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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 7, 2017 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. donald trump arrives in south korea ahead of talks about north korea's nuclear programme. the us president says he'll work with south korea on a strategy to deal with pyongyang but there are likely to be significant differences of opinion. good morning, it's tuesday the 7th of november. also this morning: the husband of a british woman in prison in iran asks borisjohnson to clarify comments he made to mps about her case that he says could see her sentence doubled. working on the edge of safety. health bosses warn staff shortages are now the biggest concern in the nhs but ministers say they have a plan to tackle the problem. good morning. more tax revelations this morning, as tech giant apple and the formula 1 driver lewis hamilton are the latest to have their affairs
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scrutinised after a huge leak of documents. i'll have more in a moment. in sport, west ham are looking for a new manager. and could it be this man? the former manchester united and sunderland head coach david moyes is expected to take over. clinging on for dear life. the first baby gibbon born in the wild to parents rescued from the illegal pet trade. and carol has the weather. good morning. we've got a cold front moving from west to east at the moment producing some rain, some blustery winds and ahead of it will be mild, buying it, sunshine and showers and this morning the temperature dropping. more details in15 temperature dropping. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first our main story: donald trump has arrived on the korean peninsula for the first time since taking office ahead of talks on a key foreign policy issue facing his presidency, north korea's nuclear programme. we can speak now to our china
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correspondent, robin brant, who is in seoul. good morning. as we can see, as i imagine, security is obviously tight? anywhere the president goes, this is what you get, he is expected here in an hour or so before he has talks with his south korean counterpart moon jae—in. this talks with his south korean counterpart moonjae—in. this is a brief visit, 2a hours, but it is highly symbolic because we are 35 kilometres from the front line of this constantly, confrontation with north korea. president trump comes here with the alliance between these two countries hugely important, it is decades old, and the message he and the south korean leadership will wa nt to and the south korean leadership will want to merge by the time he leaves tomorrow is the alliance remains resilient and strong. they have strength in unity. but there are differences of opinion about how to deal with the north. moonjae—in,
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the president, was elected a few months ago with a pledge to extend an olive branch and president trump has called that appeasement. donald trump appears optimistic this morning, sitting down with some of the american troops here, tens of thousands based here to protect this country. they had lunch and afterwards he said to reporters that it has to work out, it always works out, things have to work out. we lost your pictures at the last moment but we will be back with you through the morning. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to call his iranian counterpart this morning, after being accused of making a mistake that could see a british woman spending five more years in an iranian prison. he's facing calls to retract his claim to a parliamentary committee last week, that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists in iran when she was arrested last year, something her employer and herfamily have denied. keith doyle reports. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was arrested with her baby at tehran airport last year. she was charged with trying to overthrow the government
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and sentenced to five years in jail. she has worked with thomson reuters foundation and the bbc but insisted this trip was for her daughter to meet her grandparents, and denies all allegations against her. diplomacy has not helped secure her release, and this comment by the foreign secretary last week has set her case back, according to her family. she was simply teaching people journalism, as i understand it. in the last few days, she was brought back to court and told mrjohnson‘s comments shed new light on her case and prove she was not on holiday. it is feared iran may now increase the sentence. he needs to make a clear statement that, you know, she wasn't working training journalists. she was there on holiday and she's innocent of the association. and we've made it very clear for a long time she is not being held because of anything she has done. she's just not. the foreign office says borisjohnson will be in touch with the iranian foreign minister
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to ensure his comments aren't misrepresented. keith doyle, bbc news. let's get the latest from our political correspondent chris mason. a little dark where you are at the moment but how much hot water is mr johnson in on this one? it's deeply awkward for the foreign secretary. there he was in parliament answering questions, inadvertently it would appear he has in a throwaway remark potentially caused a real problem. so we can expect mrjohnson, as we we re so we can expect mrjohnson, as we were hearing from keith there, to try and emphasise to his iranian counterpart that this was purely a family visit, that there wasn't any pursuit of journalism family visit, that there wasn't any pursuit ofjournalism in the context of this visit. but of course, given how tricky the diplomacy has been so far in this case and how little headway in its managed to make, these comments have been seized on in tehran and so to an extent it's a
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damage limitation exercise for mr johnson now. there will be pressure i think from labour, we've also already seen criticism from emily thornbury, the shadow foreign secretary, suggesting mrjohnson and the foreign office have been sufficiently interested in this case and that if her sentence was to be increased, mrjohnson ought to consider his position. also pretty purcell, the international development secretary, is also giving a headache to the foreign minister at the moment? as if the swelling harassment incidents weren't enough for theresa may, two of her cabinet ministers on several issues in difficulty, borisjohnson for one, and priti patel, she went on holiday in the summer to israel, but she managed to find time for 12 meetings with various government and political officials and it turns out no one here in westminster knew the first thing about what was going on
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in advance. priti patel has now apologised, issuing a statement yesterday which included some extraordinary clarifications to use the language of her department where she said cheema have given the impression that boris johnson she said cheema have given the impression that borisjohnson knew about the trip in advance, she didn't -- about the trip in advance, she didn't —— might have. she might have given the impression there were just a handful of meetings, there were far more. in normal circumstances in a government that wasn't this shaky i suspect she would have been fired. thanks very much, chris. more from chris through the morning. leaked documents known as the paradise papers reveal that apple moved its profits tojersey after a tax loophole in ireland was closed. the arrangement isn't illegal, but means the technology giant saves billions in corporation tax. apple says it remains the world's largest taxpayer. the files also show formula i world champion lewis hamilton avoided tax on a luxuryjet he purchased, by importing it to the isle of man. our economics correspondent andy verity has more. hamilton is world champion... . five
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yea rs hamilton is world champion... . five years ago lewis hamilton bought his own luxury jet worth years ago lewis hamilton bought his own luxuryjet worth £16.5 million. it was something he'd always wanted. this is your plane. if i get a plane oi'i this is your plane. if i get a plane on going to pimp it out? painted red? exactly. injanuary on going to pimp it out? painted red? exactly. in january 2013 the formula 1 champion landed his new plane at the isle of man's airport importing it there. isle of man customs officials met him at 6:15am to finalise the paperwork and sign off on to finalise the paperwork and sign offona to finalise the paperwork and sign off on a vat refund of £3.3 million. i can't believe i have my own plane still after all these years. under eu rules your only meant to get a refund if the jets used for commercial purposes, but the documents suggest hamilton was planning to spend a third of his buying time on personal use. he's not alone. the leaks also show the isle of man paid £790 million in vat
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refunds to companies. if they're using it for private purposes, the fa ct using it for private purposes, the fact all this money is being refunded is quite shocking. you should not be getting vat back if it's private usage and you're getting vat back. mr hamilton's lawyer said the arrangement was lawful. the documents also reveal how the iphone maker apple used a british crown dependency to keep its tax tax bill down. we pay all the taxes we owe, every single dollar. we not only comply with the laws but we comply with the spirit of the laws. we don't depend on tax gimmicks. in 2014, ireland announced it would ban companies with no tax residency. that meant apple needed a tax residency for its lucrative irish subsidiaries fast so it sent out a questionnaire courting tax havens and it chosejersey, where its $261 billion pile of cash from selling phones and ipads is now tax
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resident. apple say the structure hadn't lowered its taxes and it remained the world's largest taxpayer. andy verity, bbc news. more on that with sean through the morning as well. the nhs is struggling to cope with rising demand forfrontline services despite increasing the number of staff in england. that's the warning from health bosses, who say boosting the workforce is not enough to tackle the growing needs of patients. nhs providers voiced their concerns ahead of their annual conference, which gets under way in birmingham today. here's our health correspondent nick triggle. there are now 1 there are now1 million people working in the nhs in england, 6% more than there was three years ago, but nhs providers says it's still not enough. a report by the group that represents health bosses highlights figures showing demand for key services has risen by much more. the number of diagnostic tests has gone up by 19%. ambulance calls by 15%. gp referrals by 11%. and
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emergency admissions by 10%. in fact nhs providers' director of policy believes the pressure has got so great on staff that patients are at risk. we've got demand for services rising at a rate that's faster than we have staff coming into the nhs, so we have staff coming into the nhs, so we've had a rise of around 6% over the last three to four years, that's about 60,000 staff, but demand for services is rising much faster than that. the group is critical of the government approach to workforce planning, saying there is no coherent or credible strategy and its warning that the prospect of brexit is making things worse as eu staff are facing uncertain futures. but the department of health insist plans are in place, it says it is overseeing the biggest ever expansion in training places for doctors and nurses which will help ensure the nhs has enough staff in place now and in the future. nick triggle, bbc news. half of the 26 victims of the worst mass shooting in texan history
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are children, officials have now confirmed. the youngest of the dead is a one—year—old baby, and the oldest is a 77—year—old woman. the identities of those killed are not yet being officially released, but some names are emerging. our north america correspondent rajini vaidya nathan reports. retailers have seen sales of non—food items grow at their slowest pace in nearly seven years. figures from the british retail consortium and accountancy firm kpmg show the sales of goods excluding food rose by only 0.1% in just three months, with clothing sales particularly badly hit. the brc says the figures will give retailers cause for concern in the run—up to christmas. you have thrown it in there. are you allowed to? you mentioned it last week. i have a mince pie in september so i only have myself to
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blame. do you suffer from a fear of heights? it depends. iwas do you suffer from a fear of heights? it depends. i was once sick at st paul's cathedral. if you suffer from a fear of heights you may want to look away now. austrian climber angela ayter has become the first woman to conquer one of the world's toughest climbing routes. this is la planta de shiva in spain. it had previously only been climbed by two men. angela spent two years training for the climb by casting replicas of the various holds along the route and installing them on her local climbing wall. and after making it to the top, it was time to relax and enjoy the view! i see, maybe she got to the top and then obviously quite safely decided to hang about, relax. maybe we need a bit ofa to hang about, relax. maybe we need a bit of a warning in that. that
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gave me sweaty hands. did you have a sweaty hand moment?” gave me sweaty hands. did you have a sweaty hand moment? i did, just watching her. she's not the only one! you were worried we have the wrong pictures? you say she's relaxing, that's not run relaxing in the slightest, is it? we were talking about bilic being the west ham manager by the end of the day, the answer is no. while most fans agreed that the should have gone, but they can't agree on his replacement. we are expecting an announcement today? yes, we are. the bbc understands the former everton, manchester united and sunderland manager david moyes has held talks to take over, but there doesn't seem much support for him from the west ham fans. a real mixed reaction among them. two harrys, both from tottenham, have pulled out of the england squad. harry winks and harry kane have withdrawn through injury. england are playing friendlies against germany and brazil at wembley over the next seven days. and irish 123 in the melbourne cup,
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the race that stops the nation. the people running men's tennis have apologised after a bizarre draw ceremony for a tournament which involved female models removing items of clothing. there was a furious reaction, with awful, a disgace and back to zero just some of the comments. a tournament for the next generation, those under 21, they selected a female model who walked along the catwalk and then the model would reveal a letter for the releva nt would reveal a letter for the relevant group by removing items of clothing. one of the players had to pull off a glove from one of the models with his teeth. such a bad
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idea. outrageous. how many meetings must they have gone through and yet someone must they have gone through and yet someone decided that was a good idea? the principal sponsor has apologised, as have the 80. idea? the principal sponsor has apologised, as have the 80m idea? the principal sponsor has apologised, as have the 80. if you look at some of their faces, they are looking round thinking, this is weird —— as have the atp tour. are looking round thinking, this is weird -- as have the atp tour. one of the models was gyrating against a male player and removing a top to show a letter. my goodness me, what century? not this one i don't think! so everyone has apologised? they have. rightly so. time now to catch up on the weather. to some of us we will see sunshine but it will not be until later on to what many of us have is a mild start to is rain forecast and around the rain we also have gusty wind. you can see this great decline of cloud. it isa can see this great decline of cloud. it is a weather front, a cold front
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and it produces rains it is a cold front and it produces rains it is a cold fro nt m oves and it produces rains it is a cold front moves south the temperature behind it will drop. we have already seen behind it will drop. we have already seen the temperature drop in some parts of the north—west. there is also a parts of the north—west. there is alsoafair parts of the north—west. there is also a fair bit of rain. if you travel this morning there could be a lot of surface water and spray on the road to take extra care. ahead of that, cloud around this morning and we have showers. but still mild conditions. kohl yesterday evening but as that cloud has come in the temperature has listed —— lifted. then there is the rain across the border. again, some heavy burst among mount. pushing up into eastern scotla nd among mount. pushing up into eastern scotland and northern isles. this is eight o'clock, not where the rain is at the moment. behind it, cloud, showers and winter in the hills. brightening up for northern ireland from the west. for wales and into the south—west again we have rain. gusty wind around this weather front we will see squally winds later on
