1,000 a month for renting out minute rooms, some as small as 10m sq. we have stopped housing people in london because we feel ethically let‘s have a check on the weather now. good morning. it‘s a cold and crisp start to this new week. in fact, the coldest of the autumn so far with many places the temperature overnight at zero or below. so a widespread frost but plenty of sunshine. there‘s not much in the way of cloud to speak of really throughout the day and the wind also is very light. now, despite those factors, it is going to be quite chilly this afternoon. we‘re looking at a maximum of ten, maybe 11 celsius, in central london. 0ut towards the suburbs it will be that little bit cooler. now, overnight tonight it will start off clear, but gradually cloud
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moving in from the west. that will continue to increase through the night. the wind also starting to strengthen. it‘s not going to be as cold, frost free in fact between eight and nine celsius. a rather grey start tomorrow, some showers for tuesday morning, but then gradually a band of heavier more persistent rain sweeping through on tuesday afternoon. the maximum temperature tomorrow at 11 celsius. now, a ridge of high pressure builds overnight tuesday so it‘s going to be another cold one, but it means the return of the sunshine as we had through wednesday, but again, those temperatures will struggle. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. we will have more on the derailment and the other travel issues. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. welcome back. it isjust approaching 7:30. thank you for being with us on brea kfast 7:30. thank you for being with us on breakfast this morning. this is a summary of the main stories from bbc news. the people who manage the queen‘s finances have defended their
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investment practices after revelations that some of her wealth has been placed into offshore funds. a huge new league of documents at the paradise papers reveal how the wrist —— rich and powerful investor money attacks he‘s a —— havens around the world. the data was sent toa around the world. the data was sent to a german newspaper which ended with internationaljournalists including panorama here at the bbc. dame margaret hodge says the queen‘s finances should never have been invested overseas. pretty furious with those who advise her and who are bringing the reputation into disrepute. it‘s so obvious that if you are looking after the money of the monarchy you have got to be cleaner than clean and must never go near the dirty world of money laundering, tax avoidance, tax evasion or, actually, aching money in dubious ways. we have more analysis in detail on our website
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and fresh revelations tonight on panorama. that is bbc one at o‘clock this evening. in other news, 26 people including several children have been killed in a shooting during a church service in texas. the attack happened at the first baptist church in the small town of sutherland springs. the suspect, named by local media as 26—year—old devin kelley was later found dead in his car. his motives are currently unknown. theresa may will meet party leaders today to discuss a new parliamentary complaints system in response to a wave of allegations of sexual misconduct by mps. meanwhile, her deputy damian green will be interviewed today as part of the cabinet office investigation into claims that pornography was found on a computer in his parliamentary office. he strenuously denies all allegations against him. police in devon say they have made a breakthrough in a 20—year—old murder investigation. 14—year—old kate busheu investigation. 14—year—old kate bushell was attacked as she walked
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her neighbour‘s dog near exeter in 1997. police believe the killer may have been wearing bright orange work overalls after they discovered fibres on her body and clothing. from today. some nhs patients will be able to access gp consultations on their video calls via their smart phones 24 hours a day. the royal couege phones 24 hours a day. the royal college of gps is warning that some patients may be left behind by complex conditions and that they maybe this —— misdiagnosed as well. the team behind the project say it will bring health consultations into the 21st century. a commuter train has derailed at a station in south—west london. the british transport police say around 250 people on board the service basingstoke to waterloo when it came partially off the tracks at wimbledon station just after six o‘clock this morning. there are reports of some minor injuries and, obviously, if you live near that rail line and you want to use it today, many delays. if you are
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celebrating bonfire night last night, here is a question for you. people are proud of their firework displays. do you think yours co m pa res to displays. do you think yours compares to this beauty in liverpool? a crowd of 50,000 gathered on the banks of the river mersey which was lit up in spectacular style for the river of light festival in a special show that was put on by the same company that was put on by the same company that organises london‘s new year‘s eve celebrations. it looks really lovely. i think we got to the of the lincoln cathedral. apparently was once the tallest welding in the world. it was built on a today‘s buyer to make it the tallest. and then i collapsed. there it is again. what we do now is that it is just as beautiful gorgeous morning there. john maguire as are talking about a charter for trees and many people
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say that the charter for trees looks like a say that the charter for trees looks likea giant say that the charter for trees looks like a giant plunger. what a glorious sight. i expect if you live close to where you will know that there are 20 bels there. you can see this frothy out about this morning. we are gathering lincoln cathedral faq for you. you will know about the height of the tower quite shortly. john is here to talk about the premier league today guest. manchester city are flying at the moment. they defeated arsenal yesterday and they have now won nine ina row yesterday and they have now won nine in a row which is a club league record. and the gap between first and second is the biggest it has ever been between the top two at this stage of the cis —— season. wenger and arsenal are very happy, however. wenger was critical of many things yesterday, the standard of umpiring as well as raheem sterling. quite unhappy with the standard of refereeing. he called it
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unacceptable and raheem sterling as well in their 3—1 defeat. you can have no complaints about this opener, however. what a goal, what a season. this is what made wenger gandhi—— season. this is what made wenger gandhi —— angry. he accused sterling of diving. and he was not happy about the third goal either, this one. he thought it was offside. i believe it was no penalty, it was a provoked penalty by sterling. we know he dives very well. the third goal was offside. i'm very upset because at 2—1 we were in the game and we looked like we could score, we had many dangerous situations. manchester united slipped further behind their city rivals as they lost 1—0 at chelsea. 0nly behind their city rivals as they lost 1—0 at chelsea. only one goal for the game as mourinho returned to face his former club. chelsea then
