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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 7, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11... fears for the british womanjailed in iran — borisjohnson is to phone his counterpart there, amid concern that comments he made about what she was doing in the country could lead to her sentence being doubled. the point the foreign secretary was making was that this arrest and detention of a uk citizen is not acceptable. pressure on the international development secretary after she apologises for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday. on a visit to south korea, president trump tells all countries to stop trading with north korea, to force pyongyang to stop its nuclear activities. i believe it makes sense for north korea to do the right thing, not only for north korea, but humanity all over the world. the isle of man's chief minister insists the island is not a tax
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haven and defends rules reportedly used by lewis hamilton to avoid vat on his £16 million privatejet. also: plans to help people out of pocket from bank scams. we hear about the people conned into authorising their banks to pay thousands of pounds to fraudsters. and west ham appoint david moyes as their new manager — they say he's the right man to turn things around at the club. good morning. it's tuesday the 7th of november. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the husband of a british—iranian woman, being held in prison in tehran, has urged the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, to "retract
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in parliament", a suggestion he made that she'd been training journalists when she was arrested last year. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe is serving a five—year prison sentence, over allegations of involvement in "propaganda against the regime". richard ratcliffe says his wife was simply visiting relatives, and fears iranian officials are using mrjohnson‘s statement to increase herjail sentence. the foreign secretary is expected to phone his iranian counterpart this morning. we arejoined now we are joined now by our assistant political editor, norman smith. borisjohnson has spoken to the uranium foreign minister this morning. we do not know the outcome of that meeting. i am told it will be made more clear later today when the prime minister's spokesman briefs reporters. we know boris johnson will make a statement in the house of commons. crucially, that
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will not be about the position of mrs zaghari—ratcliffe, but about countering islamic state. but i think the expectation within the body of the statement is that mr johnson will seek to clarify his mistake when he suggested she was in tehran to teach iranians about journals, which has given the iranian authorities a reason that they say is to possibly increase her jail sentence, maybe doubling it. all of this provoked after mr johnson appeared before the foreign affa i rs johnson appeared before the foreign affairs select committee on wednesday last week. it was here he made those remarks suggesting in many people's eyes he was undercutting the defence argument of zaghari—ratcliffe that she was on holiday and was actually there to traina holiday and was actually there to train a journalist. listen to this. if you look at what mrs zaghari—ratcliffe if you look at what mrs zaghari— ratcliffe was if you look at what mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was doing, she was simply teaching people journalism,
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asi simply teaching people journalism, as i understand... this incorrect assessment by mrjohnson is the latest in a series of episodes where he has used language which has gotten he has used language which has gotte n into he has used language which has gotten into difficulty and led to criticism of his role as foreign secretary. if you think back to the anger he caused the libyan government after he talked to the tory party conference about clearing dead bodies away so it could become a tourist resort and similarly he was caught on film telling the british ambassador not to recite a kipling poem and now this latest saga. but he has been defended by international trade secretary, liam fox. he warned against trying to make political capital out of this moment because it might make mrs zaghari—ratcliffe's position worse. this is what he said on the today programme. it is important we keep this in
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perspective. first, this is a uk citizen held on extreme and unproven charges in an unacceptable way. it is right we remind people that her detention is utterly unacceptable in an international way. the point the brand secretary was making is that this arrest and detention is not acceptable. —— that the foreign secretary. i am joined by acceptable. —— that the foreign secretary. i amjoined by a acceptable. —— that the foreign secretary. i am joined by a former labour warren secretary. what is your assessment, jack straw of the response to the fact borisjohnson made an error? —— labour foreign secretary. by all accounts this was a grave error. she was on holiday and not doing what mrjohnson said she was doing. he should have taken less than six days to make this clear. rule one, if you are british foreign secretary, careless talk can
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cost lives. in the case of mrs zaghari—ratcliffe cost lives. in the case of mrs zaghari— ratcliffe it cost lives. in the case of mrs zaghari—ratcliffe it may literally cost an extra five years in prison. all of us in these high offices sometimes make mistakes. if you do make a mistake, however, you need to go to the house of commons as quickly as possible and say, i'm sorry, i got it wrong. people will normally take that in good faith if you say that very clearly. i am amazed mrjohnson you say that very clearly. i am amazed mr johnson has you say that very clearly. i am amazed mrjohnson has decided to make a statement about islamic state. that is very important but he could easily make two statements, i did it often enough, and say this is the situation, sorry, i got it wrong. i do not understand why he is putting his sense of himself about the security and safety of mrs zaghari—ratcliffe. the security and safety of mrs zaghari-ratcliffe. there were some other incidents where he used loose language and caused diplomatic difficulty. is eats it to be foreign secretary? in many ways he does have
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the quality. —— is he fit to be foreign secretary? he is a bright man with a good turn of phrase but if he carries on like this, his own side are going to say that you need something else to do. the shadow foreign secretary has said he should consider his position. let's see what he says and what he doesn't this afternoon. this is serious for him and the reason why after a political career is that it is deadly serious for mrs zaghari—ratcliffe deadly serious for mrs zaghari— ratcliffe will stop deadly serious for mrs zaghari—ratcliffe will stop i am pleased mrjohnson zaghari—ratcliffe will stop i am pleased mr johnson ——. zaghari—ratcliffe will stop i am pleased mrjohnson ——. i am pleased he has spoken to the israeli foreign minister but the elected government ina run, minister but the elected government in a run, although quite powerful in the areas it deals with, it does not have control over the security and judiciary. —— iranians foreign secretary. the revolutionary guards
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are leading this and would have regarded brianjohnson's are leading this and would have regarded brian johnson's —— are leading this and would have regarded brianjohnson's —— boris johnson's comments as... part of iranians society, lots of them are pleased about the relationship with the uk but many are very suspicious about the uk and regard us as the clu b about the uk and regard us as the club of satan. anything like this confirms their suspicion that many british people in a run although doing straightforward things are spying on their country. we know the arabian authorities were reviewing their case and looking at bringing fresh charges. —— iranians authorities. have they seized on boris johnson's remarks authorities. have they seized on borisjohnson‘s remarks and were they going to increase the sentence anyway? no doubt they seized on the remarks. however, they still need a justification. at the court of international public opinion and local public opinion and in this
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very complex nexus of political relationships in tehran had to have an argument with people like the foreign minister, who is a decent and responsible man who would never have done this. yes, they have seized upon it but it gives them an excuse which was not there before for lengthening mrs zaghari—ratcliffe's for lengthening mrs zaghari— ratcliffe's sentence. for lengthening mrs zaghari-ratcliffe's sentence. jack straw, thank you for your time. the foreign office had issued a statement, last night, which appeared to suggest mrjohnson was looking to outline what were described as some of the most extreme and unproven allegations against mrs zaghari—ratcliffe, namely that she had been teaching journalism. we have obviouslyjust heard mrjohnson‘s words and it does look pretty clear he did think she was teaching journalism which is simply wrong, at least according to her husband and the reuters foundation for which she works. studio: for now, thank you, norman. the prime minister has asked
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for the ministerial code of conduct to be tightened after the international development secretary an apologised for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her summer holiday. she suggested some of the aid budget should be given to the israeli army to support humanitarian operations. labour said the shocking admission wa rra nts labour said the shocking admission warrants a cabinet office enquiry. james landale is here. tell us more about the work she commissioned when she came back from holiday. this is one of the great questions. what emerged from these 12 meetings she had on her trip? we know of two of them. one was a discussion about what is called a memorandum of understanding between israel and the uk overdevelopment in africa. israel isa uk overdevelopment in africa. israel is a centre of excellence for our technology and priti patel had a lot of discussions about what technology
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could be used for water purification and things like that. when it comes to the development work the uk is doing in africa. that is the first thing. the second thing is this idea, slightly counterintuitive, of the british government using its aid budget to support israeli army humanitarian work in the middle east. in the golan heights, the area of territory disputed north east of the sea of galilee, the israeli army has had a large operation there for several years has had a large operation there for several yea rs now, has had a large operation there for several years now, where it takes syrian civilians and some rebel fighters who had been injured in conflict in syria, takes them across the border, and treats them in israeli hospitals and sometimes other hospitals in other countries. once people are better again it returns them to syria. the suggestion was, could this be some
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operation the british judgment could get involved in? when priti patel came home she asked officials to look at it and they spoke to the foreign office. the foreign office said there were some problems, namely humanitarian aid might be needed more elsewhere in the second problem is the british state does not recognise the israeli annexation of the golan heights so it would be ha rd of the golan heights so it would be hard for officials to work here. we have heard there will be an urgent question on this issue in the house of commons later. how precarious is priti patel‘s position? of commons later. how precarious is priti patel's position? she is under political pressure, no doubt about that. labour have called upon her to resign. i think the governed and the prime minister in particular will be very keen for her not to resign. —— government. first the fragility of the administration. they lost a cabinet minister in michael fallon last week over the harassment scandal. she would be loathe in general terms to lose another cabinet minister so quickly. if she
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loses priti patel the cabinet becomes unbalanced in the british—macro debate. she's strong supporter of it. —— strong supporter of brexit and she is under pressure. thank you. legislation — setting out how britain could trade with the rest of the world after leaving the eu — is also due to be published today. the government says the brexit trade bill will include provisions for the uk to implement existing eu trade agreements, as well as powers to ensure british companies can continue to access government contracts in other countries. the bill is part of a raft of legislation on brexit to be discussed by parliament over the next year. president trump is on a visit to south korea that's dominated by worries over the north's nuclear programme. at a news conference in seoul, mr trump called on the international community to put pressure on on north korea to halt its nuclear ambitions. north korea is a worldwide threat
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that requires worldwide action. we call upon every responsible nation, including china and russia, to demand the north korean regime ends its nuclear weapons and missile programmes and lives in peace as the south korean people know so well, it is time to act with urgency and great determination. mark lowen explains whether or not he has seen any evidence of marking a turning point in north korea. we have seen a president trump and ban—ki—moon trying to present a united front and try to get onto the same page in terms of north korea. there has been somewhat of a disagreement between the two over the right approach. you had donald trump's bombastic rhetoric labelling
