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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 8, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. another cabinet minister fights for theirjob. the pressure grows on priti patel. just days after the international development secretary was forced to apologise over secret meetings in israel, downing street is examining new claims about her trips overseas. good morning, it is wednesday 8 november. also this morning: prince charles‘s finances face scrutiny following fresh revelations in the paradise papers. the prince's advisors deny suggestions of a conflict of interest. on his trip to south korea, president trump warns the north it is time to come to the table and make a deal. the weapons you are acquiring are not making you safer. they are
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putting your regime in grave danger. two of the big six energy companies are looking to merge. i'm taking a look at what that will mean for their millions of customers. in sport: andy murray targets a return to competitive tennis next year. the former world number one has been out of action with a hip injury, but faced roger federer in a charity match in glasgow last night. carol has the weather. good morning. it is a cold start to the day, there is quite a bit of frost around, some patchy mist and fog but for most it will be dry and sunny. however, in the south—east there is more cloud, some rain and drizzle, and we have got some wet and windy weather coming in from the north—west. i will have more details on that 15 minutes. —— in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: downing street is examining new information about the international development secretary's unauthorised contacts with senior israeli government officials. priti patel apologised for meeting israeli prime minister benjamin
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netanyahu during a summer holiday in august without telling the foreign office in advance. it is now believed she had at least one further meeting with senior israeli officials after she returned home, and failed to tell theresa may about it. let's get more detail now from our political correspondent leila nathoo. it is interesting, because more seems to be coming out. how certain is priti patel‘s future? seems to be coming out. how certain is priti patel's future? i don't think it is looking good at all for priti patel at the moment. she is still in herjob for now but possibly only because she is on an official visit to africa so theresa may did not have a chance to speak with her last night. she has already been reprimanded by downing street holding a series of unauthorised meetings in israel while she was on holiday there in the summer, without the presence of officials or the knowledge of the foreign office. she even met the israeli prime minister, anjuman netanyahu. now, priti patel had to go on the record to correct an initial statement that she gave,
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correcting the number of meetings that she had, and for suggesting previously that the foreign office did know about what she was doing. downing street hold her in and reminded her of the ministerial code, and theresa may, despite being under pressure them to sack her, considered the matter closed after she had received an apology. but now we understand that downing street is examining fresh revelations about the number of meetings that she held in israel. and i don't think it is looking good for priti patel at all, and it is certainly not what theresa may needs, at a time when her government is so fragile. thank you very much, i imagine we will continue to talk about it this morning and in future days. donald trump has issued a stark warning to north korea's leader, kimjong—un, in an address to south korea's parliament. the us president urged all countries to join forces to isolate what he called the brutal regime of north korea, saying the world cannot tolerate the menace of a rogue regime that threatens it with nuclear devastation. it is our responsibility, and our
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duty, to confront this danger together. because the longer we wait, the greater the danger grows, and the fewer the options become. in the next hour donald trump is expected to arrive in china, as he continues his tour of asia. from there, our beijing correspondent stephen mcdonelljoins us. thank you very much for your time this morning. what can we expect from donald trump's visit? iam standing i am standing outside the forbidden city in beijing, and this is the first place donald trump will come to in about 45 minutes. the us president will touch down and then in convoy come directly to the forbidden city where he will meet xi jinping fora forbidden city where he will meet xi jinping for a tea ceremony and a walk around the old imperial powers. it will be interesting to see what they talk about in the coming days,
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because donald trump pose the rhetorical question of china today, why would you want to be friends with north korea 7 why would you want to be friends with north korea? why would you want to be supporting north korea, given its appalling human rights record. the chinese government's message will be we are doing everything we can to uphold these un sanctions, the pressure north korea into giving up the pressure north korea into giving up its nuclear weapons. i suppose between the two of them they will have a difference of opinion over just how tight those screws should be turned on north korea. and it will be interesting if, in the coming days, they can come up with some sort of concrete development, some sort of concrete development, some way to move this forward. at the moment it is pretty much a stalemate. the prince of wales has been accused of calling for changes to international climate agreements without disclosing that his private estate stood to benefit from the reforms he supported, thanks to an investment in a close friend's company in bermuda. the revelations come from a number of leaked documents about tax havens, known as the paradise papers. it is the second time this week that a member of the royalfamily has been named. andy verity reports.
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prince charles has campaigned on the environment for decades, and especially for the rainforest. today, he is due to arrive in india, after flying from malaysia, as criticism grew at home of his failure to disclose a secret financial stake in a company in bermuda. on the right here is the late hugh van cutsem, one of the prince's oldest friends. he was a director of sustainable forestry management limited, a firm that managed tropical rainforests, registered in bermuda, the company wanted to trade in carbon credits. but tropical rainforests weren't included in carbon—trading schemes, so it needed the rules changed. in february 2007, the duchy buys 50 shares in van cutsem's company, worth $113,500. at that time, sfm's directors agreed to keep the duchy‘s shares confidential. mr van cutsem asked for lobbying
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documents to be sent to the prince's office, and soon the prince was making speeches campaigning for changes to two international agreements on carbon credits. injune 2008, duchy sold its shares for $325,000, a profit of more than $200,000. well, i think it's a serious conflict. there's a conflict of interest between his own investments of the duchy of cornwall, and what he's trying to achieve publicly. clarence house said... there is no suggestion of illegality, nor that prince charles‘s campaigning caused the share price of his friends company to rise. nor is it suggested that the duchy was seeking to avoid tax. andrew verity, bbc news. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet,
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who was found dead yesterday. mr sargeant left his post and was suspended by the labour party, pending an investigation into allegations made by a number of women. it is understood there is now deep unease within the welsh labour group about the treatment he received. five rail operators are facing disruption due to strike action by the rail, maritime and transport union. workers on southern, greater anglia, and south—western railway are striking for 48 hours, while staff on merseyrail and northern have walked out for 2h hours. the union is in dispute over driver—only—operated trains. the body which tackles doping in sport in the uk fears it could be made insolvent, or require a government bailout, over a dispute with boxer tyson fury. sources close to uk anti—doping have told bbc sport it may face serious financial issues if it loses a long—running case against fury and his boxer cousin hughie. our sport news correspondent richard conwayjoins us from our london newsroom. what is the background to this case?
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yes, tyson fury and his cousin were found to have an adverse doping test backin found to have an adverse doping test back in june 2016 found to have an adverse doping test back injune 2016 for a band anabolic steroid. they say, their defence, is that they got it from eating wild boar —— banned. the case has gone on for a number of months and it has got to the point where it will go to a tribunal, there has been a lot of disputed evidence, and iam being been a lot of disputed evidence, and i am being told that senior figures are saying if they lose the face, case and it goes to appeal in switzerland, eventually, they could be facing a loss of earnings lawsuit from tyson fury. given he earns around £5 million perflight and given that uk anti—doping, the body responsible for maintaining clean sport, their budget isjust responsible for maintaining clean sport, their budget is just under £8 million, you can see there is a big problem is that eventually transpires. seniorfigures
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problem is that eventually transpires. senior figures are said to have discussed this at board level, and it has been discussed by the government, but both bodies are keen to pursue the case because they think it is important for the integrity of the anti—doping process , integrity of the anti—doping process, so no integrity of the anti—doping process, so no desire to back down. sheep have demonstrated the ability to recognise familiar human faces, according to a study. after receiving training, a group of welsh mountain sheep could pick out the faces of celebrities actors jake gyllenhaal and emma watson, former us president barack obama, and bbc newsreader fiona bruce. the sheep chose photos of the celebrity faces when presented next to unfamiliar faces. researchers say it shows sheep possess similar face recognition abilities to primates. and where is fiona bruce? that's what i want to know. she will be there eventually. do you know that, idida there eventually. do you know that, i did a little bit of extra digging
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and eight times out of ten they pick the right face. and even when they change the angle of the face they we re change the angle of the face they were still pretty accurate. then they went even deeper and they put a picture of their handler up there, and they went to their handler seven times out of ten rather than the other face. you see? it is all about scientific research into a particular disease, isn't it? we will talk about it later. later on this morning: strictly‘sjonnie and oti will be here. we will get their reaction to the shock departure of aston on sunday night. we will also find out how their foxtrot is coming along, ahead of saturday's big show. that is at 8:40am. and andy murray is back. he has been a notable absentee and at this time of year we are always looking towards the end of season finals in both the men and the women's game. no andy murray and nojo konta. good to see andy murray back out on the court, but perhaps the most significant thing is that he is saying he will not play at the
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australian open at the start of next year u nless australian open at the start of next year unless he is 100% fit, and there were signs last night that he is still hobbling around a bit. he is still hobbling around a bit. he is still hobbling around a bit. he is still not 100%, but good to see him back. he says he hopes to return to competitive action in brisbane ahead of the australian open in january, but only if he is 100% fit. he played roger federer at a charity event in glasgow last night, his first match since a hip injury. back in the premier league, the former sunderland and manchester united manager david moyes took charge of training yesterday, following his appointment at west ham. gareth southgate has lost three more players from his squad, ahead of friendlies with germany and brazil. raheem sterling, jordan henderson and fabian delph have all withdrawn through injury. and england's women start the test match that they can't afford to lose this evening. defeat would mean australia retain the ashes. the men are also in action. they are playing in the first of two warmup matches before the series gets underway.
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obviously a pair of big matches for both of women and the men. and in the sunshine as well. what a place to be at this time of year. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning all. this morning if you have not stepped outside, it is a chilly start to the day. temperatures not far off freezing for many parts. you won't be surprised to hear there is a touch of frost. there are also pockets of patchy and fog, but they should lift readily. a weather front in the south—east producing some cloud and also some rain and drizzle. nothing too heavy at this stage. but as we move away from that we are back under clearer skies, and look at the temperatures. it is rather nippy and these are the
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temperatures at eight a.m.. not the current temperatures but it also means there will be a fair bit of sunshine first thing across the south—west, through the midlands, wales, northern england, northern ireland and also scotland. of scotland, you can see waiting in the winds another weather front coming oui’ winds another weather front coming our way. that will introduce some wet and windy conditions as we go through the course of the day. so away from the north—west of scotland and the south—east of england there will be a fine day with lengthy sunny spells. we have the wind arrows on because they will strengthen, especially across the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles. later we are looking at ales, especially with exposure. temperatures, well, we have the cloud in the rain, up to 11 in stornoway. where we have the south—east, up to around ten. in between, the range of eight to 11. it won't be too bad for the time of year. as we head on through the evening and overnight our rain and drizzle sinks southwards across uk. not getting as far as the south—east. behind it, clearer
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skies. again maybe some frost around in sheltered glens and still pretty windy. blustery showers across the very far north of scotland. that leads us into tomorrow, the wind a bates leads us into tomorrow, the wind abates and then it picks up later on in the day. meanwhile, the cloud in the drizzle which is left to push away towards the near continent and it right and is up from the north. temperatures tomorrow, look at this. 14 temperatures tomorrow, look at this. 1a degrees in cardiff is pretty good for this stage in november. and then, as we move from thursday into friday, things are still fairly changeable. we have a weather front coming in, pushing across the uk, bringing some rain from the west later in the day on friday and generally on friday there will be a lot of dry weather around. you will also be a fair bit of cloud at times, and we will see those showers across the far north. temperature—wise we are looking at about seven, eight or nine in the northern half of the country. though the south, tentative team. don't get used to this. as we head into the weekend it looks like it will turn
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that bit colder. the brightest weather during the course of the weekend is likely to be in the central slice of the country. this spine in the north and west and east will see some showers, so a bit more changeable. that is how it is looking for now. thank you very much, you will be with us all morning and we will see you in half an hour. thank you. the guardian are talking about the paradise papers. we will be talking about this morning. prince charles and his estate making a profit on a sta ke and his estate making a profit on a stake in an offshore firm. we will talk about that later. the express. sugar speeds up dementia and makes the condition more severe, say experts. we will be talking about a key member of a labour macro party in wales. he takes his own life after shocking sex claims ——
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labour. front page of the daily telegraph talks about priti patel and her future. i've just spotted this because i know that you are one of these people who allows 280 characters on twitter. it happened last night. a circle appeared. christmas has come early. i think less is more. in all honesty i sent the first one last night and after halfway through iti last night and after halfway through it i ran out of things to say. it is from 9pm last night 280 characters became available to all users. soi users. so i could get it. but i tried to do a tweet and it wasn't any longer. for me. but clearly i' m wasn't any longer. for me. but clearly i'm not a special as dan. i feel very privileged! jeremy corbyn labelled and hypocrite. and damian lewis received and to be
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yesterday. —— an obe. the daily mail talks about the case of a mother was spared jail yesterday after a judge to 80 on her. there's quite a lot going on in the business world. not least a possible merger between end power and sse. and power. lots of people are asking what this will mean the competition because if you look at the figures, the big six energy companies have been losing customers to the smaller companies, so i think they want to try and shake things up a bit and create this huge energy company. it will have to be 4% of the market share compared to british gas which has 92% at the moment. there are
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lots of questions round what it will mean for prices because if there are fewer competitors surely that will mean there would be as much competition. i'll be talking about that later. not something you see every day. mr cool not something you see every day. mr cool, roger federer, in a kilt. have we got pictures of him? we have. you know he is famous for his killer backhand, this doesn't slow him down. it's brilliant. get into the net could be difficult. i suppose so. it could get caught up, perhaps. female tennis players... most of them where... slightly shorter. but they wear skorts underneath. and obviously andy murray was getting in on the act as well. ididn't getting in on the act as well. i didn't realise, someone in the crowd handed them the kilt.