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defeating crystal palace. will finish in everton‘s game. came from two games down to draw. but there was 12 minutes of injury time added on in this game and that meant watford had a chance to pull level. as you can see, tom missing that chance. david moyes has confirmed he is interested in replacing village. there weren‘t any real shocks in yesterday‘s nine fa cup first round matches but woking from the national league have taken league one bury to a replay. woking went a goal down inside the first minute. but a goal from jamie philpot means they‘ll be in the hat
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for the second round. kilmarnock chalked up a much needed victory in the scottish premiership it was their first win under manager steve clarke. adam frizzell was on hand to seal a 2—1victory at hearts. it was hearts third defeat in a row, while kilmarnock move out of the relegation zone. justin rose is making a late bid to finish the year as europe‘s number one golfer. he‘s chalked up back to back tour wins after winning the turkish airlines 0pen yesterday. rose was level with belgian nicolas colsaerts on the final hole but sank this birdie putt to clinch victory. he says he will not change his plans. he will skip sun city and only played the final tournament in dubai. i guess i think this is the first time gone back to back in my career literally week on week, the last time i did it they might have been a week off between the two so to roll some form into another tournament immediately is wonderful. even though i‘m not playing it‘s a terrific week with me, i‘m going to catch up with my coaches, my physio,
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catch up with some work, get my body feeling good and come back to dubai giving myself the best possible chance. finally... finally, shalane flanagan became the first american woman for 40 years to win the new york marathon. flanagan was a popular winner of her first major marathon as she comfortably beat the defending champion mary keitany. 0ver over 50,000 people took part with tight security following the terror attack last week in new york. it is obviously quite a tense time in the city so it is wonderful to see so many people taking part. city so it is wonderful to see so many people taking partm city so it is wonderful to see so many people taking part. it must be wonderful. they have bans all the way along the route. it is fantastic. when i was there last year, somewhat later than her, it was dark and raining but the bands were still out. you did not intend to run it? i did not. it is a long story. i saw the start and i thought i would leave it because i was injured but then, you know, the atmosphere was so brilliant i was carried by it to the end. the
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mentality kicked in and you just could not give up. it is a long story. all this morning we have been reporting about a huge new lick of financial documents dubbed the paradise papers that reveals how the rich and powerful invest their money in tax havens around the world. the data was sent to a german newspaper which then shared that with international journalists which then shared that with internationaljournalists including panorama for the bbc. stefanie said talk us why this matters. let‘s start with tax havens. we might someone start with tax havens. we might someone in the uk want to use one? because it is quite lucrative. tax havens are parts of the world which offer people, the assets, their companies, a way of getting very low tax, or not paying any tax at all on the assets put their. it would be a lot less tha n the assets put their. it would be a lot less than they would pay in their resident country. you will ever heard of some of the places.
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places like gibraltar, bermuda. also the cayman islands and close to home we have places likejersey, guernsey and the isle of man. they are places which have done well out of offering the super rich, more than just your average rich person, it is normally the super rich because of the high seas and it is only worth it for people with a lot of money. be offered ridiculously low rate so they don‘t have to as much tax. and it is important to say that this is not illegal. there is a big difference between what we call tax evasion, which is illegal, and tax avoidance which is what we are referring to today. these paradise papers are all about tax avoidance. it is that loophole that lets pay less tax. the criticisms are that one, there is a moral criticism. they are not paying as much as they could to the government in their own countries. for example, they are not paying as much as they could that
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will go towards things like in education, infrastructure... there are also criticisms about the secrecy are also criticisms about the secrecy surrounding these. it is difficult to work out who‘s money as we. is also criticism around potential corruption which could happen in some areas and the fact that it happen in some areas and the fact thatitis happen in some areas and the fact that it is so secret it makes it quite difficult to work out how much money is actually out there. to touch on that final point, how much do we think is being avoided? what should be being spent on playgrounds and roads and the nhs? people have tried to work this out that it is difficult because of the secrecy. we had been given a figure of a global cost of tax avoidance being between $75 billion and £180 billion. it is a lot of money that we are talking about. this could be the tip of the iceberg. as i say it is so secret and we do not know how much money is out there. again, it is not illegal
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but there are questions around the morality. and the start of it, we know there are so many hundreds of thousands of documents. thank you for making some of the clear to us. dame margaret hodge conducted a review of the duchy of lancaster estate. shejoins us review of the duchy of lancaster estate. she joins us this review of the duchy of lancaster estate. shejoins us this morning from our london newsroom. thank you for your time this morning. it is a story on the front pages of many of the newspapers and the queen faces on the pages will. let‘s start with if we can. are you surprised that those looking after her accounts have been investing her money in this way? i think the queen will be shocked as we all are in the way in which her advisers have chosen to use her money. i tell you what i make of it, it shows how ingrained the habit of the superrich, of investing their money offshore either to hide their wealth or to avoid and evade tax has become. it
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is outrageous that the advisers to the queen had engaged in this sort of now common practice and sullied the reputation of a very trusted and much loved institution here in the uk. i understand where you come from and that it is stefanie was just explaining, offshore investments are perfectly legal. in the past you yourself have benefited from an offshore fund set up by your father. i have not benefited. my father set it up and when we discovered it we closed it. the problem was offshore trusts is that they have become the way in which britain engages in tax avoidance and evasion. we have almost become the place where the superrich and big corporations, money launderers, bribes, organised crime, all of these people try and hide their wealth and avoid and