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the north korea leader as little rocket man and threatening to totally destroy north korea. that did not go down well here. yes, you need a firm approach to north korea, you need to stand firm against north korea but you need to not shut down the door to diplomacy, to political and economic pressure. i think what we saw from donald trump was much less bellicose rhetoric. he was firm and said the us was ready to use military might against north korea, but the fact he was showing some restraint, that will be a sign of encouragement for south korea. possibly that is the kind of approach to north korea that might antagonise them rather less than has been the case in recent weeks and months when the north korea leader responded to president trump's rhetoric by labelling him a donor ca rd rhetoric by labelling him a donor card and saying the us declared war on north korea. —— doted. card and saying the us declared war
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on north korea. -- doted. the husband of an iranian woman imprisoned in tehran said bruce johnson made a gaffe about comments about her with potentially serious consequences. an urgent question will be asked in the house of commons about the action of the international development secretary, priti patel, after she apologises for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday. on a visit to south korea donald trump has urged north korea to come to the table and discuss giving up its nuclear weapons. to come to the table and discuss giving up its nuclear weaponsm sport david boyce has arrived to ta ke sport david boyce has arrived to take training for the first time as the west ham manager. he has signed a 2.5 year deal the west ham manager. he has signed a 2.5yeardealand the west ham manager. he has signed a 2.5 year deal and hisjob is to keep west ham and the premier league. steven finn is out of the england ashes tour. he has torn cartilage in his knee in training in australia and will see a specialist and fly home. the third test matches on the 23rd. england already without all—rounder ben stokes. at the melbourne cup in australia, corey
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brown rode to victory. the course is trained byjessica o'brien and it overtook the horse trained by his father aidan o'brien to win. more about those stories just after half past. the tax affairs of british crown dependencies and overseas territories are coming under intense scrutiny after the huge leak of confidential documents — known as the paradise papers. my colleague ben brown has been looking at the details. yes, more details are emerging from the cache of 13 million leaked documents — they're being shared by the international consortium of investigative journalists — including the bbc panormaa programme. the latest revelation concerns the technology giant apple, the most profitable company in the world. it's tax affairs have long been controversial. it did have a huge amount of money in ireland, but after a tax loophole
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there was closed, apple shopped around for a new offshore tax base — and finally settled on jersey apple insists the move ‘did not reduce our tax payments in any country‘ and stressed that no operations had been moved from ireland. now the paradise papers also reveal how british racing driver lewis hamilton avoided three million pounds worth of tax on his private jet after it was imported into the isle of man. but a spokesman for lewis hamilton said "as a global sportsman who pays tax in a large number of countries, lewis relies upon a team of professional advisers who manage his affairs." "those advisers have assured lewis that everything is above board". the isle of man is one of the british crown dependencies facing questions. speaking to our correspondent judith moritz, its chief minister, howard quayle, said the isle of man authorities have nothing to hide.
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i cannot discuss individual cases but the isle of man closely follows uk law on vat and as a result, we are fully compliant. we have hmrc coming every quarter to review our practices as a matter of course. they found no wrongdoing. to prove there has been no wrongdoing we have invited hm treasury to assess our practices on the treatment of vat on business jets. the two practices on the treatment of vat on businessjets. the two key allegations we receive from panorama have been investigated and the evidence we have that there has been no wrongdoing and those individuals would their vat back if they resided in or were put through a united kingdom company. no legal wrongdoing but morally there is a lot of criticism that you are on the wrong side of the moral line. absolutely not. until 2011 the jets were zero rated and did not pay any vat. if
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they are used for business, if i'm a local builder and eight by a pick—up truck i can claim back vat on my vehicle, it is the same with business jets. if you're using them for business you are entitled to a full refund. ireland officials knew that plane was going to be used in pa rt that plane was going to be used in part for private use, as well. —— the ireland officials. -- the officials. we have asked the treasury to review our practices but it is very complex and we are convinced that if he applied in the uk he would have been given the full vat refund. that was the isle of mann chief minister howard quayle. welljersey is another british crown dependency now under the spotlight after the revelation that apple moved billions of pounds there from ireland — our correspondent robert hall is there, and what are the authorities in jersey saying about all this robert? this is where you would expect to get some kind of comment. i am in
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the heart of st helier outside the jersey states building where parliament sits and in the middle of what you could call the financial district. jersey depends very heavily on the finance industry to fund, to balance its books and retain its budgets. this has stirred up retain its budgets. this has stirred upa lot retain its budgets. this has stirred up a lot of discussion. the issue in jersey involving apple does not involve illegality but there are two sides to a debate and questions are being asked, familiar to people here. jersey will maintain it is totally transparent. you heard the chief minister making that point, as well. that it operates within international regulations but there are voices here and elsewhere asking about the ethics and should companies be using the system in this way? we tried to talk to the jersey government yesterday and were told nobody was available. at half past 11 last night i got an e—mail from ian gorse, jersey's chief minister. he is on a preplanned conference in the middle east and i
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can read you that statement. it is very brief. "jersey does not want abusive tax avoidance schemes operating here and expects financial services providers to abide by volu nta ry services providers to abide by voluntary code to say they will not ta ke voluntary code to say they will not take on this kind of business. if this proves to be such business... " i'm assuming he is referring to apple, "we will consider strengthening our arrangements if necessary by amending legislation to introduce a substance test. " i sucked he means a company in any way being baited should have links to the island, employ staff. —— i assume he means here. you should not claim tax residence injersey without demonstrating, he says, a substance here. these allegations will be investigated and he concludes saying he hopesjournalist to help to produce and publicise the panama papers will help the investigation. and on the subject of investigation, just before i finish, the jersey police investigation, just before i finish, thejersey police have confirmed
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apple b, they are in many offshore centres, they have got an office here, they have asked jersey police to investigate whether the league and publication of papers has in any way resulted from a breach at the offices in jersey. —— way resulted from a breach at the offices injersey. —— the way resulted from a breach at the offices in jersey. —— the leak. robert, thank you. robert hall in jersey. labour mp margaret hodge has said on twitter the bbc panorama programme and the guardian newspaper will brief mps at westminster on the revelations in paradise papers tomorrow morning. studio: thank you. gunmen have attacked a centre in kabul. atb building was attacked after setting off explosions and a gate to the compound. a security guard was shot and hand grenades we re guard was shot and hand grenades were thrown at taking the station off the air. staff had been evacuated and the injured had been taken to hospital. the number of
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casualties is not clear. in australia, two eight—year—old boys have died after a car crashed into a primary school classroom in sydney. the incident at banksia road public school also left three girls in hospital with injuries. the driver of the car, a 52—year—old woman, was taken to a police station. authorities say they do not believe the crash was intentional. the american air force admitted it did not alert authorities about the violent past of the man responsible for the mass shooting in texas. there will be an investigation as to why there was not a conviction after knowledge from a database that would have prevented the shooter from buying weapons. he killed 26 people ata buying weapons. he killed 26 people at a church in the tiny community of sutherland springs on sunday. here is our correspondent. killed as they
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prayed. the face of some of the victims of the shooting. here were two out of nine members of the same family killed. brian was about to lead worship when he was shot dead. 16—year—old haley kruger dreamt about becoming a nurse. floral tributes have been laid outside the church. the youngest to die was only 18 months old. churches are often be focal point of communities. and here also in this texas town everybody was touched by the tragedy and knew somebody at the sunday service. police believe this place of worship was targeted by the gunman. police say devon kelly, the gunman, was motivated by a personal grudge against his mother—in—law. though occasionally worshipped at the church. in the party said threatening text messages to her. —— she occasionally worshipped. there are many ways he could have taken
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ca re of are many ways he could have taken care of the mother—in—law without carrying 15 loaded magazines and an assault rifle to the church. i think he came here with a mission. he died after two local men chased him and fired shots in his direction. he sustained three gunshot wounds. one self—inflicted. the men who gave chase are being hailed as heroes. some say the fact they had guns help save lives. as is the case of the week of mass shootings in the us, others say the massacre at this church should serve as another reason for tighter gun controls in america. the nhs is struggling to cope with rising demand for frontline services, despite increasing the number of staff in england. that's the warning from health bosses, who say boosting the workforce is not enough to tackle the growing needs of patients. nhs providers voiced their concerns ahead of their annual conference, which gets under way in birmingham today. here's our health correspondent nick triggle. there are now one million people working in the nhs in england,
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6% more than there was three years ago, but nhs providers says it's still not enough. a report by the group that represents health bosses highlights figures showing demand for key services has risen by much more. the number of diagnostic tests has gone up by 19%. ambulance calls by 15%. gp referrals by 11%. and emergency admissions by 10%. in fact nhs providers' director of policy believes the pressure has got so great on staff that patients are at risk. we've got demand for services rising at a rate that's faster than we have staff coming into the nhs, so we've had a rise of around 6% over the last three to four years, that's about 60,000 staff, but demand for services is rising much faster than that. the group is critical of the government approach to workforce planning, saying there is no coherent or credible strategy and its warning
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that the prospect of brexit is making things worse as eu staff are facing uncertain futures. but the department of health insist plans are in place, it says it is overseeing the biggest ever expansion in training places for doctors and nurses, which will help ensure the nhs has enough staff in place now and in the future. nick triggle, bbc news. people tricked into transferring money to a fraudster could find easier ways to get their money back after a change by the regulator. music is shown 19,000 victims were targeted by authorised push payment scams. “— targeted by authorised push payment scams. —— investigations have shown. it amounted to £100 million. the regulator proposes a scheme of reimbursement alongside plans to make sure banks follow best practice to help people get money back. gareth shaw is a money expert from
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which? hejoins gareth shaw is a money expert from which? he joins us gareth shaw is a money expert from which? hejoins us now. how big is this problem? it is the second largest banking fraud apart from credit and debit card fraud. it is a growing problem and has been for a long time. we are concerned consumers have been losing life changing amounts of money and have not had any protection to get it back. when you pay by direct debit, and credit card, there are schemes which can help you recover your money if you are victims of fraud. but when you transfer money to a fraudster, if you have transferred your money to them, there is a big gap in consumer protection and people have not been given their money back. that is why it is good news the regulator and the industry are setting up proposals to tackle this and protect consumers. how is this and protect consumers. how is this scheme going to work? it is called to look at the
