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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 6, 2017 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two. breaking news — a british hostage is killed in nigeria, three weeks after being kidnapped. three other britons are released. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves three actors from the bbc‘s hit sitcom mrs brown's boys. they diverted more than two million pounds into an offshore tax avoidance scheme. the latest mass shooting in the united states — 26 are killed in a texas church — president trump says guns are not to blame. the 999 call from matthew scully—hickes — moments after he'd murdered his 18—month—old adopted daughter. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. all change at west ham? yes, slaven
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bilic is sacked. he said he was expecting it, and there is no hard feelings. and the weather, it was cold. yes, we woke up to a widespread frost. if it was too cold for you, be careful what you wish for because tomorrow it's all cloud and rain, i will have details later. also coming up — one of the 4,000 drivers in england — caught committing offences over the last two years — by traffic police driving an unmarked hgv. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. a british man who was kidnapped with three other people in nigeria in mid—october has been killed.
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the three other hostages have returned home safely. 0ur correspondent is in lagos. stephanie, for a lot of people, news of their kidnap has not been released, so tell us what happened? what we know so far is that these four men were taken from a rural area in nigeria's delta area. they went to assess people for cataract surgery went to assess people for cataract surgery and they perform hundreds of surgeries forfree. surgery and they perform hundreds of surgeries for free. two of the group, shirley and david donovan, set upa group, shirley and david donovan, set up a medical charity and have run the clinic for years. we travelled to the area for years and local people told us that donovans used to come in and out, travelled to the area to visit two or three times a year to the area to visit two or three timesa yearand to the area to visit two or three times a year and they did it quite safely for ten years. this time,
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they brought two opticians with them. ian squires and elena. we had that ian squires was killed. they we re that ian squires was killed. they were taken on the 13th of october in the middle of the night by an armed gang. motives are not clear, but we believe it was purely for ransom and no political agenda. do we know how mr no political agenda. do we know how mquuire was no political agenda. do we know how mr squire was killed? we don't have any information as to how or when he was killed, whether it was today during the release or in the past two and a half weeks since they were taken. hopefully, two and a half weeks since they were ta ken. hopefully, that two and a half weeks since they were taken. hopefully, that information will come out in the next few days. in terms of the suspects, who do they believe are behind it? is a group which are a local group. the leader is a 25 you old man. a young,
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new group. they were a criminal gang who had been doing petty criminal activities like harassing women on the way to market. they were only known to have committed one kidnap before, the mother of a local politician. so not much is known about them. any more developments, we will come back to you. thank you. some breaking news from our diplomatic correspondent who says that the international development secretary has admitted that she had the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, the israeli prime minister, binyamin neta nyahu, as undisclosed the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, as undisclosed meetings during a holiday to israel over the summer. during a holiday to israel over the summer. ina during a holiday to israel over the summer. in a detailed statement, mrs patel has apologised for following failing to follow procedure and and for suggesting that boris johnson
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knew in advance of the meetings and says that she regretted the wording. more on that later on. a mass leak of secret papers is shedding new light on how the rich and powerful invest millions of pounds in offshore tax havens. the documents — called the paradise papers — have been examined by the international consortium of investigativejournalists — which includes the bbc‘s panorama programme and the guardian. they have already revealed that the queen has £10 million of her personal fortune invested in offshore trusts by the duchy of lancaster. the papers have also shown how donald trump's commerce secretary has business links with russian allies of president putin. he's told the bbc today there is nothing improper about his investments. now the latest revelations involve three actors from the bbc‘s hit sitcom mrs brown's boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme according to the papers. there's no suggestion that those involved have acted illegally. angus crawford reports.
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do you want a cup of tea. yes, please. what's up? foul—mouthed and very funny. brendan 0'carroll, alias mrs brown. his company produces one of the most popular comedy shows on tv. but bbc news has learned, three actors have been getting their fees sent offshore. patrick hoolahan, who plays wayward son dermot. do you not think you could've stayed in bed a little bit longer, marie? yeah, restless night. brendan 0'carroll‘s real—life daughter fiona delaney. morning, mummy. good morning, trevor, son. and her husband, martin delaney. this is how it works — the actors get their fees sent offshore tax—free to a series of trust funds based in mauritius. the cash then comes back to the actors, now as a loan, so avoiding tax. take fiona delaney. injust 16 months, the mauritian company lent her more than £360,000. it looks like what's called disguised remuneration. we wanted to ask her about it,
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but she didn't want to talk. can you tell me about your tax, you get paid in mauritius, don't you? and then the loans, do you pay those loans back? i don't think you pay them back, is it a tax dodge. you a tax dodgeer? i don't even know who you are. i'm from panorama. you're from mrs brown's boys, and you're a tax dodger. that's not very funny at all, is it? none of the actors have broken the law. but the chair of the commons public accounts committee is concerned. i don't understand understand why people may go to such lengths to set up complicated tax arrangements to avoid paying tax in real—time. even if they say they are going to pay it at a later date, we need that money now, and what the issue? sometimes these sums of money we're talking about is plenty of money. you know, people can certainly live on that, and even if they were paying tax on it, they would be earning a lot more than most of my constituents.
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this kind of scheme isn't new. it caught out comedian jimmy carr five years ago, forcing a public apology. and a tongue lashing from the then prime minister. some of these schemes where people are parking huge amounts of money offshore, and taking loans back to minimise their tax rates, it is not morally acceptable. as for the creator and star of mrs brown's boys, brendan 0'carroll, he denies any wrongdoing. in a statement, he said, "the actors‘ wages were paid into a uk company bank account." and, "i have never been involved with any tax avoidance scheme. patrick hoolahan and martin and fiona delaney have so far made no comment. angus crawford, bbc news. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity is here. those are the latest revelations but we heard earlier that the queen is also entangled in this? yes, the
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queen has eight private estate. in the duchy of lancaster monies invested as she draws on income. the duchy of lancaster has hundreds of millions of pounds to invest and a small fraction of that, £10 million, was invested into funds, in offshore tax havens in bermuda and the cayman islands. what know about that is what the money was invested on. it was invested in threshers, which went bust, owing tax. it also invested in a retailer called bright house. a rent to own company, a hire purchase company and you can end up paying a lot more than you otherwise word and the financial conduct company has ordered it to pay compensation. the duchy of lancaster says it's a small amount, only £3200, but it is nevertheless controversial. what has happened
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here in terms of the leak? it is the role of british protectorate and how it all works. what is remarkable about this, we have a british firm, founded by british businessmen in the late 19th century, based in bermuda. if you look at offshore financial centres, you are talking bermuda, the cayman islands, the virgin islands. 0verseas dependencies. crown dependencies likejersey, guernsey, dependencies. crown dependencies like jersey, guernsey, the dependencies. crown dependencies likejersey, guernsey, the isle of man and also ex—colonies like hong kong which are very much at the cutting edge of tax haven status. all of the centres derive their existence to some extent from the fa ct existence to some extent from the fact that their taxes are lower than in otherjurisdictions. that also means that they undermined the tax base of other countries like the uk or the us. maybe there is less money
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to go towards public services. this is tax avoidance. now, one is legal, one is not, women are talking about tax evasion. what we are talking about is illegal. people are asking why we are giving people a hard time because what they are doing is not illegal and if there was a proper regulatory system, from hmrc or whoever, then this would not be needed anyway? the vast majority of what goes on and offshore centres is not illegal. if agent is illegal, avoidance is not. but as we heard, even when you think something is legal, it may become illegal and there is also an aggressive tax avoidance when something is frowned upon. is it fair for offshore centres to be used by rich individuals all companies when it is not for the likes of you or me. it
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is the top 1% of the population that can use offshore centres. is there are very demanded for them, the bitches dependencies are facilitating that. thank you very much. and you can watch panorama's second report which includes a series of further revelations from the paradise papers tonight, on bbc one, at nine o'clock. and if you have any views, tweet us. president trump says the mass shooting in a church in texas yesterday that left 26 people dead was because of a "mental health problem" and wasn't what he called a "guns situation". us media have identified the lone gunman as devin kelley. he was thrown out of the air force three years ago for assaulting his wife and child. among the victims were several
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children and a pregnant woman. dan johnson reports. this tiny baptist church in a small texan town is where america must reflect on its latest gun massacre. 26 lives lost, 20 more torn through by bullet wounds. it is the worst shooting in the history of this state. there are so many families who lost family members — fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. the tragedy, of course, is worsened by the fact that it occurred in a church, a place of worship, where these people were innocently gunned down. so why did devin kelley go to church yesterday morning with an assault rifle? we may never know. the 26—year—old was found dead after he was chased up the highway and crashed his car. it was a local resident with his own weapon who went after him. i did what i thought i needed to do, they said there was a shooting. i pursued and ijust did what i thought was the right thing. you know there were more weapons in that car?
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you possibly stopped him from killing other people. i didn't know that. last night, people drew close to consider and to remember. among the dead is the pastor's 14—year—old daughter. there is a struggle here to comprehend such killing. it's hard to hear. people you know who are hurt that bad. i wish i could get close to him to question him why. in many ways, this massacre summarises the us gun debate. is it better to have fewer guns around, or more armed heroes on hand? the president, on a trip to japan, seemed clear. a very deranged individual. a lot of problems over a long period of time. we have a lot of mental health problems in our country, as do other countries. but this isn't a guns situation.
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i mean, we could go into it, but it is a little bit soon to go into it. fortunately, somebody else had a gun firing in the opposite direction. it could have been much worse. the debate will go on, just as it seems inevitable its focus will soon shift to the next grieving community. dan johnson, bbc news. 0ur north america correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan, is outside the church in sutherland springs. what more do we know about this government? we do have an update on him. the governor of texas gave an interview to cbs news is not too long ago where he said that this isn't thought to have been a random act on his part. he said the church was not picked at random. that would suggest that he had some sort of
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connection to this place of worship. i was speaking to the local sheriff not long ago. he told me that the suspects's in—laws worshipped here and they did not come to the service that often but after they heard what had happened, they came to the church afterwards. it is unclear why. that could be the connection that the governor is talking about. he did not elaborate. he suggested it was not a random act. two men are being hailed as heroes because they chased the gunmen? yes, there is a conversation about that. one of the men i know for sure, one person who doesn't want to talk to the media, he doesn't believe he is a hero, he just did what he would have done in that situation. the gunmen was said
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to have fled from this charge and at least one man with a weapon chased him. that is something that the president referred to in that report we saw just president referred to in that report we sawjust men. two people in this gun debate, there are clear sides, people who believe that you need more guns, you need more protection through your firearms to be able to ta ke through your firearms to be able to take on people when they are at these kinds of —— when there are these kinds of —— when there are these kinds of mass shooting, and thatis these kinds of mass shooting, and that is what the people who are hailing the other man as a hero are saying. but the other side of the debate, people who believe in tougher gun control, something like this serves as a reminder that there needs to be more restrictions on who has the access to guns. texas has some of the most lax gun laws in america. thank you. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... a british man has been killed in
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nigeria three months after being kidnapped. actors from mrs brown ‘s boys put money into a tax avoidance scheme. the president said —— slaven bilic said there are no hard feelings after being sacked from west ham. and the players draw at atp tournament was criticised for being sexist the organisers have apologised. and this player was charged with alleged biting. pretty patel went to israel last
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summer pretty patel went to israel last summerand pretty patel went to israel last summer and met the president. james landau, what should have happened before she went? when ministers go and what meetings, they have to tell the ministry is though that they can record and eight. it might even be about security if it is in a hostile environment. that is what normally happens. mrs patel went on holiday and did many things you would do as and did many things you would do as a holiday. but for a few days she has an official meetings with her ministerial hat on. so, i've reported on friday that she had met senior opposition party leader, that she had met a couple of charities, ngos were dealing with technology and work that could be used for
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development in africa. i was clearly scratching the surface. she has been forced to admit 12 separate engagements over this period of which the most extraordinary was that she met the prime minister of the country, benjamin yet netanyahu. —— binyamin netanyahu. you could say the foreign office are just getting scratchy. 0n the other hand, a minister has gone freelance, going to have meetings with other heads a government without anybody present all to record what takes place. this is extraordinary. apart from ruffling feathers, and whose feathers almost ruffled, is a boris johnson? who will be most miffed? the editing part of the statement made by mrs patel, she gave an interview to the guardian newspaper in which she said, boris knew about the visit. she has now apologised
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for making that statement. she said that the foreign secretary became aware of the visit but not in advance of it. and she made it clear that if she has suggested that the meetings that i revealed where the limit, she now regrets the lack of precision. so she has apologised for the interview she gave to the guardian and also for doing this business in the way that she did. she said, i can see how my enthusiasm to engage has been misread and the meetings were recorded in a way that did not accord with usual procedures. so i apologise for this. a bit naive? the view within government is that this is an unusual way of doing business. the prime minister is meeting other party leaders later in the wake
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of a series of sexual misconduct allegations at westminster. theresa may has warned that allegations of "serious abuse" in parliament will not be ignored and victims‘ complaints will be fully investigated. she has also promised to confront what she called "the use and abuse of power". several conservative and labour mps are being investigated because of claims of inappropriate behaviour, as our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, reports. as each day goes by, another allegation, another politician drawn into the scandal at westminster. and as she tries to shift the focus onto her government's own agenda, the prime minister will be hoping there are no more revelations to come. well, thank you very much... that while it was back to business at the cbi's conference this morning, it was a chance, too, for theresa may to call to a new culture of respect in politics. this isn't about prying into private lives. what we are talking about is the use and abuse of power. we must stand up for all the victims
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of abuse, harassment and victimisation, wherever it has occurred. now is the time to act decisively, without fear or favour to guarantee a safe and respectful environment for everyone in the future. and to achieve that, the labour leader wants training for mps, plus trade unions, to have a greater role in westminster. all of you, all of us, need to look hard at ourselves, as we in the labour party are doing, to see how our processes and procedures can be improved. how it can be made easier for women to speak out, and for victims to get the support they have a right to expect. party leaders meeting with the prime minister later agree on the need for an independent procedure committee investigate allegations of mistreatment by parliamentary staff. but there are questions over what powers this new body will have, what penalties it will be able to impose, and how quickly it can be set up, as party leaders try to get on the front foot over this scandal, and get support in place for staff, meet the
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concerns of victims, and restore the reputation of parliament. one solution suggested by the former head of the parliamentary expenses watchdog would see mps' staff recruited independently. the staff would have addictions of being in a act—macro the staff would have the protection of being in a modern organisation, a professional lives personal support and it whistle blowing system. somebody should talk to befall relationships have broken down. all this as mrs may's most senior minister damian green is —— somebody to talk to. all this as mrs may's most senior minister damian green is to be interviewed as part of a cabinet office investigation into his own conduct over claims he strenuously denies. for now, everyone here
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waits, with a fear that every new day could bring a fresh scandal. baby elsie — tiny and delicate, but with a big personality. a man has been found guilty of murdering his 18—month—old daughter — just two weeks after formally adopting her. matthew scully—hicks, who's 31, inflicted numerous injuries on her. she died after being violently shaken and struck on the head. sian lloyd reports from cardiff crown court. baby elsie — tiny and delicate, but with a big personality. at ten months, she was placed in the care of a couple with one child who wanted to adopt. but within weeks of formally adopting elsie, part—time fitness instructor matthew scully—hicks had killed her. for months, the 31—year—old inflicted a catalogue of injuries, covering up what he'd done to social workers, doctors and to his husband. this was the 999 call matthew scully—hicks made when elsie stopped breathing. the toddler died in hospital four days later.