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evade tax. as far as the queen is concerned there are in an things. when we looked at it we said two things. we said there should be greater transparency as to where her investments are in that has been my demand now for years from the government that we should insist that our overseas territories and our tax havens have public registers of ownership so we know who owns the wealth that is located there. the other thing, as far as the queen ‘s money is concerned, is that the treasury is supposed to monitor and oversee how her investments are made. that not only did her advisers get it wrong, not only is our law wrong, because we allow this secrecy in the tax havens, but the treasury as well did not carry out its role of properly monitoring how the queen‘s investments were being made. 0na queen‘s investments were being made. on a specific point of the queen having that and the government not providing enough oversight on the queen‘s account in particular, the
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duchy of lancaster. and, more broadly, do you think there, then there is a lack of oversight from there is a lack of oversight from the government on this and they are turning a blind eye? i‘m getting really fed up. this massive leak is the latest in a series of leaks. massive leak is the latest in a series of lea ks. we massive leak is the latest in a series of leaks. we have panama papers, we had big leaks from switzerland, we have the luxembourg lea ks, switzerland, we have the luxembourg leaks, and every time you get a bunch of lea ks in leaks, and every time you get a bunch of leaks in this way, what you uncover is how the superrich and great corporations hide their money and abuse the system, aggressively avoiding and evading tax. why wasn't anything done after the panama papers, a few years ago, and here we are with more papers, this time the paradise papers? absolutely, the government has to stop the rhetoric and start the action. david cameron promised he would lift the veil of secrecy on our tax havens promised he would lift the veil of secrecy on our tax havens in 2013, he promised it in 2014 and 2015, but
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they never act. i hope on the back of these paradise papers, and we‘ve got a lot of information coming out all during this week, that the government will stop the rhetoric and start the action. if we want a fairer society we have to actually close down on our tax havens for as long as they exist, the superrich and big corporations will choose to hide their money, avoid taxes, and we won‘t have everybody giving according to their wealth or according to their wealth or according to their income into the common pot for the common good. they‘re not being asked to pay more thanis they‘re not being asked to pay more than is jude, they they‘re not being asked to pay more than isjude, they arejust being asked to pay their fair rate, which is what the rest of us do —— due. briefly, what would a labour government do differently? lots of things, first of all we would insure our tax havens were open and it was transparent. the her majesty‘s
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revenue and customs, our tax authorities have to be much more aggressive. if we take one case against one of the celebrities that will be exposed during the course of this leak i think things will change enormously and they should do that. the final thing i will say is the advisers, whether it‘s the banks or the lawyers, or whether it is the accountants, all of these people, they are the ones that make millions out of inventing yet new loopholes in the tax system which can be exploited by the superrich. tough on the advisers as we ought to be on those who exploit the loopholes. thanks for your time, dame margaret hodge. as she was saying, there will be a few days of these revelations and dame margaret hodge mentioning some major names and celebrities we might hear about in the coming days as well. more on the bbc news website and fresh revelations tonight with panorama. if you didn‘t watch last
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night‘s, it will be on the iplayer and we are on the iplayer if you ever miss anything, like the weather forecast, for example. just to check how nice, correct it was perhaps? exactly! isa is a mourning for those who love their morning is crisp and fresh in their morning is crisp and fresh in the morning, a cold night, sunny start for many but the consequence is there‘s a lot of frost around —— it‘s a morning for. as low as —7 in richmond in parts of the north yorkshire and widely across england, eastern scotland and eastern wales, a frost. not just frost eastern scotland and eastern wales, a frost. notjust frost but fault has formed across parts of central and southern england under clear skies through the afternoon —— night —— but fog. lived in cabbage making for a grey day ash lifting temperatures. dasha lifting temperatures. dasha lifting temperatures are. if you‘re in parts of eastern midlands —— lifting
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temperatures. the wind is picking up and it should be fine for most. higher than that the further west you are but we should see splashes of rain into western parts of england and wales and the wettest weather in the afternoon will be for the highlands and islands. the morning commute will be cold and frosty, your journey morning commute will be cold and frosty, yourjourney home will be cold in parts of eastern england, especially east anglia and the south—east and a touch of frost here tonight but not as extensive as last night. further west, temperatures in double figures for the journey home but with it, some rain in south—west england, and the north—west of england, and the north—west of england and wales, the wind picking up england and wales, the wind picking up in irish sea coast, as in northern ireland and a good part of scotland. most will be dry with some spots of rain but the wettest of all through today and into the night will be across the highlands and islands, and that rain spreads across much of scotland and northern ireland with heavy bursts mixed in and strengthening winds touching gale force wind round western coasts and heels into tuesday morning. the further east you are, east anglia
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and the south—east, another chilly night but not as cold as last night and colder into northern ireland to start the day with skies clearing later. for tomorrow morning‘s commute, instead of the frost, southern scotland and western england and wales, heavy rain to get you to work, blustery winds. the winds will ease down during the day and the rain trundles to the east midlands and the south and one or two showers in east anglia and the south—east but much of the time it will be dry, temperatures at their highest tier. sunshine into the afternoon after that cloudy wet start —— at their highest here. colder weather here, which will push to all but east anglia and the south—east into wednesday morning. this ridge of high pressure means after a wet start, back to a frosty start for many on wednesday but a lovely sunny day for the vast majority, exceptions, a lingering weather front in east anglia and the south—east could bring patchy rain, and the highlands and islands will turn wet, northern ireland too, later. more later in the programme.