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i think that's great sport. exactly. and the ginger wig. we've got pictures of that coming up. i wanted to show you this. you know we always get a rumbling security story. this is a young man who has a false leg from a motorbike accident. he is on a four week cu rfew. accident. he is on a four week curfew. when they turned up the man from the security firm said, which led to you wanted on? so for a jokey set, surely they won't put it on a fa ke set, surely they won't put it on a fake one, they said, feel all right? he said, yes. the tag was on his removable limb! a report out today says kids have sent 65,000 phone messages by the age of 1a. by the age of 1a kids have typically said the 65,000 text and whatsapp messages. isn't it a
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surprise when you think... but at what age are you getting a phone? that's the question. this is eight to 1a. i've seen a child with a book trying to swipe it. a physical book. i've gone to photographs and tried to do that. why can't they make it bigger? we went to a restaurant three weeks ago and everybody at the table... they had their phones out. i know it annoys a lot of people... it keeps everyone quiet. but if you are going to go out, a special occasion, have a chat. i feel like special occasion, have a chat. ifeel like i'm being told. it's you! see you both later. the prince of wales has been accused of calling for changes to international climate agreements without disclosing that his private estate stood to benefit from the proposed reforms. the details emerged in the latest
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leak of financial documents known as the paradise papers. joining us now from outside the prince's london residence is our royal correspondent daniela relph. this is the second story we've had ina weak this is the second story we've had in a weak ripple —— relating to be paradise papers and the royal family. has there been any definitive statement from the palace? this has been an unhelpful few days for the royal family with this further revelations. the prince of wales is currently moving from malaysia to india today, on a southeast asian two. they has been a careful defence of the prince of wales from clarence house. in terms of investments made by the duchy of cornwall, offshore investments, clarence house has said the prince of wales is not directly involved. any big decisions made about investments from the duchy of cornwall. on the tricky issue of the
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prince of wales investing in a company of a friend of his and making speeches linked to the areas that the company worked on and then making a profit from his investment, clarence house on that issue say that there is not a conflict of interest. this was not an investment made forfinancial gain, interest. this was not an investment made for financial gain, it was one made for financial gain, it was one made because of the issues the company worked on, the environment, the sustainability of rainforests, and these are issues that are com pletely and these are issues that are completely consistent with the work that the prince of wales over a number of years has done. so this was effectively the prince putting his money where his mouth is. but this does the other couple of issues that are difficult for the royal family. it has led to a number of calls from mps and lobby groups for there to be greater transparency over royal finances. it also shows up over royal finances. it also shows up the difficulty is that you have when you have a prince of wales who is also an activist, a campaigner and a lobbyist because that does expose him more to allegations of conflicts of interest. thank you
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very much for that this morning. i want to show you this lovely picture. it's that time of year when the colours, is just saw them in london on the screen then, the colours are just absolutely fantastic. this is just colours are just absolutely fantastic. this isjust one picture. if you've got beautiful autumnal pictures this morning, send them in. i tried to take pictures of the leeds yesterday but it was disappointing because when you are looking at it the colours are so vibrant and on your phone it's not the same —— pictures of leaves. yesterday the new cameras on phones might they look better than real life. do they? not on my phone! plenty to come this morning. we will bejoined byjonnie plenty to come this morning. we will be joined byjonnie peacock. plenty to come this morning. we will bejoined byjonnie peacock. if you have any questions aboutjudging, if you want to keep people in strictly you want to keep people in strictly you have to vote for them. vote in the dams. —— dance off.
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and there's a new album out about matt king call. we'll be talking about that later. still to come: she was forced to swim for her life after fleeing syria and in less than a year yusra mardini became the first athlete to represent the refugee team at rio 2016. we'll hear about the plans for a film based on her life and the swimmer‘s tokyo 2020 ambitions. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the police watchdog says the police pursuit of a speeding car through luton, which ended up crashing and killing a teenage girl, was justified and proportionate. the 15—year—old died in august last year, after the car she was in hit a speed bump at 80mph. the driver was jailed for eight years.
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the ipcc found the officer who carried out the pursuit did so in accordance with police procedure. rail commuters are being warned to expect disruption this morning because of strike action by guards on southern, greater anglia and south—western railways. it's part of the long running dispute over changes to their role. the train operators say most services will run. but there could be delays and cancellations. plans to build a controversial road tunnel under the thames between greenwich and east london have been delayed by six months. the silvertown tunnel was backed by the mayor sadiq khan. but the government says more time is needed to consider its impact on air quality. the national infrastructure commission's said the delay is halting progress and "leaving communities in limbo". travel now. the tube is all running well so far—no reported problems on any of those lines there at the moment.
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now because of the strike action we told you about, there is a reduced service on parts of the southern and south—western railway networks this morning. southern has no service between guildford and leatherhead, and also between watford junction and milton keynes central. there's been an accident in wimbledon, the a219 the broadway is closed southbound between king's road and merton road. and in kidbrooke we a207 shooters hill has one lane closed at the academy road course of a burst water main. let's get the weather forecast. underneath the clout it hasn't been a particularly cold night, but this is the remnants of yesterday's weather system that worked its way in from the west. quite a lot of cloud and there will be some drizzly outbreaks, but it should write an app for some later. a lot of cloud to start the day. some showery outbreaks at times. further west you are the more likely it is that you will see things brighten up through
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the day. underneath the cloud it is not going to feel particularly warm, with a top temperature today ofjust nine celsius. into this evening we will start to see the sky is clear. when we hang on to clear skies for any length of time overnight, the temperatures will drop close to freezing. we could see a touch of grass frost first thing on thursday. the cloud steadily starts to increase from the north—west as we approach dawn on thursday morning. so some places will begin the day with brightness, but not long before the cloud increases, bringing some outbreaks of patchy rain. this should improve as we head through the afternoon, with some brightness kind. temperatures tomorrow feeling better, with highs of 12 celsius. on friday we start with rain but after that a good deal of dry weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast,
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with dan walker and louise minchin. still to come: as the temperature drops, the battle commences over control of the thermostat. steph will look at the ways we can all keep our energy bills low. they sailed through to this week's strictly with their salsa. jonnie and oti join us, as they prepare to foxtrot their way back to the ballroom. # you will find that life is still worthwhile, if you just smile. the unforgettable voice of gregory porter. he will be here to tell us about his musical love letter to his father figure, the late, great nat ‘king' cole. good morning. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: downing street is examining new information about
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the international development secretary's unauthorised contacts with senior israeli government officials. priti patel apologised for meeting israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu during a summer holiday in august without telling the foreign office in advance. it is now believed she had at least one further meeting with senior israeli officials after she returned home, and failed to tell theresa may about it. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. mr sargeant left his post and was suspended by the labour party, pending an investigation into allegations made by a number of women. it is understood there is now deep unease within the welsh labour group about the treatment he received. the prince of wales has been criticised for failing to disclose an investment by his private estate in an offshore company. the revelations come from a number of leaked documents about tax havens, known as the paradise papers. it is the second time this week that a member of the royalfamily has been named. donald trump has issued a stark
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warning to north korea's leader, kimjong—un, in an address to south korea's parliament. the us president urged all countries to join forces to isolate what he called the brutal regime of north korea, saying the world cannot tolerate the menace of a rogue regime that threatens it with nuclear devastation. he indicated that america is still willing to negotiate with north korea if it gave up its military ambitions. the number of homeless people in england has risen by nearly 111,000 in the last year, according to a new study. it found that there were 300,000 people homeless in the uk, and in reality
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the figure may be much higher. i don't like telling people where i live because people — they just automatically judge. i would just say to people that we live in, like, a flat. gemma and her daughter live in a hostel in cheshire. they have been homeless for the last 18 months. i loss my house, i lost myjob, and i split with my partner of seven years, probably in the space of about six months. so everything just came crashing down. you just cried your eyes out when we left. i kept saying to myself, it will only be for a couple of months, but that's definitely not the case. the shelter study found that more than a quarter of a million people in england are homeless — that's nearly 111,000 more people than last year. the top ten highest rates are in london. in newham, in 25 people is classes as homeless. outside of london, luton, brighton and manchester
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have some of the highest figures. shelter are putting the rise down to a lack of affordable homes and welfare cuts and, with the cold winter months coming, they say this is the moment to tackle homelessness. homelessness is one of the most appalling experiences anyone can go through. a lot of those people will be children. and, you know, it is a call, really, that something has to be done. the government says it is investing £950 million to tackle homelessness but, for gemma and keira, the wait continues, as they try to find a new home and a new start. ali fortescue, bbc news. five rail operators are facing disruption due to strike action by the rail, maritime and transport union. workers on southern, greater anglia, and south—western railway are striking for 48 hours, while staff on merseyrail and northern have walked out for 2h hours. the union is in dispute over driver—only operated trains. sheep have demonstrated the ability to recognise familiar human faces, according to a study. after receiving training, a group of welsh mountain sheep could pick out the faces of celebrities actors
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jake gyllenhaal and emma watson, former us president barack obama, and bbc newsreader fiona bruce. the sheep chose photos of the celebrity faces when presented next to unfamiliar faces. researchers say it shows sheep possess similar face recognition abilities to primates. i love that. i think we need to slow down and have a look, for example, at barack obama. the ship looks left and rightand at barack obama. the ship looks left and right and says that as barack obama, and has the treat. and they possess similar facial recognition abilities to primates. i am sure that has to be of some use. we will speak to someone involved in that research later. and the scientific
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importance of white sheep need to recognise people. how are we doing? it was all smiles last night. andy murray taking roger federer in a charity match. lots of fun on court but i think there was a more serious point to it, the fact it was the first match andy murray has played since he exited wimbledon in the summer. he has been struggling with this hip injury trying to get himself fit for the us open. he is still not 100% fit but he is targeting a return next year and will only play if he is 100% fit. he played in his first match, losing in the quarter—finals. last night, he was put through his paces at a charity event in glasgow by roger federer, with the swiss coming out on top. the workout was interspersed with some fun, including federer putting on a kilt. it didn't stop him winning a game, and he and murray turned it into a special souvenir for the fan who it belonged to. before the match, murray admitted it was a mistake trying to get ready for august's us open.