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coming in across the south coast of devon. dust that 50 mph. you can see is the front sinks to the south—east we have a fair bit of cloud behind it. for scotland and northern ireland, wales later on, late afternoon sunshine. don't forget the showers and possibly some hail as well. as we go through the evening in overnight you see the rain slid down into the south—east of ignorant ridge of high pressure comes in behind it so it will be a cold night was clear sky. there will be temperature is a and it will stay positive, round parts of northern ireland and the borders, for example, temperatures could drop to just below freezing. —4 or five in some places. frost around surfing in the morning. we still will have its rigid. when the weather front clears it will take a trained with it. what is left of that rain. the sun will come out and for many of us it will
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bea come out and for many of us it will be a fine day tomorrow. however, the next weather front comes in and that will bring some rain with exposure in the north—west. we will also see some dales. temperature wise, 12 in stornoway, 11 in london and between manchester and newcastle, around nine. wednesday and thursday the front nine. wednesday and thursday the fro nt syste m nine. wednesday and thursday the front system sinks southwards. dry bright day with sunny spots around injusta bright day with sunny spots around injust a few bright day with sunny spots around in just a few showers. temperatures between nine and 14 celsius. thank you so much, carol. will have a look at the papers. we have some pictures coming to us from south korea. president trump is visiting. he is on a tour of asia at the moment. i have not seen the pictures yet but that will happen shortly. yes. the motorcade arriving, i believe, with all sorts of pageantry. arriving, i believe, with all sorts of pagea ntry. front arriving, i believe, with all sorts of pageantry. front page of the papers... the guardian is one of the news organisations to
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ggggggnggggesiggfiinggtgiffgrent is hamilton plenty. the daily telegraph this morning. don't let the eu dictate the. a picture of michael parkinson sang that he used afloat but he would not dare now and an article here about school being the best place for children with sniffles. what do you think about that? there are what do you think about that? there a re rules what do you think about that? there are rules that if a child is thick that they should not go back for 24 hours. i think vomiting is a little different. diarrhoea and vomiting. yes, not sniffles. sorry. it was a bit early for that. i was never
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allowed to have a day off school. i was always just sent out, the rain or shine. i was quite good at fooling my mother. the times is also talking about the papers again. another picture of lewis hamilton. a story also about boris johnson another picture of lewis hamilton. a story also about borisjohnson and what he said about the... of the mother injail in iran and we understand they will phone iran later today. quotes from michael parkinson again. and they are not holding back either about the paradise papers. sean will have more details on that later on. mentioning this story is well. eumaeus in this yesterday about this little girl, who was elsie. rwherwasrattackeérané mergereé— after. had been
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that is the front page of adopted. that is the front page of the express. the big one in a lot of . 7—1—'..,7.,'..::..:.::.:.:.: their on . 7—1—'..,7.,'..::..:.::.:.:.: budget their on . 7—1—'..,7.,'..::..:.::.:.:.: budget in their on , ,, l'7777',m::m:x budget in a their on , ,, l'7777',m::m:x budget in a fewl their- on , ,, l'7777',m::m:x budget in a few weeks - on , ,, l'7777',m::m:x budget in a few weeks and i on , ,, l'7777',m::m:x budget in a few weeks and the 1 the budget in a few weeks and the chancellor has the big decision there. looked at non—food sales, which are falling, white goods and all that. they have grown at their slowest rate for more than six or seven years. a lot of work in the run—up to christmas. and then on the same page, of the guardian, you can see paddington bear having a feature role in the marks & spencer christmas and. i think we will go quickly... yes, to south korea where we understand that president trump arrived
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1.32th some ‘of nuclearg’if’:~: —is .. nucleaiinif’:~: ' , is .. nucleal in and % “4.5! 351: 13-2»; “3—1—7 flee-4l, —!!—.~.~: : u7! eat: i—g ' 7 757. 1177-47'74177: : are at the u7! 7!!! f!'~! ' 7 757. 1177-97 h7: : are at the home of hours in this by 2a hours in south korea. this is, by far, the most significant day of this entire tour rosacea. important news. we will talk about that throughout the morning. -- entire
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tour here. in the mail, martin keogh says that the fans need to get real and accept that perhaps they will not have a manager who will meet their ambition. perhaps david moyes would be a sensible appointment. and, interesting, a potential right—hand man, stuart pearce. a bit of passion. perhaps that is what they need to reignite things at west ham. it could be a 1- to there. something does need to change. it has not been good for quite sometime. would you like an animal named after you 7 sometime. would you like an animal named after you? i would love it. how about a rat? i named after you? i would love it. how about a rat? 73551; as! "w
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hq, landlord "w is a dorset landlord and man is new is a dorset landlord and man is new is the oldest ancestor has been named after him. if i saw this right like creature i would be scared. this man helped discover it. i could try and pronounce it... del—sto—therian—new—manny. try and pronounce it... del—sto—therian— new— manny.m try and pronounce it... del-sto-therian-new-manny. it rolls off the tongue, doesn't it? footage the wta £47 it a complete was a mmglete disgrare gig £2; gi the of and they were picking tennis stars and they were picking the groups they were in based on the models who are coming out on the catwalk. yes. the a or b of each group was revealed under clothing.
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it was all quite very wrong.|i group was revealed under clothing. it was all quite very wrong. i think everybody involved... there will be discussions. yes. rightly . coming morning of those are skills i would love to be able to do a backflip. why don't you have a go while we get some news, travel and weather. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. detectives investigating the murder of a 20—year—old woman who was shot dead in the street while out with friends have made a new arrest. mohanna abdhou was shot in malvern road in kilburn in may and died at the scene.
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a 21—year—old woman was arrested yesterday after voluntarily handing herself in at a north london police station. two teenagers have already been charged with murder. a council backed service in newham to help people trying to pay back high interest credit is being expanded. it's one of the poorest boroughs in the country and it's thought one in four people there have debt problems. moneyworks was the idea of the borough's mayor sir robin wales. we are now giving lows to people who cannot get it from anywhere else on the basis of we know them, why would we not do that? it has been successful so far. we have given out hundreds of lows. we have been running for two years and we will continue to support our residents. and all this week on bbc london we'll be discussing personal debt, so you'd like to tell us about your experience of trying to afford to live in london, then please do get in touch. residents at a housing estate in poplar say they've been told to remove their sheds in case
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they pose a fire risk following the grenfell disaster. they claim it's ridiculous — but the housing association, poplar harca, says grenfell has changed the way all public housing is managed. on the tube — there's still no service on the district line between wimbledon and parsons green following yesterday's train derailment near wimbledon. that's expected to be ongoing all morning. on the overground there's no service from wandsworth road to clapham junction because of broken rail. on the roads — waterloo bridge is down to one lane for roadworks until christmas. and york road is closed from the imax roundabout to waterloo station for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it does not feel as cold as it did this time yesterday. we do, however, have a lot of cloud
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around. it is a grey start and we are expecting some outbreaks of rain little later. at first, these outbreaks of rain are fairly light and patchy. it is not until later on when the wind will strengthen and we will see heavy and more persistent rain arrives as we head towards rush hour this evening. it may be quite wet. maximum temperature around 11 or 12 celsius. the rain will stay with us through much of the night. there will still be breezy. wet and breezy. the minimum temperature, again, reasonably mild for this time of year. as we have through wednesday the rain will start to fizzle out. the cloud gradually starting to be eaten away and towards the west we will get up right end and at maybe a bit of sunshine. clear at first overnight on wednesday so there could be an early frost that more cloud arriving by dawn meaning that should disappear to a cloudy day for thursday and for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan.
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bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: lewis hamilton and apple are the latest big names to have details of their tax affairs revealed in the paradise papers. sean will be here injust a few minutes to explain what it all means. we'll bring you news of a very special arrival, a baby gibbon born in the wild who's giving hope to the future of this endangered species. the actress charlie murphy will be here to tell us about playing peaky blinders' first non—fictional character, firebrand trade unionist jessie eden, who led thousands of women out on strike in the 19305. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to call his iranian donald trump has arrived in korea
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for the first time since taking office ahead of talks of an north korea's nuclear programme. these are live pictures of the us president, who said he will work with south korea on a strategy to deal with north korea but there are likely to be significant differences of opinions. wejust saw be significant differences of opinions. we just saw pictures be significant differences of opinions. wejust saw pictures in the last few moments of the motorcade arriving but donald trump will meet president moon in the blue house, president moon's official residence, he met him there in the last few minutes or so, met by a parade of crowds. right now he is inspecting the troops, or has been in the last few minutes. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to call his iranian counterpart this morning after being accused of making a mistake that could see a british woman spending five more years in an iranian prison. he's facing calls to retract his claim to a parliamentary committee last week, that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists in iran when she was arrested last year, something her employer and herfamily have denied. priti patel, the international did
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and secretary, apologise for not informing the foreign office of meetings with officials in israel and said boris johnson meetings with officials in israel and said borisjohnson knew before the visit. labour said it all warranted a cabinet office enquiry. the nhs is struggling to cope with rising demand forfrontline services, despite increasing the number of staff in england. that's the warning from health bosses, who say boosting the workforce is not enough to tackle the growing needs of patients. nhs providers voiced their concerns ahead of their annual conference, which gets under way in birmingham today. half of the 26 victims of the worst mass shooting in texan history are children, officials have now confirmed.
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the youngest of the dead is a one—year—old baby and the oldest is a 77—year—old woman. it's also emerged the gunman, ex—airman devin patrick kelly, was court—martialled for domestic violence in 2012, and was barred from owning or buying guns. retailers have seen sales of non—food items grow at their slowest pace in nearly seven years. figures from the british retail consortium and accountancy firm kpmg show the sales of goods excluding food rose by only 0.1% in just three months, with clothing sales particularly badly hit. the brc says the figures will give retailers cause for concern in the run—up to christmas. do you suffer from a fear of heights? evenif even if you don't this is quite something. austrian climber angela ayter has become the first woman to conquer one of the world's toughest climbing routes.
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this is la planta de shiva in spain. it had previously only been climbed by two men. angela spent two years training for the climb by casting replicas of the various holds along the route and installing them on her local climbing wall. and after making it to the top, it was time to relax and enjoy the view! asjohn was pointing out earlier, she's probably relaxing but from a normal human's point of view, doesn't look like a relaxing position. these professional climbers sometimes anchor in a makeshift tent or bed on a cliff face, that's where they can i guess when they are taking on these huge climbs. incredible. i'm going to sound like a complete wimp now, have you ever tried the hand jam on a climbing
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technique, you wedge it in... you hold and then you hang off it. technique, you wedge it in... you hold and then you hang off itm really hurts. i thinki hold and then you hang off itm really hurts. i think i would lose my arm doing something like that. really good climber friend my arm doing something like that. really good climberfriend of mine said try it and i never doing it again. it is way to power ratio. i am fartoo again. it is way to power ratio. i am far too heavy for my power! —— weight. we were saying yesterday whether bilic would still be manager of we st whether bilic would still be manager of west ham, he met with the chairman and he has gone, sacked. there is debate about the potential replacement coming in, david moyes, it's rumoured he will come in as the replacement and lots of west ham fans not especially happy. they're looking for an appointment to match their ambition and take the club forward and they think moyes is not really box office enough for them, not going to help them play the way they want to give and where they are at the moment, in the relegation zone, maybe they need someone to come in and take charge. no details
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of when that appointment will come. bilic was a popular player with the hammers before becoming manager but his team have struggled this season and they currently sit in the relegation places. bbc sport understands west ham have held talks with moyes about taking over. so who is david moyes? well, he began his career with a successful spell at preston north end back in 1998. from there he went to everton and guided them to fourth, still their best premier league finish. then he got the big job, taking over from sir alex ferguson at manchester united in 2013. the club's first new manager in 27 years. he only lasted ten months before being sacked. moyes managed in spain for a year, taking charge of real sociedad before leaving in 2015. he took over at sunderland last year but they finished bottom of the premier league and were relegated. moyes resigned in may and hasn't had any otherjob since. a massive few days lie ahead
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for northern ireland's footballers. on thursday and then sunday they'll take on switzerland to decide which side will qualify for next year's world cup. this was the last time they reached the tournament, back in 1986, but they've got a taste for big events after reaching last year's european championship. i don't think i could have enough words to describe what it would mean to us, what it would mean to the people of northern ireland. huge. but we're not there yet. we've got two games now, two cup finals, 180 minutes. what a week ahead. the tottenham players harry winks and harry kane have pulled out of the england squad for the friendly matches against germany and brazil through injury. jake livermore has been called up to replace winks who went off at half time in spurs game with crystal palace. kane was kicked in the leg in that match and his absence may mean
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a first start for 20—year—old tammy abraham. it would be a massive achievement for me. like i said, a big confidence boost to me as well and it shows i'm going in the right direction. if i do get my opportunity, i'd like to grab it as much as i can. ifeel like i'm ready but like i said, it won't be easy, i have to prove to the manager in training why he picked me and keep working as hard as i can. 1—0 up, with the other side down to ten men, non—league chorley must have thought they were in the second round of the fa cup. but fleetwood town, who play three divisions higher, equalised and then this late goal from jack sowerby broke chorley hearts. the second round draw was made last night and sees giantkillers boreham wood go to coventry. it's known as the race that stops a nation, and it was a great one for ireland. in a thrilling sprint to the finish, the melbourne cup in australia was won by the 14/1 shot rekindling, giving jockey corey brown his second triump in the event and a first for trainerjoseph o'brien.