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thanks very much indeed. the magna carta, signed in 1215, is one of the most famous documents in british history, setting out a list of basic rules about how the country would be run. what may be less well known is that two years later another historic article was signed, the charter of the forest, allowing public access to the royal woodlands. and now, 800 years later, there‘s a new charter. breakfast‘s john maguire is at lincoln castle. good morning. absolutely stunning in lincoln this morning, the cathedral behind us, the sun coming up, and we‘ve come up onto the top of the castle to the castle walls to make the best of the location. down in the best of the location. down in the grounds is the charter of the forest, the pole, it‘s been devised on something first drafted 800 years ago and the original charter is held in the magna carta vault, that
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charter written two years after the magna carta. charter written two years after the magna ca rta. why charter written two years after the magna carta. why come back to it and revisit it? it‘s about trying to guaranteed trees not just revisit it? it‘s about trying to guaranteed trees notjust for the past but also for the future. -- to guaranteed. among these trees in this ancient woodland you feel lost in time. but a reality check courtesy of modern technology tells a very different story. it looks like a woodland but you only have to zoom out to realise it‘s actually surrounded by the urban environment now. that‘s a perfect example of the fragmentation of these really are replaceable sites. this is a rare green space amongst the concrete jungle, and these 0ac is are under threat. we've lost a lot of our ancient woodland, the uk is only now 2% of the land is ancient woodland and we have the most cases of ancient woodland under threat as we‘ve ever had as a charity cover of the 100 and 80. today‘s launch of the new charter
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for trees, woods and people aims to put the conservation and preservation of what we have together with how we create forests for the future or at the centre of policy and planning decisions. it comes exactly 800 years after the original charter of the forest, which was drafted allow people access to royal forests, building which was drafted allow people access to royalforests, building on the principles of the magna carta. but what can be done today? land is a finite resource and trees seem powerless against the modern forces of commercialism and the desperate need for housing. here in greater manchester, local volunteers are at least doing their bit. we're just pruning trees up, cutting back some of the vegetation, and making it a little bit more visually porous and a little bit more inviting for people to come in and use the woodland. and this is what a citizen forrester looks like. margaret, hello. hello. you're a local, you live around here. i do. tell us about this woodland ? live around here. i do. tell us about this woodland? it's wonderful,
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it‘s a breath of fresh air. we‘ve had buzzards this year, as far as i know they nested. a lot of foxes, squirrels, woodpeckers, the normal wildlife, hedgehogs. it‘s a great place to be. maintenance for the flora and the fauna is important, but creating new words is vital. we‘ve got an aim to plant 3 million trees across greater manchester over the next generation, that‘s a tree for every man, woman and child that lives in the region. we‘re hoping to bring 2000 hectares of woodland back into use for local communities, such as this one. manchester is known for being a green city but we want to change that and make it a better place for people to live and work. that‘s the perennial challenge, so campaigners now hope inspiration from a mediaeval agreement will help to forge that link between the ancient and the modern. good morning, back with us at lincoln and here is the new charter
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that has just been drafted, professor ca rra nza that has just been drafted, professor carranza lewis from the university of linkenbach and from channel 4‘s macro time team is with me, what is the significance of this? it's 800 years since the charter of the forest, which was about people‘s relationship with the nature and the trees, their rights to use the woodland. 0ver nature and the trees, their rights to use the woodland. over the centuries we have relied on trees, the last century has been a good one and this country has got rid of trees, but they are reported for people‘s well—being, we still need to live closely with trees, so it‘s a good time to reissue it and get people thinking about how to use trees in the future. the first charter of the forest affected law across the world, the indian forest law is underpinned by the charter of the forest, so this country has a lwa ys the forest, so this country has always led the world in thinking
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about our relationship with trees so it‘s a good time to reissue it for the future and for our children who are growing up now who don‘t want to grow up in a world with fewer trees. les say hello to these chaps. you have been cycling from london, what have been cycling from london, what have you been up to? we have been going from london to lincoln, we are one of 70 organisations, fund for trees, celebrating this momentous occasion, trees aren‘tjust the cradle of the earth but they are great to look at as well. iwork for the silver foundation, another charity, and there are so many thousands of people and members of the public who have got behind us so we‘re hopeful this moment in time will help everyone celebrate the importance of trees to modern life. you think of is cool and planting trees with children, they are the best environmentalists out there? -- you‘ve been to school.
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best environmentalists out there? -- you've been to school. it's then fantastic. thank you very much indeed. that‘s the quietist you‘ve been all morning —— it‘s been fantastic. there will be ten poles around the country, we will meet with the poet who put the verse at the top of the charter as well, it‘s not just about the past, the top of the charter as well, it‘s notjust about the past, very much about the present and what will happen in the generations, maybe in the 800 years into the future. looks like a nice day for a bike ride as well so thank you very much. do you want one little lincoln cathedral fact? it‘s the third largest cathedral in the uk behind york and st paul‘s. largest cathedral in the uk behind york and st paul's. i'm glad you a nswered york and st paul's. i'm glad you answered that other question. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. we start with major disruption on the trains this morning.