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behaviour of the consumers, it's going to look at the pay in bank and the receiving bank as well to see whether or not they have done their job to protect them. if one person has fallen down out of those two banks people could get their money back. this is a really positive step forward. reimbursement scheme is a good thing. this is regulation rather than legislation. are you confident it is far enough? the report that has been published today isa report that has been published today is a set of proposals and the reimbursement scheme is a consultation. the important thing now is to see this put into practice. every day this isn't simply as consumers are losing money. there is a clear timeline to deliver these new things. they need to be implemented quickly so consumers can be protected.“ to be implemented quickly so consumers can be protected. if banks have to reimburse customers, might that mean that they might do more to stop it happening in the first
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place? if there is liability on banks, it gives them the incentive to invest in technology that protects computer —— consumers and their customers. bank should want to do that. yes, liability could well act as the incentive that helps protect more people. gareth, thank you for your time. more now on borisjohnson's comments about a british—iranian woman being held in prison in tehran. the bbc understands that boris johnson has called his union counterpart about temp one the cla rets by his counterpart about temp one the clarets by his comments last week. we arejoined by clarets by his comments last week. we are joined by sir malcolm rifkind. should boris johnson resign? no, he shouldn't. but he has two acknowledges that the mistake was made and it shouldn't have
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happened. this wasn't a casual remark that he made, it was at a committee meeting. perhaps he didn't read his brief insignificant detail, ido read his brief insignificant detail, i do know. the way he has responded is exactly right. he has already spoken to the iranian foreign minister, leaving them in no doubt that the british government see this lady as being on a private visit to a rant, so her arrest was indefensible. we understand he is likely to be reporting to the house of commons later today. this isn't the first time he has been accused of being careless with detail, though. how much of a problem is that for a british foreign secretary? it is different to almost any otherjob in the cabinet because most ministers when they make speeches give interviews are speaking to a domestic united kingdom audience who are perhaps more interested in the overall
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impression that you make on the point you're making. when you are foreign secretary, you have two audiences, the other is the wider world is, foreign governments under foreign ministries of those governments who are scrutinising every you say to be satisfied that there has not been a change in british government policy or is there anything you have said that they can exploit against british interests. these are matters that foreign secretary have to come to terms with. i think boris is aware of that but don't think he has drawn significant conclusion over high heat must not stray from detailed information. given the carelessness he seems to have displayed in this case, perhaps we should conclude that he is just not up to the job. case, perhaps we should conclude that he isjust not up to the joblj think that is unkind. boris is a hugely intelligent guy. he is not talking about somebody who doesn't have the intellectual firepower to do anyjob in government, but it is
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a question of his personality. we all know his personality is unusual to say the least! i think that is something he must come to terms with and that he must not simply be making good speeches about foreign policy, travelling the world, meeting ministers, all of which he does as far as i can tell very competently, but he must discipline himself to understand every nuance and every line. it is really hard work. i know exactly how demanding days. but you can't do the job properly unless you're prepared to do that. what does he need to do to get himself out of this mess and to help the poor woman in a random? he is doing that, to be absolutely fair. he is doing enough in your view? i am yet to think of anything else it could be doing. he has spoken directly to a very senior member of the iranian government, to
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the foreign minister. that couldn't bea the foreign minister. that couldn't be a better person for him to speak to. he has made the position clear, indicated there was a slip of the tongue in his earlier comments and hopefully that will achieve its purpose. sir malcolm rifkind, we are grateful for your time. purpose. sir malcolm rifkind, we are gratefulforyourtime. many purpose. sir malcolm rifkind, we are grateful for your time. many thanks. we have heavy rain moving from west to east across the united kingdom at the moment. really quite intense rain, particularly in south—west england and across wales. it is continuing to move eastwards. in parts of east anglia and the south—east of england, while there will be patchy rain, domains band of rain will move through the midlands slowly, central and southern england. as the rain clears away from the west sunny spells will break through. sunny in northern ireland and in much of scotland for some people turned colder here at temperatures between seven and nine celsius. the weather front bringing
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this area of rain will stall in eastern areas through tonight. clear skies elsewhere, touch of frost first thing on wednesday morning. there will be plenty of sunshine across many parts of the uk. staying cloudy in the far east and later on we will see outbreaks of rain moving their way into scotland and northern ireland, and it will feel quite cold tomorrow afternoon, as well. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: foreign secretary borisjohnson calls his counterpart in iran amid fears comments he made about a british woman jailed in the country could lead to her sentence being doubled. an urgent question will be asked in the commons over the actions of priti patel after she apologises for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday. president trump says he is hopeful
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north korea can be persuaded to enter into nuclear negotiations, warning that america was prepared to defend the south if needed. the isle of man's chief minister defends the rules reportedly used by lewis hamilton to avoid vat on his £16 million privatejet, insisting the island is not a tax haven. in a moment: from this castle in cornwall, to a cold war bunker in york. find out how your english heritage is bringing ina how your english heritage is bringing in a new way of cheering historical sites across england online. more now on borisjohnson's comments about a british—iranian woman being held in prison in tehran. the bbc understands that borisjohnson has called his iranian counterpart counterpa rt about nazanin
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zaghari—ratcliffe to clarify his comments last week. joining us now is our diplomatic correspondent paul adams, who has the latest on this story. sir malcolm rifkind seems to think that boris johnson sir malcolm rifkind seems to think that borisjohnson is doing all the right things. what is your view? malcolm rifkind also said that government scrutinise every word of the foreign secretary, and as jack straw put it earlier on careless talk costs lives. we are in the situation where borisjohnson allied the impression to get about that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was indeed ina rant nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was indeed in a rant for something other than a holiday and an opportunity to introduce her daughter to her daughter's grandparents. doris johnson did not say she was in a ra nt to johnson did not say she was in a rant to teach journalists, but he was careless in his choice of words and the delight that impression. as and the delight that impression. as a result, we have the statement a couple of days ago from the
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judiciary high council for couple of days ago from the judiciary high councilfor human rights, rather ironically, in a rant, saying that mrjohnson's statement has shed new light on the realities about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. realities about nazanin zag ha ri — ratcliffe. clearly realities about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. clearly the authorities in iran believe for one to claim to believe that she was up to claim to believe that she was up to no good. this has been their case all along, that she was involved in spreading propaganda, trying to get the kind of food going against the authorities. that is the view of the hardline authorities in terry rant and it doesn't matter what the government itself sets because it is not the government that is driving this, it is the supreme leader and revolutionary guard. borisjohnson has put mrs zaghari—ratcliffe in the position of some jeopardy. we don't know what he was able to say to his counterpart to change that situation. can you give us a sense of what options are open to the
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british government in terms of dealing with this? that he has been all along that quiet pressure is at thing that would resolve this. those campaigning for her release had taken a different view, including her husband. they have been trying to draw attention to this case at every opportunity. they have said thatis every opportunity. they have said that isjohnson has not explicitly demanded the release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and they think that should happen, the british government should be much clearer about this. that seems to be a nervousness that putting too much pressure could have adverse consequences. borisjohnson was as the other day whether there were grounds for nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe to be released on humanitarian grounds. he agreed with a member of the parliamentary foreign affairs committee that that was the case. it is mystifying,
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frankly, to a lot of people why in light of what has been said about his remarks that borisjohnson has not awaited the better part of the week to say that is not what i said and it is not what i meant. good to talk to you. let's get more now on the release of more documents relating to documents known as the paradise papers. as we've been hearing, the tax affairs of british crown dependencies and overseas territories are coming under intense scrutiny because of the leak of confidential documents. let's speak now to rita de la feria, a professor of tax law at the university of leeds. thank you so much forjoining us. what do you make of all these revelations that you have been hearing? good morning. what the lea ks hearing? good morning. what the leaks show is that essentially there isa leaks show is that essentially there is a wide spectrum of activities that goes from offshore accounts that goes from offshore accounts that might not have anything to do
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with tax to rather aggressive avoidance schemes. tell us a little bit more about those tax havens. are they a force for good? tax havens are usually characterised for two things. one, very low rates of tax, or zero rates of tax, and the level of secrecy. those that advocate that they are a force for good basically argued that multinationals that use tax havens are able to lower their costs and, therefore, that allows for growth and potentially further investment that creates employment except. it is much harder to make the case in the situation of rich taxpayers, individuals, because on that specific situation, in essence the fact that they are not paying taxes is merely subsidising their
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lifestyle. what about secrecy? how transparent as all of this? is there enough regulation of tax havens? on the secrecy that has been massive progress since the beginning of the financial crisis, but particularly after the panama papers. there has been a massive move in terms of further transparency, automatic exchange of information. all of this is basically ending secrecy, but lea ks is basically ending secrecy, but leaks show that there are still is some way to go. thank you for carrying on with the drilling without batting an eyelid, very impressive! apple, after it left ireland, it seemed it submitted a questionnaire to different areas almost as if it was a tax competition to find out which area might sit at best. would that be
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fair? ithink might sit at best. would that be fair? i think that is fair to say. this is essentially written evidence of something that the kind of knew was happening, tax competition amongst various jurisdictions around the world for investment. everybody wa nts to the world for investment. everybody wants to get the investments of the multinationals take advantage of that fact and essentially make countries compete for that investment through tax. rita de la feria, thank you for your time. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: foreign secretary borisjohnson calls his counterpart in iran amid fears comments he made about a british woman jailed in the country could lead to her sentence being doubled. an urgent question will be asked in the commons over the actions of priti patel after she apologises for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday. president trump says he is hopeful north korea can be persuaded to enter into nuclear negotiations,
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warning that america was prepared to defend the south if needed. in the business news: the owner of primark, associated british foods, has seen profits rise 22%. however, its shares are down some 3% after it warned that the profits from its sugar business were going to fall in the yearahead. business has benefited from the fall in the value of the pound and we'll look at how that works injust a minute. but retail sales generally are not looking so healthy. the british retail consortium has said sales of non—food items grew at the slowest pace since records began. non—food sales rose byjust 0.2% in the year to october. clothing sales were "particularly hard hit", and the brc said that families appeared to be spending more and more on outdoor experiences and excursions. a different picture altogether on house prices, according to the halifax.