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iam in iamina i am in a significantly better place than i was, you know, in the build—up to the us open, and certainly at the end of wimbledon, you know, i was really struggling down. walking was, you know, a big problem for me, you know. so ijust try to get myself back to 100%. and look how welcoming andy murray was. he provided roger federer with his grandmother's famous shortbread. isn't that nice? what a welcome to glasgow. david moyes will face the media for the first time as west ham manager later, and his appointment has been farfrom popular with many of the club's fans. moyes arrived yesterday to take training, for the first time since replacing slaven bilic. he has been speaking to west ham tv about his recent career, which included being relegated with sunderland last season. it has only been the lastjob that i feel as if, you know, it wasn't a
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good move, and i didn't enjoy it and it didn't work out well. so i am hungry to make sure that i get things right. any football manager wa nts to things right. any football manager wants to win, and that is what i wa nt to wants to win, and that is what i want to do. i want to win and i want to make sure that for me the supporters, everybody, that we enjoy our saturday nights because we are winning games. west ham's owners have pointed to moyes's success at everton. but, when the bbc sport website ran this poll yesterday asking if moyes was the right choice for west ham, look at the verdict. more than half of the votes cast said no. the anticipation is building in the northern ireland camp, ahead of two games which will decide whether they reach the world cup. they are taking on switzerland in belfast tomorrow, and then in basel on sunday, hoping to reach their first world cup since 1986. there will be a lot of excitement, there will be a few nerves and anticipation, everything thrown into the mix in terms of the motions going into the game but thatjust shows you the level of importance of
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it and what is riding on it. we want to go out there and try and enjoy it as much as possible through the process as well, ultimately achieve what we want to achieve, and that is get to the world cup. it never rains but it pours for england boss gareth southgate. another three players have pulled out of his squad, ahead of the friendlies with germany and brazil. raheem sterling, jordan henderson and fabian delph have all withdrawn through injury, so that is now six players gone from the original squad. burnley‘s jack cork has been called up. england are playing the opening first—class match of their ashes tour. they are batting first against a cricket australia 11. england 97—2. alastair cook and james vince the men out, mark stoneman on his way to a half—century. meanwhile, the legendary west indies batsman viv richards, who has been in london to promote caribbean tourism after the recent hurricanes, thinks england will miss ben stokes's influence. having someone like stokes, who is pretty strong in himself about how
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he feels, the confidence that he brings, it is going to be quite crucial down under. i was hearing that it was a little touch and go whether he is going to be down under or not, but let me say this. without a ben stokes down under, the english tea m a ben stokes down under, the english team is going to look like kittens. the next few days could decide whether england's women have any chance of regaining the ashes. they are preparing for the test match which starts tomorrow in sydney. if australia win, then they will be certain of retaining the ashes. so the pressure is on england, who are two points behind them under the series' scoring format. but they have told us they won't be going into their shells. we wa nt we want to be positive anyway, in any game that we play. but i think it's really crucial that, in a four day game like this, that you don't a typical, you know, slow innings. that you play positively. your intent is to score first, and survive second. irish rugby union referee
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joy neville will become the first woman to take charge of a european professional club fixture next month. she has already acted as an assistant referee, and now the former ireland captain is due to take the whistle for a match in the challenge cup next month. what a great moment that will be for her. thank you very much indeed. we will talk now about president trump, and we will show you live pictures from china, from beijing, in the last few moments. air force one just landed there. he is of course on this visit. eight days, he hasjust arrived from south korea where he addressed parliament in the early hours of this morning, and we will talk to our next guest while we watch pictures, as well. they are moving the steps into position so the president and first lady can come down from air force one. they will go straight to the forbidden city, and then there will be tea for
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the various first lady is, they will meet a number of dignitaries but have a guided tour of the forbidden city, another busy day ahead on that tour of asia. we will stay with these pictures to see how soon they get off the plane, while we talk to our next guest. joining us from our london newsroom is north korea analyst paul french. first of all, if we back up a bit, you can see the president arriving in china but he addressed the south korean parliament in the early hours of this morning. his tone in some ways was toned down. what do you make of what he said? well, the firstjob he had to do was reassure south koreans and their lawmakers and politicians that the alliance between america and south korea, the military alliance, is absolutely firm. and this is the first chance he has had to do that on south korean soil. so he did that, and he had to address the north korean question as well, which he did. he talked about north korea being ruled
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bya talked about north korea being ruled by a military cult with a deranged belief in the leader's destiny to rule, and an enslaved korean people. the tone is different, but he is still very clear what he thinks about the north korean leadership. yes, and! about the north korean leadership. yes, and i don't think that will come as a great surprise to the north koreans or everyone else. president trump is slightly more flowery in his language than previous presidents have been although the line is pretty much the same about given rights abuses and the danger of north korea's nuclear ambitions. but on the other hand, he didn't direct anything directly at kimjong—un, didn't direct anything directly at kim jong—un, the leader, didn't direct anything directly at kimjong—un, the leader, of course, and on the other side, the north koreans have not done any missile tests for a couple of months and didn't do anything spectacular knowing that trump was coming to the region. so the idea that there could be some sort of talks or breakthrough ahead, and that will be on the agenda in beijing today, is quite likely, i think. that is very interesting. as you say, he is in
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beijing. china is north korea's chief economic supporter, so there isa chief economic supporter, so there is a sense that china could be the key here. well, yes. i don't think we should overstate that. china has been involved in sanctions now more thanit been involved in sanctions now more than it has been before, but still, people who think that the idea is that all china has to do is be persuaded over the phone that north korea should give up its nuclear weapons and that that will happen, thatis weapons and that that will happen, that is not the case. what we want is for china to be part of a broad front, including south korea, japan and russia, to try and toned down the nuclear ambitions from pyongyang. and that is still possible. what we are slightly worried about is that what trump may suggest is that they have to get rid of all their nuclear weapons, and i'm afraid that that ship has sailed. of course, they are quite different, aren't they? the chinese leader, xijinping, a lifelong communist, and the billionaire us president. how do they get on? well,
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ha rd to president. how do they get on? well, hard to say. we don't get much interaction between them. xi is not the most forthcoming, the chinese state is not the most forthcoming, so we will see what happens. north korea is a problem for both of them, i think both of them would like to deal with trade. trump has this very big agenda for his domestic audience backin big agenda for his domestic audience back in the united states, of trying to do something about the unbalanced trade balance. xi, of course, has to keep a relationship with america as a massive customer for china keep a relationship with america as a massive customerfor china makes. they have many, many mutual interests, and north korea is one of those, but it is one that has slightly overshadowed and dominated a lot of the discussion at the moment. we are looking at pictures of the president arriving in china. how will they be dealing with this visit? security must be very tight. how is it viewed in china?” visit? security must be very tight. how is it viewed in china? i always think of china as being similar to
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britain when foreign dignitaries come, in that they know how to put ona come, in that they know how to put on a show. going to the forbidden city, being taken around beijing. i don't know what else. but all of this is to reiterate the donald trump that china is an ancient culture, a large country, now of course economically, diplomatically, militarily a world power and that he should sort of understand that. that they would be talked down to. i think that's very much what they wa nt to think that's very much what they want to convey to him at the moment. he will be very well looked after, very well fed, he will hopefully drink lots of tea and hopefully we can get discussions going. the report between the two men when xi visited mar—a—lago seems to be quite good, when america then launched missiles at syria. so hopefully that will continue. one last question. this is an eight day visit and so
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far so good from the president's point of view? yes. with president trump we always worry that he might go off scrip, off message. so far things have gone well. again, some wiggle room in negotiations with north korea, but there will be a restating of the commitment to both japan and south korea. hopefully talks with xi will go well and then it's on to the philippines and vietnam, which does raise the tricky question about chinese ambitions in the south china sea, but i think that will be left on the backburner. north korea dominates most. thank you. that's air force one arriving in beijing and they're certainly p°mp in beijing and they're certainly pomp and circumstance surrounding it. the chinese military are lining we route that president trump and the first lady will take when they get off the aircraft and then they will
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go straight to the forbidden city where they will meet xi jinping and then there's the talk the —— there isa then there's the talk the —— there is a tour of the forbidden city later today and then a first lady's dinner as well later. we will come back here and we will go back to that later. i quite liked those steps! steps or carol? empty steppes or carol? good morning! if you haven't stepped outside its a cold start. last night temperatures fell to —5 in northern ireland and also in the highlands. those temperatures have picked up by a degree or so but these are current temperatures. in edinburgh it is minus one. in manchester, —1, with fog. you will notice the difference in london.
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more cloud, patchy rain and drizzle. sevenin more cloud, patchy rain and drizzle. seven in norwich. where we have the cloud, patchy rain and drizzle. otherwise, clear skies. a crisp start, with sunshine. we will carry on with this cloud and the patchy rainfora on with this cloud and the patchy rain for a while in the south—east and east anglia. move away from that, by the skies. some showers along the south—west coast, parts of wales. most of that will fade. moving northwards we still have the sunshine. patchy fog around manchester and ca rlisle. patchy sunshine. patchy fog around manchester and carlisle. patchy fog across northern ireland as well. and glasgow. a lot of dry weather and clear skies. a cold and frosty start. the next weather front is waiting in the wings to come across the north—west of scotland. it will introduce rain and windy conditions and ahead of it the cloud built in scotland, northern ireland, eventually north—west england and northwest wales. the wind will
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strengthen, especially across mainland scotland and the northern isles. with exposure, gales. the average temperature at this time of year is 9— 11, so we are almost ban on where we should be. overnight the weather fronts are moving southwards, taking rain and drizzle. any rain in the south—east would be heavy. we will also have clear skies developing across parts of scotland and possibly the north of northern ireland. it will be a cold night and we could have a touch of frost. still windy in the north, with those blustery showers. we start on a windy node in the north of scotland. it will ease for retired and strengthen again. still those showers, but a lot of dry weather and sunshine following on behind the weather front, taking this cloud and the rain and drizzle into the south of the country. remember, average temperatures, 9— 11. some of us 13— 14,
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temperatures, 9— 11. some of us 13— 1a, maybe even 15. as we move into friday the weather front is gritting across ireland and we will bring rain into whales through friday. to the north of that we have something brighter, with a few showers. still the highest temperatures in the south, but bp in the north. —— bp in the north. they have now descended the empty stairs. there they are, furious waving flags by chinese school students. we president and first lady have touched down. in the early hours of the morning president trump was addressing the south korean parliament and talking really a lot about north korea, as we would expect. he was saying the world can't tolerate the menace of a rogue regime that threatens with
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nuclear action. i am sure we will be picking up some of the conversation later on in china. we were talking about the high security. you can see the president is about to enter one of the vehicles in the motorcade and they are going straight to the forbidden city. we will be that live in beijing later. of course carol was telling us it is getting colder, which means households in the uk are turning up the heat or fighting households in the uk are turning up the heat orfighting over the thermostat! we are looking at changes that are coming to the energy supply market that might affect you. there's a lwa ys that might affect you. there's always a lot of news about energy markets. there is a big change in terms of who provides it. good morning. two of the biggest names in the energy supply business, sse and npower, are in talks to merge into a new business. that combines one would supply over 12 million households and give them
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a 24% share of the energy market. that would make them bigger than british gas. what could this mean for customers? claire osborne is from the website uswitch. it's interesting news, because we a lwa ys it's interesting news, because we always talk about the big six and they're not being much competition in the energy market and essentially this could reduce it further? this has the potential to change the face of the energy industry. british gas have been the biggest supplier for as long as the energy industry has existed. sse and npower coming together would rival that. there is competition in the industry. there are the 60 energy suppliers, so there are loads of options. losing one option from within that isn't going to reduce the choice for consumers dramatically and actually some of those other providers outside of the big six are offering better deals. it is interesting because the reason why the big energy companies have been slightly worried recently is because they
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have been losing market share to the small ones. that's right. in the last five years the big six have gone from 99% marketshare to 81% marketsha re, gone from 99% marketshare to 81% marketshare, that's 2% reduction in the last quarter. so they are losing customers hand over fist and a lot of that is down to the fact that they have these expensive standard variable tariffs that two thirds of customers are wrong. customers on those tariffs are simply paying too much. they can save by switching today. so people are waking up to those savings. last month, 600,000 people switched their energy supplier and that is hitting the big suppliers hard. the switch is working. people also care about how it reduces their energy bills. not just this winter, but they can do at home. we found that about 4.6 million homes are overheating their properties to over 21 degrees. that is hotter than a summer in tenerife. when you think that the temperature
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in the uk in summer is 15 degrees and people aren't putting their heating on then, you can see that's pretty hot. that's costing millions of pounds for customers. every degree that you put your heating on, that costs £80 per year. so when people have stretched household budgets, that makes a difference. so are people putting a 21 degrees higher than they should? surely not. if they are above 21 degrees that's above the recommended amount for the energy savings structure and that's hotter than it is intended it. is it really? it's crazy. so people want to be cosy. about a quarter of the people don't want to put warm clothes on to keep warm at home and almost 2 million homes are keeping the heating on 24 hours a day. when you think that a third of people are having to ration their energy use to pay their bills, you can imagine that hitting the purse hard. interesting. thank you very much. that's it from me for now.