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johannes vermeer and max dynamite made it an irish 1—2—3. the organisers of a men's tennis tournment have been forced to apolgies after the players' draw was criticised for being sexist. players at the tournment in milan found out if they were in group a or b, when the models revealed which letter was hidden beneath their clothing. the sponsors red bull and the atp, the men's games governing body, accepted that the format was in poor taste. various prominent tennis females took to twitter to voice their opinions. judy murray commenting that the event was simply awful. ady murray's former coach amelie mauresmo wasnt a fan either, while current player alize cornet hints the so called futuristic event may be stuck slightly in the past if you've won 16 grand slams, two olympic golds and been in four
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davis cup winning teams you'd expect to be recognised at a tennis court. but this is what happened when rafael nadal turned up without his pass at the paris masters last week. he got there in the end. bring your pass next time, rafa. clearly didn't realise it was him but he talked his way in. was an awkward encounter, though. who are you, i'm rafa nadal. are you, you have a racket but i'm not convinced. he has a job to do, though, doesn't he? he does indeed. nhs staff in england are working on the edge of safety as rising demand is outstripping the increasing numbers being employed, health bosses say. there are now 6% more staff than there were three years ago, but demand for services has risen by three times as much in some areas.
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nhs providers, which represents health chiefs, said staff shortages was now the number one concern in the nhs. let's talk more about this now with the physician dr mark holland. good morning. good morning. thanks for coming on this morning. give us an idea, what kind of staffing pressure are you under at the moment? it's at all levels, it's not just doctors, its nurses, therapists, it's not uniform, it's in pockets across the nhs so you'll find some hospitals are struggling lots more than others. specific exa m ples lots more than others. specific examples might be that if you've got what's called a general medical ward, a ward outside the a&e area, outside the very acute area where you might have on average 28, 32 beds and you should been a thing people on a ratio of one to eight, eight patients to one nurse, a good ratio that's been proven, we know people do better where there's more
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nurses, you might find on weekends there's only one trained nurse and people are trying to push around to find someone to cover a shift. we find someone to cover a shift. we find covering junior doctors' rotors is more difficult than it used to be so is more difficult than it used to be so it's at many levels. you worked in the nhs for many years and you have worked in acute medicine for many years, have worked in acute medicine for many yea rs, over have worked in acute medicine for many years, over those years, how would you describe where you are now? we're ina now? we're in a different place and over the years things have never been perfect and everyone would say in the history of the nhs, it's always been a difficult history, but we're ina been a difficult history, but we're in a place where it appears we've never quite learned the lessons from the past. once upon a time, as you said, i've been in the nhs for many yea rs, said, i've been in the nhs for many years, when i was younger we did these huge shifts. which there were problems with? absolutely. that was wrong. but when you take on those shifts away, and quite rightly our junior colleagues are only working a maximum of 48 hours, that's left a big void because you have to fill
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rotors and what we've never done is be five to ten years ahead of the game so when we knew we were going to reduce doctors' hours we had plans in place to make that happen. it's not all negative, lots of good stuff is going on at the moment, recruitment drives and the idea we're trying to train people to do work traditionally done by doctors because doctors are very expensive. i think the nhs have actually got it, what the problem is, but we are just five or ten years behind the game. we know from experience that many people who work in the nhs watch the programme and a comment often because they care passionately about theirjob, often because they care passionately about their job, and often because they care passionately about theirjob, and the government will say there are 12,700 more doctors and 10,600 more nurses on ward since may, 2010. what we have got is huge numbers of posts currently unfilled and they know that's the case as well, so we've not got enough bodies in the system at the moment because we're all trying to recruit extra people.
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although we may have created more posts, the question is whether we have managed to fill those posts. as has been said, we gotjunior doctor rotors were we don't have enough hours to fill with those rotors, and all of the time, which you guys report every day, there is a scientific breakthrough which invariably means you will need more staff and more skilled staff. for example, when i was a junior doctor, stroke disease was one of those things that was catastrophic and there's no hope. nowadays we give people blood thinning medications and that created a problem, and in the near future my colleagues will be doing keyhole surgery and we will have to create a neurotic people with a new skill set again. things are the bella ping all the time —— new group of people. —— things are developing. thanks forjoining us this morning. yesterday we were talking about frost, apparently it is warmer this morning? i don't feel
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it, i still have the big coat on. temperatures up across england and wales but there is a cool front coming in and brings rain with lost three wind. behind the cold front, the temperature is falling. it depends where you are. in scotland and northern ireland it is a cool start. here we are. rain coming in from the west. very slow moving eastward. some of our rain will be heavy, some of it is already heavy so heavy, some of it is already heavy so expect a fair bit of surfers water for your journey so expect a fair bit of surfers waterfor yourjourney in so expect a fair bit of surfers water for yourjourney in this morning. also around, this band of rain, gusty wind that will pick up later on across the south coast, parts of devon into dawson and the isle of wight. this morning there is a lot of cloud around, there is also some showers. a couple of bright spells. whether cloud remains broken it is eight cool start in the south—east but where there is cloud cover and showers, the temperature is in double figures. and we had to
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the rain across northern england and southern scotland into eastern scotland. kinda, still some cloud was showers and snow on the hills. for northern ireland, the temperature drop by five degrees as the cold front went through. you have a bright start but it will brighten up further as we go through the afternoon. the band that extends from the north—west of england through much of wales. it will be a breezy day but as the weather front comes through the wind will be gusty along the south coast. we could have along the south coast. we could have a gust of wind at about a0 or 50 mile an hour. behind our rain we can still see a few showers around the brightening up as sunny spells across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wales and into cornwall. we will see some showers here and some could be heavy and possibly thundery. as we go through the evening and overnight we continue to watch the band of rain pushed down into the south—east. there will be clear skies coming in behind ina there will be clear skies coming in behind in a few showers. where we have clear skies it will be a cold night once again. the temp richer on
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the chart for towns and cities showing that we will stay in positive figures but in rural figures it will be negative. for somewhere like keith bridge, it will be about —a, —5. whizzing around the border with frost around and you could see some patchiness and fog across north—west it scotland. tomorrow we start with the weather front in the south—east slowly moving away as the week feature. with the rigid high pressure behind, a lot of dry weather and we have another weather front coming in from the west. that will also bring in some wet and windy weather with exposure in the north—west we look at gusts reaching gale force. that will move through the day but the bulk of england and wales, away from the remnants of the weather front, it will be dry, fine but not particularly warm. on thursday that scoots southward and we see a lot of dry weather, a few showers and the temperature rock a little bit. 9— 1a. topsy—turvy weatherwise to next few days. thank very
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much, carol. sorry, iwas looking the wrong way in that way. i felt carroll would be over there. i was trying to avoid her. she is always with us. the paradise papers is one of our main stories, probably for the whole week. a lot ofjustifiable anger on twitter about the way people are getting around paying the right amount of tax. sean will look at that in a bit more detail. good morning. everybody, more details have been emerging over the last few days that of shed light on how multinationals, household names are using tax havens to avoid paying theirfair using tax havens to avoid paying their fair share using tax havens to avoid paying theirfair share of tax using tax havens to avoid paying their fair share of tax to the revenue. the information was obtained, originally, by a german newspaper and they shared that with international conservative —— consortium of investigative
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journalists. that is how the guardian and the bbc came into. lewis hamilton, one of those names, avoided paying vat on a private jet. that was because it was registered in the isle of man. they also show how the tech giant apple may have saved billions of pounds around the world by using the offshore tax haven ofjersey. world by using the offshore tax haven of jersey. a world by using the offshore tax haven ofjersey. a lot of places involved in these stories as well, not just people involved in these stories as well, notjust people and companies. let's talk to russ mould, he's a financial expert at the stockbrokers aj bell... a lot of complicated tax structures in place. take the example from lewis hamilton, you look at a place like the isle of man that has been used, partly for tax purposes by a lot of different people and companies. how do crown dependencies, tax havens, how do they exist? the two things they can afford to do what they are doing,
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they are small countries. look at they are small countries. look at the uk. it spends £150 billion on the uk. it spends £150 billion on the national health service. clearly the national health service. clearly the isle of man does not need that kind of money. its outgoings are much smaller and its incomes... it will charge for companies to register their with an annual renewal fee. register their with an annual renewalfee. i'll be register their with an annual renewal fee. i'll be an register their with an annual renewalfee. i'll be an income register their with an annual renewal fee. i'll be an income tax of some kind and it may attract high net worth individuals. even if it does not charge a high percentage there will still be money coming in. there may even be things like departure taxes. there is always a cost to do this. it stops the rest of us from taking advantage. if you wa nt to of us from taking advantage. if you want to live in monaco, it will probably cause 50p —— quid for a pintand a probably cause 50p —— quid for a pint and a burger. as part of the
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investigation, the isle of man says they are now calling in the british government to review its procedures. if we go on to the questions around apple. they are not the first big technology company we have talked about tax practices. under such aid big company choose where to pay taxes. there are a lot of legal, and i stress that, legal structures. can choose that because of the tax rates. some of the lowest tax rates in europe are ireland, hungary, the u.k.'s in europe are ireland, hungary, the u. k.'s competitive in europe are ireland, hungary, the u.k.'s competitive at 19%. the global average is around 23%. you can try to have countries where you are selling but you can also have countries from which you supply yourself. star bugs were supplying themselves coffee from switzerland. the theory is that you tax the supply from switzerland and that
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original profit in the uk. it is when you book your revenue and your cost. you can set up intercompany loa ns cost. you can set up intercompany loans and charge interest between the two. apple say they pay nearly $34 the two. apple say they pay nearly $3a billion in corporate income tax around the world and they do it within the letter of the law. its corporate tax rate is around 2a%. that is pretty much bang on the global average. our pension funds, shareholders in these companies, they will want companies to make as much money as they can. it is a company's much money as they can. it is a compa ny‘s fiduciary duty much money as they can. it is a company's fiduciary duty to try and maximise profit. therefore, potentially, people's pension funds will benefit from rising profit. thank you very much. a lot of eyes will now be on governments around the world and people who make the decisions on what the tax setups are to see what they do next. we'll talk
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about it a little more here on brea kfast about it a little more here on breakfast this morning. but, not now. a baby gibbon injava has become the first of its species to be born in the wild to parents that were both rescued from the illegal pet trade. the arrival provides hope for the future of this endangered species, but researchers monitoring the trade in apes warn that it continues to threaten many animals, some of which are close to extinction. our science reporter victoria gill has been in indonesia to investigate. on steep forest slopes here in west java, conservationists trek daily to watch the new residents. these treetops are now home to a few families of endangered apes. and today the team is checking in on a very special arrival. alongside this juvenile, which was born in captivity, is a new baby. that
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six—month—old baby is the first baby javan given to be born in the wild to rehabilitated and released pa rents. to rehabilitated and released parents. both parents started their lives in the pet trade. now they are living in the wild as a family. we hope over the that they will survive and then the baby will make a new family and continue generations. they certainly look wonderful. and happy. but these dates are still under threat from the pet trade. they are brought and sold illegally and openly. sales are increasing lea k and openly. sales are increasing leak —— increasingly moving online. this baby is one of many being sold by one pet shop injava. poachers target babies that are easy to sell. and for these intelligent animals, being taken from their mother is traumatic. and the trade is not
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confined to one species. orangutans make up nearly 70% of the great apes that are seized by law enforcement. is it nine—year—old was found in a box in jakarta, is it nine—year—old was found in a box injakarta, the infant via bios toa box injakarta, the infant via bios to a purchaser. you know where you put your luggage? that is where she was 1a hours. when they found her she was traumatised to the bone. she did not eat she did not drink. it was difficult for us to get going because she lost her will to live. these rescued orangutans are now learning to live in the trees. while programmes like this can get a few animals back to the wild each year, they are not yet making a dent in they are not yet making a dent in the impact of the trade. over about a20 the impact of the trade. over about a 20 year period, where orangutans, specifically, were either confiscated or donated there were only seven prosecutions from those a00 cases. so it is a huge issue because the sellers are not being held accountable. they are not being
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prosecuted. the population of these aids continues to decline. forest destruction as well as the pet trade fuels crisis. work like this is crucial to give these precious new family isa crucial to give these precious new family is a safe life in the wild. but conservationists will have to fight for the future of the species. what lovely pictures. yes. bud quite a distressing story. you watch victoria gill's documentary — ‘our world, songbirds for sale' — in full on the bbc iplayer. will have the national headlines for you shortly, talking about donald trump in south korea. a few headaches the theresa may with boris johnson. will also speak to caroline lucas about sexual harassment in westminster. 20 to talk about. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. —— plenty to talk about. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm claudia—liza armah. detectives investigating the murder of a 20—year—old woman who was shot dead in the street while out with friends have made a new arrest. mohanna abdhou was shot in malvern road in kilburn in may and died at the scene. a 21—year—old woman was arrested yesterday after voluntarily handing herself in at a north london police station. two teenagers have already been charged with murder. a council—backed service in newham to help people trying to pay back high interest credit is being expanded. it's one of the poorest boroughs in the country and it's thought one in four people there have debt problems. moneyworks was the idea of the borough's mayor sir robin wales. we are now giving loans to people who cannot get it from anywhere else on the basis of we know them, why would we not do that? it has been successful so far. we have given out hundreds of loans. we have been running for two years and we will continue to support our residents. and all this week on bbc london we'll be discussing personal debt,
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so you'd like to tell us about your experience of trying to afford to live in london, then please do get in touch. residents at a housing estate in poplar say they've been told to remove their sheds in case they pose a fire risk following the grenfell disaster. they claim it's ridiculous — but the housing association, poplar harca, says grenfell has changed the way all public housing is managed. on the tube — there's still no service on the district line between wimbledon and parsons green following yesterday's train derailment near wimbledon. that's expected to be ongoing all morning. on the overground there's no service from wandsworth road to clapham junction because of broken rail. on the roads — waterloo bridge is down to one lane for roadworks until christmas. and york road is closed from the imax roundabout to waterloo station for gas works. the works are supposed to finish later today.