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right across the uk, they are rising strongly and it says they are going to keep on going in the months ahead. in the year to october, prices rose by 4.5%, up from 4% in september and the fastest rise since february. it brings the average price of a uk house to a new record high of £225,826. as i mentioned, associated british foods has seen annual profits surged. it is probably best known in the uk for twinings tea, kingsmill bread and the primark clothing chain. but there is a lot more to it than that and it has interests right through the food supply chain. operating profit rose 22% to £1.36 billion in last year to the 16th september. primark‘s revenues rose 19% to £7.05 billion as the chain continued to expand. remember, it's
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a multinational company. primark opened 30 new stores in nine countries last year and abf said it still had room for "significa nt growth". professor manmohan sodhi, professor of operations and supply chain management at the cass business school. hejoins us now. can you give as an explanation of why this company is doing so well at the moment? the company is a good success story for the sector it is in, for the multiple sectors it is in. its entire value chain gone from agriculture all the way to groceries and specialty foods, and the other thing is clothing, which you already mentioned, prime mark, which is almost half of its business. whether
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we have brexit, wars, middle east crisis, whatnot, primark is a very well hedged stock and of course the geographical diversity which you alluded to earlier is also there, which hedges it. what about the effect of the currency? the value of the pound has come down and that will make imported goods, imported food coming into this country more expensive. isn't that hurting the company? some parts of the company, yes will be hurt. the net effect is been hugely positive for associated foods because they have businesses in other countries. even where they we re in other countries. even where they were vulnerable to the increase, so for example clothing where they bought in us dollars that they have
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to pay in pounds, there they also made procurement gained so that they weren't hurt so bad that the currency change. overall, they have benefited quite handsomely with a fall in the pine, but that is because of their five versus —— there are diverse businesses. sugar, they think the price of sugar is going to go down next year in europe. is that a big problem for them? it's a problem, but not a big problem. the bigger problem is that the stock price fell to date because high mud can be to grow in the next year? they have grown well in the past year and the company itself says they expect about 10% growth. the market had assumed a much higher rate of growth, but in this kind of very well diversified business, to
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assume 20% growth for ever is simply not possible to stop thank you very much indeed. in other business news: hiscox, the specialist insurer, has said that the cost of the caribbean hurricane catastrophes to the insurance industry has already started to push insurance prices up, with some premiums rising by 50%. the hurricanes, not to mention the earthquakes in mexico, are expected to create up to $100 billion of claims across the industry. insurance rates are expected to rise to help rebuild profits. the japanese car giant toyota has reported a 13% rise in net profit for the first half of the year. the car maker made more than $9 billion in the last six months. toyota says the results were helped by cost—cutting efforts and a weaker yen. there are reports that walt disney is looking to buy the majority of fox. cnbc and the ft say the deal would involve the group's movie studio, 20th century fox, along with other global assets including national geographic. fox has been struggling with falling
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customer numbers as subscribers switch away from traditional cable networks. the markets. most markets around the world a re the markets. most markets around the world are hitting all—time highs, actually. mining companies are doing reasonably well, but the ftse 100 actually. mining companies are doing reasonably well, but the ftse100 is being pulled down by certain companies, g for s and associated british foods, as we were talking about. that's all the business news. some breaking news on boris johnson's comments about a british iranian women being held in prison in teheran. the foreign secretary has called his iranian counterpart to discuss the case of mrs
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zaghari—ratcliffe. he said his comments to a commons committee provide no justifiable basis for further legal action against nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. he also reiterated his anxiety over her continued suffering. in that phone call to his iranian counterpart, borisjohnson said his comments to that commons committee provide no justifiable basis for further legal action against nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, he is of course being held prisoner in teheran at the moment. more on that as we get it. rarely—seen works of art and archaeological remains across england will be among historical treasures revealed online for the first time. english heritage and google have used digital technology to create virtual tours of 29 sites,
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from tintagel castle in cornwall to a cold war bunker in york. matt thompson is head collections director of english heritage. this isa director of english heritage. this is a fantastic opportunity to see some of those smaller, quirkier stories we have about our sites. every single one of our sites is a charity and has fantastic stories to tell, but sometimes it is difficult and let you have a career to read beside you to get the stories out there. working with google we managed to get hold of some of the technology so we can get the stories out there. tell us about some of the quirkier stories. well, we have everything from our scoundrel who was involved in building this castle. it is a great opportunity to see some of the works of art, the wonderful ceiling in the library and kenwood house, which is fantastic.
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you can see it in the most remarkable detail. even if you were lying on your back on the carpet in the house you wouldn't see the detail like you can here. can you ever really replace seeing the real thing? it is a really good question. this whole project has been a fantastic experiment in whetting the appetite of people. we want to reach out to a different audience. we are keen to see if we can attract younger people, and also the international audience. this platform allows us to do that. it is a lwa ys platform allows us to do that. it is always great to be able to experience it in the flesh, in the place where it happens, and that is what english heritage do. could this put people off? my big thing, why would be bothered to go to look at the sites will make them see them online? i wouldn't agree with that. i think some people don't come to our sites because they don't realise the wealth of stories that we have got. there is so much more to see on
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those sites when you actually get there. perhaps by communicating to people we can really encourage them to come and visit in person. matt thompson, head collections karine to add english heritage, but keep talking us. the actressjulie walters has attended buckingham palace where she was made a dame. the star received the honour, presented by the queen, for services to drama, almost 35 years after her breakout role in educating rita, which earned her an oscar nomination. dame julie was also nominated for her role in the film billy elliott. on the small screen, she's best known for her collaborations with the late victoria wood. austrian climber angela ayter has become the first woman to conquer one of the world's toughest climbing routes. this is la planta de shiva in spain. it had previously only been climbed by two men. angela spent two years training by casting replicas of the holds along the route and installing them
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on her local climbing wall. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. good morning. yesterday we had the frost in the morning, of course. this morning it was not quite as cold but there was lots of cloud around, some outbreaks of brain and is not particularly pleasant conditions for the morning commute in the west. this is the scene in the west midlands at the moment. you can see where the rain is on this recent radar rainfall picture. some heavy bursts of rain in the south—west of wheels and four south—west of wheels and four south—west england. the badly and we have some sunshine. this is the scene at the moment in the
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highlands. for the rest of this afternoon we will continue to see this removing its weight gradually eastwards, but behind that there are some good spells of sunshine. for the evening rush—hour, the rain will have cleared away from cornwall and west devon and there will be late afternoon sunny spells. the same goes for wales, with the best of any sunshine and run the west this afternoon. further east, it will be cloudy with a few spots of rain. for northern ireland that has been sunny for much of the morning and it will stay dry into the afternoon, just one or two showers here. a few showers in scotland but noticeably feeling quite cold this afternoon. temperatures in aberdeen about six celsius this afternoon. in eastern england, we will see the rain for the evening rush—hour. the heaviest of the rain will be across central and southern parts of england. during tuesday evening, this weather
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fronts will continue, but there is a ridge of high pressure squeezing in between but some clear skies. the neath the fronts and the clouds temperatures staying up at 67 celsius. the need to clear skies above turn quite cold. there will be above turn quite cold. there will be a frost to take us on the wednesday morning. this is how it looks hold on wednesday. a cold front in eastern areas. in between we have this nose of high pressure which is squeezing in. that gives us are some sign —— a sunshine sandwich. more pliable move into northern ireland and scotland and with some outbreaks of rain, and also quite cold for us for many of us on wednesday. on thursday, more cloud around, by the afternoon some sunny spells, but milderfeel. maximum afternoon some sunny spells, but milder feel. maximum temperature afternoon some sunny spells, but milderfeel. maximum temperature is on the rise again, so between ten and 1a degrees. more details
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available on the website. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday... fears for the british womanjailed in iran — borisjohnson phones his counterpart there, amid concern that comments he made about what she was doing in the country could lead to her sentence being doubled. if you are british four secretary, remember that careless talk can cost lives. in the case of mrs zaghari—ratcliffe it might literally cost a n zaghari—ratcliffe it might literally cost an extra five years in prison. pressure on the international development secretary after she apologises for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday. on a visit to south korea, president trump tells all countries to stop trading with north korea, to force pyongyang to stop its nuclear activities. the isle of man's chief minister insists the island is not a tax haven and defends rules reportedly used by lewis hamilton to avoid vat on his £16 million privatejet.