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two years ago, 17—year—old yusra mardini fled syria, travelling by boat to greece. she ended up swimming for her life when it began to sink, saving 19 fellow passengers in the process. less than a year after that, she competed at the olympics in rio. her story is being made into a film, but the teenager has her sights firmly set on a place at the tokyo 2020 olympics. our sports correspondent alex capstick went to meet her in berlin. you know that you might lose your life on the way. yusra mardini, olympian and refugee who saved lives, including her own. the teenage swimmer who fled war—ravaged syria to pursue her sporting dreams. a25 syria to pursue her sporting dreams. a 25 day nightmare which featured a sinking boat full of migrants heading for greece. yusra and her sisterjumped heading for greece. yusra and her sister jumped into the heading for greece. yusra and her sisterjumped into the sea to help keep it afloat. i was afraid, it was dark and! keep it afloat. i was afraid, it was
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dark and i was just seeing the island but never reaching it. not that i was the hero pulling a rope, it's ok, i helped the boat. it was not only me or my sister. you can imagine that they told you it is 45 minutes trip and used a 3.5 hours. what did you have with you? nothing. my what did you have with you? nothing. myjeans what did you have with you? nothing. my jeans and my what did you have with you? nothing. myjeans and my t—shirt. my shoes we re myjeans and my t—shirt. my shoes were also gone. yusra mardini eventually arrived in berlin, already a promising swimmer she joined this club at the ditty‘s olympic park. incredibly just 11 months later she was in rio on the biggest sporting stage of all, competing for the first ever refugee team. even after, before when they we re team. even after, before when they were telling me that i'm leaving, to the olympics, it was a really big surprise after only one year i'm a refugee in germany and i'm going and there is a refugee olympic team. refugee in germany and i'm going and there is a refugee olympic teamm
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was incredible. yusra's remarkable back story means she is now a teenager in the band, with an expanding on the raj befitting her growing stature on the world stage. there have been meetings with major globalfigures. she has addressed the un and given talks at other high—profile events, highlighting the plight of refugees. i'm just hoping to get the idea to people that they are normal people and they had a normal life and they were forced to flee their country because of violence. and movies are being made about you. how exciting is that? it's amazing. i'm really excited. who would you like to play yusra mardini? i have no idea. i would like yusra mardini to play yusra mardini, but i can't act. above all, yusra mardini is focused on training hard. she wants a place at the 2020 olympics in tokyo and doesn't mind who she represents. my
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ambition is just to doesn't mind who she represents. my ambition isjust to be doesn't mind who she represents. my ambition is just to be an athlete. if i'm going to start for germany or for my country or for the refugee olympic team, i'm going to do the best i can and it would be my pleasure. in a life full of twists and turns, the way to tokyo may not be straightforward, but it's clear this determined 19—year—old will rise to whatever challenges lay ahead. very good luck to her. what a story. as you have been hearing, there are severe disruptions to some parts of the uk today. find out if it effects you. good morning from bbc london news. the police watchdog says the police pursuit of a speeding car through luton, which ended up crashing and killing a teenage girl, was justified and proportionate. the 15—year—old died in august last year, after the car she was in hit a speed bump at 80mph. the driver was jailed
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for eight years. the ipcc found the officer who carried out the pursuit did so in accordance with police procedure. plans to build a controversial road tunnel under the thames between greenwich and east london have been delayed by six months. the silvertown tunnel was backed by the mayor sadiq khan. but the government says more time is needed to consider its impact on air quality. the national infrastructure commission's said the delay is halting progress. rail commuters are being warned to expect disruption this morning because of strike action by guards on southern, greater anglia and south—western railways. it's part of the long running dispute over changes to their role. how is this affecting services? on the tube, there's currently no piccadilly line between acton town and uxbridge and no district line
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between turnham green and ealing broadway. due to strike action, southern trains have no service between guildford and leatherhead and also between watford junction and milton keynes central. there's a severely reduced service between clapham junction and watford junction. south—western railway has a reduced service across most of the network. there are no direct trains between feltham and hounslow. if we take a look at the a13 now, there are queues building into town from rainham to barking. and there's been an accident in wimbledon, the a219 the broadway is closed southbound. let's get the weather forecast. underneath all this cloud it's not been a particularly cold night, but this is the remnants of yesterday's weather system that worked its way in from the west. quite a lot of cloud and there will be some drizzly outbreaks, but it should brighten up for some later. a lot of cloud to start the day. some showery outbreaks at times. the further west you are the more likely it is that you will see things brighten up through the day.
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underneath the cloud it's not going to feel particularly warm, with a top temperature today ofjust nine celsius. into this evening we will start to see the skies clear. where we hang on to clear skies for any length of time overnight, those temperatures will drop close to freezing. so we could see a touch of grass frost first thing on thursday morning. the cloud steadily starts to increase from the north—west as we approach dawn on thursday morning. so some places will begin the day with some brightness, but it's not long before the cloud increases, bringing with it some outbreaks of patchy rain. this should improve as we head through the afternoon, with some brightness tucking in behind. temperatures tomorrow fairing better, with highs of 12 celsius. on friday we start with rain but after that a good deal of dry weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin.
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another cabinet minister fights for theirjob. the pressure grows on priti patel. just days after the international development secretary was forced to apologise over secret meetings in israel, downing street is examining new claims about her trips overseas. good morning, it is wednesday 8 november. also this morning: prince charles‘s finances face scrutiny following fresh revelations in the paradise papers. the prince's advisors deny suggestions of a conflict of interest. in the past few minutes, president trump has arrived in beijing for
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talks on trade and north korea. early this morning he warned the north it was time to come to the table and make a deal. one of the best—known names on the high streets, marks & spencer, will have its latest financial results out in the next few minutes. i will be looking at that, and why the retailer expects a tricky christmas ahead. in sport, andy murray says he wont play in the australian open next year unless he's 100% fit. the former world number one has been out of action with a hip injury, but faced roger federer in a charity match in glasgow last night. carol has the weather. good morning. it isa it is a cold and frosty start to the day but many of us it will be dry some sunshine. exceptions in the north of the country where there is a band of rain, windy conditions coming in and cloudy start with patchy rain in east anglia the south—east. here, it should right and up. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: downing street is examining new information about the international development secretary's unauthorised
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contacts with senior israeli government officials. priti patel apologised for meeting the israeli prime minister during a summer holiday in august without telling the foreign office in advance. it is now believed she had at least one further meeting with senior israeli officials after she returned home, and failed to tell theresa may about it. let's get more detail now from our political correspondent leila nathoo. it is quite difficult to keep on top of exactly what has happened, but there are more revelations, aren't there? so since priti patel's unauthorised meetings in israel emerged at the end of last week, there has been some back and forth between her, the international development secretary, and number ten. she was holding the downing street to explain her conduct after these revelations about the meetings took place. she had a bit of a dressing down from the pm, was reminded of the ministerial code and theresa may hoped that that was the
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end of it. she certainly considered it to be that way. but now we understand that there have been further meetings, two specifically now we understand, from the department, that took place in israel without the presence of officials, and that were not disclosed or carried out in the usual hysteria way. and that is what we believe that number ten is now examining. the allegation is that priti patel actually misled the prime minister when she went in to see her, too apparently confess exactly what she had done. it appears she did not fully disclose the extent of her meetings in israel. so i think we can see priti patel's future hanging in the balance this morning. she is currently on an official visit to ethiopia and uganda. we are expecting her back in the country later today, we think. i think it is only because she is out of the country at the moment that she remains in her post. and on the
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wider question, borisjohnson remains in her post. and on the wider question, boris johnson in parliament yesterday explaining what he said about a british citizen imprisoned in iran. how much is this government under pressure? how significant is all of this? well, i think there is no doubt that theresa may is fighting fires on a number of front. she has, as you say, got her foreign secretary, boris johnson, front. she has, as you say, got her foreign secretary, borisjohnson, in a bit of trouble over some comments over a british citizen in iran. he, though, i think is safer in this post in priti patel. we have also had the resignation of sir michael fallon last week over the sexual harassment allegations, and of course, her de facto deputy, damian green, is also underfire course, her de facto deputy, damian green, is also under fire over allegations of misconduct. so she cannot afford to be losing cabinet ministers at a time like this. she will be hoping that she can draw a line swiftly under the priti patel
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row so she can try and get on and keep control over her ministers. but i certainly think that this has left theresa may looking very exposed and vulnerable. thank you very much, thank you. we will be speaking to a representative from the foreign affairs select committee about the issues she is facing at the moment. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. mr sargeant left his post and was suspended by the labour party pending an investigation into allegations made by a number of women. it is understood there is now deep unease within the welsh labour group about the treatment he received. donald trump has issued a stark warning to north korea's leader, kimjong—un, in an address to south korea's parliament. the us president urged all countries to join forces to isolate what he called the brutal regime of north korea,
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saying the world cannot tolerate a rogue nation that threatens it with nuclear devastation. it is our responsibility, and our duty, to confront this danger together. because the longer we wait, the greater the danger grows, and the fewer the options become. from beijing, our correspondent stephen mcdonelljoins us. there is a long delay on the line, so there may be a delay between question and answer. they will see gorgeous tourist attractions, but also some very serious discussions to be taking place with the chinese president today. that's right. donald trump has already touched down here in beijing and soon this motorcade will arrive here. they are
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coming directly from the airport to the forbidden city and this will be this first chance to discuss matters with china's president, xijinping. we are expecting north korea to be at the forefront of their talks over the coming days and we heard it mentioned that donald trump is calling on russia and china to fully implement un sanctions against north korea. china's response to that has been that we are already doing that, and much more. we have seen reports coming out that china has just ordered two groups to stop sending chinese tourists into north korea. —— tourgroups. chinese tourists into north korea. —— tour groups. that would really hurt that regime, and these will be the kinds of things they discussed in the coming days. we are waiting to see if they will be any sort of official announcement from the two leaders, in terms of new measures to force north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. so a big day ahead in beijing. thank you very much. the prince of wales has been
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criticised for failing to disclose an investment by his private estate in an offshore company. the revelations come from leaked documents known as the paradise papers. there is no suggestion of wrongdoing. the prince's spokesman insists he has never chosen to speak out on a topic simply because of an investment decision. andy verity reports. prince charles has campaigned on the environment for decades, and especially for the rainforest. today, he is due to arrive in india, after flying from malaysia, as criticism grew at home of his failure to disclose a secret financial stake in a company in bermuda. on the right here is the late hugh van cutsem, one of the prince's oldest friends. he was a director of sustainable forestry management limited, a firm that managed tropical rainforests, registered in bermuda, the company wanted to trade in carbon credits. but tropical rainforests weren't included in carbon credit trading
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schemes, so it needed the rules changed. in february 2007, the duchy buys 50 shares in van cutsem's company, worth $113,500. at that time, sfm's directors agreed to keep the duchy‘s shares confidential. mr van cutsem asked for lobbying documents to be sent to the prince's office, and soon the prince was making speeches campaigning for changes to two international agreements on carbon credits. injune 2008, duchy sold its shares for $325,000, a profit of more than $200,000. well, i think it's a serious conflict. there's a conflict of interest between his own investments of the duchy of cornwall, and what he's trying to achieve publicly. clarence house said... there is no suggestion of illegality, nor that prince charles‘s campaigning caused the share price of his friends company to rise. nor is it suggested that the duchy
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was seeking to avoid tax. andrew verity, bbc news. for more on this, we can speak to our royal correspondent daniela relph. first of all, what reaction has there been from the palace?m first of all, what reaction has there been from the palace? it has been an uneasy few days for both the queen and now the prince of wales around the issues which have come out of the paradise papers. the prince is currently on a tour of south east asia. within the last couple of hours at an event in malaysia the bbc has attempted to ask him about the issues involved here. do you have any comments on the paradise papers revelations today? so perhaps not surprisingly, not any comment from the prince of wales himself. but this officers here at clarence house have been rather more
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forthcoming, and what they have done isissued forthcoming, and what they have done is issued very careful but direct response to the accusations here. in terms of offshore investments, they have made it very clear, they say that the prince of wales is not directly involved in any big investment decisions made by the duchy of cornwall, and on the issue of the company owned by a friend of this, they say it was not an investment made for financial gain, but it involved issues around which the prince had an ongoing interest, around issues of sustainability of the rainforests, of the environment, issues the prince of wales had been speaking out on for a number of yea rs. speaking out on for a number of years. but what this does is throw up years. but what this does is throw upa years. but what this does is throw up a couple of difficult issues for the royal family. the transparency of royal finances, should there be more, and the difficulties you have when you have a prince of wales who is an activist and campaigner, which can expose him to accusations of conflict of interest. the half-year
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results for marks & spencer have just been announced. up or down? down, which is not a surprise. their profit before tax is down 5.3%, which is not the worst we have seen from m&s, to be honest. the chief executive, who has not been there that long, has been talking about how they are starting to make better progress in terms of remedying the problems they have had, and he is admitting they have had problems for the last 15 years, in terms of not getting it right particular in the clothing side of the business. what is more interesting from this is the fa ct is more interesting from this is the fact they are admitting it is getting tougher in the food side of the business. for a long time it has been very much a tale of two businesses. they have done really well and food but not great on clothing. what the chief executive has said this morning is that actually things are getting tougher in food now. we are starting to see food prices go up in all of the supermarkets, because of the price pressures , supermarkets, because of the price pressures, that we import a lot of
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food and because of the currency markets it makes it more expensive to import food at the moment, because the pound has been so low. customers are more savvy in terms of what they pay for in premium products. a lot of the m&s food, quite a lot of it is what we might class as premium, more expensive than a lot of the other supermarkets. they are saying things are getting tougher in terms of food, and they are just advising generally that times are tough for the consumer at the moment. the interest rate rise last week will make people's mortgages more expensive so people might start to think about what they should be cutting back on. they are saying looking ahead to the future we have to be careful that we are offering people the best price for things. later we have people from strictly and we will get the reaction to lots of things, including the shock departure of astin. that at 8:40am.