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and in thamesmead, eastern way is closed near to birchmere park following a collision. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it does not feel as cold as it did this time yesterday. we do, however, have a lot of cloud around. it is a grey start and we are expecting some outbreaks of rain little later. at first, these outbreaks of rain are fairly light and patchy. it is not until later on when the wind will strengthen and we will see heavy and more persistent rain arrives as we head towards rush hour this evening. it may be quite wet. maximum temperature around 11 or 12 celsius. the rain will stay with us through much of the night. it will still be breezy. wet and breezy. the minimum temperature, again, reasonably mild for this time of year. as we have through wednesday the rain will start to fizzle out. the cloud gradually starting to be eaten away and towards the west we will get brighter at the end and at maybe a bit of sunshine.
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clear at first overnight on wednesday so there could be an early frost that more cloud arriving by dawn meaning that should disappear to a cloudy day for thursday and for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. donald trump arrives in south korea ahead of talks about north korea's nuclear programme. the us president says he'll work with south korea on a strategy to deal with the north but there are likely to be significant differences of opinion. good morning, it's tuesday the 7th of november. also this morning: the husband of a british woman in prison in iran asks borisjohnson to clarify comments he made to mp5 about her case that he says could see her sentence doubled. working on the edge of safety.
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health bosses warn staff shortages are now the biggest concern in the nhs but ministers say they have a plan to tackle the problem. more tax revelations this morning, as tech giant apple and the formula 1 driver lewis hamilton are the latest to have their affairs scrutinised after a huge leak of documents. new rules expected to come in for those tricked to making bank payments to fraudsters. more more in a moment. in sport, west ham are looking for a new manager. and could it be this man? the former manchester united and sunderland head coach david moyes is expected to take over. i'm in west london finding out why when it comes to girls and boys, at sport they have vastly different attitudes. i'll be looking at what's being done to tackle it. let's find out what the weather is like. a band of rain moving from the west to the
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east with blustery winds around. ahead of it, mild, behind it despite the sunshine and showers it will be that bit colder. more in 15 minutes. good morning, first our main story: in the last hour donald trump has arrived in korea for the first time since taking office ahead of talks about north korea's nuclear programme. the us president says he'll work with south korea on a strategy to deal with pyongyang, but there are likely to be significant differences of opinion. our china correspondent, robin brant, reports. this is a very brief visit, 2a hours, but i think it's highly symbolic because we're just 35 kilometres from the front line in terms of this confrontation, this escalating nuclear confrontation with north korea. president trump comes here with the alliance between these two countries hugely important, it is decades old, and the message
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he and the south korean leadership will want to merge by the time he leaves tomorrow is the alliance remains resilient and strong. they have strength in unity. but there are differences of opinion about how to deal with the north. moon jae—in, the president, was elected a few months ago with a pledge to extend an olive branch and president trump has called that appeasement. donald trump appears optimistic this morning, sitting down with some of the american troops here, tens of thousands based here to protect this country. they had lunch and afterwards he said to reporters that it has to work out, it always works out, things have to work out. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to call his iranian counterpart this morning after being accused of making a mistake that could see a british woman spending five more years in an iranian prison. he's facing calls to retract his claim to a parliamentary committee last week, that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists in iran when she was arrested last year, something her employer and herfamily have denied. when you look at what nazanin
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zaghari—ratcliffe was doing, she was simply teaching people journalism as i understand. let's get the latest from our political correspondent chris mason. how are things going at the moment? it's an extraordinary period of politics, not only is brexit dominating, for the last week or so we've seen the allegations about harassment dominating the headlines and now this, two separate stories in which two individual cabinet ministers are in a huge amount of trouble. the suggestion is boris johnson, the foreign secretary, has made, in the words of labour, a serious mistake in misrepresenting what was happening in iran and what
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nazanin was doing there. her husband has said they were on holiday, her and her daughter, she wasn't pursuing journalism. and her daughter, she wasn't pursuingjournalism. she and her daughter, she wasn't pursuing journalism. she worked for the thomson reuters foundation but they don't have any programmes in iran, but as a result of these remarks from mrjohnson, she has been hauled back before the iranian courts and faces the potential of a far longer stint in prison. in addition to that, another cabinet minister this morning facing very awkward questions. priti patel, the international do the secretary, she went on holiday to israel in the summer. went on holiday to israel in the summer. nothing odd about that but it's odd if you squeeze in 12 political meetings that nobody at westminster knew anything about that international development secretary. she's apologised to the prime minister —— international development secretary. the prime minister wants to beef up the code ministers apply by. in a less secure
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government —— in a more secure government —— in a more secure government she government —— in a more secure government she would have been fired but she will hope to cling on this morning. we were talking about the paradise papers over the last few days and we will be talking about it through the morning. they've revealed that apple is sheltering some of its profits injersey. the practice isn't illegal, and the company says its done nothing wrong and remains the world's largest taxpayer. they also reveal lewis hamilton avoided tax on a jet he purchased by importing it to the isle of man. judith moritz is there for us this morning. what exactly are the allegations about the isle of man specifically? in terms of lewis hamilton, as you were saying, his legal team have said that the scheme to import his jet
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legal team have said that the scheme to import hisjet here legal team have said that the scheme to import his jet here to the isle of man was given the island's informed approval and it was all legal and above board and in fact the paradise papers have found evidence of 50 similar cases so with questions being asked on the island about how such schemes can be put into place and questions being asked around the world, the island's government here has asked the uk treasury to review the practice of importing luxury jets into treasury to review the practice of importing luxuryjets into the eu via the isle of man. but it's not just jets that have via the isle of man. but it's not justjets that have been of concern when it comes to do with tax, another allegation was made by panorama that the law on this island was changed to enable it to become easier to dodge tax. the programme showed paperwork which demonstrated letters had been sent from lawyers to the former financial regulator here on the island, david vick, asking for the law to be changed, but the done so to enable to get around a european law and that's
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something that has caused the debate here. the chief minister has said on the island if there is evidence he sees the island if there is evidence he sees that that proves it then he will take action and apologise. there's a separate row about an international travel business that was able to use the tax rules to artificially shift profits between germany and the island. lots of aspects to this, it's very compensated. the islands parliament only sits three times a month, it is due to sit today, it's anticipated it will all be aired there today. we'll be putting those points to the isle of man's chief minister at 7:30am. the nhs is struggling to cope with rising demand forfrontline services despite increasing the number of staff in england. that's the warning from health bosses, who say boosting the workforce is not enough to tackle the growing needs of patients. nhs providers voiced their concerns ahead of their annual conference, which gets under way in birmingham today.