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also: touring a stately home from the comfort of your sofa. great houses and archaeological sites across the country go online so you can explore with a virtual tour. west ham appoint david moyes as their new manager — they say he's the right man to turn things around at the club. good afternoon. it's tuesday the 7th of november. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. foreign secretary borisjohnson has spoken to his iranian counterpart to
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clarify comments about it british— iranian woman held prison in tehran. last week he told mps mrs zaghari—ratcliffe had been training journalist, which is family denied, insisting she was visiting relatives. she is now serving a five—year sentence over allegations of involvement in propaganda against the regime. the foreign office said mrjohnson accepts he could have been clear when talking to mps but the husband would like the comments retracted in public. during us for the latest is our assistant political editor, norman smith. call it an error or a slip of the time. these remarks have provoked massive controversy at westminster. —— slip of the tongue. he might have jeopardised the case of zaghari—ratcliffe and she might face an even longer jail term zaghari—ratcliffe and she might face an even longerjail term as a result
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of his incorrect remarks. downing street says mrjohnson spoke with his iranian counterpart this morning and they said his remarks were not the cause of the decision to review and possibly increase her sentence. they also say mrjohnson had said nothing which might in any circumstances give them justification for increasing the sentence. mrjohnson also appears to be standing by the line issued by the foreign office late last night, suggesting when he said mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was their teaching iranian people about journalism, that he was in fact alluding to the iranian case against her. this is what he actually said when he appeared before the foreign affairs select committee last week... when you look at what mrs zaghari—ratcliffe when you look at what mrs zaghari— ratcliffe was when you look at what mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was doing, she was
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simply teaching people journalism, asi simply teaching people journalism, as i understand. this is not the first time loose language used by mrjohnson has caused considerable diplomatic difficulty. at the conservative party conference he provoked outrage among libyan authorities after he suggested dead bodies needed to be cleared away so it could be turned into a tourist destination. he was also caught on film being told by the british ambassador in me and mark not to recite kipling and now this latest saga. this morning we have had criticism from a former labour foreign secretary, jack straw, who said careless talk could cost lives and the former conservative foreign secretary sir malcolm rifkind said borisjohnson needed to concentrate more. should not have happened. this was notjust a casual remark. it was evidence to the select committee on foreign
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affairs. i the select committee on foreign affairs. lam the select committee on foreign affairs. i am sure the select committee on foreign affairs. lam sure he had a brief prepared and he might have read it but maybe not in sufficient detail. that is for him to explain. the way he has responded is exactly right. he has already spoken to the iranian foreign minister and let them in no doubt that the british government see this lady as having been on a private visit to the country and that her arrest was indefensible. we understand he is likely to be reporting to the house of commons later today. i am joined reporting to the house of commons later today. i amjoined by reporting to the house of commons later today. i am joined by the local mp of mrs zaghari—ratcliffe. how do you read borisjohnson's handling of the affair?|j how do you read borisjohnson's handling of the affair? i am very worried. this is not a blunder. it isa very worried. this is not a blunder. it is a very serious mistake which will have serious consequences of life and death. my constituent has been in jail and death. my constituent has been injailfor and death. my constituent has been injail for more and death. my constituent has been in jail for more than 18 and death. my constituent has been injail for more than 18 months. she has been on hunger strike and is suicidal and now the iranians judiciary website said in light of what the foreign secretary of our
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country said, this is fresh light on her case and will face fresh charges. this is deeply worrying. he needs to put out a statement immediately. how do you respond to those who say that we need to avoid making political points and the more publicity given to this, the more it makes her position even more difficult? i am not interested in political point scoring. i only want my constituent to come back home to herfamily and my constituent to come back home to her family and come back to west ham stood where she belongs. we cannot escape the fact that the top diplomat of our country, the foreign secretary, who i have raised this place with for 18 months, did not know the facts. he needs to apologise for making a mistake and make it clear that zaghari—ratcliffe was not in a run training journalists. she was there on holiday. this is a matter of life and death. it is not a laughing matter. it is not something boris johnson should try to weasel out of. if this was a labour foreign
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secretary i would say the same thing. iwant secretary i would say the same thing. i want my constituent home and do not want to spend even one extra day injail. if she spends even an extra day injail extra day injail. if she spends even an extra day in jail because extra day injail. if she spends even an extra day injail because of our foreign secretary, he needs to resign with immediate effect. we understand the arabian foreign ministry has said mrjohnson's remarks were not the cause of the decision to review and possibly increase her sentence. is it a coincidence the day after these comments were made she was pulled into court when she was not supposed to be there and was told she would face fresh charges and would spend more time in prison? is it a coincidence that the official website of the iraniansjudiciary said because of what the foreign secretary had said we have fresh evidence against this constituent? i am worried that foreign secretary's comments are very damaging. they must be taken seriously and i am shocked borisjohnson has not issued a retraction. no point in beating
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around the bush. these words have been very damaging. it could be life or death for my constituent. boris johnson needs to take responsibility for it. we know he will make a statement to the house of commons about countering islamic state and within that we are expecting an update on the current position. is that satisfactory? i sincerely hope when he comes the parliament he says loud and clear that he was mistaken and he retracts the fact he said zaghari—ratcliffe and he retracts the fact he said zaghari— ratcliffe was training journalists and he makes it very clear that because it was ill informed he made these comments and he knows she was on holiday with her baby daughter in tehran and there was nothing more than that. if he says that loud and clear at least he has made some attempt to try and make some correction on what he said. these are deeply damaging comments from the foreign secretary. he should know better and should know the details of the case. he is the top diplomat in this country. of
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course the iranian authorities are to blame for imprisoning zaghari—ratcliffe. to blame for imprisoning zaghari— ratcliffe. but we to blame for imprisoning zaghari—ratcliffe. but we should be trying to help get out ofjail and not make matters worse. thank you very much indeed. i should tell you the foreign secretary will also be visiting hirano later this year. he hopes it possible to visit mrs zaghari—ratcliffe when there. —— visiting hirano later this year. more information to bring you about this story. —— visiting the iranians later this year. this woman being held in prison was on holiday, we are being told, when she was arrested. this follows the earlier comments to the foreign affairs select committee that zaghari—ratcliffe had been training journalists. the foreign office have said that in a telephone call to his iranian counterpart, boris johnson made it clear that the point he was seeking to make in his evidence to the select committee was he
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condemned the iranians view that training journalists was a crime and not that he believed in allegations that zaghari—ratcliffe had been engaged in that activity. the statement from the foreign office is quite lengthy but it also says the foreign secretary accepted his remarks to the foreign affairs committee could have been more clear on this aspect and he does intend to update the house of commons this afternoon. the prime minister's spokesman has said the prime minister has full confidence in the foreign secretary's ability to do thejob after his foreign secretary's ability to do the job after his remarks to the select committee last week. the spokesman was not aware if theresa may and boris johnson spokesman was not aware if theresa may and borisjohnson have spoken recently. the bbc has also been seeking to clarify something which came up in this story, as well. it reiterates, as you might imagine,
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that it remains concerned about this case, but wanted to say contrary to some reports, mrs zaghari—ratcliffe has never worked for bbc persian. she has not worked for the bbc as a journalist. she worked briefly for bbc media action, the international development charity, in a junior administrative capacity over seven yea rs administrative capacity over seven years ago. if there are more developed than that story we will bring them to you. the prime minister has asked for the ministerial code of conduct to be tightened after the international development secretary an apologised for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her summer holiday. she suggested some of the aid budget should be given to the israeli army to support humanitarian operations. labour said the shocking admission warrants a cabinet office enquiry. they have
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been granted an urgent question in the house of commons. james landale said it is not clear about the nature of the 12 meetings she held in israel. we understand there is a memorandum of understanding between israel and the united kingdom over development in africa. israel is a set of x —— excellence for much technology and we understand there was a discussion about what technology could be used for solar power and water purification. when it comes to the development work the uk is doing in africa. that is the first thing we know. secondly, the idea, slightly counterintuitive, that british government could be using its aid budget to support israeli army humanitarian work in the middle east. in the golan heights, the area of territory disputed north east of the sea of galilee, the israeli army has had a
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large operation for some time now, several years, where it takes syrian civilians and some rebel fighters, who had been injured in conflict in syria, takes them across the border and treats them in israeli hospitals and treats them in israeli hospitals and sometimes other hospitals in other countries and when people are better again, returns them to syria. the suggestion was could this be some operation the british and could get involved in? when priti patel came home she asked her officials to look at it. the foreign office said there are some problems. namely that there are some problems. namely that there might be more humanitarian aid needed elsewhere. secondly the problem is the british government does not recognise the israeli annexation of the golan heights. it would be very hard for officials to work there. how precarious is her position? she is under political pressure, no doubt about that. labour have called on her to resign.