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commuters are being warned after a south—western railway passenger train derailed in south—west london passengers have tweeted saying the eight—car train bound for waterloo had just left wimbledon when the last carriage shook violently and derailed just before 6am. there are no reports of any serious injuries but the london fire brigade says it‘s sent nine appliances to the scene. the london living wage is set to rise today from it‘s current rate of £9.75 an hour. the wage is based on the amount an individual needs to earn to cover the basic costs of living. a full time worker on the london living wage currently earns around £95 a week more than those on the government minimum wage. 1,000 employers in the capital have voluntarily signed up to the initiative. the rise will be announced later this morning. the housing charity st giles trust says it will no longer place homeless people in private accommodation in the capital because of falling standards and cramped conditions. they say the homeless are often forced to use their housing benefits to pay for tiny rooms in crowded houses. landlords are demanding
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over £1,000 a month and you can see more on that story on inside out london. that‘s tonight at 7:30pm on bbc one. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. a power surge has effected a number of lines meaning there are severe delays and minor delays on the circle line, hammersmith & city line and london 0verground. anyone heading out on the tube this morning, i‘d advise you to check before you travel. due to the detrailment at the moment it‘s affecting the district line. no service on the district line from parsons green to wimbledon and on south—western the londonbound line at wimbledon is blocked with delays expected all day. let‘s have a check on the weather now. good morning.
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it‘s a cold and crisp start to this new week. in fact, the coldest of the autumn so far with many places the temperature overnight at zero or below. so a widespread frost but plenty of sunshine. there‘s not much in the way of cloud to speak of really throughout the day and the wind also is very light. now, despite those factors, it is going to be quite chilly this afternoon. we‘re looking at a maximum of ten, maybe 11 celsius, in central london. 0ut towards the suburbs it will be that little bit cooler. now, overnight tonight it will start off clear, but gradually cloud moving in from the west. that will continue to increase through the night. the wind also starting to strengthen. it‘s not going to be as cold, frost free in fact between eight and nine celsius. a rather grey start tomorrow, some showers for tuesday morning, but then gradually a band of heavier more persistent rain sweeping through on tuesday afternoon. the maximum temperature tomorrow at 11 celsius. now, a ridge of high pressure builds overnight tuesday so it‘s going to be another cold one, but it means the return of the sunshine as we had through wednesday, but again, those temperatures will struggle. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom it's
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it‘s eight o‘clock. millions of lea ked it‘s eight o‘clock. millions of leaked documents reveal how the powerful and wealthy, including the queen, secretly invest vast amounts of money in offshore tax havens. the so—called paradise papers show around £10 million of the queen‘s private funds were invested offshore. it's a big problem. the global cost of tax avoidance is estimated to be £180 billion. i will be looking at why it matters. good morning. thanks for watching on brea kfast. good morning. thanks for watching on breakfast. we will have the latest on the programme from america, where this morning‘s other main story, 26
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people are dead, the youngestjust five years old after a gunman opened fire at a church in texas. president trump condemned the shooting as an act of evil. through the tears and through the sadness, we stand strong, oh so strong. party leaders will meet today to discuss a new complaint system for parliament staff as a number of mps are investigated for inappropriate behaviour. arsene wenger says referees are getting worse and worse after the arsenal defeat to manchester city. he says raheem sterling dived to win a penalty and another city goal was offside. another strictly shocker, as one of the favourites for the glitter ball trophy, aston merrygold, is sent home in one of the most dramatic dance—off is in the competition‘s history. in the weather, no real shock, typical autumn weather. we
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start with frost and fork and also a lot of sunshine. the forecast coming up lot of sunshine. the forecast coming up in the next 15 minutes. the main story, the people who manage the queen‘s finances have defended their investment practices after the revelation some of wealth has been placed in two offshore funds. this follows a massive new lea k of funds. this follows a massive new leak of financial documents called the paradise papers, revealing how the paradise papers, revealing how the rich and powerful investor money in tax havens around the world. 0riginally all that information was sent to a german newspaper who then shared it with international journalists including the bbc‘s panorama papers. the bbc doesn‘t know the source of the leak, which includes 30 million documents, mostly includes 30 million documents, m ostly fro m includes 30 million documents, mostly from one finance firm based in bermuda. the vast majority of financial transactions did not include any illegal activity. here‘s our financial correspondent andy
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verity. bermuda. where the law firm at the heart of the biggest leak in offshore history, appleby, has its head office. the queen is the head of state here but until now we did not know that some of her private money was invested in tax havens like this one. the duchy of lancaster, the private investment vehicle for the queen, put £10 million, a small fraction of its overall investments, in offshore funds with $7.5 million of that in one fund in the cayman islands. in 2007, it was asked to put £350,000 into investment projects including the purchase of two retailers. one was the company that owned threshers that later went bust owning £70 million in tax, and the other was brighthouse, the controversial rent—to—own retailer which was recently forced to compensate a quarter of a million customers. i am pretty furious with those who advise her and that are bringing her reputation into disrepute. it is so obvious that if you are looking after the money of the monarchy, you have got to be cleaner than clean and you must never go near the dirty world of money laundering,
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tax avoidance, tax evasion or making money in dubious ways. the duchy told us that all of the investments were fully audited and legitimate. the documents also reveal that donald trump‘s commerce secretary, wilbur ross, has business links with russian allies of vladimir putin. mr ross has a secret stake in a shipping company called navigator holdings. one of its major clients is a russian energy company. the associate of vladimir putin, gennady timchenko is a shareholder, and sanctioned by the us government. mr ross told us none of the funds he managed ever owned a majority of navigator shares. more revelations are to come. stephanie, can you explain why this