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doctors found she'd suffered a string of injuries, including a fractured skull, several broken ribs and a broken leg. there was also evidence of recent and older bleeding to her brain — injuries, according to experts, that were typical of babies who've been violently shaken. it wasn't the first time that elsie had been rushed to hospital whilst in the sole care of matthew scully—hicks. two months before she died, he dialled 999, claiming she'd fallen down the stairs when a safety gate had given way. matthew scully—hicks denied ever hurting elsie. the prosecution said he was struggling to cope within days of her moving in. in text messages to friends, he described her as having a "diva strop" and to his husband, craig, who frequently worked away from home, he called elsie a "psycho"
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and "satan dressed up in a baby grow". it's particularly tragic when a little girl who should have been loved and protected by her new adopted family found herself abused and then suffered horribly in that home. the court heard that social workers frequently visited the family home while supervising elsie's adoption. matthew scully—hicks told them her injuries were accidental. thejury did not believe his excuses and he'll be sentenced for her murder. sian lloyd, bbc news, cardiff crown court. now time for a look at the weather. the picture tells a rather chilly story? i hope you were moaning that it was
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cold this morning, because look how beautiful it was! wear you out walking the dog ‘s? no, not walking the dog. the adults were happy this morning... i wondered what happened to them. —— the dogs were happy this morning. we keep the sun in some areas. it has all changed because tomorrow morning people will be moaning about how cold and grey it is. there will isa how cold and grey it is. there will is a lot to minus six degrees in general parts but the changes coming because we have cloud, wind and rain in from the north—west. it is bringing light, patchy rain into northern ireland and scotland. central and eastern areas will cling on to minus six degrees in general parts but the changes coming because we have cloud, wind and rain in from the north—west. it is bringing light, patchy rain into northern ireland and scotland. central and eastern areas will cling onto the sunshine. beautifulforsome, eastern areas will cling onto the sunshine. beautiful for some, but not for all. a spot of two full of
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nuisance rain through wales and south—west england but through the end of the day, the rain will take over. here is a high in the next hour or so. as we go through the night, all the eyes of ours are squeezed together over the north—west, meaning it will turn pretty windy and the wins will come from the south—westerly direction. quite squally winds. bringing in heavy rain at times. behind the rain, single figures because it will turn colder but brighter. western scotland, northern ireland, you will see sunshine and isolated showers. the rain sits across the scottish mountains. then the heaviest of the rain through north—west england and wales. a pretty miserable early morning rush—hour and also in the south—west. but across parts of the midlands and south east of england, we start of cloudy but it will be
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dry. not for too long, because that weather front will push in from the west, steadily marching east. it will sit around the pennines, down through the pennines by the end of the afternoon. so stay open —— predominantly dry in daylight hours in the south—east. a scattering showers overnight in the north and west. the rain still to clear through tuesday night and wednesday morning. clearer skies and then a brief lull in proceedings and another front waits in the wings. so no two days the same this week. one day cold and sunny the next, wet and windy. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a british hostage kidnapped in nigeria's southern delta state last month has been killed. the foreign office says three other britons have returned home safely. the latest revelation from the paradise papers — three actors from the bbc comedy programme mrs brown's boys diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax—avoidance scheme. the gunman who killed 26 people
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at a texas church was a military veteran who'd been dishonourably discharged. matthew scully—hicks has been found guilty of murdering his 18—month—old baby just two weeks after formally adopting her. as the un climate change conference gets under way, the world metrological organisation says 2017 is likely to be one of the warmest yea rs on is likely to be one of the warmest years on record. sport is now on afternoon live, and we will talk about west ham in a moment, but what else is going on? a really interesting story that has caused a stir on social media, a tennis tournament in milan that has been slammed for being sexist. when they did the draw to work out which group players would be in, they each had to pick a female model, walked
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down a catwalk, and then she had to remove an item of clothing to reveal which group the player was playing in. it has been called awful, a disgrace by some top female players, and the organisers have had to apologise, more on that in just a bit, simon. it is 2017, isn't it?! west ham, changes there. yes, slaven bilic is the fourth managerial sacking of the season. he has said there are no hard feelings after he was sacked by west ham after two years in charge. they've won just two matches this season and find themselves in the relegation zone. jessica creightonjoins me for more on this. no hard feelings, he said he was expecting a — we all work. no hard feelings, he said he was expecting a - we all work. yes, after such a poor run of results, he said the pressure was madden on him and the players after every game, but he said he was proud of the work he had done at the club but that it wasn't very good this season. indeed, they are languishing in the
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relegation zone, currently an 18th, just nine points from 11 games, they have won just two of their matches, despite slaven bilic having spent £42 despite slaven bilic having spent £112 million over the summer, breaking the club record transfer fee. after the thrashing from liverpool, 4—1 in front of home fans on saturday, his position became untenable. in a statement from the owners, david gold and david sullivan, they say performances and results have not been of the expected standard in recent weeks, we believe a change is necessary to ensure we move the team back in the right direction, and it has been quite a fall from grace, because bilic guided them to seventh in the premier league in his first season, then 11, and now they are 18. results going in the wrong direction. how much of a foregone conclusion that david moyes will ta ke conclusion that david moyes will take over? reading some of the papers, it is a done deal. yes, the
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press and social media are all pointing towards david moyes been the frontrunner, and he has expressed interest in the role. just yesterday he said that he would be interested , yesterday he said that he would be interested, so he does seem to be the frontrunner at this point. we understand he has had talks with the clu b understand he has had talks with the club in recent weeks, the former everton and manchester united boss, most recently with sunderland, after getting them relegated from the premier league. whoever comes in is going to have to be someone who is able to inspire the players, because tea m able to inspire the players, because team morale is very low the moment. thank you very much. everton defender michael keane has been called into the england squad for their friendlies against germany and brazil. he played in their 3—2 win over watford yesterday, after returning from a leg injury. england take on germany on friday and brazil next tuesday, both at wembley. 0rganisers of a tennis tournament in milan have apologised after accusations of sexism. female models were asked to remove an item of clothing to determine which group each player would be in.
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the atp and red bull have said the draw for the under—21 tour finals was unacceptable. 0ur tennis correspondent russell fuller has more. the female model would reveal which group they were in by having to remove an item of clothing to show whether they ended up in group a or group b, and there were one particularly cringeworthy examples, the young canadian playerfound out which group e was in when the female model he had chosen lifted up a lay stress to reveal the letter a on her right thigh. and a south korean player had to take the glow of his female model off with his teeth to find out his fate. there has been a strong reaction on social media from high—profile women in the game, judy murray was one of those to tweet earlier, she described it as awful.
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amelie mauresmo, former wimbledon champion and australian open champion, branded ita champion and australian open champion, branded it a disgrace. and alize cornet pointed out this was meant to be showcasing the future, but said it was back to zero. that is all the sport for now, more for you any next hour — if my voice last that long! i hope you could hear me properly. you will be back whatever(!) many of the most seriously wounded victims of the manchester arena bombing in may had to wait for more than an hour before they got expert medical help. the bbc‘s inside out programme has also learnt of delays in paramedics and specialist fire crews getting into the scene of the attack. 22 people were killed and more than 500 were injured. colin paterson reports. 0n the night of may 22nd, the emergency services treated hundreds of people, many of whom had suffered life—changing injuries. but what we have learned is that some of the most seriously wounded had to wait for more than an hour before receiving any expert medical treatment. only three paramedics were allowed
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into the so—called "hot zone", where the bomb had exploded. kim and phil dick were in the foyer and tried to help some of the injured. there was just too much for three paramedics to deal with. there was too much for 20—30 paramedics to deal with. you got bandages out, and we were just keeping them alert and talking to them. how long was this over? it's over an hour. over an hour. just over an hour. fire and rescue staff were held back at their stations for one hour and 47 minutes after the blast. the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, has had a bad independent review to learn lessons from the events in may. it is due to report next year. none of the emergency services, police, ambulance or fire service, want to speak to the bbc before then. greater manchester fire
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and rescue say that they have conducted their own internal debrief to organisations's response to the manchester arena attack and are fully cooperating with the kerslake review. but for those caught up in this incident, they simply want to know why it took so long for help to come. the longer it went on, the more silent it became. and it was really eerie. and people who i'd seen a little earlier, who were severely injured, were now dead. colin paterson, bbc news, manchester. and you can see more on this story tonight on bbc one in yorkshire and the north west in inside out at 7:30 and on the bbc iplayer. in saudi arabia, hours after a major purge of the kingdom's political and business leadership, a senior saudi prince and seven other officials have been killed in a helicopter crash near the country's border with yemen. prince mansour bin muqrin, the deputy governor of asir province, was returning from an inspection tour when his aircraft came down. as yet there's no cause given for the crash. this is all according
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to saudi arabia's interior minister. well, in that purge, an anti—corruption body led by crown prince mohammed bin salman, 32, ordered the detentions of dozens of people, including 11 princes, four ministers and dozens of ex—ministers. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner is here. ido i do not think there is any proven connection between the purge and the crash, the purge in itself is huge news, absolutely seismic for saudi arabia. at the moment, it looks like coincidence that the helicopter came down in those very mountainous valleys, i have flown them myself in helicopters, the weather is unpredictable, and the unofficial explanation is that bad weather brought it down. i do not know what the state was, but about this time last year i flew through that area, through horrendous thunderstorms in a light plane, and it was bucketing around all over the place. so you
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know, it could perfectly well be bad weather. the purges are huge. 0stensibly, this is about cleaning out the corruption at the top of saudi society, the princes and business, but the guy spearheading this, the crown prince, is someone who spent $400 million on a yacht, so who spent $400 million on a yacht, so not mr austerity. this is primarily about power, about making sure that he has got 0lli rehn is of power in his hand, and nobody is going to be there to contradict his modernisation programme for saudi, which is well intended. so whether it is an accident or not, a helicopter crash with these casualties sends quite a message, whether he meant it to happen or not, and he is working on what, fear? i will say again, not, and he is working on what, fear? iwill say again, but not, and he is working on what, fear? i will say again, but the crash to one side... but in terms of the purge. absolutely, the messages coming out of the attorney general‘s
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0ffice coming out of the attorney general‘s office and the royal court is that nobody is immune from this anti—corruption purge, and that status will not save people from the full force of the law. we do not yet know what that is. an officially, we are told they are accused of misuse of their office to improve their personal wealth, but this is the way business has been done in saudi arabia for decades. it was always done on kickbacks, in terms of the arms sales, contract prices would be inflated to put a certain amount into line pockets. that is how it was done, saudi diplomats have said it themselves on air, so i am not breaking any great tabuk in saying that. private citizens in saudi, and a lot of people are not that wealthy, it may be the richest country in the middle east, but there are a lot of poor people who will welcome this, but they will wa nt to will welcome this, but they will want to see it being practised from the top, that if this is going to be
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practised and they are going for transparency, then let's see transparent government accounts, because the one thing you don't get in saudi arabia is accountable governance when it comes to oil revenue. stuff gets siphoned off, passed to the thousands of princes, nobody knows how much money goes to whom. but a $400 million yacht will not go down with that audience. well, no, but what is a few bob between friends! the very top levels have never been short of money, because of course it is the world's richest oil producer, but they do face long—term problems, which is why the crown prince has launched something called vision 2030 to try to wea n something called vision 2030 to try to wean the country off its dependence on oil revenue and turn it into a modern economy. as part of that, he has announced a $500 billion megacity project in a part of the desert where there is nothing at the moment, to try to turn it
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into a new dubai. it is very ambitious, and a lot of people are saying this guy is taking on too much, he has started a war in yemen thatis much, he has started a war in yemen that is unwinnable, pushing a boycott against neighbouring qatar, which is damaging everybody, fighting a cold war against iran, biting isis, taking on the clerics, and now he is alienating the older generation of princes. 0ne analyst described this as building up a reservoir of discontent. these are high—stakes games reservoir of discontent. these are high—sta kes games he's reservoir of discontent. these are high—stakes games he's playing. frank, fascinating, thank you very much. starting today, some nhs patients will be able to access gp consultations via video calls on their smartphone 24 hours a day. the royal college of gps is warning that some patients could be left behind and complex conditions may be misdiagnosed. but the team behind the project say it will bring health consultations into the 21st century. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, reports. the founders of the new service say they want to make getting health consultations as easy as online banking and shopping. it's being launched by a group of london gps and the online health—care
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provider babylon. nhs patients will be able to check symptoms through a smartphone app and then book appointments if they wish. those signing up will leave their existing practice with their records transferred to a group of five central london gp practices. the service promises a video consultation with a gp within two hours and, if required, a face—to—face appointment with a doctor within 48 hours. prescriptions will be e—mailed to a local pharmacy chosen by the patient. it's high time nhs patients were given the opportunity to benefit from technology, to improve access to health care. we've benefited from this kind of technology in so many different aspects of our lives — whether it be in shopping or banking. it's really time that we were able to do that in health care for nhs patients. but the royal college of gps said there is a danger the new service would only work for younger, healthier commuters, and that it might not be appropriate for those with complex health conditions.