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good morning. going back to the main story. downing street is said to be looking into new revelations about the international development secretary's unofficial meetings with senior israeli government figures. priti patel's apologised to theresa may for not informing her about the discussions and it's now thought her position in the cabinet is increasingly uncertain. let's talk now to the conservative mp nadhim zahawi, a member of the foreign affairs select committee. do you think that priti patel will still be in herjob at the end of the day? good morning. it is totally in the gift of the prime minister that any person should serve in government. i think priti patel realises the seriousness of her mistake. she has apologised and put out a statement of all the meetings
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during her holiday in august, in israel, which you are quite right the foreign office didn't know about in advance, which was wrong, but they did know while the trip was taking place. it is up to the prime minister what she does. she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. the one thing i would remind your viewers. this isn't the visit to some enemy state and administer doing something clandestine, she has already apologised for this. that's all the more reason that she should be transparent with regards to this. you talk about those meetings which she has now apologised for, but the press associations are talking about further meetings, one taking place in new york, one in parliament. one was undisclosed and one was only disclosed retrospectively. this seems to be a pattern, that the way
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she conducts business. you could argue it is misleading the public which is perhaps a more serious charge. this is all speculation. i haven't seen the full details of what the media are reporting this morning. the comment i would make is that if she was in israel on a family holiday, which she paid for herself, she has many friends in that country, we have many friends. israel is one of our closest allies. but you are craig whyte —— quite right, she made a mistake in not called meeting with the foreign office before actually taking those meetings. either she also met with many charities in her sector in overseas aid. start—ups which are doing incredible work in africa. overseas aid. start—ups which are doing incredible work in africam is great that she is meeting with charities and start—up organisations. but she is opening
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herself up to issues by not having officials there are there is no record of the meeting. there could bea record of the meeting. there could be a security breach in the future. at the very best to you concede that she is naive in doing what she has done? she has made a mistake and she has put out a statement with basically all of the meetings she had during the meeting in israel and it is an error ofjudgement and she has apologised for that. she has coolly demonstrated their error of herjudgement and is tightening up the ministerial code. that's the right thing to do. ultimately it's up right thing to do. ultimately it's up to the prime minister, what she does, if there are new revelations as you have just outlined. priti patel is one issue that the prime minister's house faces at the moment. from the outside you address the viewers earlier. i can speak on behalf of many of our viewers who say what it looks like from a member of the public‘s perspective today is
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you know about michael fallon, the defence secretary, who has left the cabinet for inappropriate behaviour. the foreign secretary has been apologising to parliament and could potentially find himself in jail for what he said. this is the prime minister's top table. the government is in minister's top table. the government isina minister's top table. the government is in a mess, is it not? i think it's worth reminding ourselves that it's worth reminding ourselves that it is our prime minister theresa may who came out firmly and said that on sexual harassment very zero tolerance in this government. and acted on it immediately, with michael fallon. i assure you she will do the same again if there are other members of parliament or ministers who are found to be guilty of sexual harassment of staff are anyone else. i think she is to be commended for that. that's not something... shouldn't be brushing these things under the carpet or hiding them. we addressed the priti
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patel issue and with borisjohnson coming to parliament yesterday, explaining himself, he also spoke to his counterpart in iraq and he explained that borisjohnson's comments have no relevance to radcliffe. he said he appreciated the foreign secretary redoubling his effort to get her back home so i think you are conflating many issues. the sexual harassment issue cove rs issues. the sexual harassment issue covers all parties in parliament. all individuals who work there have a responsibility to protect their staff and to treat them properly as well as any other individual, not just are. embers of the media who have interviews with them and so on. soi have interviews with them and so on. so i think the prime minister on the contrary to what you are suggesting has actually done the right team.
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thank you for your time this morning. let's catch up on the weather forecast. we have been told it is cold and frosty this morning! good morning. that's right, it's a cold start the day widespread frost. these are the current temperatures. these are the current temperatures. the anomaly is in london, where it is seven. that's because we've got more cloud and patchy rain. that's helped maintain the temperatures through the night. it's notjust in the south—east, it is also east anglia where we have the combination. away from that, clear skies and some patchy mist and fog first thing. we hang on to the patchy rain and drizzle for a bit longer. it will eventually fade and the sun will come out. a bright start, with sunshine, in the channel islands and the isle of wight and also the isles of scilly. inland there are some showers in south—west england that will fade. a beautiful start in wales, the midlands, the
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northwest of england. there is a touch of fog around as there is in northern ireland and around the central lowlands, especially the glasgow end. a lot of dry weather and sunshine. that will change in north—west through the when another weather front arrives, introducing wet and windy weather. the stronger twins in the far north of mainland scotla nd twins in the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles. touching gale force with exposure. some sunny spells develop in the south—east, but equally cloud at times. in between we have some sunshine. temperatures roughly where they should we. the average is between nine and 11 at this time of year. overnight the weather front seats —— moves south. most of the rain in it will be light and patchy, with drizzle. behind it under clear skies in scotland we could have a touch of frost. still blustery showers across the far north and a nippy start of the day tomorrow in
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the far south—east. tomorrow, eventually the weather front gets across the south—east, taking the re m na nts of across the south—east, taking the remnants of the cloud and patchy rain with it. it brightens up nicely from the north, so you can see the sun coming out. still a few showers across northern scotland, the quite blustery winds as well. later in the day there's another system coming in across ireland. that's going to swing in across of wales and south—west england. here it is on the pressure chart. it comes in through friday. many of us will have a dry day. and again it will be fairly breezy, especially in the north of the country. and as we look down east coast there will be some sunshine around. temperatures by then, seven in the north, 15 in the channel islands. quite a difference between north and south! thanks very much. choices for shoppers in english town centres are shrinking, according to research for the bbc. a survey of 12 government—funded towns found nearly 1,000
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shops had disappeared in five years. the towns were awarded a £1.2 million share. our correspondent went to stockport. this one is empty? yes, we still have a number of empty units in the town centre that still need filling. joe is the man behind getting portas town status. port. he put the successful bid together and ran a pilot for five years. the plan has gone pretty well and we've managed to attract new interest into the old town especially. but across the whole town centre we still have a
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big rob with shops and it's a question of more retailers going online. what kind of retailers are going to fill them? we have to think of creative solutions to really solve this problem on the high streets. the barometer of a healthy high—street is to look at the va ca ncy high—street is to look at the vacancy rate. it's fallen in ten of the 12 towns but is still higher than the national average. in stockport is more than double the national average. but the council here things reshaping the town centre is one solution to getting that down. it is hard to believe that down. it is hard to believe that just 18 months that down. it is hard to believe thatjust 18 months ago this square looked like this. the council demolished the shops that were here and created this new, more attractive area for shoppers. and created this new, more attractive area for shoppersm and created this new, more attractive area for shoppers. it is important to the people of stock bought at important to visitors, but it's important for the retailers as well because they really benefit from having the kind of environment where people do want to spend time, so if it's a nice area to sit and meet friends, relax, places to eat,
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and they are more likely to do their shopping here as well. we asked a company which monitors the health of high streets to review the portas project. one thing they found is most of the towns have more independent shops than before. most of the towns have more independent shops than beforem the last five years nearly 1000 jobs have disappeared from the 12 portas towns. that's one closing every 22 days. a town centre with fewer shops doesn't necessarily mean it is in decline. more and more empty units are being converted into other uses. there is a contraction required of retail within the town centres and therefore you then have to fill that with an appropriate use and residential driving people into the towns to utilise and bring forward all of the ideas of what a town centre is. that's what we are trying to achieve. we think we can get three orfour to achieve. we think we can get three or four townhouses here and six or seven apartments, but with a terrace overlooking. as our shopping habits change and more of us shop
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online, the traditional high street has to adapt if it's going to survive. there you go. we've been talking and hearing about severe disruption on rail services this morning. yes, because of strike action. you can find out with the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. the police watchdog says the police pursuit of a speeding car through luton, which ended up crashing and killing a teenage girl, was justified and proportionate. the 15—year—old died in august last year, after the car she was in hit a speed bump at 80mph. the driver was jailed for eight years. the ipcc found the officer who carried out the pursuit did so in accordance with police procedure. plans to build a controversial road tunnel under the thames
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between greenwich and east london have been delayed by six months. the silvertown tunnel was backed by the mayor sadiq khan. but the government says more time is needed to consider its impact on air quality. rail commuters are being warned to expect disruption this morning because of strike action by guards on southern, greater anglia and south—western railways. it's part of the long running dispute over changes to their role. how is this affecting services? well before we get to that, let's have a quick check on the tube, there's currently no district line between turnham green and ealing broadway and no piccadilly line between acton town and uxbridge. that's because of a signal failure. due to strike action, southern trains have no service between guildford and leatherhead and also between watford junction and milton keynes central. there's a severely reduced service between clapham junction and watford junction. south—western railway has a reduced service across most of the network. there are no direct trains between feltham and hounslow. if we take a look at the a13 now,
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there are the usual queues building into town from rainham to barking. in kidbrooke award the main has burst. one lane is closed in the town. let's get the weather forecast. underneath all this cloud it's not been a particularly cold night, but this is the remnants of yesterday's weather system that worked its way in from the west. quite a lot of cloud and there will be some drizzly outbreaks, but it should brighten up for some a little bit later on. a lot of cloud to start the day, with some showery outbreaks at times. the further west you are the more likely it is that you will see things brighten up through the day. but underneath the cloud it's not going to feel particularly warm, with a top temperature today ofjust nine celsius. into this evening we will start to see the skies clear. where we hang on to clear skies for any length of time overnight, those temperatures will
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drop close to freezing. so we could see a touch of grass frost first thing on thursday morning. the cloud steadily starts to increase from the north—west as we approach dawn on thursday morning. so some places will begin the day with some brightness, but it's not long before the cloud increases, bringing with it some outbreaks of patchy rain. it should start to improve as we head through the afternoon, with some brightness tucking in behind. temperatures tomorrow fairing better, with highs of 12 celsius. looking ahead to friday, we start with rain but after that a good deal of dry weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: downing street is examining new information about the international development secretary's unauthorised contacts with senior israeli government officials. priti patel apologised for meeting the israeli prime minister
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during a summer holiday in august, without telling the foreign office in advance. it is now believed she had at least one further meeting with senior israeli officials after she returned home, and failed to tell theresa may about it. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. mr sargeant left his post and was suspended by the labour party pending an investigation into allegations made by a number of women. it is understood there is now deep unease within the welsh labour group about the treatment he received. in the last few minutes, donald trump has arrived in beijing. the american president will ask china to cut its financial links with north korea, and to abide by un sanctions. earlier, mr trump urged all countries to join forces to isolate what he called the brutal regime of north korea, saying the world cannot tolerate a rogue nation that threatens it with nuclear devastation.