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the department of health says it needs more staff and recently provided the biggest ever expansion of training places for doctors and nurses. half of the 26 victims of the worst mass shooting in texan history are children, officials have now confirmed. the youngest of the dead is a one—year—old baby and the oldest is a 77—year—old woman. it's also emerged the gunman, ex—airman devin patrick kelly, was court—martialled for domestic violence in 2012, and was barred from owning or buying guns. retailers have seen sales of non—food items grow at their slowest pace in nearly seven years. figures from the british retail consortium and accountancy firm kpmg show the sales of goods excluding food rose by only 0.1% in just three months, with clothing sales particularly badly hit. the brc says the figures will give retailers cause for concern in the run—up to christmas. a number of people contacting us to say they do suffer from a fear of
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heights and this has given them a bit of a fright this morning but here we go anyway. austrian climber angela ayter has become the first woman to conquer one of the world's toughest climbing routes. this is la planta de shiva in spain. it had previously only been climbed by two men. ina minute, in a minute, i warn you, you will see herfall, in a minute, i warn you, you will see her fall, but in a minute, i warn you, you will see herfall, but it in a minute, i warn you, you will see her fall, but it is in a minute, i warn you, you will see herfall, but it is planned in a minute, i warn you, you will see her fall, but it is planned and something she knew she was going to do. she is celebrating reaching the top. until this point only two men had ever managed to get to the top of this climb, so she's breaking a bit of history. after that she was relaxing and enjoying herself and the view in a slightly strange upsidedown position. a brave woman! could we be one step closer to seeing what the uk's trade deals could look like post—brexit? today the government is publishing its brexit trade bill. it's part of an array of legislation that will be discussed by parliament over the next year, aimed at ensuring a smooth departure from brussels. we'rejoined now by liam fox mp, secretary of state for international trade. good morning and thank you for
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joining us. so much interest in this obviously, how do you see best case scenario it working? well, this legislation is aimed to provide market stability as we leave the european union. it does a number of things. we are in course required to introduce new training schedules at the world trade organization in geneva, replicating what we've been doing as members of the eu in terms of global trading obligations. we wa nt to of global trading obligations. we want to see the arrangements the eu has with other countries where they have a trading agreement, we want to see that replicated in uk law. we have to take powers to do that. we have to take powers to do that. we have to take powers to do that. we have to set up a trade remedies authority to protect british business against dumping our subsidy once we leave the eu because we would otherwise have no mechanism to do that. what we're doing today is setting out a means of replicating the safety and security for british
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business and british exporters. there's so much interest in this of course. there's so much interest in this of course. let's talk about one thing, for example, wilbur ross, a us commerce secretary, talking about changes to regulations, he was saying there may have to be changes for example to regulations involving chlorinated chicken. are you looking at that kind of thing? we've made very clear that we won't see any reduction in uk standards either environmental, food, workers' rights, for example, as we leave the european union. that's why we've incorporated all of those in our eu withdrawal bill and we would seek to replicate those as we technically transpose the eu's free—trade agreements with us. for example, if america asked us to change the regulations, we wouldn't do that? we'll not want to reduce our standards in anyway, we've made that very clear. our consumers, as standards in anyway, we've made that very clear. our consumers, as well as our producers, very clear. our consumers, as well as our producers, have rights in this and we'll want to insure their
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protected. but we also want to have these detailed russians with the united states, i'm not sure they will be the top issues. for example we wa nt will be the top issues. for example we want to look at what we can do in terms of financial services and reducing artificial barriers in the defence industry. we want to make sure we defence industry. we want to make sure we get the best deal and naturally we wouldn't agree to something we didn't think was in the interests of the uk, either uk producers or consumers. interests of the uk, either uk producers or consumers. the confederation of british industry, you talk to them all the time, have said uncertainty could harm businesses. there are so many deals to be done, do you accept there is uncertainty? what we're doing today is exactly to reduce that uncertainty because we're going to bring into the united kingdom the laws we need to replicate the practice that the eu already has with a lot of these other countries in terms of trade. if we were not to do this today we would face the potential of not having trade agreements with countries such as switzerland or south korea, which
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are major training partners. so what we're doing today is exactly the sort of thing the cbi urged us to do, to provide certainty that as we leave the eu there will be no change in the market for our exporters or trading allies —— trading partners. let's talk about the customs bill and how that would work. we are hearing there could be the need for 5000 extra staff, what would you say to that? we need to update our customs procedures anyway and already investing a lot of money in that. exactly what we'll need in terms of the uk's eu will depend on the final agreement that we reach with the european union —— the uk eu. as you're well aware, the eu aren't willing to talk to us about that and that's unfortunate because for a lot of businesses and a lot of international investors, and a lot of european businesses, they want to know what that end state might look like so they can plan now for that. at this point the british government
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is urging the european union to talk to us about that so we can get much better certainty and much better clarity on what the future relationships might look like. can we talk a bit if we could about paradise papers and questions being raised about the willingness of british crown dependencies and overseas territories to facilitate tax avoidance. is enough being done, do you think you should be doing more? obviously tax transparency is a global issue and requires global action, especially in the very interdependent global economy that we have today. in fact, there's been a huge amount of progress made with dependent territories in terms of access to information and they are now allowing uk authorities to get real—time access to information. her majesty's revenue and customs have asked to see these papers, they're looking to see the timescale involved in this and are looking to see whether any wrongdoing has actually happened. so i think we have to wait to see exactly what
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information comes out of that before we makejudgements information comes out of that before we make judgements on whether we need to go even further than the current government has gone, and remember, we've actually collected £160 billion more in tax since we came to office than otherwise we would have because of the anti— avoidance measures we've taken. i want to talk also about boris johnson and british patel. how would you describe the mood in government at the moment? i describe it as businesslike. our major task is to deliver a major brexit and we are getting on with that. when it comes to the case of the foreign secretary i think we need to be careful. nothing but the foreign secretary has said would give us any justification for increasing the length of sentence. this is a regime acting in an appalling way and we need to be careful that in attempting to have a debate or even
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pointscoring the we do not make life more difficult for someone being held abroad in one of the most —— on the most spurious and unacceptable grounds. good morning to you if you are just joining us. here is what is happening with the weather. good morning. forsome of us that it is a mild start to the day. for scotland and northern ireland, cold a start. that is because we have a cold weather front pushing southwards, taking rain blustery winds with it as it also. using the radar picture, it is moving out of northern ireland and western scotland and moving westward —— westwards towards the south—east of country but slowly. six degrees in glasgow at the moment. ten minutes ago in edinburgh it was 10 degrees but with the weather front going through the temperature is falling and it is eight now. 11 in
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manchester and that will drop by a good few degrees as the weather front comes through. the rain continues down into the south—west. some of it is heavy. gusty wind as round as well. the wind will pick up later across southern counties. is also quite avail of cloud with some showers. not everyone will see the showers. not everyone will see the showers. temperatures have risen through the course of the nike tick the cloud and the showers extend into northern england and then we run into the band of rain across borders, in true scotland and behind that, still, avail of cloud the brightening up in the west. nonetheless, some showers and on the hills those showers will be wintry. in northern ireland, the rain has gone through and it will brighten up slowly. showers in the west and here is the rain across wales. gusty wind, particularly with height. through the rain as the rain advances to the south—east you will find the wind will pick up across
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south devon, dorset into the wards the isle of wight. behind that band of rain, it will brighten up with sunshine and a few showers. some of the showers across western scotland and northern ireland could prove to be thundery. there is no heat wave in prospect. you can see the temperatures dropped. ahead of the weather front we hang on to the skin of our teeth to 11. through the evening and overnight, as the front moves evening and overnight, as the front moves into the south—east, behind it a ridge of high pressured built—in. that will kill off many of the showers that it will be a cold night asa showers that it will be a cold night as a result. the temperature that you can see is indicative of towns and cities. in rural areas they will be lower. in rural parts of the country, you could get to temperatures around for —— —a —5. some frost around and patchy mist and fog as well. tomorrow, the weak front will edge away. then we have the next weather front coming in.
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that will bring in wet and windy weather, gales with exposure in the north—west but it leaves the temperature will not be quite as low as it is going to be today. ican i can looking at the wrong screen!|j am i can looking at the wrong screen!” am behind you! behind you! bud, i watch the screen in front of us... that and we look behind me, i100% look the wrong way. let's do the papers now. isil we were going to talk about girls and sport. will we do that in a moment? many of the papers are talking about paradise papers. front page of the times, the us firm secret move to a lloyd a tax bill. they are talking about apple. a picture of lewis hamilton, accused of avoiding tax on this private aircraft which he had delivered
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through the isle of man where the vat refund was available because of slightly different rules. we will speak to someone about that in about ten minutes time. the daily mirror is also talking about lewis hamilton. the daily mail, many of you may have seen the news yesterday, a young girl who died at 18 months old. she had just been adopted. there is a lot about the investigation into what happened. social workers and medical staff mist a series of chances to save her. that was all covered in court yesterday to the daily telegraph, don't let the eu dictate brexit warns the us. quite a few of the newspapers are carrying this interview with michael parkinson who says he was flirty but would not dare do that now. louise, you mention this one earlier, school being the best place for children with sniffles. parents are being told to get a grip and stop keeping their children from school simply because they have a call for a cold.
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a crackdown on unauthorised absences in east sussex has warned parents they will be fined if their children is cold. is the season —— season for sniffles. many of you thinking right now, we'll send them to school or not? now you went to school, didn't you? my mother would tell me to get a grip. i had an older brother who was... he often stayed off. i got the rough end of the stick. good luck with those decisions this morning. something else we discuss a lot on this programme is women in sport. how you get women to be active in sport and have that continues through life. especially... i properly gave up sport at about 15 and came back to it quite late in life. i wish i had stayed with it all the way through. there is still a shocking gender gap when it comes to physical education. we have known about it for a long time so why is it so difficult to
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persuade teenage girls to get active? let's get more from our reporter holly hamilton, who's at a school in west london for us this morning. good morning. you have literally hit the nail on the head there. the fact that there are so many women out there who look back at their time at school and think why did i not stick it out? this is what we are talking about? it won't come as a surprise to many people that there is a gender divide when it comes to attitudes towards physical education between girls and boys. you would not think it hit today. these girls are very active. they are very committed. they will be looking at initiatives that are trying to solve that. this survey that has been carried out is the biggest of its kind. it finds the girls are lacking in confidence, especially when compared to boys. i will be speaking to some of the girls to find out just what they think some of those things are. it is no secret that girls are not
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getting enough physical activity. in fa ct, getting enough physical activity. in fact, just 8% of those aged 8— 11 is doing the recommended daily amount. half the amount of boys. the question is why. i think with girls, my airdoes question is why. i think with girls, my air does not like good, summing silly like that. especially the boys can see. they would just getjudged. body confidence is just one of the issues raised by girls in the survey of over 26,000 pupils in england northern ireland. with one in three aged 1a— 16 admitting they are unhappy with their appearance. and while both recognise the importance ofan while both recognise the importance of an active lifestyle, girls are lax —— less likely to put it in practice. tell me, honestly. have all of you always enjoy playing in primary school, everything was like gymnastic and dance. then i came to high school and we do all sorts of stuff like rugby which i really enjoyed to karachi in this seven. it
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does not really matter how you look when you do if it is how well you can do it. the youth sport trust has made a number of recommendations it hopes will make physical activity in school more relevant to girls and that includes having the right role models. my inspiration is gabriel douglas. abbey siddons. do you think we see enough of these role models and the media and the press or is that too much of a fixation may be on the mend side of things? they focus on serena williams and having a baby and how she looks rather than the number of grand slam ‘s. a baby and how she looks rather than the number of grand slam 's. you see more about league three teams losing ona 0—0 more about league three teams losing on a 0—0 draw than about top—flight women. the barriers they face go well beyond the school gates it is certainly a start. and who knows who our role models of the future will be. some of the frustrations from
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some be. some of the frustrations from some of those girls you heard there. but had now to play a. claire, you area but had now to play a. claire, you are a great example. you are someone who did not enjoy pe at school.” did not enjoyed as much as i think the skies do now. think things have changed a lot for our students. i think there is so much more publicity around everything that they do. so much more energy and enthusiasm, driven notjust by but buyer of all organisations. so much more publicity around it all. it is out there a lot more. is so girls get a lot more opportunity.” out there a lot more. is so girls get a lot more opportunity. i think thatis get a lot more opportunity. i think that is the thing. speaking to some of the girls, they highlighted that to me. that they would like to see a lot more women on the tv and in the media. talking now to have from women in sport. what was the most surprising thing for you? this is something we have heard before. we have heard this before. it is not new information. half as many girls aren't reaching recommended activity levels. what was new information was that girls wanted to be more active
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and that they understand it is important to be active and healthy. they have a whole host of barriers and a whole range of reasons why they are not as active as boys. we found that one quarter... sorry! they are definitely active here! we found that one quarter of girls arriving at secondary school are already saying they do not till confident about the way their body looks at the they reach their mid—teens that goes up to one third of girls who are unhappy. that is playing out in terms of sport and activity. they are not confident being active, they are not co mforta ble being active, they are not comfortable in the close they were nor the knowledge they have in that setting. that is why we need parents and teachers to get behind the girls and teachers to get behind the girls and encourage them, talk to them, find out what is going on and how they would like to be active and more choices they would make. these girls were straight in hit a straightaway and just because the teacher spent time, she understands what they want to be doing and how they want to be active. very
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quickly, i would like to speak to alison from the youth trust. what other solutions? we were then about education. weekly, is that the answer? what can parents do?m education. weekly, is that the answer? what can parents do? it is about understanding the motivations and barriers that girls face. that is different in every school and different with every young person. is schools in particular can work quite closely with their goals and talk to them, consult and can show that they understand barriers and how they can address them, then they can make a difference towards the girls warm. it also means notjust consulting but working with them to design and develop new activities, new interventions, new ways of delivering pe in sports the girls are comfortable with it and believe irrelevant to them. i think that a move on the court —— before we literally get wiped out by a ball. we will speak to more girls later on the first, time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm claudia—liza armah. detectives investigating the murder of a 20—year—old woman who was shot dead in the street while out with friends have made a new arrest. mohanna abdhou was shot in malvern road in kilburn in may and died at the scene. a 21—year—old woman was arrested yesterday after voluntarily handing herself in at a north london police station. two teenagers have already been charged with murder. a council—backed service in newham to help people trying to pay back high interest credit is being expanded. it's one of the poorest boroughs in the country and it's thought one in four people there have debt problems. moneyworks was the idea of the borough's mayor sir robin wales. we are now giving loans to people who cannot get it from anywhere else on the basis of we know them, why would we not do that? it has been successful so far. we have given out hundreds of loans. we have been running for two years
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and we will continue to support our residents the way i think councils should. and all this week on bbc london we'll be discussing personal debt, so you'd like to tell us about your experience of trying to afford to live in london, then please do get in touch. residents at a housing estate in poplar say they've been told to remove their sheds in case they pose a fire risk following the grenfell disaster. they claim it's ridiculous — but the housing association, poplar harca, says grenfell has changed the way all public housing is managed. on the tube — there's still no service on the district line between wimbledon and parsons green following yesterday's train derailment near wimbledon. that's expected to be ongoing all morning. on the overground there's no service from wandsworth road to clapham junction because of broken rail. on the roads — waterloo bridge is down to one lane for roadworks until christmas. and york road is closed from the imax roundabout to waterloo station for gas works. and in thamesmead, eastern way
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is closed near to birchmere park following a collision. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it does not feel as cold as it did this time yesterday. we do, however, have a lot of cloud around. it is a grey start and we are expecting some outbreaks of rain little later. at first, these outbreaks of rain are fairly light and patchy. it is not until later on when the wind will strengthen and we will see heavy and more persistent rain arrives as we head towards rush hour this evening. it may be quite wet. maximum temperature around 11 or 12 celsius. the rain will stay with us through much of the night. it will still be breezy. wet and breezy. the minimum temperature, again, reasonably mild for this time of year. as we head through wednesday the rain will start to fizzle out. the cloud gradually starting to be eaten away and towards the west we will get brighter at the end and at maybe a bit of sunshine. clear at first overnight on wednesday so there could be an early frost that more cloud arriving
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by dawn meaning that should disappear to a cloudy day for thursday and for friday. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. in the last hour donald trump has arrived in korea for the first time since taking office ahead of talks about north korea's nuclear programme. president trump met president moon at the blue house, his official residence, he was met by a parade and crowds lined the streets. for some and crowds lined the streets. for some of the morning he will inspect the troops. the us president says he'll work with south korea on a strategy to deal with pyongyang, but there are likely to be significant differences of opinion.