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the college argued the new service would lure gps away from frontline general practice at a time of severe workforce shortages. hugh pym, bbc news. we are going to be going live to rebecca marsden at the cbi in a moment, but first the headlines on the afternoon live. a british hostage has been killed in nigeria, three weeks after being kidnapped in its delta state. three other britons have returned home safely. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves three actors from the bbc‘s hit sitcom mrs brown's boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax—avoidance scheme. president trump says guns are not to blame for the mass shooting in the united states in which 26 people died. as we've been hearing the cbi is having its conference today, and the prime minister, theresa may, and the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, have been addressing business leaders. our business
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correspondent rebecca marston is at that conference in greenwich. hi, simon, good afternoon from the cbi conference, a great number of businesses are members of this lobbying group, around 200,000 affiliated members who employ around 7 million people in this country, almost a quarter of the uk workforce. in the wall behind me there is only room for about 1500 delegates from those organisations, and it has been standing room only for some of the sessions. you mentioned theresa may gave a speech this morning, standing room only, and later on, just before lunch, jeremy corbyn, the leader of the 0pposition, also addressed conference. let's see how it is going from the president of the cbi, paul draxler. good afternoon, how is it all going? we are having an excellent day with great speeches from political leaders, we havejust
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heard from the secretary of commerce from the usa, and i think a lot of positivity about future opportunities. we are hearing now from people talking about artificial intelligence, about automation, the fourth industrial revolution, things that have the potential to create great future opportunities in this country. globalisation and the automation of the official themes of the conference, but brexit is, of course, a massive presence here, as it was last year, and theresa may also addressed conference last year. how much difference between that speech and this one, how much further have we moved? business a lwa ys further have we moved? business always approaches all this stuff optimistically, that is what makes great business leaders. in this context what i would be saying is what we have from the prime minister now is the florence speech, and the importance of that was setting out, number one, the importance of a long—term relationship with our
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friends in europe, where 40% of our trade is done. secondly, the recognition of the importance of a transitional deal, because we know a transitional deal, because we know a transitional deal, because we know a transitional deal creates time for businesses to prepare and get them to stop the clock that is currently running that is forcing them to enact their contingency plans. and that means at the moment already 10% of them have started to allocate employees, to plan investments, make decisions that will go against the best interests of the uk in the longer term. by the end of the year that will be 25%, and by march, 60% of firms will have made big decisions which are contingency plans to prepare for the unknown. was there a marked difference between whatjeremy corbyn was saying last year and what he was saying last year and what he was saying this year? again, i think
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there was a clear set of messages from jeremy corbyn and the labour party about their understanding now of the real challenges of brexit. nobody is debating that the people have voted, there has been a referendum, a decision to leave. but there is a lot of opportunity to question what is the best way for us to leave to create future jobs. a lot of what we heard today was jeremy corbyn replaying what he heard from business and a lot of that matches what members say is important. at the same time, he trailed one or two ideas that business would be less enthusiastic about — including nationalisation of utilities. thank you very much indeed forjoining us, paul draxler, president of the cbi. i have not yet heard any shouts of oh, jeremy corbyn, but if i do, i will be reporting back in an hour, and we will be talking to frances 0'grady,
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the head of the tuc. there are more than 350,000 mobility scooters on britain's high streets and pavements, travelling up to eight miles an hour. but their users don't get any formal training. in 2014 there were more than 200 mobility scooter—related accidents in england and wales, nine of which were fatal. now psychologists at nottingham trent university are working to develop a video that they hope could improve safety. here's our transport correspondent richard westcott. wagons roll! a unique driver's eye view from a mobility scooter and you'd better watch out. ten minutes around nottingham is more like an obstacle course than a shopping trip. we're going into a big crowd of people and clearly noticeably people on their phones and not really looking, is that normal? yeah. he saysjust as... yeah. i do it as well, go on my phone, i don't look. everyone does.
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users like jamie say they get abused as they drive around. i've had people threaten to throw me out of the scooter and make me walk, and obviously i can't do that because i got injured in the army, so this is the only way i can get around, in my electric wheelchair. a third of a million britons use a mobility scooter. there are hazards everywhere but the people driving them get no advice on dealing with some pretty big dangers. now psychologists at nottingham trent university are working with the road safety trust to develop a new training video that could help. they've recruited a team of volunteers and some special scientific equipment. as well as the cameras on the scooters themselves, the volunteers are going to be given these laser eye—tracking glasses, it's £50,000 worth of equipment so they can tell exactly where the driver is looking.
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the dots you can see follow their eyes as they negotiate the streets. the psychologists will then analyse the data to help them design the safety video. the long—term benefits would be that scooter users have improved safety in terms of getting involved in less incidents or accidents, but also that scooter users feel more confident in using a scooter in various different situations. scooter use has been shown to have a number of psychological benefits, so reduced isolation and increased independence, improved self—esteem, quality of life. scooter crash figures are patchy, but there were around 200 recorded accidents in 2014, including nine fatalities. surveys suggest far more go unreported. but scooters also change lives. it's like having a new pair of legs, basically. without this, i couldn't
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get around the shops, i couldn't go into shops, i couldn't go shopping, i couldn't go and meet my friends. i can travel distances on this that even if i was walking with my crutches i couldn't walk. a new training video should help cut accidents and maybe ease some of the tension between scooter drivers and pedestrians. richard westcott, bbc news, nottingham. police say more than 4000 drivers in england have been caught committing offences over the last two years following a special operation using a lorry. officers from 28 have used an unmarked lorry to film examples of dangerous driving. one man was seen of dangerous driving. one man was seen steering with his knees while eating lunch and using his mobile phone. highways england, which funded the vehicle, said it would continue to use the hgv to catch offenders. this year is likely to be one of the warmest on record, that's according to the world
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meteorological organisation. its report was released as the un climate change conference began in the german city of bonn. it's the first major meeting since president trump announced plans to take the us out of the paris pact. our environment correspondent matt mcgrath has been looking at the report. delegates from all over the world have come here to bonn for the start of un climate talks and today the world meteorological organisation has released their state of the climate report, based on data from january and october. but the wmo said it's likely that 2017 will be one of the top three warmest years on record. and they said that without the influence of el nino, it would be the warmest on record. and over the past five years, that period is the warmest since records began. the wmo is also pointing out that 2017 has been a record year for extreme events. we've had hurricanes in the caribbean that have been devastating, we've had hurricanes in the united states, floods in many parts of asia and india and china and nepal and bangladesh, and wildfires in europe and the united states. devastating wildfires. the wmo isn't saying that all these
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events are caused by climate change. scientists would say it's very difficult to attribute any single events to climate change, but the wmo says clearly, the tell—tale signs of the human influence on the climate are evident in these events. the human influence, they say, is the continued use of fossil fuels, the burning of fossil fuels by humans. that report may not be a big surprise to the meeting here, but it's likely to increase their sense of urgency, to get on with their business here and put the framework in place for the paris climate agreement agreed two years ago. let's get a weather update, louise lear is on the balcony, and when we woke up this morning, it wasn't particularly warm! it was pretty chilly, ironic that we are following that story about one of the warmest years on record when iam of the warmest years on record when i am starting with this, chilly this
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morning, those in rural spots down to minus six, but all change through the night tonight — in some areas we could see temperatures 10 degrees upon that, so a milder start to tuesday morning. unfortunately, it comes at a price, i prefer cold and crisp, because there will be cloud and rain. first signs of that pushing into the north—west as we speak, but we keep the sunshine for the rest of the afternoon, what is left of daylight hours, drawing a line from hull to the isle of wight. cloud and rain gathers, rather grey looking skies across western areas, rain and not too significant, but starting to grow through the night, isobars squeezing together, the wind changing direction, introducing slightly milder air, when starting to come back from a south—westerly. some of that rain could turn quite heavy, so greens and yellows creeping in to denote the intensity
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of the rain, temperatures all over the shop first thing tomorrow, chilly for a time in the south—east, milder where we keep the cloud, but then cooler behind that front, because we will have more sunshine into western scotland and northern ireland, so a disappointing afternoon today, but hopefully tomorrow more sunshine and a few scattered showers. the rain quite heavy through the scottish borders, down through the isle of man, western fringes of wales first thing, this is eight o'clock in the morning. that rain already into the south—west as well. but for central and eastern areas, probably starting dry, clouding over through the morning, rain arriving, some of it heavy as it pushes inland, down through the midlands, not going to reach the south—east corner until the end of the day, so here predominantly dry, ten or 11 degrees. scattered showers, cold feel, 7—8 into scotland and northern ireland. somewhere to weather, not
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very heavy, it has to be said, as it clears tuesday into wednesday morning, then this brief ridge, things will quieten down into wednesday before a new system moves through, it is real autumn this week, no two days the same, one dry and colder, the next wet and windy. i will be back injust a and colder, the next wet and windy. i will be back in just a few moments. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3... a british hostage is killed in nigeria, three weeks after being kidnapped in the country's delta state. three other britons are released. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves three actors from the bbc‘s hit sitcom mrs brown's boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme. the 999 call from matthew scully—hickes, moments after he'd murdered his 18 month old adopted daughter.
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coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. slaven bilic has finally been sacked as west ham manager. he is the fourth managerial sacking of this premier league season. david moyes is the most likely successor. more at half—past. louise lear has the weather. we must enjoy this beautiful scene behind me. clear blue skies, lots of sunshine and autumn colour. it is all change from tomorrow. wet and windy. also coming up, one of the 4,000 drivers in england, caught committing offences over the last two years by traffic police driving an unmarked hgv. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy.
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a british man who was kidnapped with three other people in nigeria in mid—october, has been killed. ian squire was an optician giving free medical aid to a rural community in the niger delta. three other hostages, alanna carson and david and shirley donovan, were freed and returned home safely. stephanie hegarty is in lagos. what do we know about this death first of all? well, at this point we know very little about what happened to ian squire. we don't know whether he was killed during the release or whether he died during the last couple of weeks when he was being held hostage. we are still waiting for that information. what we do know is that the four medical
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missionaries, shirley and david donovan, who had said up this foundation ten years ago in this area in the niger delta, and the opticians they brought with them on this trip were all taken on the 13th of october in the middle of the night by an armed group from this very rural town where they were working. they were there to do assessments for hundreds of local people. they planned to do cataract operations in january. and who do we think was behind the kidnapping? we visited the area last week and we we re visited the area last week and we were told by locals in the community that there is a criminal gang, a small gang that had been operating forjust over a year in the area, carrying out petty crime. they were led by a young man about 25 years old. this is theirfirst kidnapping of foreigners. they had kidnapped, very recently, the mother of a local politician. before that they were
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carrying out petty crime. do we know if any carrying out petty crime. do we know ifany ran carrying out petty crime. do we know if any ran some work —— was paid? whatever the circumstances of the release of the other three? we know a ransom was demanded but we don't know if it was paid. we have heard so know if it was paid. we have heard so far is that they were released safely and that they were in the hands of local politicians, who seem to have managed the release. the details are sketchy. these negotiations are often held secretly to keep the people being held, safe. and to avoid the ransom number being driven up unnecessarily. the information is sketchy still. we will probably find out more in the coming days. thank you forjoining us. a mass leak of secret papers is shedding new light on how the rich and powerful invest millions of pounds in offshore tax havens. the documents — called the paradise papers — have been examined by the international consortium of investigativejournalists, which includes the bbc‘s panorama programme and the guardian. they have already revealed that the queen has £10 million of her personal fortune invested
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in offshore trusts by the duchy of lancaster. the papers have also shown how donald trump's commerce secretary has business links with russian allies of president putin. he's told the bbc today there is nothing improper about his investments. now the latest revelations involve three actors from the bbc‘s hit sitcom, mrs brown's boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme, according to the papers. there's no suggestion that those involved have acted illegally. angus crawford reports. do you want a cup of tea. yes, please. what's up? foul—mouthed and very funny. brendan o'carroll, alias mrs brown. his company produces one of the most popular comedy shows on tv. but bbc news has learned, three actors have been getting their fees sent offshore. patrick hoolahan, who plays wayward son dermot. do you not think you could've stayed in bed a little bit longer, marie? yeah, restless night.
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brendan o'carroll‘s real—life daughter fiona delaney. morning, mummy. good morning, trevor, son. and her husband, martin delaney. this is how it works, the actors get their fees sent offshore tax—free to a series of trust funds based in mauritius. the cash then comes back to the actors, now as a loan, so avoiding tax. take fiona delaney. injust 16 months, the mauritian company lent her more than £360,000. it looks like what's called disguised remuneration. we wanted to ask her about it, but she didn't want to talk. can you tell me about your tax, you get paid in mauritius, don't you quiz and what about? and then the loans, do you pay those loans back? i don't think you pay them back, is it a tax dodge. you a tax dodgeer? i don't even know who you are. i'm from panorama. you're from mrs brown ‘s boys, and you're tax dodger. that's not very funny at all, is it?