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but he indicated that the us was still willing to negotiate with north korea, if it gave up its military ambitions. now, sheep might not have the reputation for being the cleverest of animals, but new research shows they can learn to recognise human faces. a group of welsh mountain sheep had special training, after which they could pick out the faces of celebrities actors jake gyllenhaal and emma watson, and former us president barack obama. the sheep chose photos of celebrity faces in a line—up of photos. researchers say it shows sheep possess similar face recognition abilities to primates. it is all in the name of science as they are investigating huntington's
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disease, and this is part of it. coming up on the programme: carol will have the weather for you in ten minutes. we will speak to our guests about that, because it is very serious research. no one from the world of sport, or even from breakfast! we have been missing andy murray.- wimbledon he was hobbling around a lot, and has he been on a court since then? no, it is his first match since he exited the quarterfinals. he tried to rush himself back to the us open and said it was a bad move. now we will see. and this charity match he played with roger federer is great. he will only return if he is 100% fit, so the next grand slam, the australian open, he is saying he will not play if he knows he is not 100%. he played in his first match losing in the quarter finals at wimbledon. that is murray wearing a tam o' shanter and ginger wig.
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not to be outdone, federer donned a kilt, and had no problems pulling off his signature shot — his one—handed backhand. fun aside, murray said he will only return to competitive tennis next year if he is fully fit, and admitted he rushed back too soon to try and play at the us open in august. i'm in a significantly better place than i was, you know, in the build—up to the us open. and certainly at the end of wimbledon, you know, i was really struggling there. walking was, you know, a big problem for me, you know. so i just try to get myself back to 100%. and what a welcome federer was given — some of granny murray's shortbread. someone who's hungry — david moyes, for success at west ham, after being appointed as their new manager. he arrived yesterday to take training for the first time since replacing slaven bilic,
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and gave this interview to west ham tv. it may take some time to win them round — the bbc sport website ran this poll yesterday asking if moyes was the right choice, and more than half of the votes cast said no. two games to decide their world cup fate — northern ireland take on switzerland in belfast tomorrow, before the return leg in basel on sunday, as they look to reach their first world cup since 1986. there'll be a lot of excitement, there'll be a few nerves and anticipation, everything thrown into the mix, in terms of the emotions going into the game. but thatjust shows you the level of importance of it, and what's riding on it. we want to go out there and try and enjoy it as much as possible through the process, as well — ultimately achieve what we want to achieve, and that's get to the world cup. it never rains but it pours
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for england boss gareth southgate. another three players have pulled out of his squad, ahead of the friendlies with germany and brazil. raheem sterling, jordan henderson and fabian delph have all withdrawn through injury, so that is now six players gone from the original squad. burnley‘s jack cork has been called up. england are playing the opening first—class match of their ashes tour. they are batting first against a cricket australia 11. england 97—2. "164-3. alastair cook and james vince the men out, mark stoneman on his way to a half—century. the next few days could decide whether england's women have any chance of regaining the ashes. they are preparing for the test match which starts tomorrow in sydney. if australia win, then they will be certain of retaining the ashes. so the pressure is on england, who are two points behind them under the series' scoring format. so if australia win, they will
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automatically retain the ashes, so england must win, really. the prince of wales has been accused of calling for changes to international climate agreements without disclosing that his private estate stood to benefit from proposed reforms. the details emerged in the latest leak of financial documents known as the paradise papers. joining us now from our london newsroom is the former royal press secretary dickie arbiter. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us, and the concern here is that he may have benefited from something that he spoke out about, campaigned for. do you think there is a conflict of interest?” don't think there is a conflict of interest at all and i don't think for a moment the prince of wales knew anything about the investment. he is the duke of cornwall, he does head—up the duchy of cornwall, but head—up the duchy of cornwall, but he doesn't have his fingers on every single aspect of it. as much as your
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director—general does not know every single thing which goes on in the bbc. he would be chairman of the council and the day—to—day running of the duchy, and it is financial advisers who were invest where they think appropriate. what you are talking about is the investment of something like 0.01% of the total value of the duchy, around £86,000. very little return. there are those who will think it is quite a good return, but there was a suggestion that he only made speeches concerning carbon credits after the investment was made. i don't think researchers went back far enough. if you go online you will find all 852 of his speeches going back to 1970, and if you trawl through all of those you will find he has been banging on about carbon emissions, he has been banging on about climate change, since 1970. so this is not something new, and it is not something new, and it is not something that just so something new, and it is not something thatjust so happened because there is an investment.” expect some people watching will
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think that £86,000 sounds like a large investment. should he, given what has come out now, have more oversight? you know, there is a lot of capital being made out of the fa ct of capital being made out of the fact that the royal family are investing overseas. they have done nothing illegal. it is legal, it is above board. when the money comes back to the country, hmrc get their taxes out of it. nothing illegal has been done. itjust so happens that because it is the prince of wales, eve ryo ne because it is the prince of wales, everyone is saying, shock horror, it shouldn't be done. everyone is saying the monarchy should modernise and investing overseas is a bit of modernisation. if they didn't put the estate's finances in proper order they would be criticised for letting it go. damned if you do, damned if you don't. let's talk about the queen and her investments, which have been making headlines this week. how damaging do you think this week. how damaging do you think this is? what will they be thinking?
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i don't believe it is damaging at all. there will be probably a bit of shock and upset, not because this has come out, but because maybe they didn't have their finger on the financial pulse, but people are paid to do it on their behalf. the queen is not hands—on in the same way as the prince of wales is a hands—on duke of cornwall. but what is coming out of the duchy of lancaster is topping up what comes out of the sovereign's grant. it is paying for the running of monarchy plc. there will be concern that they should have been alerted to the fact that this was happening, but you can't be alerted to every single thing which is going on in an organisation. thank you forjoining us on brea kfast thank you forjoining us on breakfast this morning. just to let you know what is happening in the next few hours of the programme...
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until 9:15 a.m., i suppose that constitutes a few hours. gregory porter will be here at around 8:50 a.m., and oti and johnnie, i think they are fox trotting. let's also find out about the weather. if you have been out this morning, you will know it has been cold. louise is absolutely right, a cold start to the day. frost and patchy fog as well, across parts of northern ireland, north—west england and the central lowlands, especially the west of the central lowlands. and what we have had all morning is a bit more cloud and also some patchy light rain and drizzle in the south—east. that will slowly fade. we will start to see at ryton up from the west through the course of the afternoon, but there will be a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. however, across the north—west we are going to see some rain and strengthening wind coming our way. into the afternoon, we
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shave away this cloud from the west. still a fair bit of cloud across parts of east anglia, with the odd spot of rain left on it into the afternoon. as we head through the midlands, southern counties, the isle of wight, the channel islands, the isles of scilly, in the isles of scilly, into southern england, there isa scilly, into southern england, there is a lot of sunshine. when we lose the fog from cumbria, it is going to bea the fog from cumbria, it is going to be a fine afternoon across north—west england and also north—east england, for that matter. northern ireland scotland seeing some rain coming in from the west. the wind strengthening, especially the far of mainland scotland and the northern isles and here we will have that combination through the night. our weather front that combination through the night. our weatherfront sinks that combination through the night. our weather front sinks southwards, taking rain which will mostly be light by then further south. behind that, some clearance in the sky, so prone areas in scotland, for example, seeing a touch of frost. still wintry with blustery showers but under this vale of cloud it will not be as cold night as the one just gone across many parts of the uk.
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but, before that front arrives in the south—east, under clear skies here as well, it will be cold. the front gets into the south—east, crosses it, and we take its patchy rain with it on to the near continent. it brightens up ahead of that weather front with sunshine coming through. still a peppering of showers across the far north of scotland. after a very windy start to the day, the winds will ease a touch and they will pick up later on in the day. later in the day again we will start to see some rain coming in across ireland courtesy of this weather front which is going to sinks southwards, clearing, and then later in the day on friday we will see another one coming in, which will bring in more rain from the west. so for friday it self we will get off to a largely dry start, and then we see the rain clear from the south—east, most of us having a fine day, with bright and sunny spells, and later the rain comes in across ireland and sinks in across wales in south—west england, leading us into a cold weekend. the brightest conditions this weekend will be down the spine of the country. for the
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rest of us there will be some showers. we have some breaking news from the energy world. it's about a merger going on from two of the big names in the business. we are talking about ssd and npower. sse says it will i npower. combine they would supply over 12 million households, giving them over 20% of the energy market. what could this mean for customers? claire osborne is from the website uswitch. good morning. this has all happened earlier. we were talking about what might happen if this happens and it looks like it will. what are your thoughts? this will change the face of the energy industry. someone coming into rival british gas as the biggest energy supplier will shake things up, definitely. but with there being about 60 energy
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suppliers in the market now, two of them consolidating won't change things massively. when you say shake things massively. when you say shake things up, in what way? like i say there will be some good competition to british gas but also these companies coming together, they should be able to create efficiencies of scale and so the questions we should be asking them as they progress through this is whether they are going to pass those efficiencies on to customers. the bigger they are the cheaper it should be? exactly. what's interesting is obviously these things take time, so if you are one of the customers of these companies, it won't make much difference in the meantime? the deal is intended to com plete meantime? the deal is intended to complete at the end of next year or the beginning of the following year and for customers in the meantime there are few things they should be confident. first of all in most circumstances they will lose their energy supply. in all circumstances their credit will be protected. and in either case you can still make choices about who supplies your
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energy and take advantages of some of the savings available, by switching today. you don't need that to be taken out of your hands. switching today. you don't need that to be taken out of your handsm switching today. you don't need that to be taken out of your hands. it is interesting because we've spoken about switching for a long time, we are starting to finally see it have an impact. some of the smaller companies are taking a share away from the bigger ones. that's right. with all of these new companies coming in, some of the changes are making a difference. in the last five years with gone from 99% market share with the big six players, soon to become five, going down to 81% market share. that's a big change and that speeding up rapidly. two percentage points in the last quarter. so the big six are under pressure from these cheaper, smaller and sometimes better service rivals. i know you guys have some research out today about how to make your energy bills cheaper, simple things you can do in the home. because it is quite staggering what one degree in your house can mean in terms of your bills. tell us about that. if
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your bills. tell us about that. if you heat your home one degree hotter, that cost you about £80 every year. sue if you are wrangling with your partner about how hot to have the thermostat, these show the numbers. what else have you found? there are few things you should be doing. always make sure you are on the best possible deals so you aren't too much. then think about how you use your energy. turning off your tech so that you are not on standby. that can save you about 80 quid. and turning down the cabbage on your washing machine. about 90% goes into heating water in your washing machine. so there are a lot of changes you can make that can save you money and when one third of homes are rationing their energies they can pay their bills, that will make a difference. good tips. it's incredible what difference it can make. thanks for your time. that's it from me. thank you very much. iron and 19 degrees person. you're 19.5? degrees person. you're19.5? it makes all the difference!