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i think the prime minister will be keen for her not to resign for a variety of reasons. they lost a cabinet minister, the defence secretary, michael fallon, last week over the harassment scandal. i think she would be very loath to lose another cabinet minister so quickly. if she loses priti patel the cabinet becomes unbalanced in terms of the brexit debate. she's a strong supporter of brexit. i think they will do everything they possibly can to make sure she stays in post. but she is under pressure. james landale. legislation setting out how britain could trade with the rest of the world after leaving the eu — is also due to be published today. the government says the brexit trade bill will include provisions for the uk to implement existing eu trade agreements, as well as powers to ensure british companies can continue to access government contracts in other countries. the bill is part of a raft of legislation on brexit to be discussed by parliament over
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the next year. president trump is on a visit to south korea that's dominated by worries over the north's nuclear programme. at a news conference in seoul, mr trump called on the international community to put pressure on on north korea to halt its nuclear ambitions. north korea is a worldwide threat that requires worldwide action. we call upon every responsible nation, including china and russia, to demand the north korean regime ends its nuclear weapons and missile programmes and lives in peace. as the south korean people know so well, it is time to act with urgency and great determination. we arejoined by high
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we are joined by high washington correspondent. from what we were seeing there from president trump he seemed more measured and less confrontational than in the past. that is exactly what he was. none of the talk about fire and fury and destroying north korea or insulting kimjong un and destroying north korea or insulting kim jong un and calling destroying north korea or insulting kimjong un and calling him the rocket man. now he is on his doorstep he was much more measured. i think that was much more about calming the nerves of people in south korea. you can use that fiery rhetoric, military rhetoric, but ultimately it is the people here who will feel the consequences of any military action and all the analysis suggests tens of thousands could be killed even in the first few hours of any conflict with north korea. all that rhetoric in recent months has made people here are very nervous. donald trump had a job to
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do, to calm those nerves and it seems he got the memo, at least in terms of military rhetoric. but he did call for something more to be donein did call for something more to be done in terms of pressure on north korea. he called for all countries to stop trading completely with north korea, which goes beyond the current sanctions which allows for some business ties. in that respect, it was some tough talking but not the kind of military hype we have heard in recent months. what has been the reaction to his visit in south korea? there have been protests very close to where he met the south korea president at the blue house, the presidential residence. there was an extraordinary ceremony here to welcome him. but protests took place outside with people echoing very much the feelings of the president
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of south korea, president moon, who feels dialogue would be better than conflict. that is something for which donald trump has almost mocked the president in the past. at least today the two managed to show something of a united front. for now, thank you. a line breaking news that the scottish parliament an incident has occurred which required the evacuation of the parliament buildings. a bbc colleague andrew kerr has said on twitter, incident at holyrood closes msp block. they have gathered in garden lobby. white powder sent to msp, it is claimed. the building has been evacuated and the scottish parliament says that police are now at the scene. a bbc reporter, andrew kerr, we have seen
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his message on twitter saying a package containing white powder was sent to one conservative msp and pa rt sent to one conservative msp and part of the scottish parliament building in edinburgh has been evacuated because of a security alert and police are at the scene. of course, we will bring you more detail on that as we get it. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has called his counterpart in iran — amid fears comments he made about a british woman jailed in the country could lead to her sentence being doubled. pressure on the international development secretary — priti patel mounts, after she apologises for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday. on a visit to south korea, donald trump has urged north korea to "come to the table" and discuss giving up its nuclear weapons. let's catch up with the sport news
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at the bbc sports centre. david moyes is the new west ham manager appointed on a 2.5 year deal. he takes training for the first time this morning but has not confirmed who his backroom staff will be. rumours are he will bring in stuart pearce as his number two. he said he had a point to prove. some fans were unhappy slaven bilic had been sacked but were willing to give him a go. david moyes was good at everton but the other clubs, not so good. at the same time, he is here. the fans have got to get behind him. if they don't, as boris iam behind him. if they don't, as boris i am concerned, they are not getting behind the team. he could turn it around but we have got to give him time. —— as far as around but we have got to give him time. —— as faras i am
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around but we have got to give him time. —— as far as i am concerned. if we have stuart pearce coming that will be a good thing. but i'm gutted for slaven bilic. and gutted for we st for slaven bilic. and gutted for west ham. man city's raheem sterling and fabian delph have returned after being ruled out of the england friendlies. jordan henderson will miss out after the back—to—back games against germany and harry kane and harry winks have been ruled out. gary cahill has joined the squad for training today. steven finn will miss the ashes series after he picked up a knee injury while training in australia. it was brought in to replace ben stokes did not travel after his arrest. but he flies home for treatment on a knee injury. the first test match starts on november 23. the england coach has already decided on most of his side for that test match. has already decided on most of his side for that test matchlj has already decided on most of his side for that test match. i think we area side for that test match. i think we are a little bit like australia. we are a little bit like australia. we are probably down to nine of the 11.
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there are one spots we are still discussing. we still have two more matches to go yet. i am sure it will work itself out before the first test match. the england women are preparing for their crucial ashes test match, which starts on thursday. they have been training at the sydney oval, knowing only a win will do. they trail australia 4—2. if australia when they cannot be beaten in the series. it was imperative we learned a lot from the last game, the last three days. i think not only have we learned more but some of the youngsters have picked up a lot of information which was not there before. it is important that we spend the next few days really going on from that. hopefully we will have a nice little win over here in a few days! crucial match for england's women on thursday. that is all the sport for now. more at about half past one, just after the one o'clock news.
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studio: kathryn, thanks. more on the story involving the borisjohnson. he has now clarified that a british iranian woman held in prison in tehran was on holiday in the country when she was arrested. this follows his earlier comments to a foreign office select committee that zaghari—ratcliffe had been training journalists. we heard from the bbc that she had not worked for the bbc asa that she had not worked for the bbc as a journalist. now we are hearing as a journalist. now we are hearing a statement from thomson reuters, saying they well, boris johnson's clarification of his comments about zaghari—ratcliffe. she works for thomson reuters, and he accepts he could have been clearer about her work at the thomson reuters foundation. he goes on to say she has never trained journalists in
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iran and that they are pleased boris johnson admitted to the iranian foreign minister in a phone call early this morning that she was in the country purely on holiday. i would just like to remind you the foreign office earlier had also said the firm secretary accepted his remarks to the foreign affairs committee could have been clearer and he intends to update the house this afternoon. i also would like to remind you that in that statement the foreign office said boris johnson has set out his intention to visit the country before the end of the year to discuss this case further. they lot of lines emerging from this. let's bring you up to date with what we know... the foreign secretary is clarified that zaghari—ratcliffe, held in prison in tehran, was on holiday in iran when
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she was arrested. this follows earlier comments made to a foreign affa i rs earlier comments made to a foreign affairs select committee that she had been training journalists. the bbc and thomson reuters, for whom she now works, said she has never trained journalists in a run on their behalf. boris johnson trained journalists in a run on their behalf. borisjohnson will be visiting it run by the end of the year, before the end of the year, to discuss the case further. —— iran. the tax affairs of british crown dependencies and overseas territories are coming under intense scrutiny after the huge leak of confidential documents — known as the paradise papers. my colleague ben brown has been looking at the details. yes, more details are emerging from the cache of 13 million leaked documents — they're being shared by the international consortium of investigative journalists — including the bbc panormaa programme. —— including the bbc panorama programme.
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the latest revelation concerns the technology giant apple, the most profitable company in the world. it's tax affairs have long been controversial. it did have a huge amount of money in ireland, but after a tax loophole there was closed, apple shopped around for a new offshore tax base — and finally settled on jersey apple insists the move ‘did not reduce our tax payments in any country‘ and stressed that no operations had been moved from ireland. now the paradise papers also reveal how british racing driver lewis hamilton avoided £3 million worth of tax on his private jet after it was imported into the isle of man. but a spokesman for lewis hamilton said "as a global sportsman who pays tax in a large "number of countries, lewis relies upon a team "of professional advisers who manage his affairs. "those advisers have assured lewis that everything is above board". the isle of man is one of the british crown dependencies now facing questions.
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speaking to our correspondent judith moritz, its chief minister, howard quayle, said the isle of man authorities have nothing to hide. i cannot discuss individual cases, but the isle of man closely follows uk law on vat and as a result, we are fully compliant. we have hmrc coming every quarter to review our practices as a matter of course. they found no wrongdoing. to prove there has been no wrongdoing we have invited hm treasury to assess our practices on the treatment of vat on business jets. the two key allegations we receive from panorama have been investigated and the evidence we have that there has been no wrongdoing and those individuals would their vat back if they resided in or were put through a united kingdom company. no legal wrongdoing, but morally there is a lot of criticism that you are on the wrong side of the moral line. absolutely not.