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none of the actors have broken the law. but the chair of the commons public accounts committee is concerned. i don't understand why people go to such lengths to set up complicated tax arrangements to avoid paying tax in real—time. we need that money now. sometimes these sums of money we are talking about, it's plenty of money. people can certainly live on that. even if they were paying tax on it, they would be earning more than many of my constituent?. this kind of scheme isn't new. it caught out comedian jimmy carr five years ago, forcing a public apology. and a tongue lashing from the then prime minister. some of these schemes where people are parking huge amounts of money offshore, and taking loans back to minimise their tax rates, it is not morally acceptable. as for the creator and star of mrs brown's boys, brendan o'carroll, he denies any wrongdoing. in a statement, he said:
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patrick hoolahan and martin and fiona delaney have so far made no comment. angus crawford, bbc news. the paradise papers also include revelations that the queen's private estate invested offshore , and that president trump's commerce secretary, wilbur ross, has business links to russian figures who are currently under us sanctions. but this morning mr ross said there was nothing improper about his investments. andy verity reports. bermuda, where the law firm at the heart of the biggest leak in offshore history has its head office. the queen is the head of state here, but until now we did not know some of her private money was invested in tax havens like this one. the documents reveal the queen's private estate, the duchy of lancaster, invested £10 million offshore in 2004 and 2005. 5 million of it went to a fund in bermuda, with another £5 million,
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$7.5 million to a cayman islands fund. a small part of that investment helped purchase the controversial retailer brighthouse and 75% of first quench, which used to own threshers, which went bust owing £70 million in tax. brighthouse has been accused of exploiting low income families and the financial conduct authorities ordered to pay almost £15 million in compensation to a quarter of a million customers. the duchy says it's only a small stake worth only £3208. the duchy told us that all of our investments fully audited and legitimate. ifa if a very wealthy person wants to avoid taxation in britain, and therefore put money into a tax haven somewhere, who loses? schools?
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hospitals? housing? all those public services lose. and the rest of the population have to pay to cover up the deficit created by that. the documents also reveal that wilbur ross, us commerce secretary, as business links with russian allies of president putin. mr ross has a secret stake in a shipping company called navigator holdings. one of their major clients is an energy company. the company that is our client was not then sanctioned. it is not now sanctioned. and never was sanctioned in between. so there is nothing whatsoever improper about navigator having a relationship with cyborg. i don't know any of those
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individuals. i have never met them and certainly have not had commercial dealings. former conservative party deputy chairman and treasurer lord ashcroft has been confronted with evidence suggesting he misled the public without giving up he misled the public without giving up his status as a non—dom, a status which allows wealthy people to avoid tax on overseas earnings. lord ashcroft also put hundreds of millions into a bermuda trust from which $200 million was paid out. e—mails suggest trustees were concerned that the rules guaranteeing its tax—free status we re guaranteeing its tax—free status were being broken. to put it blu ntly, were being broken. to put it bluntly, we seem to be told nothing. lord ashcroft wouldn't answer questions from panorama. more revelations from the paradise papers, including wealthy might —— multinational companies and sports stars are expected this evening. joining me now from new york is anthony travers, chairman of the cayman islands stock exchange. we have seen it already with the
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panama papers and now with the paradise papers. how damaging is this? it is not a ball. the debate has been completely mischaracterised. mr corbyn seriously understands the position that they fear the bbc do, too. there is complete transparency with regard to british overseas territories. inland revenue have had the ability to make enquiry. we now have a —— proactive reporting of financial transactions in every account in the overseas territories. the suggestion that any this is based on secrecy, or is in some way tax haven related, is simply a mischaracterisation of the position. so why are we seeing this in a leak rather than the official papers from those involved in the transactions?
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secrecy is one of the reasons people go to these companies, isn't it? you are badly confusing the issue of secrecy, are badly confusing the issue of secrecy, which as a negative connotation very often used in connection with tax evasion, which is off the table in this debate. and a legitimate right to privacy, established by the un convention on human rights and part of the united kingdom law and the human rights act 1998. business people have a legitimate right to privacy. bear in mind that right to privacy does not extend, let's say, to enquiry by tax authorities from the united kingdom, europe, the united states or other jurisdictions, or indeed law enforcement. the secrecy is a legitimate right to privacy. it yields to proper enquiry by tax authorities are law—enforcement. yields to proper enquiry by tax authorities are law-enforcement. why do people go to the effort to open accou nts do people go to the effort to open accounts in places like the cayman islands? there are two reasons.
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firstly, as i say, people have a legitimate right to privacy. that is upheld in the offshore territories, crown dependencies. secondly, it's a little bit like asking why do bank robbers rob banks? they rob banks because that is where the money is. people investing offshore financial centres like the cayman islands because that is where two thirds of the world's hedge fund are and they have superior rates of return. it's perfectly understandable that people should seek to invest in those vehicles. tax evasion is never a motivation? it is not illegal. not that i have seen in nearly 40 years, no. and you don't have any statistical evidence that supported. you blithely referred to the panama papers. but can you tell me of one conviction for attaching —— for tax evasion that has resulted from the papers? tax evasion is not illegal.
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you are badly confused. tax evasion is illegal. tax avoidance is not illegal. the panama papers look that aggressive tax avoidance. that is where people begin to get concerned about the accounts that we're reading about now. well, yes. but if you are reading about now. well, yes. but if you a re really reading about now. well, yes. but if you are really looking for the aggressive tax avoidance of the sort we re aggressive tax avoidance of the sort were hundreds of millions of dollars are involved, and usually by corporations like starbucks, google, amazon, you have to look at the european union jurisdictions with tax treaties. that is where aggressive tax avoidance occurs. that is because of the failure of the oecd double tax treaty network, which does not properly operate cross—border. that is a very
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different issue that you are now describing. i'm just wondering different issue that you are now describing. i'mjust wondering how you would feel if, we will say in the uk, the revenue and customs decided to make the tax system simpler, and make the sort of availability of the funds that come from places like the cayman islands and other protectorates, whether it is down to the hmrc to simplify things to make it not worth people going abroad to make sad tax avoidance? that is a very good point. that is what president trump is suggesting in the united states. by is suggesting in the united states. by entering into competitive tax reductions. bear in mind this has been hugely successful in the republic of ireland. it has a 12.5% tax rate. jurisdictions with lower tax rate. jurisdictions with lower tax rates to attract inflows of capital. so yes, you would be quite right about that. is thisjust capital. so yes, you would be quite right about that. is this just the tip ofan right about that. is this just the tip of an iceberg? no, not at all.
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inland revenue, irs have had unlimited power to make investigations in jurisdictions. unlimited power to make investigations injurisdictions. and we have seen almost no enquiry and virtually no statistical evidence of tax evasion whatsoever. anthony taras, thank you forjoining us. thank you. and you can watch panorama's second report which includes a series of further revelations from the paradise papers tonight, on bbc one at nine o'clock. at 3:30pm there will be an emergency question on the issues produced by the paradise papers. john mcdonnell, the paradise papers. john mcdonnell, the shadow chancellor, is asking that. we will go to the house of commons at 3:30pm. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: a british hostage has been killed in nigeria three weeks after being kidnapped in its delta state. three
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other britons have returned home safely. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves actors from mrs barron —— mrs brown's boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme. this is not illegal. a man has been convicted of murdering his 18 month old daughter, two weeks after he and his husband formally adopted her. in sport, slaven bilic says there are no hard feelings after he was sacked by west ham after two years in charge. organisers of a tennis tournament to be held in milan next week have apologised after the players‘ draw was criticised for being sexist. and jermaine mcg illva ry being sexist. and jermaine mcgillvary could miss the rest of the rugby league world cup after being charged with alleged biting. more at half past three. a man has been found guilty of murdering his 18 month old daughter, just two weeks after formally adopting her. matthew scully—hicks, who‘s 31, inflicted numerous injuries on her. she died after being violently shaken and struck on the head. sian lloyd reports from cardiff crown court.
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we can now cross to cardiff crown court and speak to our correspondent tomos morgan a very distressing case? is very distressing case. the trial lasted just over a month at cardiff crown court. the jury taking two and a half days to reach the decision to convict 31—year—old fitness instructor matthew scully—hicks. they found him guilty of murdering 18—month—old elsie. he and his partner had formally adopted lc two weeks prior to her death. in the evidence that the jury heard, they heard that elsie suffered a catalogue of injuries over the months that she was in matthew‘s ca re months that she was in matthew‘s care in his home in cardiff. within that time she sustained bruises to her head in the home. she broke her
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leg. and she also fell down the stairs. four days before her death, there was an incident in the home where only matthew was the only other adult present with elsie. she was taken to hospital. four days later she died. after thejury was taken to hospital. four days later she died. after the jury found matthew scully—hicks guilty here at cardiff crown court, the cps gave a statement outlining how exactly they we re statement outlining how exactly they were able to build a case against him. elsie suffered serious injury at the hands of her adoptive father. these ultimately caused her death. this was, of course, a tragic case, and our thoughts and sympathies are with elsie's loved ones. the evidence put forward by the cps proved that matthew scully—hicks was not only responsible for her injuries, but that he intended to seriously harm her. the prosecution build a case through careful and detailed analysis, witness accounts, medical
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evidence and the circumstances surrounding elsie's death. this resulted in good guilty verdicts returned by the jury. thejury returned by the jury. the jury heard that matthew scully—hicks were struggling to cope with looking after elsie. they also heard of neighbours —— from neighbours, who had heard him shouting and swearing at the baby. but in the postmortem, the paediatrician had told the jury here that the injuries that elsie had sustained were very typical of babies who had been shaken. a scan showed elsie had suffered both acute and chronic bleeding on the brain. new and old bleeds. as well as having broken ribs, a fractured femur in her leg and a fractured skull. police also gave a statement after he was found guilty and said they —— their thoughts are with
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elsie‘s family. our thoughts today are with little elsie and those who knew and loved her. her untimely death at just 18 months old has had a devastating effect, first and foremost on her family, who remain at the most in our thoughts. elsie's death has impacted the wider community, including the many professionals involved with her care and subsequent investigation. i would like to thank all of them, including the many witnesses who assisted the prosecution. this case represents an extremely rare and distressing set of circumstances. we at south wales police continue to respect and value the role that adoption and those involved to play in our society. judge nicola davies said after the jury judge nicola davies said after the jury returned their verdict that elsie scully—hicks had been particularly vulnerable because of her age. there was gross abuse of trust. the prosecution began their case here over a month ago by saying that matthew scully—hicks had caused
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elsie serious injury and that it was a tragic combination of violent conduct of an infant that he should have loved and protected. a child practice review is now expected to ta ke practice review is now expected to take place. it will investigate the roles of the agencies that took place and whether lessons can be learned from preventing further tragedies. thank you. the prime minister is meeting other party leaders later, in the wake of a series of sexual misconduct allegations at westminster. theresa may has warned that allegations of serious abuse in parliament will not be ignored, and victims‘ complaints will be fully investigated. she has also promised to confront what she called "the use and abuse of power". several conservative and labour mps are being investigated because of claims of inappropriate behaviour, as our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, reports as each day goes by, another allegation, another politician drawn into the scandal at westminster. and as she tries to shift the focus onto her government‘s own agenda, the prime minister will be hoping there are no more revelations to come.
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well, thank you very much... but while it was back to business at the cbi‘s conference this morning, it was a chance, too, for theresa may to call to a new culture of respect in politics. this isn‘t about prying into private lives. what we are talking about is the use and abuse of power. we must stand up for all the victims of abuse, harassment or discrimination wherever it has occurred. now is the time to act decisively, without fear or favour, to guarantee a safe and respectful working environment for everyone in the future. and to achieve that, the labour leader wants training for mps, plus trade unions, to have a greater role in westminster. all of you, all of us, need to look hard at ourselves, as we in the labour party are doing, to see how our processes and procedures can be improved. how it can be made easier for women to speak out, and for victims to get
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the support they have a right to expect. party leaders meeting with the prime minister later agree on the need for an independent procedure committee investigate allegations of mistreatment by parliamentary staff. but there are questions over what powers this new body will have, what penalties it will be able to impose, and how quickly it can be set up, as party leaders try to get on the front foot over this scandal, and get support in place for staff, meet the concerns of victims, and restore the reputation of parliament. one solution suggested by the former head of the parliamentary expenses watchdog would see mps‘ staff recruited independently. the staff would have the protections of being in a modern organisation, professionalised personnel support, whistle—blowing. somebody to talk to before relationships are broken
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down. all this as mrs may‘s most senior minister damian green is to be interviewed as part of a cabinet office investigation into his own conduct over claims he strenuously denies. for now, everyone here waits, with a fear that every new day could bring a fresh scandal. president trump says the mass shooting in a church in texas yesterday, that left 26 people dead was because of a "mental health problem" and wasn‘t what he called a "guns situation". us media have identified the lone gunman as devin kelley. he was thrown out of the air force three years ago for assaulting his wife and child. among the victims were several children and a pregnant woman. dan johnson reports. this tiny baptist church in a small texan town is where america must reflect on its latest gun massacre. 26 lives lost, 20 more torn through by bullet wounds. it is the worst shooting in the history of this state. there are so many families who lost
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family members — fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. the tragedy, of course, is worsened by the fact that it occurred in a church, a place of worship, where these people were innocently gunned down. so why did devin kelley go to church yesterday morning with an assault rifle? we may never know. the 26—year—old was found dead after he was chased up the highway and crashed his car. it was a local resident with his own weapon who went after him. i did what i thought i needed to do, they said there was a shooting. i pursued and ijust did what i thought was the right thing. you know there were more weapons in that car? you possibly stopped him from killing other people. i didn‘t know that. last night, people drew close to consider and to remember. among the dead is the pastor‘s 14—year—old daughter. there is a struggle here to comprehend such killing. it's hard to hear.