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before rugby union went professional in the 1990s only a handful of players were household names, among them rob andrews. now the former england player is making headlines again, blaming england's 2015 world cup performance on stuart lancaster and his handling of sam burgess. robjoins us now. you are laughing when i said i was 19. what about at your house? 18.5, but it doesn't go on very often. there's a degree between us all. it is lovely to see you. you've written a book about your life in by written a book about your life in rugby and all the rest of it. let's look back at back on the day because you played when it wasn't professional and it was a quite different sport in some ways. very different. i think people forget quite quickly. 20 years ago, i played to the mid— 80s —— in the mid— 80s to the mid— 90s, we all
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worked and played together. pictures like that. it was a completely different game. we hadn't been in the gym very much, obviously. the book is really a story office bought, that had been amateur for 100 years, going professional, and the challenges of going professional. rugby has sort of gone very quickly over 20 years and it still got teething problems and it's got some issues. you are still heavily involved with the rfu. you details on the book what happened in the world cup from your perspective. you've never held back with your opinions, that's yourjob in the game. does it come down to sam burgess? went wrong at the world cup? there's been a lot of focus on sam burgess. there's a lot of other stuff around the world cup. the
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issue was... might be comment around it is head coaches getjudged on their results and they have to make decisions around selection. sam burgess was a massive decision. it's not just blaming him, burgess was a massive decision. it's notjust blaming him, it wasn't his fault he was picked to play for england, but it changed the dynamic of that squad into the world cup and head coaches lived or died by the decisions they make and we —— it was a massive risk and a massive decision and it didn't come off. was he given the support he needed at the time? he made that decision. did he get the support? that gets thrown back at people, was he given enough support. one of the things i've learnt over many years is that had coaches are pretty much control freaks. they are on the job because they want to be the head man, whether it is eddiejones or whoever around the world. in any sport they are in charge" are the main man and
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they live or die by those decisions. when you get it right it is great, when you get it wrong it is tough. eddiejones is when you get it wrong it is tough. eddie jones is currently when you get it wrong it is tough. eddiejones is currently in the england job. it is a case of him making the right decisions? was he the right man for thejob? eddie jones is very experienced and the other part of the book is around appointing coaches. what's right and what is wrong. in the only right decision is whether they win. if they win you've made a really good appointment and if they lose you haven't. stuart was appointed... everyone felt it was the right decision at the time and it is an enormous amount of good work. he is still very proud of what he did. and quite rightly. there's a lot in the book around his work and again the point is he did such a lot of good work and then made a few decisions and in the biggest tournament in our sport it went wrong in the world cup. eddie is the first to admit
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that he's picked up a very good side, good young players, and he's taking it forward. there are some real characters as well and some excellent players. you talked about tea m excellent players. you talked about team dynamics. is it that suddenly things are coming right?” team dynamics. is it that suddenly things are coming right? i think it was happening under stuart. it was moving in that direction. it was just a big blip during the tournament. so i think there is a tea m tournament. so i think there is a team dynamic building. you can see a strong england group developing. they will bejudged strong england group developing. they will be judged in 2019. this group of players. we getjudged on our world cups. in the 91 world cup final be lost and we can't get that back. the 2003 team, they won it. this group, by 2019 they will be in a strong position. there are two big talking point at the moment. i think we've mentioned both of them. one is compassion. the culture that is
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putting some people. dealing with concussion first. should rugby be noncontact in schools?” concussion first. should rugby be noncontact in schools? i don't think so. the injury issue in rugby is an issue that's been there for a long time. it is a contact sport. u nfortu nately time. it is a contact sport. unfortunately people do get injured. even in the amateur game people got injured. i best friend at school was paralysed at the age of 15 in a game i was playing. injury in rugby is really a n i was playing. injury in rugby is really an important topic for me, personally, and for everybody. it is taken very seriously and it's a big issue and it is being managed well. but the sport has changed and i think that's the thing with professionalism. you look at the physical nature of the guys. not just the top end, at school rugby as well. it does need managing. you think that whole culture and the initiation ceremonies, do you think
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that needs to change? absolutely. there is no place for it whatsoever. you can have a bit of fun with a tea m you can have a bit of fun with a team and you can have a drink. there's nothing wrong with that. everybody likes a drink. nobody likes a drunk. where does that change come from? it has to come from within the organisation and the clu bs. from within the organisation and the clubs. the universities. it is just unacceptable. it doesn't have any pa rt unacceptable. it doesn't have any part to play in being part of a team. a football team or a cricket team, a rugby team, it has no part in it. good to talk. thank you very much. i was going to say, i always wanted to tell you that one of my favourite moments of sports commentary is when you are commentating and you screened over the top ofjonny wilkinson's drop goal. he has never forgiven wilkinson's drop goal. he has neverforgiven me! wilkinson's drop goal. he has never forgiven me! the sheer emotionjust pours he has never forgiven me! the sheer emotion just pours out.
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and his book is called rugby: the game of my life. we will be back with the main headlines at eight a.m.. there is severe disruption that many of the rail services because of strike action today. find out now whether that affects you. good morning from bbc london news. the police watchdog says the police pursuit of a speeding car through luton, which ended up crashing and killing a teenage girl, was justified and proportionate. the 15—year—old died in august last year, after the car she was in hit a speed bump at 80mph. the driver was jailed for eight years. the ipcc found the officer who carried out the pursuit did so in accordance with police procedure. plans to build a controversial road tunnel under the thames between greenwich and east london have been delayed by six months. the silvertown tunnel was backed by the mayor sadiq khan. but the government says more time
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is needed to consider its impact on air quality. travel now. severe delays on the district line. and the piccadilly line between acton town and uxbridge because of a signalfailure. guards acton town and uxbridge because of a signal failure. guards on the ra i lwa ys signal failure. guards on the railways are taking strike action today as part of the long—running dispute over driver only operated trains. that means there are no southern trains between guildford and leatherhead and between watford junction and milton keynes central. there is a severely reduced service between clapham junction. south—western railway has a reduced service across most of the network. there are no direct trains between feltham and hounslow. if we take a look at the a13 now. there are queues building into town from rainham to barking. and there's been an accident on the m25.
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there are long queues clockwise from junction 1a for swanscombe to junction 3 for the swanley interchange. let's get the weather forecast. underneath all this cloud it's not been a particularly cold night, but this is the remnants of yesterday's weather system that worked its way in from the west. quite a lot of cloud and there will be some drizzly outbreaks, but it should brighten up for some a little bit later on. a lot of cloud to start the day, with some showery outbreaks at times. the further west you are the more likely it is that you will see things brighten up through the day. but underneath the cloud it's not going to feel particularly warm, with a top temperature today ofjust nine celsius. into this evening we will start to see the skies clear. where we hang on to clear skies for any length of time overnight, those temperatures will drop close to freezing. so we could see a touch of grass frost first thing on thursday morning. the cloud steadily starts to increase from the north—west
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as we approach dawn on thursday morning. so some places will begin the day with some brightness, but it's not long before the cloud increases, bringing with it some outbreaks of patchy rain. it should start to improve as we head through the afternoon, with some brightness tucking in behind. temperatures tomorrow fairing better, with highs of 12 celsius. looking ahead to friday, we start with rain but after that a good deal of dry weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. another cabinet minister fights for theirjob. the pressure grows on priti patel. just days after the international development secretary was forced to apologise over secret meetings in israel, downing street is examining new claims about her trips overseas. good morning.
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it's wednesday, 8th november. also this morning, prince charles' finances face scrutiny following fresh revelations in the paradise papers. the prince's advisors deny suggestions of a conflict of interest. in the past few hours president trump has arrived in beijing for talks on trade and north korea. earlier this morning he warned the north it was time to "come to the table" and "make a deal". sse and npower are merging. i'm taking a look at what it will mean for their 12 million customers. andy murray says he won't play in the australian open next year unless he is 100% fit. the former world number one has been out of action with a hip injury, but faced roger
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federer in a charity match last night. jonny and oti join us as they prepare to foxtrot their way back to the ballroom. and carol has the weather. for many of us, it will be dry and sunny. wet and windy weather will push in later, it will brighten up will push in later, it will brighten up in the south east. i will have more details in 15 minutes. theresa may is coming under pressure to sack the international development secretary, priti patel. downing street is examining new information about her unauthorised contact with senior israeli government officials. priti patel apologised for the meeting during the summer. it is believed she had one meeting with senior israeli officials after returning home and again, she failed to tell the prime
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minister about them. let's get more detail now from our political correspondent, leila nathoo. how safe is herjob? it is looking precarious, lou. there is two issues, one the issue of her a p pa re ntly issues, one the issue of her apparently freelance diplomacy that she carried out over the summer in israel and the secondary issue of how she reported this to the prime minister. we know that priti patel had to correct the record regarding the number of meet it is that she had in israel in august. she initially said it was only a couple. it transpired it was 12. she also had to retract comments she made suggesting that the foreign office knew about the meetings beforehand. it was clear the foreign office didn't know about that. so she was hauled into number ten on monday to see theresa may. she was reprimanded. she was reminded of her ongations under the ministerial code and as faras
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ongations under the ministerial code and as far as downing street was concerned, she had apologised and that was the matter closed, but now we understand that number ten is examining details of two further meetings that priti patel had in september where no officials were present and they were not carried out in the usual ministerial way. so i think it is looking pretty ropey for priti patel this morning. theresa may is under pressure to sack her. earlier in the programme we spoke to a conservative mp who said it was up to theresa may what to do. it is up to the prime minister what she does. she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. the one thing i would just remind your viewers is this isn't a visit to some enemy state and a minister doing something clandestine and priti already apologised. yes, priti patel said
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sorry for her actions, but it is pretty extraordinary territory in terms of the scale what she was doing over the summer and certainly theresa may is going to come under pressure to sack her and certainly if she doesn't, that will raise questions as to why not? what more did priti patel have to do in order to lose her job? did priti patel have to do in order to lose herjob? we know priti patel is on her way back from east africa where she has been on an official visit and i wouldn't be surprised that we see some further developments on this story later this afternoon. thrit there might be phone calls made as soon as she arrives. there has been so much going on. it has been a bruising time. has she got a grip of what's going on in her cabinet? well, there is no doubt that theresa may is fighting on all fronts at the moment. we have got a number of her cabinet ministers under pressure, priti patel being the most vulnerable, but we had borisjohnson making comments about a british iranian citizen being held in iran,
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suggestions that he had potentially hampered her case by some comments he made. sir michael fallon quick as defence secretary over allegations of sexual harassment and damian green, the de facto deputy prime minister is also under investigation by the cabinet secretary over allegations of inappropriate behaviour. so yes, theresa may, hugely under pressure here. she can't really afford to be losing cabinet ministers weekly or daily which it might transpire and i think that this does put her under some pressure, but she will very much be hoping to draw a line at least under the priti patel row by potentially letting her go later this afternoon. thank you. the prince charles has been criticised. in the latest revelations from the leaked documents known as the paradise papers,
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the prince of wales has been criticised for failing to disclose an investment by his private estate in an offshore company. there is no suggestion of wrong doing. the prince's spokesman insists he has never chosen to speak out on a topic simply because of an investment decision. earlier we spoke to a former royal press secretary who said he didn't believe there was a conflict of interest. yes, he is the duke of cornwall. he does head up the duchy of cornwall, but doesn't have his fingers on every single aspect of it in such the same way as your director—general doesn't know everything that's going on in the bbc. he would be chairman of the council. chairman of the day—to—day running of the duchy and it is financial advisors who will invest where they think appropriate. in the last hour donald trump
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has arrived in bejing. the american president will ask china to cut its financial links with north korea and to abide by un sanctions. earlier mr trump urged all countries to join forces to isolate what he called "the brutal regime of north korea" saying the world cannot tolerate a rogue nation that threatens it with nuclear devastation. it is our responsibility and our duty to confront this danger together because the longer we wait, the greater the danger grows and the fewer the options become. our beijing correspondent stephen mcdonelljoins us. it isa it is a beautiful tourist attraction, but some serious talks on going today with the chinese president? yes, that's right. i'm standing outside the forbidden city. on the other side of those impressive walls, the old impeeral palace, donald trump is having a
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tour around this tourist site and i guess you would think that in the first instance that would be pleasantries first instance that would be pleasa ntries and chitchat first instance that would be pleasantries and chitchat before they get down to serious talks about north korea and its nuclear weapons. donald trump has asked why would china be prepared to support a regime like that in north korea given its horrendous human rights record? the given its horrendous human rights record ? the chinese given its horrendous human rights record? the chinese on the other side are saying we are fully implementing all of the un security council resolutions against north korea and we saw reports today that chinese tour groups are being told to not go into north korea anymore. this would be a big blow for that nation because that's a big source of ha rd nation because that's a big source of hard currency for north korea and these are the types of things they will be throwing about what is an appropriate level of pressure to put on north korea to get it to give up nuclear weapons. thank you very much. if we see the president while we are
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on air, we will show you the pictures. thousands of people with the most advanced cancers are living longer than expected. for the first time, macmillan cancer support has looked at the outcomes for patients diagnosed with stage 4 of the disease where the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. the charity says in 2015 at least 17,000 people had beaten their survival odds. jane maher is chief medical officer at macmillan cancer support and joins us now along with emma young who was diagnosed with stage 4 breast and bone cancer in 2014. good morning. good morning. emma, let's start with you. so 2014, you get this diagnosis, what did you think at the time? what were you told at the time? i thought at the timei told at the time? i thought at the time i wasjust going to die. i have got cancer, i'm going to die. that was it. at the time i was told, i wasn't told a lot. i didn't want to be told a lot. i would rather be oblivious. you asked your doctors not to give you the full details.”