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the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to call his iranian counterpart this morning, after being accused of making a mistake that could see a british woman spending five more years in an iranian prison. he's facing calls to retract his claim to a parliamentary committee last week that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists in iran when she was arrested last year, something her employer and herfamily have denied. the prime minister has asked for the ministerial code of conduct to be tightened after an mp apologised for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during the summer. priti patel, the international development secretary, apologised for not informing the foreign office and suggesting borisjohnson knew in advance of the visit. labour said the shocking admission warranted a cabinet office inquiry. more revelations have emerged from the millions of leaked documents known as the paradise papers, with technology giant apple the latest to be named.
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the documents show that apple is sheltering some of its profits injersey following a crackdown on tax laws in ireland. the practice isn't illegal. apple says it remains the world's largest taxpayer and that the tax it pays has not been reduced. rising demand for frontline services is leavign the nhs struggling to cope, despite increasing the number of staff in england. that's the warning from health bosses, who say boosting the workforce is not enough to tackle the growing needs of patients. nhs providers voiced their concerns ahead of their annual conference, which gets under way in birmingham today. the department of health says it needs more staff and recently provided the biggest ever expansion of training places for doctors and nurses. half of the 26 victims of the worst mass shooting in texan history are children, officials have now confirmed. the youngest of the dead is a one—year—old baby, and the oldest is a 77—year—old woman. it's also emerged the gunman, ex—airman devin patrick kelly, was court—martialled for domestic violence in 2012, and was barred from owning or buying guns. as you've been hearing this morning,
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leaked documents show that the technology giant apple looked for a new tax haven after a crackdown on tax laws in ireland. apple says its actions complied fully with the law. the paradise papers leak also shows the formula 1 world champion lewis hamilton reduced his vat bill on the purchase of a private jet by importing it to the isle of man. his lawyers say the arrangement was lawful. our north of england correspondentjudith moritz is there for us this morning. judith, what are the allegations being made about the isle of man? a lot of focus here on the isle of man about these allegations, there's a lot of them so let's get straight to it. the chief minister is howard quayle and he joins to it. the chief minister is howard quayle and hejoins me now. first of all, the allegations surrounding lewis hamilton, his legal team say it's all above board but this £3
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million vat refund, there's questions being asked about it, should he be made to pay that back? at the moment there is no evidence to suggest that, i can't discuss individual cases but the isle of man closely follows the uk law on vat and asa closely follows the uk law on vat and as a result we are fully compliant. we have her majesty's revenue and customs come over every quarter to review our practices, that's a matter of course, and they found no wrongdoing. but to prove that we've invited hm treasury over to carry out an assessment of our practices on the treatment of vat on businessjets. as i say, the two key allegations we've received from panorama have been investigated and the evidence we've had is there's been no wrongdoing and those individuals would get their vat back if they resided or had put it through a uk company. no legal wrongdoing but morally where do you stand? wrongdoing but morally where do you stand ? there's wrongdoing but morally where do you stand? there's criticism you're on the wrong side of the moral line?
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absolutely not, until 2011 these jets were zero rated and they paid no vat if you use them for business use, if i'm a local builder and i buy a pickup truck i can claim the vat back. it's the same with business jets, vat back. it's the same with businessjets, if you use them for businessjets, if you use them for business you get a full refund. the officials knew that plane was going to be used privately as well? vat is highly complex and that was stated from day one. as a result we have called on hm treasury to review our practices, but it's highly complex and we are convinced had he applied in the uk he would have been given a full vat refund. there are other allegations, panorama expose the issue about the law on the island being changed they said to enable tax avoidance to be made easier and to avoid european rules. you said to panorama if you found proof you would apologise, i going to do that? not at the moment because i haven't received any evidence from panorama.
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what they skilfully admitted in the interview i gave them was this happen 13 years ago —— omitted. the rules and revelations have changed since then. i was looking evidence, for evidence from them and it was not given. no tax was avoided as a result of the rule change, it was from the treaty of the oecd, so no tax was ever avoided as a result of the rule change and sadly that was omitted. howard quayle, chief minister of the isle of man, thanks very much. the parliament here, the lower house, only sits three times a month. today it is due to be sitting by chance, it is certain i'm sure that this sort of issue and the other allegations are likely to be aired. thank you very much, judith. howard quayle answering some of the allegations which are not only from panorama last night but repeated on many of the front pages of the papers this morning. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. and john is here
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to talk about the sport. specifically west ham ? to talk about the sport. specifically west ham? we talked about whether slaven bilic would survive the day and he didn't, the chairman talk and they decided he had to go and most west ham fans are in agreement about that, but they aren't convinced about david moyes, his potential replacement, but we will see. no decision yet on when that appointment will come. bilic was a popular player with the hammers before becoming manager but his team have struggled this season and they currently sit in the relegation places. bbc sport understands west ham have held talks with moyes about taking over. so who is david moyes? why is he not being welcomed with open arms as a why is he not being welcomed with open arms as a potential replacement? well, he began his career with a successful spell at preston north end back in 1998. from there he went to everton and guided them to fourth, still their best premier league finish. then he got the big job, taking over from sir alex ferguson at manchester united in 2013. the club's first new manager in 27 years. he only lasted ten months before being sacked. moyes managed in spain
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for a year, taking charge of real sociedad before leaving in 2015. he took over at sunderland last year but they finished bottom of the premier league and were relegated. moyes resigned in may and hasn't had any otherjob since. perhaps it is that recent run that makes perhaps it is that recent run that ma kes west perhaps it is that recent run that makes west ham fans reluctant to see him in the dugout. the tottenham players harry winks and harry kane have pulled out of the england squad for the friendly matches against germany and brazil through injury. jake livermore has been called up to replace winks who went off at half time in spurs game with crystal palace. kane was kicked in the leg in that match and his absence may mean a first start for 20—year—old tammy abraham. it would be a massive achievement for me. like i said, a big confidence boost to me as well and it shows i'm going in the right direction. if i do get my opportunity, i'd like to grab it as much as i can. ifeel like i'm ready but like i said, it won't be easy, i have to prove to the manager
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in training why he picked me and keep working as hard as i can. it's known as the race that stops a nation, and it was a great one for ireland. in a thrilling sprint to the finish, the melbourne cup in australia was won by the 1a/1 shot rekindling, giving jockey corey brown his second triump in the event and a first for trainerjoseph o'brien. johannes vermeer and max dynamite made it an irish 1—2—3. interesting conversations around the dinner table after that one. the organisers of a men's tennis tournment have been forced to apolgies after the players' draw was criticised for being sexist. players at the tournment in milan found out if they were in group a or b, when the models revealed which letter was hidden beneath their clothing. the sponsors red bull and the atp, the men's games governing body, accepted that the format was in poor taste. various prominent tennis females took to twitter to voice their opinions.
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judy murray commenting that the event was simply awful. ady murray's former coach amelie mauresmo wasnt a fan either, while current player alize cornet hints the so called futuristic event may be stuck slightly in the past if you've won 16 grand slams, two olympic golds and been in four davis cup winning teams you'd expect to be recognised at a tennis court. but this is what happened when rafael nadal turned up without his pass at the paris masters last week. he got there in the end. love it, who are you? he obviously doesn't recognise him, he recognises the name but it's not great for
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security, anyone could say, i'm roger federer. if you're not recognised, come on in!” roger federer. if you're not recognised, come on in! ithink roger federer. if you're not recognised, come on in! i think he should have made him show the pass. no pass, no entry. interesting he didn't go for the, don't you know who i am? i've been to various events with people of sporting stature, it's a regular occurrence that even if you're really well— known, i'm standing that even if you're really well—known, i'm standing there thinking of got my pass, butjust let them in! ! exactly! we all know who he is! we are getting more details of the worst mass shooting in texan history. half of the 26 victims of the worst mass shooting in texan history are children, officials have now confirmed. the youngest of the dead is a one—year—old baby, and the oldest is a 77—year—old woman. amongst them was 1a—year—old annabelle pomeroy, who was the daughter of the church pastor frank pomeroy. her mother sherri has paid tribute to her. we lost more than belle yesterday
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and one thing that gives me a slither of encouragement is belle yesterday was surrounded by a church family that loves her the sleek and vice—versa. as senseless as this tragedy was, our sweet belle would not have been able to deal with losing so much family. there have been 307 mass shootings in the united states so far this year, according to data from the gun violence archive. two of the five deadliest shootings took place in just the last 35 days. the number of people killed in the us as a result of gun violence so far this year is 13,158. joining us now is steve hewitt, a specialist in american studies. to say those figures are sobering is... an understatement. staggering,
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it happens year after year after year, 3000 americans, a third are homicides, a lot of suicides, a lot of accidental deaths because often children get access to weapons in a pa re nt‘s children get access to weapons in a parent's purse or draw. it goes on year after year and then you have something like texas, it amplifies the violence. it doesn't seem to be getting any better, it seemed like gun sales soared after las vegas, and more people have access to guns? interestingly the number of americans owning guns is declining but the number of guns owned is increasing to the point where there's about 300 million guns, so we are getting close to one gun per person in the united states. the sort of gun used in what happened in texas, there's a cachet to that so then gun collectors buy these in the fear that they might be banned so the of those always shoot up after an attack. there's the dreadful
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repetition, isn't there? what is a mass repetition, isn't there? what is a mass shooting, three or more people? that's right. what's the reaction the uk and theyjust have a very different view on it. it is normalised. it is everyday. there was a normalised. it is everyday. there was a shooting in the walmart in colorado this week were three people we re colorado this week were three people were killed and it didn't really make the news over here, then there was make the news over here, then there was something exceptional, at a church, a country and western concert or a school, then it gets global coverage but the day to day carnage continues and it is just accepted and it's almost like the weather, there's nothing that can be done. even though gonna ownership goes up there is always a debate after incidents like these about gun control. president obama says it was
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this greatest regret that he never managed to change legislation. but it does not seem that anger —— the velocity of anything changes. —— ferocity. that was after a school shooting. everyone thought that was a tipping point that would change things. president obama would push for gun control to write away with this one president trump said it is not about guns, it is about mental hills. immediately he is deflecting away from that and trying to sideline the debate. if there is no momentum at the top then it is hard to imagine things changing. the argument that the nra and others come back to is the way to stop a good guy with a gun... sorry, a bad quy good guy with a gun... sorry, a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. yes. and there was someone outside the church who chased the gunmen away but that was after he
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killed 26 people. that logic... and also, the texas jet attorney said we need more guns in churches as a way of dealing with this. we can see a picture of the man here, as far as i understand, he should not have been allowed a gun. also, the system as it is does not appear to be working. double play into the logic of, well, there is gun control but it did not work anyway. the same way with the good guy with a gun. those narratives that will be used by the nra and others to push against any restrictions on weapons. it is amazing. louise said at the start that those statistics are sobering yet they do not make a difference. so many people killed already this year and probably that will change as well today. undoubtedly, there will be more mass shootings. it goes on and on. pinkie very much for your time. ifear we will on and on. pinkie very much for your time. i fear we will speak to you again. 12 minutes to eight. let's
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get a check on the weather this morning. good morning. this morning we have some rain moving from the north—west towards the south—east. ahead of it it is still mild and behind, chilly. to emphasise that point, in glasgow the temperature is six. in london and others it is ten. cardiff has 12. these temperatures through the day will go down. they won't in glasgow in belfast that they will across england and wales. you can see where we have had rain through the course of the night. some has been heavy so there will be surfaced water and spray on the roads this morning. and despite the ruck —— along the rain we have gusty wind. this morning ahead of it there isa wind. this morning ahead of it there is a feather cloud around. that helps to maintain temperature levels overnight. as the rain comes through you will notice the well. behind it, slowly, it will brighten up and eventually you will see some sunny spells. the wind is also due to
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strengthen across southern counties as well. this afternoon, in northern ireland, the sun will be out and there will be showers in the west. some of those could be heavy and sunbury but it will be mostly dry as we push further east some sunshine to this morning, you can see someone trainers coming out of the showers in the hills. northern england, drying up quite nicely behind the rains temperatures dropping. here is the band of rain across north—east england into the midlands. ahead of that, as a bit of cloud around with showers. that helps to maintain that average level. behind a band of rain it will brighten up across the south—west. it'll be slowly but it will not be dry, there will be showers. in wales, some bright showers. in wales, some bright showers developing. just to show you the temperatures. at the moment in edinburgh it is eight and that temperature will drop. in manchester it is ten and that will drop. before the rain gets in to, for example,