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people you know that bad. i wish i could get close to him to question him why. in many ways, this massacre summarises the us gun debate. is it better to have fewer guns around, or more armed heroes on hand? the president, on a trip to japan, seemed clear. a very deranged individual. a lot of problems over a long period of time. we have a lot of mental health problems in our country, as do other countries. but this isn‘t a guns situation. i mean, we could go into it, but it is a little bit soon to go into it. fortunately, somebody else had a gun firing in the opposite direction. it could have been much worse. the debate will go on, just as it seems inevitable its focus will soon shift
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to the next grieving community. dan johnson, bbc news. we are going to the house of commons shortly for the urgent question on the paradise papers. now the weather. very cold this morning. i was going to say it wasn‘t a bad cold! i bet you go out and have a drink in a cafe. for the proper skiers, we‘ve had about 50 centimetres of snow at the weekend. they like a good base for the start of the season. we have had some snow closer to home? yes, you are well informed. this was my favourite from the weekend. snow showers on high ground is what we got. it will probably melt in the
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next couple of days. it has been pretty mild. that is due to the cloud pushing into the north—west. elsewhere it was cold. yes it was frosty this morning. at least we have kept the sometime this afternoon. from hull to the isle of wight, cold, crisp and sunny. the story through tonight and into tomorrow, all change. the cloud and rain set to rise. it will pushing gradually from the north—west. some of it turning heavy. this shift in wind direction and strength. squally gusts of wind coming up from the south. that will bring some rain across scotland. some of it heavy. maybe to the tops of the mountains we will see some white stuff. temperatures all over the shop. if you keep the clear skies in the south—east it will be chilly. elsewhere, double digits because of the cloud and the rain that arrives in the morning. we will see some brighter skies into western scotland
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and northern ireland. that will lead to sunny spot and showers tomorrow. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: a british hostage, kidnapped in nigeria‘s southern delta state last month, has been killed. the foreign office says three other britons have returned home safely. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves three actors in the bbc‘s hit sitcom mrs brown‘s boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme, although this is not illegal. matthew scully—hickes has been found guilty of murdering his 18—month—old baby just two weeks after formally adopting her. international development secretary priti patel has apologised for holding a series of undisclosed meetings with the israeli prime minister and other officials during a private holiday over the summer. a new 24—hour nhs service has been launched, offering gp consultations via a smartphone app. the scheme will initially cover three and a half million patients in london. sport now on afternoon live with kat. what‘s coming up?
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we will be talking about slaven bilic and the sexism row over the atp draw for the under 21s players. female models were used to reveal which groups the players were in. we have news of a high—profile italian footballer who has announced their retirement from playing football. gary lineker said he is one of the best mid—fielders of his generation. the tennis pictures, not much leaves me speechless, but that does! all eyes are on west ham? yes, who will take over, that‘s the question now. he said there are no hard feelings after he was sacked by west ham after two years in charge. we have won just two matches and they find themselves in the relegation zone. after a poor run of results even
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slaven bilic said pressure is mounting. he is proud of the work he has done, but he admits that they are weren't they good. they are languishing in the relisation zone and just nine points from their 11 games and they have won just two of their matches and that's despite bilic having spent £42 million over the summer. i think after that thrashing from liverpool, 4—1, in front of the home fans on saturday, his positionjust front of the home fans on saturday, his position just became front of the home fans on saturday, his positionjust became untenable. ina his positionjust became untenable. in a statement from the owners of we st in a statement from the owners of west ham, they say performances and results have not been of the expected standard in recent weeks. they say, "we believe a change is necessary is to move the team back in the right direction." bilic
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guided them to seventh in the premier league. the second eason they finished 11th and now they are 18th. andrea pirlo has announced he is retiring from football after playing his last game for new york city pirlo played 116 times for italy and won the world cup in 2006. he played most of his career in italy for both milan clubs and juventus. in a message on social media he thanked his family for their support throughout his career. organisers of a tennis tournament in milan have apologised after accusations of sexism. female models were asked to remove an item of clothing to determine which group each player would be in. the atp and red bull have said the draw for the under 21 tour finals was unacceptable. our tennis correspondent russell fuller has more. the female model would reveal which group they were in by having to remove an item of clothing to show whether they had ended up in group a orgroup b. whether they had ended up in group a or group b. and there were one or
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two cringeworthy examples. a young canadian player found out what group he was when the female modelled lifted up her lace dress and the south korean player had to take the glove of his female model worthwhile his teeth. judy murray tweeted earlier. she described it as awful. the former coach of andy murray and form wimbledon champion branded it a disgrace and the current wta player making the point that this is meant to be show casing the future, ended her post with, "hashtag back to zero." england wingerjermaine mcgillvary is facing a ban of up to 12 weeks after being charged for alleged biting. he‘s accused of biting lebanon captain robbie farah during saturday‘s rugby league world cup game. he‘ll have a hearing on wednesday. in rugby union, scotland‘s most capped player, hooker ross ford,
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has been ruled out of this month‘s autumn internationals with a chest injury. he‘s expected to be out of action for up to four months after surgery on the injury he suffered in training last week. he‘ll be replaced by his uncapped edinburgh team—mate neil cochrane. two more edinburgh players — prop rory sutherland and flanker magnus bradbury — have also been called up. that‘s all the sport for now. hugh will be here with you later. and rest that voice, catherine. our political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminster and we can speak to her now. john mcdonnell called for a public inquiry, that‘s what we are expecting to hear, is it? this has been labour‘s position for sometime, talking tough on tax avoidance. jeremy corbyn raised the issue in last week‘s prime minister‘s questions. and john mcdonnell saying this morning that he was shocked, but not surprised to hear the revelations as you say calling for a
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full public inquiry and accusing the the government of failing to act. he says tax avoidance is going on on an industrial scale. last week we heard jeremy corbyn and theresa may accusing each other of having blocked reforms in recent months. but i think this is something that labour want to keep the pressure on the government quite considerably. john mcdonnell was on thejeremy vine radio programme and saying it is the scale of this that he things will be distressing to people? there has been a number of leaks. the panama papers were the first huge haul of these documents, now we have got another major batch here, but although it can seem quite complicated to the average listener, but it does, i think, the scale is something that will really come across. millions of documents here have been gone through and i think that the idea that british overseas territories are involved, the idea that the government can exert pressure on that, that is something that labour wants to see. theresa
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may has been talking today about this. insisting that the government is working towards trying to encourage more transparency from the british overseas territories. she said £168 billion extra in revenue had been recaptured by revenue and customs over the last seven years, but she does concede there is more work to be done, but insists the government is working with the overseas territories. but we have jeremy corbyn, the labour party calling for a full public inquiry on this. it does suggest that this is something that‘s not going to go away. there is always a risk when politicians start talking about morality and john mcdonnell has been doing that in connection with the paradise papers, the queen has been dragged into this, having done nothing illegal, there are risks in this tack, aren‘t there? nothing illegal, there are risks in this tack, aren't there? yes, i thinkjeremy corbyn found himself on slightly wobbly ground earlier when he was asked whether the queen should apologise... let's go over to
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the commons. on the government's actions to curb aggressive tax avoidance schemes in the light of paradise papers revelations. mr speaker this government believes in afairtax speaker this government believes in a fair tax system where everyone plays by the rules. it is this government that has taken decisive action to tackle tax avoidance and evasion and who improve the standards of international tax transparency. the uk has secured an additional £160 billion in compliance revenue since 2010. far more than was achieved under the last labour government. under this government, the uk now has one of the lowest tax gaps in the world. we have provided hmrc with new powers and in 2015, hmrc received additional funding to go an
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tackling tax avoidance. mr speaker, yesterday evening several news organisations led by the international consortium of investigative journalists reported on an information leak regarding the financial affairs of a large number of individuals. mr speaker, i should remind the house that ministers do not intervene in the tax affairs of individuals or businesses, as to do so individuals or businesses, as to do so would be a breach of taxpayer confidentiality. however, ican inform the house and on 25th october, hmrc requested that the icij, the guardian and the bbc share the leaked data so that this information can be compared with the vast amounts of data hmrc already holds due to the initiatives that this government has under taken. they have yet to respond to the request. nevertheless since this data was retrieved in to #20 15.
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hmrc are already benefiting from the automatic exchange of financial account information through the common reporting standard and initiative in which the uk led the world with over 100 jurisdictions sign up. the crown dependencies and overseas territories are among those signed up to this initiative and have been exchanging information with hmrc for over a year and the crown dependence chris and overseas territories have committed to holding central registers of beneficial ownership information which the uk authorities are able to access. it is important to note and i quote the icij‘s disclaimer here, scw there are legitimate uses for off—shore trusts and companies. the icrj do not intend or suggest or imply that any people, companies or other entities included in the icij lea ks data base have other entities included in the icij leaks database have broken the law or otherwise acted improperly." so mr speaker, notwithstanding the
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generalised aspersions made opposition the use of off—shore accou nts opposition the use of off—shore accounts or trusts don‘t mean dis—honestly, this house should be assured under this government the hmrc will continue to bear down with vigour on any tax avoidance or evasion activity wherever it maybe found. u nless found. unless there is a critically overriding reason o for the chancellor not to be here, i believe the house will consider it unacceptable that he‘s not here to address the biggest tax scandal of this begin ration. the minister‘s response today was the same blurser. he quotes a figure of additional tax reve nu es he quotes a figure of additional tax revenues that can‘t be verified. refers to a tax cap which doesn‘t include the likes of apple, facebook, google and others. he boasts of his government‘s efforts to address avoidance. last week they voted to protect non—doms in the
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finance bill and last month, the european parliament accused this government of obstructing the fight against tax avoidance, evasion and even money laundering. doesn‘t he appreciate the outrage in our community at this tax dodging? every poundin community at this tax dodging? every pound in tax avoided is a pound taken away from our nhs, our children‘s education, and care for the elderly and disabled. given the chairman of the conservative party and duchy of lancaster is responsible for administering the estate and rents of the duchy of lancaster, has the chancellor or minister discussioned the revelation with the member for derbyshire minister discussioned the revelation with the memberfor derbyshire dales and will he be apologising to her majesty with the embarrassment this has caused? majesty with the embarrassment this has caused ? lord majesty with the embarrassment this has caused? lord ashcroft who contributed to £500,000 to the conservatives in the general election campaign, can the minister tell the house what information he
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has had about the domiciled status of lord ashcroft between 2010 and 2015 and whether he was paying taxes on his overseas wealth? the chancellor now has an opportunity to tackle tax avoidance. can he assure the house that in the forthcoming budget he will adopt labour‘s proposals to remove exemptions from non—doms and secure full transparency of trusts? he now also agree to labour‘s proposals to establish an independent public inquiry into tax avoidance. in this government refuses to act, this next labour government will. well, mr speaker the, the honourable member raises the issue of the veracity otherwise of our figures. £160 billion collected on evasion and non compliance. that is a figure
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he will find broken down and published in the annual report and accounts. he refers to lord ashcroft and i‘m clearly not going to start getting into the individual tax affairs of any particular individual regardless of their political allegiance or whoever they maybe, but he raises the issue of non—dom status and non—doms and he raises theissue status and non—doms and he raises the issue of the measures he and his party put forward in the last finance bill. it is this party that has put an end to permanent non—dom status. and it was the party opposite that sought by voting against that bill at third reading to stop that from happening. thank you, mr speaker. there seems to be an extraordinary misunderstanding by the shadow chancellor between avoidance and evasion. evasion is wholly illegal. avoidance is normal. people invested, people who put their money
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into an isa are avoiding tax. that is completely legal. what there is a moral issue, sir and if you happen to bea moral issue, sir and if you happen to be a political party, that spends £1 million a year on rent in a tax exempt country... studio: let's exempt country... studio: let‘s pull away from the debate. our political correspondent is still in westminster for us. and well, we will talk about the morality issue earlier and that‘s been raised there. in terms of what john mcdonnell wants, saying they would have to wait for the next labour government to get this sorted, but treasury is robust. yes, i think the treasury is sticking to their guns saying that the government has taken action on tackling tax avoidance and evasion, but mel stride responding and clear that in of themselves the off—shore trusts and accounts are, they are
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some legitimate uses of such arrangements. so he is saying to labour that they shouldn‘t be criticising the existence of those arrangements who are the misuse of them and the government insisting as they have done for sometime, we have heard this number from theresa may today and last week at prime minister‘s questions, that an extra £160 billion has been brought in by hmrc in relation to tax avoidance and evasion since 2010. the government saying this was more than under labour. now, i think there is some fear, certainlyjeremy corbyn outlined this last week that hmrc was going to take a hit in the budget and there may not be extra resources given to hmrc, but the government clear that hmrc have been given new powers and resource to tackle tax avoidance. labour tacking about having one rule for the super rich and one rule for everybody else. john mcdonnell quite clear that he thinks this is worthy of a public inquiry. thank you very much. one tham that
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cropped up was that of lord ashcroft who featured in the panorama programme and as that debate wag getting under way, he took to twitter to say basically as you can see my response to the panorama programme, "the bbc suggested i may have ignored rules in connection with the trust that efficiency involved with. i can state that i have not ignored rules and that i do not control the trust and never have done. as a matter of my tax status following the change in the law, i was deemed tax resident and domiciled. this is all publicly available information. nothing was produced by the bbc which suggests difference. both the panorama broadcasts were unashamedly one—sided." as a result he says i wrote to the director—general of the bbc saying i was simply not prepared
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to deal with panorama. so that was the statement coming from lord ashcroft in the last few minutes. so, as his name was being named by john mcdonnell in the house of commons. the cbi have been having its conference today. our business correspondent is at the conference in greenwich and can bring us up to speed. hi, simon. well back here at the sunny cbi conference business groups and lobby groups have been discussing all sorts of issues. there is a lot for the delicates to be talking about. they represent a couple hundred thousand businesses and lobby groups and employ seven million people. that‘s about a quarter of the uk‘s workforce. addressing the conference later today for the first time is the head of the tuc, frances o‘grady. welcome. thank you. why do you think
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they have invited you for the first time to address the conference? they have been holding the conference for many years? well, i'm really pleased that we have got caroline fairburn asa that we have got caroline fairburn as a leader of the cbi. we meet regularly and we have common issues and concerns around brexit, and around industrial strategy and a commitment to seeing equality too. one of the hot topics has, of course been, sexual harassment in the workplace. some of myself and my female colleagues have been discussing the types of things that happened to us and some of the male collea g u es happened to us and some of the male colleagues have been surprised at what they have been hearing from us. this goes back some years. it does seem this goes back some years. it does seem to be something that happens more to younger women. we did think this was dying out, but it isn‘t. why not no, the tuc did the biggest survey on sexual harassment last year and we know it is a particular problem for young women, but it is a
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problem for young women, but it is a problem for young women, but it is a problem for all women and some young men too, but the really worrying fa ct men too, but the really worrying fact is that eight in ten women don't report it. why not? because they are on freelance or zero—hours or temporary contracts and feel they won't get offered work again and that's why it is important for business to talk to unions about how we can stop it happening in the first place. what should business be doing? what can they do? the first thing they can do is work with unions. we have got lots of experience in drawing up effective policies and fair procedures for everybody and making sure there is good training, but i think most womenjust don't good training, but i think most women just don't want good training, but i think most womenjust don't want it good training, but i think most women just don't want it to good training, but i think most womenjust don't want it to happen in the first place so the first step is preventing it. well, let's rattle on to another pressing topic, the theme of the conference is globalisation and ought owemation. this is an important issue because the theory is ought owemation will bring in artificial intelligence and robotics will replace the lower paid
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and the less skilled workers first and the less skilled workers first and they will enup with nothing to do. what can you do to help your members avoid this fate? well, there is that worry that we will see president growth of a kind of tech tale nt president growth of a kind of tech talent at the top, a well skilled and secure and well rewarded, but a growth of even bigger growth of that low paid, insecure army at the bottom. what we're calling for is for the government to set up a commission on the future of work. bring everybody around the table. let's look at skills, not just apprenticeships, but training and upskilling throughout working life. let's make sure that everybody gets fair shares of the rewards that new technology generates and that that is reinvested into people and public services, but critically, let's make sure that ordinary people get a voice in the design, of technology for social good, notjust voice in the design, of technology for social good, not just private profit. thank you very much, frances o‘grady. she is the head of the tuc and she is going to be speaking to
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the delegates at the cbi conference down in greenwich in london in half an hour‘s time. that‘s it from me, for now, simon, i will be talking to you again in an hour. rebecca, thank you again in an hour. rebecca, thank you very much. an army sergeant accused of trying to murder his wife by tampering with a gas fitting has told the court he didn‘t do it. he denies the charges. our correspondent is at winchester crown court. what has the jury been hearing? well, this is the second day that he has been giving evidence. he is facing a charge of attempting to murder his wife. it is the prosecution‘s case that he tampered with her parachute. it was in 2015 his wife victoria scrap cilliers fell 4,000 feet when her parachute and verve parachute failed. she suffered from multiple
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injuries. today mr cilliers said i took her parachute the day before into the lavatory when i was taking one of our children into the toilet. he said he didn‘t tamper with it. he was asked by his defence barrister, "between getting that parachute and taking to the locker, did you open any part of it?" no, he replied. she asked had you interfered with any pa rt asked had you interfered with any part of it? no, he replied again. had you removed any slinks from the reserve chute, he replied no. finally the barrister asked him, did you wish your wife any harm? again, he replied no. he talked about the day after that parachute jump, his wife went to carry it out. he then got a phone call saying that she was in hospital, suffering from multiple injuries. he has finished giving evidence for his defence, the prosecution are now questioning him in courtand prosecution are now questioning him in court and he denies all the charges against him.