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didn't know want to know the details. i thought i would prefer to live that way rather than if you're told so many years, what happens when you get to zero and you're still here? i didn't want to know any details at all and i still really don't know the ins and outs to be honest. right. and there are so many people living in the same position as you. it is a good news story here that cancer used to be like you say, you had cancer, you thought that was it, but there are so many people now living with really serious cancer? i think it is a really good news story in that we have found for the first time that there are thousands of people who are living several years, not months, after having cancer that spread all over the body. but it is also quite tough. it is quite a tough situation to be in when you do have incurable, but treatable cancer. you have lots of uncertainty hanging over you. you have lots of difficult decisions to make about what treatments to have and what we
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learned is that actually it is really important to have palliative ca re really important to have palliative care and anti—cancer treatment at the same time. so you tend to think that it the same time. so you tend to think thatitis the same time. so you tend to think that it is all about having anti—cancer treatment, but we found that actually you need both. what has changed in the last 15 or 20 years? is this research because of money that's been put into that side of working out the treatment of cancer and how we can deal best with that? there is two things that happened. firstly, there has been lots more anti—cancer treatments. so ifi lots more anti—cancer treatments. so if i think about when i started as an oncologist, the number of cancer drugs that are available to treat people are enormous, but we've also learnt much better how to help people to live with their illness. so also, we've learnt how to help people to cope and how to help people to cope and how to help people manage their symptoms. sol think it is both things. ijust think it is both things. i just wanted to talk to you about the impact of living with this as well. presumably, given that you
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know, it is incurable, is that right? you have got to have doctors appointments and tests all the time. how does it impact on you? it's co nsta nt. how does it impact on you? it's constant. it is not as bad as when i was first diagnosed. i was having treatment every week and scans every three months. since i have been sta ble three months. since i have been stable for a couple of years, i now have scans every six months. i still have scans every six months. i still have a an injection, it is a har moan implant, it puts me into a medically induced menopause, but as i have gone on my appointments have got less and less which is great, but at first, the impact, that's just your life, it is pointment after appointment. you seem to be dealing with it incredibly well, can i say? jane, i suppose people deal with it so differently and some people can be psychologically damaged of having something as serious as stage four cancer? that's right. as doctors and nurses we have to get better at helping people to
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adjust to this very different situation. i mean it is interesting emma hearing you talk about that as well. maybe we need to change the language around it and you are one of those people who are living with something, it is very possible to live with? yeah, i mean it has changed and we were just talking outside, you know, the word cancer is quite a dirty word. people are like, "oh cancer." but it is so different now to what it used to be. ijust, ijust hope that people could look at me and think well, she is living with it. i'm under no illusions, i have friends who are poorly at the moment and aren't as lucky as i am, but i know at some point my luck will change as well. but until then, you know. point my luck will change as well. but untilthen, you know. it's got to have an impact on your family. you have got children as well. how do you manage with them? well the two youngest don't know the severity. they know i have cancer, that's about it. the oldest one knows everything. i found that's about it. the oldest one knows everything. ifound it that's about it. the oldest one knows everything. i found it easier to be honest with her. i didn't want
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to be honest with her. i didn't want to lie to her, but i kind of make it humorous and we joke, notjoke about it, it is a serious thing, but i keep it light and humorous rather than having this deadly serious conversation. what would be your advice to people who might be going through the same thing that emma has gone through? don't be frighten. get as much information as possible and seek out support. you said incurable, but treatable. maybe we need to change the first word? treatable, but incurable. maybe, that's more positive. but it is fascinating, thank you very much indeed. emma, thank you very much for joining indeed. emma, thank you very much forjoining us. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. a beautiful autumnal shot behind you. it is gorgeous but it's also a cold start to the day
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less across the board. we've got a widespread frost. we've got a bit more cloud down in london and also patchy rain across east anglia and the south—east so the temperature hasn't fallen as low as it has elsewhere during the night. when the patchy mist and fog lifts, also across parts of northern ireland and western scotland, there will be some sunshine. increasingly through the day the cloud will build across northern ireland and scotland, introducing some rain. also the wind strengthening across mainland scotland and the northern isles where we will be seeing gusts to gale force. no such problems across northern england. a fine and dry afternoon with lengthy sunny spells to look forward to. as we have through lincolnshire, heading down towards the midlands. we hang
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on the ground in east anglia and the south—east but it is being eroded from the west. for southern counties a fine day generally. one or two showers tending to fade. a lot of dry weather with sunny spells. exactly the same for wales. dry with sunny spells. the rain coming in across scotland and northern ireland through the evening and overnight will push that further south but cloud building ahead of it. rain turning light in nature. it will be cold enough especially in sheltered glens for a touch of frost. we still have blustery showers across the far north of scotland. before the riverfront arrives in the south—east, under clear skies it will be cold. that weather front gets into the south—east with its patchy rain before clearing. then you can see how it brightens up behind it. dry weather tomorrow, fair bit of sunshine, still windy in the north and still those showers. temperatures above average for this
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stage in november. the averages between 9—11. for thursday and friday we've got this cold front moving south. the rain on it is fairly weak. behind it is the next warm front coming our way. as the cold front moves south it will bring cloud and the odd spot of rain. rain coming in later and which leads us into the weekend. for most it's going to be bright and breezy. there will be some showers, particularly in the west, the north and east. the best of the weather down the central swathes of the country. feeling cold. thank you, carol. breaking news in the last hour. the energy providers ssc and npower are merging. at this time of yet everyone is arguing
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about what temperature to have the thermostat at. good morning. you're talking about two of the biggest names in the energy business. sse has said it's going to buy end power. they would supply over 12 million households and give them 20% of the energy market —— sse is going to buy npower. we arejoined by of the energy market —— sse is going to buy npower. we are joined by the director of retailfor to buy npower. we are joined by the director of retail for sse. what does it mean for customers? good morning. i think it's good news for customers. we are proposing to merge the retail business of sse and npower to create a fully independent company listed on the london stock exchange. the customers it means the organisation will be more efficient, more innovative and agile for the future. will it be cheaper? as a result will be able to create efficiencies and add more value back to our customers. that could be more competitive prices or equally
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through more innovation, new propositions, new products. the market is massively changing. the digital economy is here. customers wa nt to digital economy is here. customers want to be served in a different way. also with electric vehicles, smart meters, all of these things, customers will have new needs. we will be able to support our customers moving forward. what will it mean for customers in practical terms? who will you get your bills from and how will it shape? there's a process we need to go to. we've announce the proposal to merge. the cma and regulatory authorities will look at it which will take about 12 months. nothing will change in the short term. ultimately there will be a new board of directors and a new management team and they will decide on the strategy for the future company and the structure of that organisation. will there be a name change? it's up to the new board of directors to decide what they cool
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themselves and the strategy for the new business. at this time of year we are always talking about energy bills and often over the winter months we often hear about price rises. what are we expecting from you guys? i can't comment on future prices but we've got a track record of doing the right thing. if you ta ke of doing the right thing. if you take the last 2—3 years we've reduced prices twice and increased once. we are going into the winter and very aware once. we are going into the winter and very aware we once. we are going into the winter and very aware we need to support our customers and our customer service teens are lined up to help our customers through the winter period. thank you. sse are planning to merge with npower. sheep, your favourite story of the day. sheep have a reputation for being dim—witted creatures but it seems they've been pulling the wool over our eyes, they're actually surprisingly intelligent. a new study has found that they can be trained to recognise human faces from photos and can even respond
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to images of their handlers without any training. let's take a look at how the experiment worked. these are the sheep which have been trained to recognise people's faces from photographs. it's all for a study at the university of cambridge. the sheep learned how to recognise the faces of four well—known public figures by getting a food reward every time they chose the photo. no recognition, no grub. once they learned to recognise the faces, they were then shown two pictures and received a reward for choosing the right photo. the sheep could even recognise people when their faces were shown at an angle. the researchers then tested further, and found that sheep can recognise their handler from a photograph without any training at all. that's a little demonstration of what happened. profjenny morton lead the research. shejoins us now. good morning. where you surprised
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sheep were able to recognise faces? i was sheep were able to recognise faces? iwasa sheep were able to recognise faces? i was a bit surprised because we've never tried this experiment before. i wasn't that surprised that they could make decisions because we've done lots of cognitive testing on sheep and they are quite good at decision making. the photographs was a step up, actually. what has this taught you about sheep that you didn't know before? we were joking about the fact we have an image of them being dim—witted but they are actually quite intelligent, aren't they? we had already done experiments looking at cognitive function in sheep and a couple of yea rs function in sheep and a couple of years ago we published a paper showing they could perform executive decision—making in the same way as a muqqy decision—making in the same way as a muggy or human. they already have quite advanced cognitive processing —— a monkey or a human. quite advanced cognitive processing -- a monkey or a human. you chose for people, why them? there were a lot of photographs of those people available on the web, we wanted
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photographs of face and pictures and then the tilted angles. we tried to find people we were sure the sheep had never met before. we were pretty sure they've never met barack obama! then you had a front and photograph and two tilted photographs which is surprisingly hard to come by. so my research assistants shows the actual people but that was the basis on which we chose them. i'm not laughing at the research, i'm laughing at the research, i'm laughing at the idea of a sheep not having seen barack obama before and how do you find that that's the case. forgive me! for example if you went to go and see a sheep readily would it recognise you? definitely. i think farmers all over the country are saying we knew that all the time. she'd definitely recognise their handlers, their owners. they almost certainly recognise vehicles. —— sheep definitely recognise their
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handlers. this research has a serious point, why have you done it? i work on huntington's disease and we have a huntington's disease sheep model developed in australia. these animals don't show any symptoms at all so we have been trying to devise ways of testing their cognitive function. oursemi—yorked ways of testing their cognitive function. our semi—yorked to assist you saw in the video allows us to test the decision—making of the sheep without interference from the operator —— semiautomated. usually we use letters and colours and shapes which is a standard way of testing human cognitive function. face recognition was an additional level. tell us about huntington's disease and how it affects people, and why this is important. huntingdon ‘s is a progressive genetic disorder. if you have the genetic disorder. if you have the gene you will get the disease. its late—onset server doesn't usually appear until a person is in their
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40s. there are three groups of symptoms. movement disorder, cognitive decline and psychiatric disorders. it eventually kills the patient. now you know this about sheep, how will you implement it and how will it help people in the future? our plan is to test therapies. the next step is to test therapies. the next step is to test the huntingdon sheep to see whether there is a difference between the way the normal sheep and the huntingdon sheep make decisions. if there is, then we have a way of measuring therapy. if you give their appeal to a sheep that reverses its disorder, that's very promising. the sort of therapy i'm interested in are things you can't easily test in patients straight. gene therapy could cause irreversible changes. we would want to test those in an
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animal model before we go into the clinic. thank you. a fascinating subject with very applicable results. we'll be talking about nat king cole later on. we've gotjohnny and oti from strictly. many people were shocked at the weekend by aston's departure. carol will have the weather. we'll be looking at the help of the high street has new research suggests nearly 1000 shops across england have disappeared in five years. as we've heard as well there is severe disruption for some rail services. find out if it's going to affect you with the travel and weather news where you are. good morning. it's a cold and frosty
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start to the day. with clear skies last night, we had an amazing scene of the aurora across scotland. look at that picture there from one of our weather watchers. lots of clear skies around this morning except the far south—east where there is patchy rain associated with this weather front which is not going to move far. it will stay cloudy across the far. it will stay cloudy across the far south—east corner. elsewhere, mist and fog patches will tend to clear away. lots of sunshine into the afternoon. the exception being scotla nd the afternoon. the exception being scotland and northern ireland where the cloud tin ceases here and there will be outbreaks of rain moving in. it will feel chilly. even with that sunshine, temperatures about eight to ten celsius or 11 celsius. through this evening and tonight, this cloud and rain across scotland and northern ireland will move its way south and east ward. the rain will fizzle out. there will be a few
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spits and spots into the early hours of thursday. not as cold as last night. temperatures typically staying up around about four to seven celsius. during thursday, while it will be cloudy to start off, there could be mist and fog patches. mist and rain here and there, the cloud will move away and there, the cloud will move away and there will be good spells of sunshine. more so towards the northern half of the uk and maximum temperatures up to about ten to 12 or 13 celsius and to the feeling as cold as it will today. going into friday, we have got this weather system which is going to move in from the west. so, some rain pushing its way into northern ireland, into wales and the south—west of england. more so later in the day. it will spread its way further east ward. elsewhere, it should be dry and chilly in northern areas, towards the south, just holding on to less cold air. temperatures about 13 celsius. into the weekend, it will become bright. it will be breezy. there will be showers around and it will feel noticeably colder again.
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bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and jamie robertson. scaling the chinese wall — will the us president put past trade tensions behind him to win the support in america's top trade partner? live from london, that's our top story. president trump and the first lady
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have just landed in china and they have just landed in china and they have met president xi. the nuclear threat posed by north korea is dominating the agenda but mr trump is also expected to take aim at trade

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