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matters so much? we are talking about a lot of money that could be used by governments in things like education and health care and infrastructure. if you look wider than just the paradise infrastructure. if you look wider thanjust the paradise papers, it‘s actually really tricky to work out the exact money that is offshore. but there have been some figures put forward as an estimate of what it might be. it‘s said if you look globally at the cost of tax avoidance it‘s up to £180 billion. that‘s money that isn‘t going into governments, like ours, that could be using it towards the things we so needin be using it towards the things we so need in this country. its importance to point out it is not illegal to do this, its tax avoidance, not tax evasion, which is illegal. it‘s not that these people who are investing in tax havens are doing anything wrong, but it‘s the moral questions around it. and also the secrecy, there are questions around why we
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don‘t know more about where the money is, who is it invested by and where the money is. the reason it matters is because the money is missing from what we could use here. we will be talking to royal correspondent nicholas witchell is shortly about this. more will come out over the next couple of days. shortly about this. more will come out over the next couple of daysm will keep us busy. 26 people, including several children, have been killed in a shooting in a church shooting in texas. the suspect, named by local media as 26—year—old devin patrick kelly was found dead in his car. his motives are currently unknown. the scene of america‘s latest mass shooting. a tiny church in a texas town. a sunday morning gathering that turned into a massacre. more than two dozen dead and many more injured. the ages of the victims range from five to 72. the motive of the
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gunman is not known. we are dealing with the largest mass shooting in our state‘s history. there are so many families who have lost family members. fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. the tragedy, of course, is worsened by the fact that it occurred in a church, a place of worship, where these people were innocently gunned down. the gunman fled the scene and was later found dead in his vehicle. it is unclear whether he shot himself or died of a gunshot wound inflicted by a local resident who pursued the suspect, armed with his own rifle. this close—knit community has been left shattered and distraught. stay with us as we learn to deal with this... as people wait for news of their loved ones, many are overwhelmed by the scale of the tragedy. there is no words. this happens in new york, in big cities. no—one is safe. my dad has already taught
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me how to get the gun from the safe and load it. if it can happen here, it can happen anywhere. president trump, who was on a tour of asia, condemned the shooting as an act of evil. based on preliminary reports, it‘s a very deranged individual with a lot of problems over a long period of time. we have a lot of mental health problems in our country, as do other countries. we could go into it, but it‘s a bit too soon to go into it. fortu nately it‘s a bit too soon to go into it. fortunately someone else had a gun shooting in the opposite direction, otherwise it would have been much worse. the shooting comes just over one month after the deadliest mass shooting in modern us history when a gunman in las vegas killed 58 people. now, another community has joined the roll call. more lives lost and more families asking why us? as they struggle with their grief. theresa may will meet party leaders
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today to discuss a new parliamentary complaints system in response to a wave of allegations of sexual misconduct by mps. damian green will be interviewed as part of the cabinet office investigation on claims that pornography was found on a computer in his office. he strenuously denies all accusations against him. a commuter train has derailed at a station in south—west london. british transport police say around 250 people were on board the surface from basingstoke to waterloo when it became partially off the tracks just outside wimbledon station at around 6am this morning. reports of minor injuries and it‘s causing transport issues for many people. from today some nhs patients will be able to access gp consultations on video calls through a smartphone 24 hours per day. the
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royal college of gps is one in some patients could be left behind by the technology and complex conditions might be misdiagnosed. the team behind the project say it will bring health into the 21st century. it has been described as one of the biggest shocks in strictly mac history. aston merrygold was voted off the show last night. he was one of the bookies‘ favourites to win. but the jls starand his bookies‘ favourites to win. but the jls star and his dance partner jea nette jls star and his dance partner jeanette failed to inspire the judges with theirjackson five inspired viennese waltz. craig revel horwood only gave them a four.” have friends who have done this before and they said you have so much runs from start to finish. they we re much runs from start to finish. they were not lying. everything from this lady, everybody here, you guys, claudia, test, everybody who i get
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to spend time with. it‘s been amazing. some have been venting their frustration this morning. amazing. some have been venting theirfrustration this morning. it has happened in the past, though. if you don‘t vote for your favourite. dennett says, it‘s a travesty, but people are not voting for aston because they believe he will be safe. they are voting for the likes of ruth and susan. gareth says it‘s the correct decision. they did not dance a viennese waltz, even though the dance is ok. chris eaton says she is appalled that he was voted off last night. even on the dance was not to their taste, he can still dance better than a whole lot of other dancers on the show. others making the point that that is why people watch, there is genuine
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jeopardy. also a conspiracy theory that they want debbie mcgee to win! there are more important things to talk about now! back now to our top story and the leak of millions of financial documents, dubbed the ‘paradise papers‘, revealing how the rich and powerful invest their money in tax havens the data was sent to a german newspaper who then shared it with internationaljournalists, including panorama reporter richard bilton who joins us from our belfast newsroom. what‘s the background to this leak? panorama has been working on this for the best part of the year. it‘s a big job because it‘s an enormously. i am the reporter on this story, but essentially on an operation like this i am just the front and behind me is an enormous
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tea m front and behind me is an enormous team of amazing journalists who are pouring through all the documents. it's pouring through all the documents. it‘s worth bearing in mind that in films people open files and it says, here is all the evidence, but it‘s not like that in real life. you have tojoin the dots not like that in real life. you have to join the dots from spreadsheets and complicated pieces of data, so it‘s difficult to get to this stage. but it is worth it, because it‘s such a big story. looking at appleby, where the leak comes from, based in tax havens all around the world. most people go to tax havens for pretty basic reasons. low tax rates, secrecy, and lax regulation. you can go there for legal reasons, you can do it by the book, but you can also go therefore ropey reasons, dodging tax or worse. the thing about this week is you can see the sort of deals that have been brokered by firms like appleby. you say there is a lot to pore over.