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police say more than 4,000 drivers in england have been caught committing offences over the last two years, following a special operation using a lorry. since april 2015, officers from 28 forces have used an unmarked lorry to film examples of dangerous driving. one man in the east midlands was seen steering with his knees while eating lunch and using his mobile phone. highways england, which funded the vehicle, said it would continue to use the hgv to catch offenders. it's it‘s time for the weather. we have warped up a bit. it was a chilly start. weather watchers was two years old. it was its birthday at the weekend andi it was its birthday at the weekend and i have been able to show you the faces of the weather. we had the cold, frosty start and we are closing out the day with a beautiful sunsetin
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closing out the day with a beautiful sunset in norfolk. it was cold. temperatures first thing this morning were down minus four to minus sucks celsius in rural spots, but it will be all change tomorrow morning due to a blanket of cloud that‘s arriving as we speak. temperatures a good ten degrees milder than this morning and the reason being is this cloud and rain that‘s pushing in from the north—westful it will continue to drift eastwards. just look at the glorious end to the day that we‘ve got across much of the eastern england. as we go through the night, that cloud, that rain from the weather front will continue to sweep its way steadily eastwards. it is going to take its time in arriving. the winds will pick. squally gusts into the south—west and that‘s going to bring wet weather as well across northern and western parts of the scotla nd northern and western parts of the scotland and northern ireland. the east will stay with clear skies and through the night and maybe a little bit chilly and in fact the temperatures will be all over the shot across the country. five or six celsius into the east and then where we have got the cloud, it will be milder, double digits. behind it,
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quite a clear end and sunshine and u nfortu nately quite a clear end and sunshine and unfortunately my graphics are jerky, bear with me, but it looks like we keep the clear skies out to the west with sunny spells across scotland and northern ireland. the rain heavy across central and southern areas of scotla nd across central and southern areas of scotland running down through the irish see and fringing with wales and south—west england. ahead of it, there will be cloud and scattered showers. if we start off bright with sunshine into the south east, it is not going to last because the emphasis for tomorrow‘s weather will be that front will bring cloud and rain infrom be that front will bring cloud and rain in from the west. it will take sometime to move its way east through the day. behind it, well, it does look as though we will stay bright and breezy with a scattering of showers into scotland and northern ireland. a little bit fresher here. six to eight celsius, double digits likely into the south east corner. on tuesday, the weather front will continue to push its way eastwards and behind it, clear skies and lighter winds. so a real topsy
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flavour to our weather. high pressure is likely to build one more time. it will allow for a brief frost in sheltered and western areas before another front brings wetter, windier and slightly milder conditions. i will back with the headlines in a few minutes time. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4... a british hostage is killed in nigeria, three weeks after being kidnapped in the country‘s delta state. three other britons are released. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves three actors in the hit bbc sitcom, mrs brown‘s boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme, although it is not illegal. the 999 call from matthew scully—hickes, moments after he‘d murdered his 18 month old adopted daughter. coming up on afternoon
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live, all the sport. it is change at west ham? it is, yes. good afternoon. slaven bilic is gone as west ham boss. bbc sport understands david moyes could make a surprise return in london. louise has the weather. the old thermostats were cranked up to cope with these temperatures first thing. it is not going to last. it will be a pretty mild night. details in half an hour. coming up, priti patel has apologised for holding meetings during unofficial visit to israel this summer. we will have the latest. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live, i‘m simon mccoy.
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a british man who was kidnapped with three other people in nigeria in mid—october, has been killed. ian squire was an optician giving free medical aid to a rural community in the niger delta. three other hostages, alanna carson and david and shirley donovan, were freed and returned home safely. stephanie hegarty is in lagos, and i spoke to her earlier. what do we know about this death first of all? well, at this point we know very little about what happened to ian squire. we don‘t know whether he was killed during the release, or whether he died during the last couple of weeks when he was being held hostage. we are still waiting for that information. what we do know is that the four medical missionaries, shirley and david donovan, who had set up this foundation ten years ago in this area in the niger delta, and the opticians they brought with them on this trip, were all taken on the 13th of october in the middle of the night, by an armed group from this
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very rural town where they were working. they were there to do assessments for hundreds of local people. they planned to do cataract operations in january. and who do we think was behind the kidnapping? we visited the area last week, and we were told by locals in the community that there is a criminal gang, a small gang that had been operating forjust over a year in the area, carrying out petty crime. they were led by a young man about 25 years old. this is their first kidnapping of foreigners. they had kidnapped, very recently, the mother of a local politician. before that they were carrying out petty crime. do we know if any ransom was paid? or the circumstances of the release of the other three? we know a ransom was demanded but we don‘t know if it was paid. what we have heard so far is that they were released
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safely and that they were in the hands of local politicians, who seem to have managed the release. the details are sketchy. these negotiations are often held secretly to keep the people being held, safe. and to avoid the ransom number being driven up unnecessarily. the information is sketchy still. we will probably find out more in the coming days. stephanie hegarty. jo black is in cambridgeshire were two the hostages came from. what more do we know of this? it has not been in the news. i am in march in cambridgeshire. i am outside the gp practice where doctor david donovan used to work. he was a gp here for around five years. two weeks before he made the trip to
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nigeria with the other three he handed in his notice. he liked being agp handed in his notice. he liked being a gp but decided he wanted to concentrate more on his charity work. we are told he went to nigeria around three or times a year to help people in rural communities. help deliver medicines and help children. those who know him say you could never have a conversation with him about anything else, he was just so passionate about it. he was always talking about his trips. we do know that he is back in the country with his wife. they are safe and well. there is huge relief here for the staff at this surgery, and of course from the cobbled‘s friends and family. a statement says, we are grateful for the support received from the british high commission and nigerian authorities in negotiating their relief —— release. we are delighted and relieved that alana,
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david and shirley donovan returned home safely. our thoughts are with the family and friends of ian as we come to terms with his sad death. huge relief here but sadness for ian squire and his family and friends. jo black. i‘m joined by an associate fellow on the african problem for the international affairs think tank, chatham house. how risky an area in the niger delta is it for people going out to basically try to improve things? it is a really volatile part of the country. for decades there have been on and off insurgencies. people who work for oil companies, because oil is the main industry of that region. most of the targets for kidnapping tend to be people who work for oil companies. these companies tend to put a lot of money and resources into extreme security for their staff. for medical practitioners, ngos, charity workers, it is dangerous to be there. the
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motivation for a kidnap like this would be money, would it? the official motivation for these militants in the region is that they have a cause, they are doing it for their people, they are doing it against the government, who they see as being in collusion with oil companies to pollute their land and the environment, not produce jobs for the local community. they feel they have been neglected by the state. the money from the oil industry isn‘t being fairly allocated to their region. that is kind of the official reason that has been given, that is usually given for a been given, that is usually given fora and been given, that is usually given for a and attacks in the region. there are tonnes of money involved. are few days ago the main militant group was engaged in talks with the government. what has happened there? the niger delta avengers is the main group that has actually been talking to the government. they resumed the
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hostilities a couple of years ago. they announced about two days ago that the ceasefire was over. i can‘t make any connection with this particular group because this kidnapping was done in a different state. any militant group that says the ceasefire is effectively over, it means they will resume hostilities in the region, which is bad for everybody. at some stage we will find out what has gone on? yes, it is really unusual for a foreigner to be killed by militants in the nigel delta. —— niger delta. you will find that more often than not in the north—east. very unusual for foreigners to be killed in this area. in terms of ngos and other charity workers who go to this area, you have said it is a risky region, but what sort of support do they get? the british high commission is usually very good at giving people
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advice. there is quite a large security presence in the region. they have military in the region carrying out drills to warn off militants and to increase security. i was at militants and to increase security. iwas ata militants and to increase security. i was at a meeting today at chatham house with a governor from the region. he is not the governor of the delta state body is a governor in the region. he had several complaints about how security in the states is not controlled by the states is not controlled by the state governors themselves. he can commission gunboats to patrol the waters, sign of budgets for police ca rs waters, sign of budgets for police cars to be patrolling, but ultimately everything is controlled by the federal government, which is halfway up the country in abuja. he was saying these gunboats that he has commissioned, he has no idea what they‘re doing, where they are, whether they are doing what they are supposed be doing. it is all very
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chaotic? it is not the best organised in terms of security. it increases the risk of anybody who is going out there to do any kind of work. very good of you to talk to us. thank you. a mass leak of secret papers is shedding new light on how the rich and powerful invest millions of pounds in offshore tax havens. the documents — called the paradise papers — have been examined by the international consortium of investigativejournalists, which includes the bbc‘s panorama programme and the guardian. they have already revealed that the queen has £10 million of her personal fortune invested in offshore trusts by the duchy of lancaster. the papers have also shown how donald trump‘s commerce secretary has business links with russian allies of president putin. he‘s told the bbc today there is nothing improper about his investments. now the latest revelations involve three actors from the bbc‘s hit sitcom, mrs brown‘s boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme, according to the papers. there‘s no suggestion that those involved have acted illegally. angus crawford reports. do you want a cup of tea? yes, please.
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what's up? foul—mouthed and very funny. brendan o‘carroll, alias mrs brown. his company produces one of the most popular comedy shows on tv. but bbc news has learned that three actors have been getting their fees sent offshore. patrick houlihan, who plays wayward son dermot. do you not think you could‘ve stayed in bed a little bit longer, marie? yeah, restless night. brendan o‘carroll‘s real—life daughter fiona dela ny. morning, mummy. good morning, trevor, son. and her husband, martin delany. this is how it works, the actors get their fees sent offshore tax—free to a series of trust funds based in mauritius. the cash then comes back to the actors, now as a loan, so avoiding tax. take fiona delany. injust 16 months, the mauritian company lent her more than £360,000. it looks like what‘s called disguised remuneration.
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we wanted to ask her about it, but she didn‘t want to talk. can you tell me about your tax? you get paid in mauritius, don‘t you? what‘s that about? and then the loans — do you pay those loans back? i don‘t think you pay them back, is it a tax dodge. are you a tax dodger? i don‘t even know who you are. i‘m from panorama. you‘re from mrs brown‘s boys, and you‘re tax dodger. that‘s not very funny at all, is it? none of the actors have broken the law. but the chair of the commons public accounts committee is concerned. i don‘t understand why people go to such lengths to set up complicated tax arrangements to avoid paying tax in real—time. we need that money now. sometimes these sums of money we are talking about, it‘s plenty of money. people can certainly live on that. even if they were paying tax on it, they would be earning more than many of my constituents. this kind of scheme isn‘t new. it caught out comedian jimmy carr five years ago, forcing a public apology.
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and a tongue lashing from the then prime minister. some of these schemes where people are parking huge amounts of money offshore, and taking loans back to minimise their tax rates, it is not morally acceptable. as for the creator and star of mrs brown‘s boys, brendan o‘carroll, he denies any wrongdoing. in a statement, he said: patrick houlihan and martin and fiona delany have so far made no comment. angus crawford, bbc news. the paradise papers also include revelations that the queen‘s private estate invested offshore, and that president trump‘s commerce secretary, wilbur ross, has business links to russian figures who are currently under us sanctions. but this morning mr ross said there was nothing improper about his investments.