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until 2011 the jets were zero—rated and did not pay any vat. if they are used for business, if i'm a local builder and buy a pick—up truck, i can claim back vat on my vehicle, it is the same with business jets. if you're using them for business you are entitled to a full refund. island officials knew that plane was going to be used in part for private use, as well. vat is highly copmlex. —— vat is highly complex. we have asked the treasury to review our practices but it is very complex and we are convinced that if he applied in the uk he would have been given the full vat refund. that was the isle of man chief minister howard quayle. well, jersey is another british crown dependency now under the spotlight after the revelation that apple moved billions of pounds there from ireland — our correspondent robert hall is there, and what are the authorities in jersey saying
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about all this robert? you can imagine that the avastin have caused a lot of debate. like the isle of man this islands depends heavily on the finance industry and its international reputation. that's debate on the one side would say jersey is working very hard to be as transparent as possible and to operate within the guidelines issued to it from the uk and internationally. on the other hand some say that what they perceive as tax avoidance is not something they believe is ethical. there are those debates. no illegality is implied in what apple are said to have been doing injersey. what apple are said to have been doing in jersey. but what apple are said to have been doing injersey. but these headlines will not be welcomed. this is the jersey evening post and on top of the page and other unwelcome headline, you probably cannot read it, jersey and european union blacklist discussion to take place today. the finance ministers who we re today. the finance ministers who were going to discuss whetherjones cand were going to discuss whetherjones c and guernsey should be added to a
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blacklist of offshore tax shelters and tax heavens, that discussion is taking place today. —— jersey and guernsey. they are awaiting the outcome of that. we have been trying to talk to somebody from the jersey government about this since yesterday morning. we were told nobody was available. late last night we had a statement from ian gorse, the chief minister. he is currently in bahrain on a preplanned conference, we are told. the statement came in on my e—mail at about half past 11 last night. i will just read it about half past 11 last night. i willjust read it to you. jersey does not want abusive tax avoidance schemes operating in the island. it expects financial services providers to abide by a voluntary code. saying they will not take on this kind of business. if this proves to be such business, he said we will consider how to strengthen arrangements if necessary by amending legislation to introduce a substance test. that would be a big move. he means a company operating herewith a
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presence here should have a physical presence, employs staff and contribute something to the island. he said it was not satisfactory for a foreign registered company to claim tax residency injersey without demonstrating substance. he said the allegation will be investigated and he said he hopes the journalists behind the avastin will investigate. appleby in the last 2a hours have said this report has not come as a result of a data lea k has not come as a result of a data leak but from a serious actor criminality, allowing an intruder to hack. jersey, in one of the officers, they have asked detectives from jersey to talk to them about if any local crime has been committed. roberts, thank you. you can find all the latest on this,
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and reaction, on the bbc news website. thank you. let's catch up with the weather. i preferred the golden crisp, but we have cloudy at the moment. it is more mild. some of the rain in the south—west has been quite heavy in the last hour or so. colder crisper weather is set to return with a few isolated showers behind the weather front. tonight we will see a frost returning. too much on the way of cloud and patchy rain in the south—east for that to be an issue. in rural spots rooted seedlings of minus three degrees. there will be some mist and fog lingering in some places first thing. for tomorrow, another promising day, lots of sunshine. a bit disappointing in the
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south—east. another weather front is pushing into the north—west. that will introduce milder air yet again. here, double digits, but in the sunshine temperatures will struggle at highs of eight or 9 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines: the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, calls his counterpart in iran amid fears comments he made about a british woman jailed in the country could lead to her sentence being doubled. an urgent question will be asked in the commons about the actions of the international development secretary, priti patel, after she apologises for holding
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secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday. president trump says he's hopeful north korea can be persuaded to enter into nuclear negotiations, warning that america was prepared to defend the south if needed. the isle of man's chief minister insists the island is not a tax haven and defends rules reportedly used by lewis hamilton to avoid vat on his £16 million privatejet. let's get more nyon borisjohnson's comments. the bbc has learnt
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the foreign secretary, borisjohnson called his iranian counterpart to discuss the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and clarify his comments made at a select committee hearing last week. she is currently serving a five—year sentence over allegations of using propaganda against the regime. there have been lots of developments on the story this morning. tallis more about the clarification that boris johnson has issued. the foreign secretary has put out a statement in which he has admitted he could have been clearer with what he was trying to say to the foreign affairs committee last week in which he appeared to suggest that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe had been teaching journalism in iran. he said what he was trying to say was that he was condemning the reunion view that teaching journalism was somehow a bad thing to do. he seemed to be saying he was not in there and that she was their teaching journalism, but that is what he appeared to say,
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hence the angry reaction from temp one's family. she is serving a prison sentence in and around. she maintained she was only in their country to take her daughter to meter grandparents. we have been hearing from her employer and to a previous employer, the bbc. that's right. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe works for thomson reuters foundation, and overseas charity. they have now said they welcome in a statement the statement from boris johnson clarifying his comments in which he admits that he could been clearer about the work at thomson reuters that she was undertaken. about the work at thomson reuters that she was undertakenlj about the work at thomson reuters that she was undertaken. i am going to interrupt you there. labour have asked for a response to an urgent question on the release of the brexit impact assessment papers ministers are answering urgent questions in parliament. let's listen in. mr speaker, we have this morning
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laid a written ministerial statement on this issue which sets out the timeline and nature of our response to last week's motion. it is not the case that there are 50 its sectoral impact assessments. during the opposition day debate rob walker told the house that there has been some misunderstanding about what this sectoral analysis actually is. it is not a series of 58 impact assessments. the secretary of state brexiting the eu made the same points before the lords eu committee on the 31st of october and at the house on the 2nd of november. let me clarify exactly what this sectoral analysis ease. it is a wide mix of qualitative and quantitative analysis contained in a range of documents developed at different times since the referendum. it means looking at 58 sectors to help inform
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our negotiating positions. the analysis examines the nature of activity in the sectors, how trade is conducted with the eu currently and in many cases considers the alternatives after we leave the eu as well as looking at existing precedents. our analysis is co nsta ntly precedents. our analysis is constantly evolving and being updated but it is not or has it ever been a series of impact assessments examining the quantitative impact of the exit on these sectors. given this, it will take the government some time to collate and bring together this information in a way thatis together this information in a way that is accessible and informative to the committee. we will provide this information to the committee as soon as is possible. we have made claim to the house daugherty is that we currently expect this to be no more than three weeks. here we are again, mr speaker. members from across house of repeated the
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question requested that the 58 analysis taken by the government should be released. ministers argued that publication of these analyses would compromise the uk's negotiating position. on no occasion did ministers argue or unfair that the information did exist as the street discrete documents. but yesterday that is exactly what the secretary of state argued. can the minister tell the housewives edit the information that members had been repeating the call for, i clearer impression has been allowed to develop over many months that these exist. to a freedom of information request, requesting details of publication of the analyses, the departments freedom of information team said that the department holds the information you have requested, yet in his letter to the chair of the select committee
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the chair of the select committee the secretary of state in fares it will take time to gather the information because some of that is held by other departments. can the minister confirm that this is correct and that the department audience permission? if not, can the minister tell the housewives the department's freedom of information tea m department's freedom of information team said that. if the department holds some of the information not all of that, can the minister tell the house what is preventing the information that is available being released immediately? this farce has dragged on forfar too long. ministers cannot use semantics and doublespeak to avoid the clear instructions that this house is given. they can be no further delay. ministers just need to get on with it. mr speaker, the honourable gentleman says that an impression has been allowed to develop. it was never our purpose to allow such an impression to develop. this
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situation, mr speaker, is that the government, as i have explained, carries out a wide range of analysis across these sectors in order to inform our negotiating position. purposeis inform our negotiating position. purpose is to develop our negotiating capital, not to create the kind of stories that the honourable gentleman seems to be pursuing. the government holds a wide range of information across a wide range of information across a wide range of documents. the information is provided by departments and collated by my department, but what it does not comprise or has ever comprised is quantitative forecasts of impact on those sectors. what i will say is i think the public will look at the labour party today, look at what they are asking for, look at the kind of narrative that members opposite are trying to create and they will ask who's side bayonne. as
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vice—chairman of the select committee on accident in the european union, can i thank my honourable friend for his answer. cani honourable friend for his answer. can i say to him that the select committee has not discussed this matter formally, but committee has not discussed this matterformally, but from my committee has not discussed this matter formally, but from my own point of view can i tell him that what he has said to the host this afternoon seems to be entirely reasonable. i'm very grateful to my right honourable friends and i believe it is the case that my right honourable friend the secretary of state has spoken to the chairman of the committee and i believe that a further meeting has been scheduled. i think it is absolutely astonishing that more than 500 days on from the referendum that these are not prepared yet. first of all, that is astonishing. if they are scrabbling together this in three weeks' time, will betide us all. will these be
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shared by the devolved administrations? have these been chaired to the dissolved administrations, something that the secretary of state intimated to the committee. can he confirm what other assessments have been made about the regional impacts of leaving the european union, as well? this criticism comes from a party which decided to leave the united kingdom without deciding what currency it would use. this sectoral analysis has been discussed with the devolved administrations and we will give careful consideration as and when information is released to the select committee about how we share that information with the dissolved —— dissolved administrations. the information we have does not or has ever comprised wanted to do forecasts on the sectors or any region. this is a storm in a teacup.