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what else is in the files?” say there is a lot to pore over. what else is in the files? i think it isa what else is in the files? i think it is a pretty dramatically. i have worked on a view. there are more names to come with pop stars, sports stars, politicians and multinationals, they are all in there. last year i was the reporter on the panama papers. that actually became a much bigger story than i think even we thought it would be. what it did was pull back the curtain and we got to see this weird world where very wealthy people, if they choose, can go to an alternative world of not paying tax. what‘s the panama papers was, was effectively somebody else‘s backyard. mossack fonseca were based in panama. they dealt with brits, but they worth based somewhere else. appleby are based in britain, overseas territories and crown
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dependents. this is a leak in our backyard. there are lots of brits and british companies in here. and other people from all over the world. but it shows as our offshore empire, if you like. so many things being revealed in the papers and information about the queen‘s finances. let‘s get more from nicholas witchell who is at buckingham palace for this morning. nicholas, just take us back if you would, this refers to the duchy of lancaster. what is that? it's a private estate which for 600 years has been providing a private income to the monarch. now, most of the holding is land. it‘s 18,000 hectares of land in lancashire, cheshire, yorkshire, but there is also property here in central london, just off the strand and it has this small investment portfolio.
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altogether it has assets which were valued at £500 million and it has delivered a private thick to the queen from the duchy of lancaster in the last financial year of just queen from the duchy of lancaster in the last financial year ofjust over £19 million. now that is an income on which she voluntarily pays a sum, equivalent to income tax and she has been doing that since the early 19905, been doing that since the early 1990s, so there is no question of tax avoidance. in her case, it is a question ofjudgment tax avoidance. in her case, it is a question of judgment by tax avoidance. in her case, it is a question ofjudgment by her advisers as to whether it was wise for her to go off—shore with some of her investments. you refer to her advisers. how does the duchy of lancaster operate? the duchy of lancaster operate? the duchy of lancaster is quite separate as it we re lancaster is quite separate as it were from buckingham palace although there is a senior palace official on its council. the duchy has a council and that‘s what runs the investment strategy and the question, i suppose, this morning is whether
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there was sufficient oversight by there was sufficient oversight by the duchy council of the investment managers, whether there was sufficient guidance given to them as to the kind of investments that it was felt that it was appropriate for the queen‘s income to be placed into. this was back in the early 20005, into. this was back in the early 2000s, some of the initial investments, so the question as i say is whether the investment managers and sometimes this is done at several hands distant from the duchy itself. whether they were guided as to the kind of investments which would not be deemed to be appropriate. what‘s the reaction from the palace then? there has been really no reaction. buckingham palace has known for several days this was coming. the palace felt it was a matter for the duchy of lancaster. the duchy issued a statement to panorama saying its investments are legitimate, pointing out a proportion are in equities and investments and making this point once again that the queen does
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voluntarily pay a sum equivalent to income tax on her investments. nicholas, witchell, live from outside of buckingham palace, thank you very much, nick. there is more analysis and detail from the paradise papers on the bbc news white. as richard bilton was telling us, there will be fresh information on panorama. you‘re watching breakfast. it is frosty out there. matt has all the details. good morning. it is rather frosty as well. temperatures at the moment starting to rise after dropping as low as minus six celsius in one or two spots, but around parts of north yorkshire and teesside, we are at minus three and most of you starting the day with frost. not just frost, fog across central and southern england. notice cloud into western scotla nd england. notice cloud into western scotland and northern ireland. lifting the temperatures across
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eastern scotland too. and that will introduce rain. not much rain during day time, most places will stay dry. but increased cloud after a sunny start across western areas. a few splashes of rain across east anglia and the south east, but the midlands and the south east, but the midlands and towards eastern england, you will stay sunny all day long. just a gentle breeze, but temperatures sluggish after that chilly start only eight or nine celsius for some of you at best. it will stay clear into the evening rush hour. after a frosty morning, it will be a clear and cold evening across east anglia and cold evening across east anglia and the south east for the journey home. temperatures dropping quickly. a frost for some tonight. not as extensive as last night. in the west temperatures ten or 11 celsius at 6pm. a little bit of drizzle at times too. the same across southern and eastern scotland, but many will stay dry as will northern ireland. the breeze picking up, but through the highlands and islands, it will be range from late morning onwards. some heavy rain to come as that
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spreads across scotland and northern ireland and into western fringes of england and wales for first light on tuesday morning. gale force winds in around the irish sea coasts, but it will keep temperatures up for most of you overnight. a touch of frost in east anglia and the south east and later into northern ireland. a better day for you tomorrow. overnight rain clears and a day of sunshine and only one or two showers. the morning commute tomorrow, southern and eastern scotla nd tomorrow, southern and eastern scotland and western england and wales, rain developing widely. some of the rain will be heavy. the winds will ease down as the rain spreads into north—east england and the midlands and central and southern england. only a few showers in east anglia and the south east. mildest of the air here. as the sunshine comes out in the west, the cold air is back and the cold air will push in through tuesday and into tuesday night. so a touch of frost around into wednesday morning as this little ridge of high pressure starts to build its way in. we could see cloud and patchy rain in the south east. most of you will have a dry day on wednesday.