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andy verity reports. bermuda, where the law firm at the heart of the biggest leak in offshore history has its head office. the queen is the head of state here, but until now we did not know some of her private money was invested in tax havens like this one. the documents reveal the queen‘s private estate, the duchy of lancaster, invested £10 million offshore in 2004 and 2005. five million of it went to a fund in bermuda, with another £5 million, $7.5 million to a cayman islands fund. a small part of that investment helped purchase the controversial retailer brighthouse and 75% of first quench, which used to own threshers, which went bust owing £70 million in tax. brighthouse has been accused of exploiting low income families and the financial conduct authorities ordered to pay almost £15 million in compensation to a quarter of a million customers. the duchy says it‘s only a small stake worth only £3208. the duchy told us that all of our investments fully audited and
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legitimate. if a very wealthy person wants to avoid taxation in britain, and therefore put money into a tax haven somewhere, who loses? schools? hospitals? housing? all those public services lose. and the rest of the population have to pay to cover up the deficit created by that. the documents also reveal that wilbur ross, us commerce secretary, has business links with russian allies of president putin. mr ross has a secret stake in a shipping company called navigator holdings. one of their major clients is an energy company, sibur. putin‘s associate is a shareholder, who was sanctioned by the us
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government in 2014. the company that is our client was not then sanctioned. it is not now sanctioned, and never was sanctioned in between. so there is nothing whatsoever improper about navigator having a relationship with sibur. i don't know any of those individuals. i have never met them and certainly have not had commercial dealings. former conservative party deputy chairman and treasurer lord ashcroft has been confronted with evidence suggesting he misled the public about giving up his status as a non—dom, a status which allows wealthy people to avoid tax on overseas earnings. lord ashcroft also put hundreds of millions into a bermuda trust from which $200 million was paid out. e—mails suggest trustees were concerned that the rules guaranteeing its tax—free status were being broken. to put it bluntly, we seem to be told nothing. more revelations from
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the paradise papers, including wealthy multinational companies and sports stars, are expected this evening. in the last hour lord ashcroft has issued a statement in response to the question he may have ignored rules. he said: he joining me now is ronen palan, professor of international politics at city university of london. let‘s clear up this issue of trust. lord ashcroft talking about his role ina lord ashcroft talking about his role in a trust or not. explain what it
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is about trusts that does seem to open questions? i was not involved in this panorama programme but i was involved in another in the past. what has been happening in the last few years, the rules and regulations to counter secrecy have tightened up. that is applied also to the cayman islands and bermuda. but there is one facility that has been left. it is an old anglo—saxon rule call the trusts. what we find from these particular papers is that the trust had become the main vehicle of maintaining secrecy today. you use the world secrecy —— word secrecy. he says it is not secrecy, it is privacy. trust was supposed to be about privacy but in reality, the reality behind this particular veil,
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it is very difficult to find out who owns what, who is doing what and when. even with the case of wilbur ross, even the robert mueller investigation would not be able to find the information unless it was leaked. the trust facility is a very strong veil and offers secrecy and opacity who —— for those who would like to use it. why would you do it? what is in it for you to use a trust and use the facilities of the cayman islands and other places? the facilities are being used for various reasons. the cayman islands has no taxation whatsoever. no income tax, corporate tax, vat, inheritance tax. no form of taxation. that means that at least your transaction takes place there and is not subject to taxation. why
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would you use trusts? to use the veil of secrecy from inland revenue. against your competitors. perhaps against your spouse. there are many reasons why people want to maintain a secret business. the trust offers them the opportunity to do so. one thing perhaps we will never know is the huge amount of money we are talking about? yes, the estimates, discounting aircraft, yachts, heart, which is several trillion, the lower estimates of the size of this particular world is about seven. i believe the size is more like 20 trillion. about 12% of global wealth is located in this jurisdiction one way or another. nobody has done
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anything illegal but it is the complicity... the league is from a big law firm. governments a seemingly not doing too much to stop it. where does the buck stop? arguably with government. there is a cosy relationship between big business, compliant governments and professional services. legal affairs, accounting firms, financiers. between them they have created this extra work. ultimately governments can stop it and it will be... the united states, the european union and china join together we can more or less kill this relationship. but at the moment they do not cooperate. thank you for your time. and you can watch panorama‘s second report which includes a series of further revelations from the paradise papers tonight, on bbc one at nine o‘clock. police are giving a news conference
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after the multiple shooting in texas. let‘s go to that now. texas. let's go to that now. first and foremost let's go to that now. first and fore m ost we let's go to that now. first and foremost we would like to keep our thoughts and prayers with the families who‘ve lost loved ones, the victims who were injured and the entire community which has come together to support each other during this difficult time. our investigators worked tirelessly around the clock since the shooting and we will continue to do so together. here is what we confirm at this point. the deceased, there are 26 deceased, 23 in the church, to outside and one at the hospital. the total wounded include, the total number is 20. there are six in a sta ble number is 20. there are six in a stable condition. four hour in a serious condition. and ten remaining
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critical condition. this number could rise. we ask that everyone keep them in your thoughts and prayers. the names of the victims will be released as soon as all of the next of kin have been notified. we appreciate everyone‘s understanding. the suspect is devin patrick kelley. he is a 26—year—old white male. he was residing in texas. the cause and manner of the death with the shooter will be determined by a pathologist during the autopsy. however, investigators found evidence at the scene that indicates the subject may have died from a self—inflicted gunshot wound. we can tell you, as in all active shooter situations, the number one goal of law enforcement is to neutralise the shooter. we had two good samaritans that did that for law enforcement. the first goal we got was issued recall. law
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enforcement was responding but a local resident who lives across the road from the church heard what was going on, he armed himself with an assault rifle and the suspect. we know that the suspect was shot. he dropped his assault rifle. he fled the scene. our taxes here are flagged down another young man, and jumped in his vehicle. they pursued the suspect. we know during that pursuit the suspect used his cell phone to notify his father that he had been shot and didn‘t think he was going to make it. subsequently, he shot himself. as i said, the pathologist will determine the cause of death. we can confirm that the suspect did not have a licence to
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carry. the suspect did have a non—commissioned private security licence similar to a security guard ata licence similar to a security guard at a concert type situation. there we re at a concert type situation. there were no disqualifys entered into the information centre data base were no disqualifys entered into the information centre database that would preclude him from receiving a private security licence. private security background checks, including fingerprints, were checked and he was cleared. i can tell you there is video recording from inside there is video recording from inside the church that has been secured and we have viewed the video. the crime scene we have viewed the video. the crime scene investigation will go on for days. all the bodies have been removed. our victims will be autopsied at the examiner‘s office.
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our suspect was autopsied of this morning in travis county. that information will be forthcoming. we know you have a lot of questions. we will answer what we can. to start offi will answer what we can. to start off i think we are going to go to the special agent in charge of atf to a nswer the special agent in charge of atf to answer questions he can answer. the suspect and his purchase of the firearms. good morning. i'm a special agent in charge of the field division. first and foremost, our hearts go out to the citizens of this community and the citizens of this community and the families of the victims. it is obviously tragic for all of us. what ican obviously tragic for all of us. what i can confirm, three firearms have been uncovered. one was the rifle re cove red been uncovered. one was the rifle recovered in the church. two additional handguns were recovered
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from the vehicle of the deceased suspect. one was a block and one was a lugar. i can also confirm that these firearms were purchased by the deceased suspect, and there has been a lot of information in the media and questions about the discharge of this individual from the military. what i will tell you right now is that in general if an individual has a dishonourable discharge from the military, they would be prohibited from possessing or purchasing firearms. in this specific investigation we do not have all the documentation yet. until we can get all the documentation, determine exactly what is discharge was and his conviction in the military, we will not have a determination. thank you. next we have the wilson
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cou nty thank you. next we have the wilson county sheriff. i think county sheriff. ithinkl county sheriff. i think i spoke to most of you this morning. some things have changed from early morning. we will be getting back with you all later. most of you have my telephone number if you need to contact me. right now our hearts are going out to all the family members that have lost family have family in the hospital. thank you all. next we have the fbi special agent in charge. lam the special agent in charge. i am the fbi special agent in charge. first of all, our condolences to this community on this horrific act. we are here with the gps and the rangers, assisting them in any where we can. right now
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we are providing evidence teams and support, also some technical support, also some technical support, with farms, video that we talked about going back to our lab. we are in support of the texas dps and we will be here as long as they need us. one thing everybody wants to know is why did this happen. it is a senseless crime. but we can tell you there was a domestic situation going on within his family. the suspect‘s mother—in—law attended this church. we know that he had made threatening... she had received threatening... she had received threatening texts from him. we can‘t go into details about that domestic situation that is continuing to be investigated. but we want to get that out there that this was not politically motivated. it wasn‘t over religious beliefs. there was a domestic situation going on with his in—laws. the wilson county district
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attorney. good morning. we learned this morning just how small—town america truly is. we have had a tremendous outpouring across the country for people wanting to assist families in need. i want to make sure that everyone knows how they can help, because everyone can help. everyone can help. the other thing is you can help these families financially. and so we are help these families financially. and so we are working and in the process of setting up two bank accounts. the sutherland springs community organisation has a main account through commerce bank in scottsdale, it will be exacting —— accepting monetary donations. wells fargo will have an account set up for the victims. if you want a way to help, it's
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through prayer and it's through financial donations. let‘s pull away interest that. but hearing that the suspect in the shooting telephoned his father during a chase after the massacre and told him he had been shot. this is after two men, who have been hailed as heroes, pursued the gunman suspected of killing 26 people at the texas church. we will have more on that. that‘s the image of the man suspected of being behind the killing. so we will bring you more on that story later on. a man has been found guilty of murdering his 18 month old daughter, just two weeks after formally adopting her. matthew scully—hicks, who‘s 31, inflicted numerous injuries on her.
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she died after being violently shaken and struck on the head. sian lloyd reports from cardiff crown court. baby elsie — tiny and delicate, but with a big personality. at ten months, she was placed in the care of a couple with one child who wanted to adopt. but within weeks of formally adopting elsie, part—time fitness instructor matthew scully—hicks had killed her. for months, the 31—year—old inflicted a catalogue of injuries, covering up what he‘d done to social workers, doctors and to his husband. this was the 999 call matthew scully—hicks made when elsie stopped breathing. tell me exactly what happened. i wasjust changing my daughter for bed and then she went all floppy and limp and now she'sjust not... she's not doing anything. she's lying on the floor. 0k. are you with her now, sir? lam. how old is your daughter? she's18 months. 0k. is she awake? no. is she breathing? no.