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london, that original will hold. the rain will reach london and that will be later on tonight. as that rain band pushes to the south—east. things will settle down in the skies will clear and we will have a few showers. it will be a cold night. towns and cities will have temperatures in single figures, on the plus side. in rural areas it is more likely to be subzero. some rural parts could hit minus five. frost around tonight. there will also be some mist and fog patches. tomorrow, when we lose this, the district of high pressure is quite quiet. this weather front will be introducing rain to the north—west, accompanied by gusty winds, gales and we hang on to bright skies for the bulk of the uk and the remnants of today's rain in the south—east. it is all change. it is all change here. you even know where she used
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this time. new rules are being introduced this morning to protect consumers who are tricked into making bank transfer payments to fraudsters. sean has been looking into this — what's been said? we're talking about authorised push payments scams, where you're tricked into transferring money, and actually authorising, a payment to a scammer‘s bank account. and most victims don't get their money back. today the regulator says it wants some form of reimbursement scheme in place by september next year, but that some people will still miss out. one person who has already been stung is kate blakeley, after she and her partner lost thousands to fraudsters when buying their first house together we received an e—mail from what we saw was our conveyancing we received an e—mail from what we saw was our conveyancing solicitor
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with our bank account details of where and how to make the final transfer. as it turned out, that e—mail had been intercepted and it was e—mail had been intercepted and it was not from our solicitors. money on completion day went into a fraudulent bank account. was just under £300,000 and within a few hours we were made aware that the money was hours we were made aware that the money was missing. as you can imagine, we were in complete shock. was such a large amount of money. it happened quite quickly. we had to go through the process of trying to identify where those funds were and recover the money. kate eventually got all the money back, the police recovered most of it. but not everyone is so lucky. the body bringing in the new rules is the payment systems regulator — and hannah nixon is their managing director good morning. this throws spotlight into the payment system that millions of us use. when you look at that you look at the details an you don't cross reference to name an account that you pay too with the number you are paying. customers are not being protected by this, are they? would you want to see that
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technology brought in but we need to remember we're talking about a crime here. one can have a devastating impact on the lives of people. there is no single bullet. there are many things we can protect us. thank you very much for your time. those rules, in theory, a reimbursement scheme in place by next september. no—one in place at the moment. real, people getting into all sorts of difficulties that is great advice to time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. detectives investigating the murder of a 20—year—old woman who was shot dead in the street while out with friends have made a new arrest. mohanna abdhou was shot in malvern road in kilburn in may and died at the scene. a 21—year—old woman was arrested yesterday after voluntarily handing herself in at a north london police station. two teenagers have already been charged with murder. a council—backed service in newham to help people trying to pay back
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high interest credit is being expanded. it's one of the poorest boroughs in the country and it's thought one in four people there have debt problems. moneyworks was the idea of the borough's mayor sir robin wales. we are now giving loans to people who cannot get it from anywhere else on the basis of we know them, why would we not do that? it has been successful so far. we have given out hundreds of loans. we have been running for two years and we will continue to support our residents the way i think councils should. and all this week on bbc london we'll be discussing personal debt, so you'd like to tell us about your experience of trying to afford to live in london, then please do get in touch. a dutch painting that was gifted to the city of london has been handed back to its rightful owner after it emerged that it had been stolen in
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19a5. the 17th—century masterpiece has hung on the walls of mansion house for 30 years. the corporation only became aware of its origins following a report from europe. the painting is being returned to holland today. on the tube — there's still no service on the district line between wimbledon and parsons green following yesterday's train derailment near wimbledon. that's expected to be ongoing all morning. on the overground there's no service from wandsworth road to clapham junction because of broken rail. on the roads — waterloo bridge is down to one lane for roadworks until christmas. and york road is closed from the imax roundabout to waterloo station for gas works. good morning. it does not feel as cold as it did this time yesterday. we do, however, have a lot of cloud around. it is a grey start and we are expecting some outbreaks of rain little later. at first, these outbreaks of rain are fairly light and patchy. it is not until later on when the wind will strengthen and we will see heavy and more persistent rain arrives as we head
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towards rush hour this evening. it may be quite wet. maximum temperature around 11 or 12 celsius. the rain will stay with us through much of the night. it will still be breezy. wet and breezy. the minimum temperature, again, reasonably mild for this time of year. as we head through wednesday the rain will start to fizzle out. the cloud gradually starting to be eaten away and towards the west we will get brighter at the end and at maybe a bit of sunshine. clear at first overnight on wednesday so there could be an early frost that more cloud arriving by dawn meaning that should disappear to a cloudy day for thursday and for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker.
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donald trump arrives in south korea ahead of talks about north korea's nuclear programme. the us president says he'll work with south korea on a strategy to deal with the north, but there are likely to be significant differences of opinion. good morning, it's tuesday, 7th november. also this morning... the foreign secretary is accused of making comments that could see a british woman spend five more years in an iranian prison. boris johnson will speak to the government there later. more tax revelations this morning, as tech giant apple and the formula 1 world champion, lewis hamilton, are the latest to have their affairs scrutinised after a huge leak of documents. good morning. new rules are expected to come into force this morning to protect those who are tricked into making bank payments to fraudsters. i'll have all the details shortly.
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in sport, west ham are looking for a new manager. and could it be this man? the former manchester united and sunderland head coach, david moyes, is expected to take over. lam finding i am finding out why when it comes to sport and girls and boys, attitudes are very different. i will look at what has been done to tackle the problem. clinging on for dear life — the first baby gibbon born in the wild to parents rescued from the illegal pet trade. more on that later. also, the weather with carol. a band of rain and gusty winds moving to the south—east of the country. a lot of cloud ahead of it. behind it, it will brighten up, showers, but turning that bit colder. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump has arrived in korea for the first time since taking office, ahead of talks about north korea's nuclear programme.
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he flew in from tokyo after saying on monday japan could he flew in from tokyo after saying on mondayjapan could shoot down north korea's missiles with us equipment. we can speak now to our china correspodent, robin brant, who is in seoul. pa rt part of his eight day tour. significant place to be? the briefest of visits, 2a hours, before he heads to china, but i think it is the most symbolic. he comes here to a country the united states has helped protect for six decades, they have a very strong alliance, very resilient alliance, and a show of unity between the two leaders of these countries is the most important message they want to send not just to the important message they want to send notjust to the people of south korea who faced the prospect and have done for decades of military confrontation but they want to send a message to kim jong—un confrontation but they want to send a message to kimjong—un in confrontation but they want to send a message to kim jong—un in the north. the border with that country isa north. the border with that country is a few dozen kilometres from where lam speaking is a few dozen kilometres from where i am speaking to you at the moment.
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president trump comes here in optimistic mood, he told reporters a few hours ago after lunch with some of the tens of thousands of american soldiers based here, that these things always work out, it will work out, he said. underthe things always work out, it will work out, he said. under the surface, differences of opinion between mr trump and his south korean counterpart, moon jae—in, trump and his south korean counterpart, moonjae—in, a man elected a few months ago, to extend the olive branch to the north. the problem with that view in terms of the white house is president trump seesit the white house is president trump sees it as appeasement and he has told him sees it as appeasement and he has told hi m exactly sees it as appeasement and he has told him exactly that. there are key differences between the two men, differences between the two men, differences over trade, the bilateral relationship between the countries, the key thing will be one president trump addresses the national assembly tomorrow. the show of unity is the message and the south koreans do not want to hear the incendiary language, fire and fury, talk of rocket man, that they believe has made the situation
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worse. believe has made the situation worse. thank you. one of our other headlines this morning... the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to call his iranian counterpart this morning, after being accused of making a mistake that could see a british woman spending five more years in an iranian prison. he's facing calls to retract his claim to a parliamentary committee last week that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists in iran when she was arrested last year — something her employer and herfamily have denied. when you look at what nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was doing, she was simply teaching people journalism, as i understand. let's get the latest from our political correspondent, chris mason. boris under pressure. he really is. often the word gaffe is taxed to remarks politician say that they later regret. plenty of his critics say that it is too throw away a word to describe what he has
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said in front of the parliamentary committee because of the grave potential consequences of his language a couple of days ago. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was brought back in front of an iranian court on saturday and they picked up on the remarks from mrjohnson because they have always accused her of plotting propaganda against the iranian regime. they equate the suggestion she was pursuing journalism with that end. her family say it is simply not true. she was not working journalistically, yes, she had worked for thomson reuters but they do not have programmes in iran, she was merely on a trip with her daughter to meet her daughter's grandparents for the first time. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's husband wa nts nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's husband wants mrjohnson not only to speak to the iranian government but also to the iranian government but also to address parliament here as well. we have not yet found out if that will happen. all of this, as a
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second british cabinet minister finds themselves in hot water this morning, not to do with the dominating theme of our time, brexit, nor the dominating theme of the last fortnight, harassment, this time, the international development secretary, priti patel, in a separate incident, having to apologise over remarks that she has made regarding a trip to israel over the summer. she told absolutely no one in government about it. not only has she had to apologise but she put out a statement in which she had to say there has been a clarification of remarks she made to the guardian on friday, clarification is polite westminster speech for an almighty u—turn. what she said that the guardian was not amounting to the full truth of what she is now acknowledging was a mistake. double headache for the prime minister this morning, two ministers in a spot of bother. technology giant apple is the latest
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to be named in the paradise papers. it is sheltering some of its profits injersey it is sheltering some of its profits in jersey following a crackdown it is sheltering some of its profits injersey following a crackdown on tax laws in ireland. the practice is not illegal. apple says it remains the world's largest taxpayer and tax it pays has not been reduced. the formula 1 world champion lewis hamilton avoided tax on a jet by importing it to the isle of man. his lawyers say it was lawful. what more can you tell us? lewis hamilton's lawyers say the scheme they were involved in was lawful and that this island gave it informed approval. the paradise papers showed there are 50 similar such schemes in operation on the isle of man. earlier i asked the chief minister here whether this island is doing enough to prevent tax avoidance. the isle of man
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closely follows the uk law on vat and asa closely follows the uk law on vat and as a result, we are fully compliant. we have hmrc come over every quarter to review our practices, a matter of course. they have found no wrongdoing. to prove there has been no wrongdoing, we have invited hm treasury over to assess our practices on the treatment of vat on business jets. the paradise papers also showed the law on this island was changed, the panorama programme say, to make it easier to avoid tax. the island has started a review, they have asked the treasury to conduct a review as well, and the chief minister said to me he would not apologise for the allegations, he wants them to be proven, he wants to see the papers himself, directly, he has not done that. this is likely to be something which is hotly debated later today when the island's parliament sits. it only sits three times a month. it
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is due to sit today anyway. all of this is likely to be aired there. thank you. a little bit earlier on brea kfast, thank you. a little bit earlier on breakfast, we spoke to the secretary of state for international development, liam fox, who said the government might need to look again at its anti—avoidance measures. government might need to look again at its anti-avoidance measures. hmrc have asked to see the papers, they are looking to see the timescale involved in this, to see whether any wrongdoing has actually happened. i think we have to wait to see exactly what information comes out that before we make judgments on whether we need to go even further than the current government has gone. remember, we have collected £160 billion more in tax since we came to office done otherwise we would have because of the anti—avoidance measures we ta ken. rising demand for frontline services is leavign the nhs struggling to cope, despite increasing the number of staff in england. that's the warning from health bosses, who say boosting the workforce is not enough to tackle the growing needs of patients. nhs providers voiced their concerns
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ahead of their annual conference, which gets under way in birmingham today. the department of health says it needs more staff and recently provided the biggest ever expansion of training places for doctors and nurses. half of the 26 victims of the worst mass shooting in texan history are children, officials have now confirmed. the youngest of the dead is a one—year—old baby, and the oldest is a 77—year—old woman. it's also emerged the gunman, ex—airman devin patrick kelly, was court—martialled for domestic violence in 2012 and was barred from owning or buying guns. reports coming in on an attack on afghanistan on a private satellite television station in kabul. eyewitnesses say men threw grenades and fired guns as they entered the headquarters. there were thought to be more than 100 employees inside the building. the number of