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i look forward to wednesday. a—level students are being let down by colleges cutting the number of subjects on offer due a lack of funding, according to new claims today. the sixth form colleges association says its members are cutting languages and science courses as well as extra curricular activities. unions are now asking the government to boost sixth form funding. sanchia berg reports. school funding per head is less than for younger secondary students. half the university tuition fee. many colleges and schools are dropping subjects. half the colleges and schools surveyed cut modern languages. usually french, german or spanish and most now only allow stu d e nts to spanish and most now only allow students to study three subjects instead of four. two—thirds have
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reduced student support services. the government is spending £7 billion and said a record proportion of the age group with us now is bill watkin, chief executive of the six form colleges association and sixth form student ola kozlowska who sometimes travels up to four hours a day to study the subjects she wants to. is this not about a change in the subjects that we study. for example law a—level which was popular a while ago is maybe more of a university course. it is not offered anymore? the problem is that our sixth—formers have been underfunded and neglected by government for yea rs and neglected by government for years and this has got to stop. one of the consequences of the under funding is that you have to have bigger classes for them to be financially viable. and that means
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that some subjects can‘t be afforded by colleges and sixth forms in schools. the problem most often happens in small colleges and schools and one of the other consequences of the funding is that fewer people are choosing four subjects. they are choosing three instead and that means there are fewer choices in the pot. have you seen a fewer choices in the pot. have you seen a change? you teach languages, don‘t you? seen a change? you teach languages, don't you? i used to. in the past, when six or seven students would have been taught an a—level in say for example spanish, you might not be able to do that until you get 15 or 20 students? that's right, yes. i have taught sixth form classes in the past with three or four students, but now, you have got to have at least 15, probably 20 for a sclas to be viable. you have had to travel far now, haven‘t you, to get the course you wanted. so how far do you have to travel and why do you do that? if i miss the school bus i have to travel two hours in the
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morning and because it is heavy traffic around manchester, two hours back, especially with the dark, cold nights. why did you want to go to that college, because you could have gone somewhere closer, couldn‘t you? loretta has a high level of education. it is grade one in most subjects. i wanted to study politics because i'm really interested in parliamentary system, voting. and my sixth form college did not provide that at moment sol sixth form college did not provide that at moment so i wanted to go to loretta because had the high level. they are not able to put the courses on because there is not enough stu d e nts on because there is not enough students who want to then do it. it comes down tojust students who want to then do it. it comes down to just a funding issue? it isa comes down to just a funding issue? it is a funding issue. the funding means you have got to have bigger classes. if you have got students choosing only three subjects instead of four, the fourth subject is one that gets lost. so we are losing, not only modern language classes, we are losing science, technology,
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engineering and maths, but increasingly as well, what is at risk is the pastoral support, the guidance for university entrants, the careers advice and the mental health support and the extra kerrick collar duke of edinburgh award. the government says we are investing £17 billion to make sure there is a place in educational training for every 16 to 19—year—old who wants one. they are trying to extend the offering. what are you most concerned about? you have mentioned languages and stem subjects and science subjects. what are you most concerned about? the bred of breadth of the curriculum in general. the government will say we are putting more money in education. they have put £1.3 billion into schools and 16 to 18—year—olds, the doctors and lawyers and accountants and scientists of the future don‘t get as much money. i want to ask you about your friends. where they having to choose
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subjects that they might not have chosen because they weren‘t on offer? the science subjects are more facilitated in colleges. there is more focus on stem students. certain colleges may specialise in drama. that maybe funded quite well. whereas humanities are not very well funded. so you are not getting that level of teaching and support in extra certificate rick collar as well. i wanted to study politics. they provide a debate club. thank you very much indeed. good luck with your a—levels. it is time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching us. it's
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it‘s been a cold start to the day with widespread frost across england and wales, up into eastern scotland. we‘ve had clear skies throughout the night but further north and west temperatures rising across northern ireland and western scotland with that area of clout, increasing breeze and rain starting to move in. patchy fog affecting central and southern areas of england this morning. we will have sunshine in the afternoon. it‘s further north where we will see rain moving in and it could turn heavy. temperatures of 8-13dc, 9-11 in the it could turn heavy. temperatures of 8—13dc, 9—11 in the far south—east. it will turn chilly in the evening. cloud continuing to move to eastern areas. overnight, this band of rain which will turn heavier, and a band of rain moving through. chilly in
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the south—east. temperatures perhaps staying in double figures elsewhere. through tuesday, rain continuing to spread eastwards. a wet start through scotland, western parts of england and wales but the rain not reaching east anglia until the evening. the rain clears to the eastward sunshine developing across northern and western areas. it. to feel more chilly with temperatures of 8-9dc. feel more chilly with temperatures of 8—9dc. clear skies elsewhere other than east anglia. we have warmer and milder air moving its way infor warmer and milder air moving its way in for the end of the week, that‘s all associated with that weather system. in between, as we go through wednesday, it‘s largely fine and dry. chilly start on wednesday with crowd, rain clearing away from east. eventually rain spreading into the far north and west. the maximum
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temperature with sunshine, 9—11. more details available on the website. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben bland. a huge new leak of financial documents — known as the paradise papers — has revealed how the powerful and wealthy secretly invest vast amounts of money in offshore tax havens. live from london, that‘s our top story. the details are contained in millions of documents from a law
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firm which specialises in offshore arrangements for individuals and companies. we will talk you through the detail you need to know. also in the programme — all smiles on the golf course but president trump is talking tough on trade with japan.

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