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0k. are you right by her now? yeah, i'm trying to do cpr. the toddler died in hospital four days later. doctors found she‘d suffered a string of injuries, including a fractured skull, several broken ribs and a broken leg. there was also evidence of recent and older bleeding to her brain — injuries, according to experts, that were typical of babies who‘ve been violently shaken. it wasn‘t the first time that elsie had been rushed to hospital whilst in the sole care of matthew scully—hicks. two months before she died, he dialled 999, claiming she‘d fallen down the stairs when a safety gate had given way. matthew scully—hicks denied ever hurting elsie. the prosecution said he was struggling to cope within days of her moving in. in text messages to friends, he described her as having a "diva strop" and to his husband, craig, who frequently worked away from home, he called elsie a "psycho" and "satan dressed up in a baby grow". it‘s particularly tragic
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when a little girl who should have been loved and protected by her new adopted family found herself abused and then suffered horribly in that home. the court heard that social workers frequently visited the family home while supervising elsie‘s adoption. matthew scully—hicks told them her injuries were accidental. thejury did not believe his excuses and he‘ll be sentenced for her murder. let‘s catch up on the weather. the day has gone. it has ban beautiful day has gone. it has ban beautiful day for most of us with glorious sunshine around. yes, it was cold, wasn‘t it. temperatures down to minus four to wasn‘t it. temperatures down to minus fourto minus wasn‘t it. temperatures down to minus four to minus six. cloud and rain arrives and temperatures in some areas will be eight to ten
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degrees up on what we had this morning. this blanket of cloud and rain that‘s pushing in and it is introducing a wind direction from the south—west. it will be breezy through the night. gusty winds with the heaviest of the rain and the rain will push in through scotland and northern ireland towards the irish sea by dawn tomorrow morning. temperatures in the south east, an early frost. there is clearer skies here, but we will see double figures for many with the cloud and the rain. behind it, cooler conditions because that‘s where the best of the weather is likely to be. bright and breezy with showers. the rain heavy for a time breezy with showers. the rain heavy fora time and breezy with showers. the rain heavy for a time and weakening as it pushes further east and it stays dry during daylight hours. top temperatures tomorrow, seven to 11 celsius. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: a british hostage, kidnapped in nigeria‘s southern delta state last month, has been killed. ian squire was one of four britons taken by suspected militants. three others have been released. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves three actors in the bbc‘s hit sitcom mrs brown‘s boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme, although this is not illegal. police say the former mother—in—law of a gunman who killed twenty—six 2017 will be among the three hottest on record, the united nations said on monday. almost 200 countries are gathering in bonn to bolster the paris climate accord. sport now on afternoon
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live with hugh. no the biggest surprise that news from west ham? no. slaven bilic dismissed today, simon from west ham united, but maybe more of a surprise is that the former he have tonne and manchester united boss david moyes is set to replace him on an interim basis. we can speak tojessica our reporter. we will come to david moyes in a moment. what has slaven bilic had to say he said he is expected this decision. he has no ha rd expected this decision. he has no hard feelings against the club. he said he was proud of the work that he has done. but did admit that they didn't start the season well enough andindeed didn't start the season well enough and indeed as you say they are this the relegation zone, west ham, languishing in 18th, just nine points interest their 11 games and just two wins in the time. and that is despite slaven bilic having spent £42 million in the summer. he broke
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the club record transfer fee for marco went and another player for £20 million. it was the 4—1 thrashing on saturday by liverpool that put the writing on the wall for slaven bilic. it was the way they played so poorly. the club released a statement, the owners, have said performances and results have not been of the expected standard in re ce nt been of the expected standard in recent weeks. they go on to say, "we believe a change is now necessary to ensure we can begin to move the team backin ensure we can begin to move the team back in the right direction." certainly, it has been a fall from grace for west ham. slaven bilic guided his team to seventh in the league and last season they were 11th and now they are in the relegation zone. who can push them back in the direction? david moyes is one name being mentioned? he has been linked toa being mentioned? he has been linked to a fewjobs, but he does seem to be the frontrunner for the west ham job. some reports suggesting as early as tomorrow and he will be
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there until the end of the season. it was only yesterday he spoke to a broadcaster to reiterate his expression of interest in the role. is he man the for the job? he had experience at eve rton is he man the for the job? he had experience at everton and manchester united, hasn't he, he has got that experience as a premier league manager. he knows what is expected ofa premier manager. he knows what is expected of a premier league manager, but his voyage in the premier league, of course, voyage in the premier league, of course , was voyage in the premier league, of course, was with sunderland and that didn't end well, they were relegated from the premier league back to the championship. back in may. now, he does have time on his hands, david moyes if he was to come in. the international break means he will have a couple of weeks to get his feet under the table and get to know the club and the players. team morale is low at the moment. jessica, thank you very much. one of modern football‘s greats — andrea pirlo — has announced he is retiring from football after playing his last game for new york city fc. pirlo played 116 times for italy and won the world cup in 2006. he won two european cups,
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having played most of his career in his homeland, for both milan clubs and juventus. in a message on social media, he thanked his family for their support throughout his career. organisers of a tennis tournament in milan have apologised after accusations of sexism. female models were asked to remove an item of clothing to determine which group each player would be in. the atp and red bull have said the draw for the under 21 tour finals was unacceptable. the female model would reveal which group they were in by having to re move group they were in by having to remove an item of clothing to show if they ended up in group a or group band there if they ended up in group a or group b and there was one or two cringeworthy examples. a young ka anywayian player found out which group efficiency in when the female model lifted her a lcec and a korean
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had to take the glove off his female model off with his teeth to find out his fate. there is hand a strong reaction on social media from many high—profile women in the game. judy youry tweeted and described it as awful and former coach of andy murray and former wimbledon champion and australian open champion branded ita and australian open champion branded it a disgrace and the current wta player made the point this is meant to be show casing the future ended her post with # tag back to zero. england wingerjermaine mcgillvary is facing a ban of up to 12 weeks after being charged for alleged biting. he‘s accused of biting lebanon captain robbie farah during saturday‘s rugby league world cup game. he‘ll have a hearing on wednesday. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. earlier priti patel apologised
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because she had gone on holiday and used the time to speak to members of the it really government without get or giving prior knowledge to the foreign office. we are just hearing from theresa may who says she didn‘t know that priti patel had met binyamin netanyahu. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. mary rhodes is in birmingham where one man has written an emotional letter to his foster parents, thanking them for the love which transformed his life. and carol malia is in newcastle where a small community has produced an amazing display of 15,000 knitted poppies. but first to mary rhodes, an incredible story tonight on your programme ofjosh
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and his foster parents jane and bill, give me an idea of josh‘s background. josh smith had a difficult start to his life. his parents separated when he was young. his mother had mental health problems and she died when he was quite little so he lived with his dad. but his dad was very abusive both verbally and physically. josh was frequently told that he was worthless, he was a waste of space and no good and he waste of space and no good and he was regularly beaten. now, this next bit of detail is quite difficult to comprehend really. josh had quite a close relationship with his mum. and the turning point came when his father tipped the ashes of his mother over the 11—year—old josh and that was a big turning point for josh. he had the courage to run to the police and that‘s when he was placed into foster care with bill and jane. and he has written a deeply personal tribute to his foster parents. what he said? yes, it is very, very
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moving, simon. josh is now 21, so it‘s ten years since he was first placed into their care and he has written a lengthy letterjust stating his thanks for the love and the care that he received from bill and jane. just simple things like clea n, and jane. just simple things like clean, warm pyjamas and having pocket money. here is a taste of the letter. ten years on, knowing you as well as i do, i doubt your kindness was plarned. you seemed to know how to put me back together. you had your work cut out as jane talked about the warm towels waiting upstairs. a voice warned don't get comfy, but thanks to you i have a positive example to follow. i stand a chance of being a parent any child could be proud of. a remarkable young man. what‘s he doing now? could be proud of. a remarkable young man. what's he doing now?m is incredible given the awful start in life thatjosh had and it is down to the loving care from i had foster
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pa rents. to the loving care from i had foster parents. he has a decentjob and has his own with a girlfriend who his foster parents describe as lovely andi foster parents describe as lovely and i think possibly the greatest testa m e nt of and i think possibly the greatest testament of all to his foster pa rents testament of all to his foster parents is that one dayjosh said he would like to be a foster parent. 770 families in the west midlands alone are needed to foster. mary, lots more, i suspect, alone are needed to foster. mary, lots more, isuspect, at 6.30pm. and we can now cross to carol malia at bbc look east in newcastle — where hundreds of volunteers have knitted and planted 15,000 poppies — a very noticeable act of remembrance from one small community, it is, indeed. i don‘t know how you are with knitting. my guess is perhaps not so good! you would be right! laughter i‘m struggling to knit a scarf for my eight—year—old. we are used to seeing the tributes for remembrance day, but the ladies of none thorpe have surpassed themselves. 15,000
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knitted poppies and they are displayed around the areas of the town, their own weeping wall there, they have been knitting at bus stops while waiting for doctors appointments, hospital appointments and put the poppies on railway platforms, outside churches, care homes, they have really turned the town red. they have done fan tas tuckically well. age range is something i love, the knitters have included a five—year—old girl and they go up the scale to a 95—year—old woman! and they have been at it for seven months solidly andi been at it for seven months solidly and i think we should take our hats off to them really. and we do. we do. it says you have been looking at ourdrinking do. it says you have been looking at our drinking habits, but it is specifically whisky in the lake district? it is whisky in the lake district. it is the quality of the water and the lake district where better can there be. a distillery opened three years and they have decided that they are going for
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high—end quality whisky because they worked out that people want to drink less, but they want their tipple to be really topnotch. and they have had 100,000 visitors to this new distillery. it has only been opened three years and it is in the top ten of lake district visitor attractions and in these beautiful wooden casks they have got £30 million retail value of malt whisky. it takes three yea rs value of malt whisky. it takes three years to mature. you have to be patient. this latest batch is ready ina patient. this latest batch is ready in a month or two. so, patient. this latest batch is ready in a month ortwo. so, i patient. this latest batch is ready in a month or two. so, i don‘t know, if wa nt in a month or two. so, i don‘t know, if want to come up and have a tipple, i know victoria! you don‘t need an excuse to visit the lakes. we actually go every year. well, there is another place to go. that's not good for business. but wouldn't think it would be good for business. if they go for the quality, people wa nt to if they go for the quality, people want to buy the special bottles and savour each one and perhaps they are drinking less, it is more about
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getting the really beautiful taste and that‘s what they are going for. soi and that‘s what they are going for. so i will have to try it out obviously. carol and mary, thank you very much. you‘re watching afternoon live. if you‘d like to catch up with more of those news nationwide stories, go to the bbc iplayer. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. british hostage ian squire has been killed in nigeria, three weeks after being kidnapped. three others have been released. the latest revelation from the paradise papers involves three actors in the bbc‘s hit sitcom mrs brown‘s boys. they diverted more than £2 million into an offshore tax avoidance scheme, although this is not illegal. police say that a gunman who killed
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people in texas had fought with his mother—in—law who sometimes attended the church. as we‘ve been hearing, the cbi is having its conference today, and the prime minister theresa may, and the labour leaderjeremy corbyn, have been addressing business leaders. our business correspondent rebecca marston is at that conference in greenwich. it has been a very busy day for the delegates. over 1,000 made their way to the conference centre in greenwich to hear from representatives of 200,000 business organisations that are associated with the cbi, sexual harassment, the ics, official theme was globalisation and ought owemation and to discuss that i have two guests with me. i have the chief executive of siemens uk and omar from the global it consultancy. you
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have spent months looking at what we, we will be calling the fourth industrial revolution in the uk. what does that look like? 200 businesses large and small, but many small companies and we have been working on a report that looks at how do we as britain maximise the potential for the british economy out of this fourth industrial revolution? really what we are talking about is creating the new makers, the creators, the manufacturersers, the makers, the creators, the manufacture rsers, the exporters makers, the creators, the manufacturersers, the exporters like we had in the second industrial revolution, only this time it is data and the internet power of the industrial revolution and that's what we have been working on. one of the things people are most afraid of arejobs. i was the things people are most afraid of are jobs. i was speaking to the head of the tuc, frances o‘grady, there isa of the tuc, frances o‘grady, there is a concern generallyt maybe naive that robots will replace us humans.
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is your argument though that al creates jobs as well as replaces them, not to the same extent though? it is notjust artificial intelligence, it is robotics and in the study that we have done, we are pretty clear that as long as we really invest in the technologies, we will create more jobs overall than we displace. that doesn't mean we don't displace jobs, we do, but the good news is, is they get replaced with different, very often higher skilled, higher paid jobs so there is a challenge and the tuc, frances o'grady is right that we have to prepare ourselves well and we have to upskill re, reskill people to take the newjobs and that's a challenge. omar, do you think it is naive to focus on jobs? it is understandable that people worry about this. for example, you mentioned artificial intelligence.
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there is a load ofjobs that artificial intelligence can do that human beings can't. they can perform roles that can take the drudgery and mundaneness out of jobs. roles that can take the drudgery and mundaneness out ofjobs. if you talk to someone who mundaneness out ofjobs. if you talk to someone who was mundaneness out ofjobs. if you talk to someone who was beaten by a computer, chess champion, he will tell you a human with al can beat any computer. you worked on the report or your company worked on the report or your company worked on the report into this fourth industrial revolution, what were you asking the government to do? do you think it will actually do it? my view is very simple. the uk has the possibility to be even more amazing. if we invest in these technologies we increase rodivity and it improves our economy and it helps all of us. so the government can help with its industrial policy. we want to be in electric vehicles that affects business and local government and
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central government. it can help us create innovation hubs and ecosystems. it can help with the reskilling and education to help the workers that remember referring to here. i workers that remember referring to here. lam positive workers that remember referring to here. i am positive about what we can did do. two guests who think the future is very bright, indeed, that‘s it from me, simon, from the cbi, we have had a great day, talk to you soon. you will, rebecca, thank you very much. the ftse has closed at another record high, 7562 and that follows a record high, 7562 and that follows a record high, 7562 and that follows a record high yesterday. so, the ftse on the up once again. the prime minister is meeting other party leaders later, in the wake of a series of sexual misconduct allegations at westminster. theresa may has warned that allegations of "serious abuse" in parliament will not be ignored and victims‘ complaints will be fully investigated. she has also promised to confront what she called "the use and abuse of power". several conservative and labour mps are being investigated because of claims of inappropriate
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behaviour, as our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, reports. as each day goes by, another allegation, another politician drawn into the scandal at westminster. and as she tries to shift the focus onto her government‘s own agenda, the prime minister will be hoping there are no more revelations to come. well, thank you very much... but while it was back to business at the cbi‘s conference this morning, it was a chance, too, for theresa may to call to a new culture of respect in politics. this isn‘t about prying into private lives. what we are talking about is the use and abuse of power. we must stand up for all the victims of abuse, harassment or discrimination wherever it has occurred. now is the time to act decisively, without fear or favour, to guarantee a safe and respectful working environment for everyone in the future. and to achieve that, the labour leader wants training for mps, plus trade unions,
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to have a greater role in westminster. all of you, all of us, need to look hard at ourselves, as we in the labour party are doing, to see how our processes and procedures can be improved. how it can be made easier for women to speak out, and for victims to get the support they have a right to expect. party leaders meeting with the prime minister later agree on the need for an independent procedure committee investigate allegations of mistreatment by parliamentary staff. but there are questions over what powers this new body will have, what penalties it will be able to impose, and how quickly it can be set up, as party leaders try to get on the front foot over this scandal, and get support in place for staff, meet the concerns of victims, and restore the reputation of parliament. one solution suggested by the former head of the parliamentary expenses watchdog would see mps‘ staff recruited independently. the staff would have the protections
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of being in a modern organisation, professionalised personnel support, whistle—blowing. somebody to talk to before relationships are broken down. all this as mrs may‘s most senior minister damian green is to be interviewed as part of a cabinet office investigation into his own conduct over claims he strenuously denies. for now, everyone here waits, with a fear that every new day could bring a fresh scandal. that‘s it for today. next the bbc news at 5pm with huw edwards. now the weather. good evening. what a day, it was cold and crisp and sunny for most of us, but it is all change as we go into tomorrow. we started off this morning on a real cold note. tomorrow morning a different story.
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in some places we could see temperatures eight to ten degrees milder. the reason for that is cloud and rain that‘s pushing into the north—west. it will drive this blanket of cloud through the country through the night with the exception down towards the south east corner. with the cloud and rain across west facing coasts, but turning windy and wetter through scotland and northern ireland overnight. so a real mishmash in terms of temperatures. for most underneath the cloud and rain we will see double figures, but chilly in the south east and colder behind because here we will have clearer skies. shaoun r a behind because here we will have clearer skies. shaoun ra scattering of showers through the day. heavy pulses for a time, but weakening as it moves into the south east corner. it is not really going to arrive into the south east until after dark on tuesday. seven to 11 celsius our overall high. it looks as if it will stay wet and windy tuesday night and into wednesday.
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today at five. a british hostage is killed in nigeria — three weeks after he was kidnapped by militants. the christian charity worker — ian squire — was one of four britons being held. three have been freed — but mr squire was killed. the group was providing free health care — in nigeria‘s delta state. the families of those released have expressed their relief. we‘ll have the latest from cambridgeshire — the home county of two of the former hostages. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. priti patel — the international development secretary — has apologised after admitting meeting the israeli prime minister and others — while on an unofficial visit to israel. leaked papers reveal three actors from the bbc show — mrs brown‘s boys — transferred over two million pounds into an offshore tax avoidance scheme — but it wasn‘t illegal. flags at half mast across the united states —
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