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attackers and the number killed and injured remains unclear. that is from official police sources. a developing story and as we get more detail, we will bring it to you. you might have seen this earlier, if you suffer from a fear of heights, look away, it could make it worse for you. this is an austrian climber who has become the first woman to conquer one of the world's toughest climbing routes, in spain. previously only been climbed by two men. angela spent two years training for the client by costing replicas of holes along the route. fear not... it is all part of the master plan, relaxing and enjoying the view. i know i have seen that a couple of times this morning, but it still makes me feel ever so slightly ill. the fact it is in slow motion
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does not aid your problem! possibly worse does not aid your problem! possibly worse than real—time! good morning. quick look at some of the front pages. we have been speaking about paradise papers, it broke on sunday night, big story yesterday and today. daily mirror not holding back, the tax dodge parasites, lewis hamilton, £3.3 million vat back on his private jet, hamilton, £3.3 million vat back on his privatejet, apple sidestepped billions, three of the stars from mrs brown's boys, invested £2 million offshore. us firms, secret move million offshore. us firms, secret move to avoid multibillion—dollar tax bills. front page of the telegraph, talking about brexit, britain must avoid too much compromise with the eu over the brexit divorce settlement if it wa nts brexit divorce settlement if it wants speedy trade with the us. michael parkinson, giving an interview, saying he was flirty in
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the past, he would not dare to be now. he has been talking about coronation street, saying it is more violent. losing the plot, he said. it's been an extraordinary few weeks in westminster, and yesterday, we had an extraordinary attempt to come to some sort of solution to the current crisis. it's not a sight you see every often, but the leaders from all the mainstream parties came together in one room and agreed to introduce a new grievance procedure for staff to deal with misconduct allegations. so, will the measures go far enough? let's speak to the co—leader of the green party, caroline lucas, and sophie walker, leader of the women's equality party. good morning. thank you for your time. caroline, starting with you, what was the spirit in that meeting like yesterday? it is rare to get all of the party leaders together. was their unity on the way forward? i think it was a constructive
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meeting, a genuine recognition we need to urgently change the structures so that we can deal with harassment more effectively. i was pleased both the idea of an independent grievance process was accepted and also that my proposal around training was taken up. crucially, we need to make sure the training now is notjust on employment practices, but is on issues around consent. i think if anything has been revealed over the last few days and weeks, it is there are plenty of mps sadly who still do not understand what consent means, the idea of michael fallon saying his behaviour ten, 15 years ago, it would have been fine, but only since 2002 we have suddenly had this revolution of women in the workplace, it underlines the fact consent lessons have to be mandatory. if mps refuse to go to them, they should have their pay docked. you have worked in westminster, sophie, is it a toxic atmosphere? the fact the
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harassment... epidemic of harassment has come through in media, entertainment and politics shows the scale of the problem and it demonstrates that it is about an imbalance of power. what has been disappointing to me in the debate in westminster is that we have not got very far beyond discussing reporting systems. it is great mps are getting their house in order, but i also think it is a box ticking exercise unless those mps understand that this is also about a huge imbalance, structural imbalance of power across the country. if we are going to invest in systems for women in westminster, why not invest in funding for women's services across the uk? why are we not funding rape crisis, refuges for women? why are we not dealing with the fact we have the most expensive childcare in the world in the uk? all of these things contribute to women's lack of power
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and for the two main parties do have had the kind of conversations and not begin to address this, it shows you how much work we still have to do to understand why sexual harassment happens. caroline can i ask you how things have been over the past few weeks? has there been a change in atmosphere? has that changed? are people talking about this? people are talking about, but i think, you know, everything that sophie has said is right and if you walk into the doors of westminster it is still an old boys club and we are not going to change that until we have far more women in parliament and until we have a far more diverse and representative parliament. you only need to watch pmqs to see the barracking that someone like layla moran got, all of men making really stupid sounds and comments and you know on one level you might say that's pmqs, isn't it? but it speaks
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to the fact that women are a minority there. it speaks to the fa ct minority there. it speaks to the fact that men think that's an appropriate way behaving and i would wa nt to appropriate way behaving and i would want to reinforce what sophie said about the wider context. we are focussing on westminster right now, but if it is serious enough to be saying that we should be overhauling our structures in westminster then why are we at the same time cutting funding for rape crisis? why are we reduce the support network that we have been learning is important across have been learning is important across the country? one of the things you raised yesterday specifically was the way that mps employ their staff. you say they should be employed by parliament rather than the mp5 themselves. how did that go down? at the moment that wasn't accepted. i was disappointed because i think for as long as you have 650 small businesses working in different ways then it will be difficult to make sure that staff are properly protected. there is a working group that's being set—up as a result of last night's meeting. i
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will continue to be pressing for at the very least a review of employment structures so that we can try and build in the basic safeguards that you would have in most other organisations of this size. in other words having legal support. having a proper human resources capacity for mp5 because with the best will in the world they will not become model employers overnight. sophie, just finally, if we can come back to you. i know you've laid out some of the issues you've laid out some of the issues you think are important issues, not just in parliament, but across the country. surely it is a positive step that the party leaders are together and yes it might take time together and yes it might take time to get the new structure in place, but at least something is being done? there is a demonstration of an understanding that this is a first step and not drawing a line under this. i mean for me, i'm the leader of the uk's first feminist party and i hope people understand why having a feminist political party is
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important in our political scene because this stuff is seen as separate, isolated, small things that don't actually all link up into a bigger picture of women's inequality. sophie walker, caroline lucas, thank you very much for your time. it is great to speak to you both on breakfast. it is 8.19am. it is not so chilly as it was yesterday for most. that's right. we have a weather front moving towards the south east. it is mild. behind it, it is cooling down and that process will continue as we go through the course of the morning. so for example, in glasgow at the moment it is six celsius. in manchester, it is 11 celsius, but that manchester temperature is going south. now you can see where we have had the rain this morning, watch out for surface water and spray on the roads. some of the rain has been herself why you and some of it will continue to be heavy as we go through the next few hours. it is courtesy of this weather front here slowly continuing to push to the
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south—east, not getting into the south east until much later in the day. so behind it, brightening up nicely across scotland and northern ireland. we will see sunshine by the afternoon and showers. ahead of it, afternoon and showers. ahead of it, a lot of cloud and showers and here is the band of rain slowly moving south—east wards. gusty winds around it as well. so across yorkshire, lincolnshire, in towards derbyshire, the midlands, that's where the rain will be by 3pm. ahead of it, a fair bit of cloud. some showers, but temperatures holding up, gusty winds again around this band particularly along the south coast so from devon all the way over towards the isle of wight in particular and behind it, for cornwall and west devon, again, brightening up. west wales brightening up. west wales brightening up. west wales brightening up. rest of wales, still quite a bit of cloud around with the odd shower. sunny spells for northern ireland with showers in the north—west. some could be heavy and thundery as could the showers across western scotland, but the rest of scotland, again, dry with sunny spells, but a bit chilly. to show
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you the difference in the temperatures, at the moment, it's 11 celsius in manchester. this afternoon, it's going to be about eight celsius. it's 12 in cardiff at moment, this afternoon it's going to be about eight celsius. behind this cold front, it will feel that bit colder. through the evening and overnight, there goes the weather front pushing down towards the south east. a ridge of high pressure builds in behind it. so things are fairly quiet. the high pressure will burn off a lot of the showers or kill off a lot of the showers. it will be cold as well. in towns and cities temperatures generally staying in the positive side, but still quite low. but in rural areas, rural parts of county durham, county down as well, we're looking at possibly below freezing. katesbridge could get down to minus four or any mus could get down to minus four or any mus five. there will be frost and we will see patchy mist and fog too. tomorrow we have got the remnants of the front in the south east, this ridge of high pressure, a quiet day for most, but another weather front from the west will introduce wet and windy conditions again across the north—west of scotland and the
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north—west of scotland and the north—west of scotland and the north—west of northern ireland. it will be windy with this. particularly with exposure where we could have gusts to gale force. there will be the remnants of today's rain clearing away, but in between, there will be a lot of sunshine, but note the temperatures nines and tens and 12 coming in across nines and tens and 12 coming in across the outer hebrides. thursday, that band of rain will have crossed overnight and in the south east first thing, leaving behind it cloud, showers, but temperatures are that little bit higher. so it's all over the place this week, dan and lou. thank you very much, carol. a baby gibbon has become the first of its species to be born in the wild rescued from the illegal pet trade. researchers among r monitoring the trade in apes warns that it continues to threaten many animals, some continues to threaten many animals, some of which are close to extinction. victoria gill has been in indonesia to investigate. today the team is checking in on a
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special arrival. alongside thisjuvenile special arrival. alongside this juvenile which was born in captivity, is a new baby. that six—month—old baby is the first baby gibbon to be born in the wild from re—released parents. both pa rents started from re—released parents. both parents started their lives in cages in the pet trade and now they're living wild. they 're a family. we hope for the long—term they will survive and then the baby will make a new family and continue a new generation. well, they certainly look wonderful and happy. yes. but these apes are still under threat
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from the pet trade. they are bought and sold illegally and openly. sales are increasingly moving online. this babyis are increasingly moving online. this baby is one of many being sold by just one pet shop injava. poachers target babies that are easy to sell. and for these intelligent animals, being taken from their mother is traumatic. and the trade is not confined to one species. orang—utans make up 70% of the great apes that are seized by law enforcement. this was found in a box being sent to a buyer. you know where you put your luggage, that's where you put your luggage, that's where she was for ten hours. when they found her, she was traumatised. she didn't eat or drink. it was difficult to get her going because she lost her will to live. these rescued orang—uta ns are she lost her will to live. these
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rescued orang—utans are learning to live in the trees, but while programmes live in the trees, but while programmes like this can get a few animals back to the wild each year, they are not making a dent in the impact of the trade. over about a 20 year period where orang—utans were either confiscated or donated there we re either confiscated or donated there were only seven prosecutions out of the a00 cases. so, it's a huge issue because the sellers are not being held accountable. they are not being prosecuted. the population of these apes continues to decline. forest destruction as well as the pet trade fuels that crisis. work like this is crucial to give these precious new families a safe life in the wild. but conservationist also have to fight for the future of this species. you can watch victoria gill's documentary in full—on the bbc iplayer. we have got some wrestlers
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coming up later. if you're into your wrestling they are touring the uk. two of the biggest stars. he will be defending his title... not here. not here! you have been warned. no wrestling. we are talking about sporting wise, is women in sport. holly hamilton is out and about. it is how to keep girls stay in sport. i mean i left sport on girls stay in sport. i mean i left sport on message, girls stay in sport. i mean i left sport on message, i left sport at the age that so many children do. particularly girls. about 1a, 15, gave up competitive sport. we are talking about how to keep girls in. lots of people saying we missed a trick with the 2012 london olympics, but it is never too late to sort it out. i am testament to that! it's time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. yesterday it was all
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about the frost and fog. this morning it is much milder. a lot more cloud around and pretty heavy rain this morning. recent radar picture, you can see the rain spreading from scotland, west wales and the south west of england. the rain is going to be quite intense for a short time as it pushes east through today. as it moves east, there will be sunnier spells developing across scotland, northern ireland, and eventually to western areas. the rain making gradual progress east, not reaching east
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anglia and the south—east until later, temperatures 10—12d, chilly as the rain clears from the west. this evening and tonight, the rain will stall in the far east of england, a cold front, not will move -- it england, a cold front, not will move —— it will not move far into wednesday. i did, a small ridge of high pressure moving in, clear skies, turning cold again. a frost in northern and western areas on wednesday morning. wednesday, you might need your cart scraper once again, one of those mornings. the high pressure will still be with you on wednesday. weather front in the far east keeping things cloudy here. in the meantime, another weather system is going to slowly spread into the west. wednesday, it will continue to cloud over a cross wednesday, it will continue to cloud over across scotland, northern ireland, outbreaks of rain moving
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in. in between, a sunshine sandwich, temperatures of eight, nine. thursday, quite cloudy skies for many. a few spots of rain moving south. otherwise, a dry day and milder. temperatures back up to 11-13d. milder. temperatures back up to 11—13d. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with david eades and jamie robertson. tech giant apple has a pile of cash worth tens of billions of dollars injersey where it pays no tax. live from london, that's our top story. on day two of the paradise papers, fresh revelations from millions of leaked documents shines the spotlight on the offshore tax business.
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also in the programme... us president donald trump is in south korea with the north's nuclear ambitions and trade high on his agenda. let high on his agenda. us have a look at the markets
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