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given the extent of analysis, the time frame seems reasonable given that the —— if an incomplete picture was presented the opposition would be the first to criticise it. as it suggested the minister that we should not want to weaken our negotiating hand. i'm gratefulto my honourable friend. our purpose today asa honourable friend. our purpose today as a nation is to go forward and maximise our negotiating capital in order to deliver the best possible dealfor all people in order to deliver the best possible deal for all people in the order to deliver the best possible dealfor all people in the united kingdom. we now know what this material consists of, but i am concerned to read in the letter at the secretary of state sent to me that ministers not intend, and a goat, to collate and bring together this information in a way that is accessible and informative for the committee. mr speaker, iwould expect the committee to receive
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these documents in the form they we re these documents in the form they were when the motion was carried, in other words an amended. as a made clear in my letter to the secretary of state, i think it is for the committee to decide in what form they are published because we are conscious of our responsibilities in the same way the whole of the houses, and can the minister therefore confirmed that this is what will now happen and that there will be no further anju delay? mr speaker, the material that we hold holds commercially sensitive material and it includes material which is relevant to our negotiating position. the house has previously voted not to release information which would be prejudicial to negotiating position. what i would say to him is if we were to give him and the committee the original reports which were commissioned at the beginning of the department's like he would find that that material was not a incomplete and out of date. it is our intention to
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satisfy the motion by providing to him information that is relevant and timely and correct. you have been watching the secretary of state for accessing the eu, he has been making a statement about the publication of papers which examined the impact of brexit on the uk economy. the speaker of the house of commons had given the government deadline of tonight to publish these breads at impact assessments or explain why it had not done so. we heard steve baker, the gingerbread is administered, saying that those brexit assessments will be released to the relevant parliamentary committee in no more than three weeks. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has called his counterpart in iran amid fears comments he made about a british woman jailed in the country could lead to her sentence being increased. pressure on the international development secretary, priti patel, mounts after she apologises for holding secret meetings with israeli officials during her holiday.
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on a visit to south korea, donald trump has urged north korea to "come to the table" and discuss giving up its nuclear weapons. a campaign against government surveillance in the uk will be heard by the european court of human rights in a landmark case. activists and journalists worldwide will argue that cross—border surveillance programmes exposed by the us whistleblower edward snowden unlawfully breach privacy and freedom of expression. the government says the intelligence community works within a strict legal framework and it will defend the powers needed to keep people safe. the government is being warned that foodbanks could struggle to meet demand this winter unless urgent action is taken to improve universal credit. the trussell trust, which is the uk's biggest foodbank operator, says areas where universal credit has been in place for six months have seen
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a 30% increase in demand on the previous year. the government says it is misleading to link foodbank usage to any one issue. rarely seen works of art and archaeological remains across england will be among historical treasures revealed online for the first time. english heritage and google have used digital technology to create virtual tours of 29 sites from tintagel castle in cornwall to a cold war bunker in york. a short time ago, i spoke to matt thompson from english heritage. f7 plastic opportunity to see some of the smaller stories, maybe the slightly quirky stories we have about our sites. every one of our sites is a charity and they have fantastic stories that bail, but sometimes it is quite difficult
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u nless sometimes it is quite difficult unless you have curator beside you to get the stories out there. working with google we got folders the technology that allows us to get those stories out there saw sorts of people can experience them. tell us about those quirky stories? well, this castle, the scoundrel involved in building the castle. also, a great opportunity to see some of the works of art, let's say the wonderful ceiling in the library at kenwood house. it is fantastic and you can save in the most remarkable detail. if you were lying on your back on the carpet in the house you still wouldn't get that view. we can also provide the commentary to explain what you're looking at. nonetheless, can you ever replace seeing the real thing? nonetheless, can you ever replace seeing the realthing? that is nonetheless, can you ever replace seeing the real thing? that is a good question. this whole project has been a fantastic experiment in whetting the appetite of people. we wa nt to whetting the appetite of people. we want to reach out to a different
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audience. we are keen to see if we can attract younger people and that international audience. this platform allows us to do that. it is a lwa ys platform allows us to do that. it is always great to be able to experience it in the in the place where it happened, and that is what english heritage do. it also frequently could put people off, they might then why bother to go and look at these sites when you can see them online? i would not agree with that. one of the reasons people to come to this site is they don't realise the wealth of stories they have got. these single snippets, single stories. there are worse is so much more to see when you get there. we can really encourage people to come and visit in person. the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall have continued their tour of three asian countries in malaysia with a visit to an orang—utan rehabilitation centre on the island of borneo and a walk through the world heritage site in the historic quarter of the island of penang. our south—east asia correspondent
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jonathan head is with the royal tour and sent this report. in time—honoured fashion, this whirlwind royal tour contained many colourful figure yet. this whirlwind royal tour contained many colourfulfigure yet. this is whirlwind royal tour contained many colourful figure yet. this is soft power at work, bringing together two countries which believe they have a lot to gain from each other. there we re lot to gain from each other. there were opportunities for the prince of wales to pursue his environmental interests. massive logging in malaysia borneo has robbed orangutans of much of their natural habitat. this is a rehabilitation centre for just a handful of these endangered animals with the hope one day of returning them to the ra i nfo rest. day of returning them to the rainforest. from there, the royal couple moved to penang, the first british trading post on the malay
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peninsulas, not a hugely successful economies shared by communities of ethnic chinese, indians and malay muslims. this historic multireligious city is the perfect place for the prince of wales to showcase his personal interests in interfaith harmony, but it also will signpost his future role as head of the commonwealth and the rich potential of malaysia as a trading partner in a post—brexit written must also have been a factor in its inclusion on the royal itinerary. the spectacular lion dance at an old chinese temple. followed by a brief hot wok later to a dazzling 180—year—old hindu temple. then a walkabout along the old streets of this world heritage site. the prince was being shorn the best of malaysia and none of the serious political challenges facing this country, but that his visit brings britain and palatial little closer together it will, in all likelihood, bejudged a
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success. conservationists are celebrating the arrival of a babyjavan gibbon — the first of this species to be born in the wild to parents, rescued from the pet trade. the birth is a boost for the future of the apes on the indonesian island ofjava, as victoria gill reports. in this protected rainforest in indonesia, conservationists introduced me to a very special family. these are javan gibbons. they were released here by a team who rescued them from the pet trade. now they have settled into their new home and have just had a baby. that six—month—old baby is the first babyjavan gibbon to be born in the wild from rehabilitated and rereleased parents. both parents started their lives in cages in the pet trade. now they're living wild. there are a family. but some gibbons are not so lucky. they are still sometimes taken
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from the wild and sold as pets. researchers say the trade is now happening more online. sometimes on social media. we found this video of a gibbon for sale on facebook. and british researchers who are studying the pet trade showed me videos and pictures posted by indonesian pet shops including this one of a babyjavan gibbon. it's illegal to sell these endangered animals. and gibbons are not the only type of ape affected. these baby orangutans were also rescued and are now being cared for at a sanctuary. apes are very intelligent. being taken from their family to be someone's pet is frightening for them. he was found injakarta in a bus in a postal package. someone was posting her? exactly, yes. it's horrific that this is happening. when they found her she was traumatised. it was really difficult for us to get going. these youngsters are now learning to live in the trees so they can one
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day go back to the forest. facebook told us they had removed the video we found and they said they wanted to help tackle the illegal online trade in protected wildlife. conservationists here want to fight the trade too and they want to bring more of these gibbons out of cages and back into the wild where they belong. austrian climber angela ayter has become the first woman to conquer one of the world's toughest climbing routes. this is la planta de shiva in spain. it had previously only been climbed by two men. angela spent two years training by casting replicas of the holds along the route and installing them on her local climbing wall. the actressjulie walters has attended buckingham palace where she was made a dame. the star received the honour, presented by the queen, for services to drama, almost 35 years after her breakout role in educating rita, which earned her an oscar nomination. dame julie was also
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nominated for her role in the film billy elliott. on the small screen, she's best known for her collaborations with the late victoria wood. in a moment, the news at one with jane hill. first, the weather with simon. good afternoon. but a difference a day makes. mundy started cold and frosty, tuesday it was cloudy and wet for many, but mild. 11 degrees. this front is producing heavy bursts, particularly in the south—west, but behind that some decent spells of sunshine, but much fresher feel. in the far north of scotla nd fresher feel. in the far north of scotland we have 7 degrees, but the beautiful story here for the rest of the day. this will be the theme as we go through the week. mundy was
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cold but you can see the slice of milderair cold but you can see the slice of milder air out cold but you can see the slice of milderairout in the cold but you can see the slice of milder air out in the south—west. that has a right to date, but cold airwill that has a right to date, but cold air will return on wednesday morning, it could be frosty again, before the milder air takes over once more. heading into the weekend, the cold winds takeover. the weekend looks cold and bright, but it will be chilly. before all that we have decent spells of sunshine out to the west. cold front continues to work this way steadily eastwards. it will bring heavier pulses of rain this afternoon across the isle of wight, stretching up on to the midlands into lincolnshire, gradually drifting eastwards. a wet entered the day in the south—east corner. it will be a chilly afternoon, but lovely spells of sunshine elsewhere. the showers will mostly be confined to west facing coasts, with ties between seven and the degrees. they've invited tuesday, it will be a wet rush hour in the south—east corner and maybe dublin could linger
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for a corner and maybe dublin could linger fora time, corner and maybe dublin could linger for a time, but the clearer skies and lighter winds temperatures could fall away, there could be patchy fog in northern ireland. frost is possible in northern ireland, scotla nd possible in northern ireland, scotland and shelter project north wales. in the countryside we could see temperatures down as low as minus four degrees. the south—east of england will cling on to the cloud and light patchy rain first thing. any early—morning mist and fog will lift. you can see the seesaw weather pattern containing with them next batch of wet and windy weather starting to arrive into the far north—west. the finished thursday on a cloudy but quiet note that the best of the sunshine in the far north—west. the foreign office admits borisjohnson could have been clearer, when he spoke about the case of a british—iranian woman who's being held in tehran. the foreign secretary has since spoken to his iranian counterpart on the phone — and says he will now visit the country —
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but still faces criticism: yes, he made a mistake — his problem if i'm absolutely honest about it, is that he's done it before. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's family fear the foreign secretary's comments could see her sentence doubled. and this lunchtime the international development secretary priti patel is also under pressure, as questions are asked in parliament about her meetings in israel. also this lunchtime: donald trump has urged north korea to "come to the table" and discuss
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