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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 8, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11: cabinet minister priti patel‘s future in doubt as theresa may orders her back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials. it is up to the prime minister what she does, she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. the nhs was not on the ballot paper but it was on the ballot bus. vote leave for a better funded but it was on the ballot bus. vote leave for a betterfunded health service, £350 million a week. donald trump arrives in beijing and tours the forbidden city with his chinese counterpart xijinping, amid rising tensions with north korea. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant — a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday.
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also this hour — who ewe looking at? how sheep can be trained to recognise a familiar face from a photo — including barak 0bama and the bbc‘s fiona bruce. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the future of the international development secretary, priti patel, is in doubt after details emerged of further undisclosed meetings she had with israeli politicians. ms patel is currently flying back from africa, after being ordered to return to the uk by the prime minister. she apologised to theresa may
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on monday about unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians in august, but it appears she did not reveal details of further meetings held in september. joining us from westminster is our assistant political editor norman smith. is there any course of action open to theresa may other than to sack priti patel? it is very hard to see any other outcome, all the signs are priti patel, when she landed back in london, will be summoned to meet the prime minister, and she will be asked to give her version of events, why she did not disclose details of further meetings with israeli politicians when she met the prime minister on monday for that face—to—face dressing down, why she did not from the prime minister about her idea of possibly giving the israeli army taxpayers' money to
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help syrian refugees fleeing into the golan heights. if there is no adequate answer that i assume she will be sacked. she already has had toissue will be sacked. she already has had to issue clarifications about who she saw, when she saw them and who she saw, when she saw them and who she told about those meetings, she has already had to issue an apology over her conduct and already been formally reprimanded by the prime minister and has already prompted a review of the ministerial code. it is very hard to see any other outcome than the sacking of priti patel. is it right priti patel should be sacked? i am very much focusing on theissues sacked? i am very much focusing on the issues here at the nato conference and making sure ministers understand our commitment to the defence of europe is resolute.
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it does not give a huge amount of confidence for britain's ministerial overseas footprint. we are focused on talking about military matters here and that is what i will be doing all day. thank you for your time. are there any questions are there any truth in the rumour is that you were involved in getting rid of michael fallon? the prime minister makes all the decisions on who serves in her cabinet and she makes all the sessions. she always makes all the sessions. she always makes her own decisions. thank you ever so makes her own decisions. thank you ever so much for your time. that was the new defence secretary gavin williams, the lorry was in the cabinet and not wanting to talk about priti patel. but talking to others at westminster, the
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overwhelming consensus is priti patel is destined to be sacked, even by those who might normally rallied to her defence, leading brexit ministers except she is likely to be sacked. 0ne minister... it is totally in the gift of the prime minister to any minister, any cabinet minister, should serve in government. priti patel was brought into number 10 downing st, i think she realised the seriousness of her mistake, she has apologised and put out a statement of all her meetings during her holiday in august in israel which the foreign office, you're quite right, did not know in advance therefore could not coordinate, which is wrong, but did know while the trip was taking place. it is up to the prime minister what she does. she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. the one thing i would remind you of yours is this isn't a visit to some enemy states or in minister doing something
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contesting. priti has already apologised for this. there has been something of the pushback, shall we say, one suspects by friends of priti patel. in the jewish chronicle but there are suggestions she did in from the prime minister about her meeting with letting young —— with the israeli prime minister. 0ne with letting young —— with the israeli prime minister. one of the other two meetings was here in london with the israeli security minister in september which she has only now made public or rather her department has made public. we are beginning to get signs of possibly priti patel‘s side of the story that appears to be downing street was at
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least aware of the israeli prime minister meeting so perhaps we will get more on her side of the story later today. the head of the nhs in england is challenging the government to find an extra £350 million for the health service every week, as promised during the eu referendum campaign. simon stevens used the controversial claims used by vote leave to put the case for more money in a speech at the nhs providers conference. in his keynote address he also warned that operation waiting list could reach to their highest levels ever. 0n the current funding it is going to be increasingly hard to expand mental health services or improve cancer care, mental health services or improve cancer ca re, services mental health services or improve cancer care, services the public need and rightly want. crucially, on the current funding outlook, the nhs waiting list will grow to 5 million people by 2021. that is an extra i
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million people on the waiting list, one in ten‘s waiting for an operation, the highest number ever. the nhs was not on the ballot paper but it was on the ballot bus. vote believe for a better funded but it was on the ballot bus. vote believe for a betterfunded health service, £350 million a week —— vote leave. here is what the campaign director of the vote leave said this year, mps kept saying why isn't vote leave are looking at the con and living standards. they did not realise for millions of people 350 million for the nhs was about the economy and living standards and thatis economy and living standards and that is why it was so effective. it was clearly the most effective argument, what almost every demographic. would we have won without the 350 million for the nhs? all our research and the close results suggest no. some people now
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claim this was cynical and we never intended to spend more on the nhs. wrong. rather than criticising these promises, the public will doubtless wa nt to promises, the public will doubtless want to see them honoured. the health secretaryjeremy hunt said the government was committed to investing in the nhs. misgovernment‘s approach to the nhs is very simple, it is our important public service —— this government's approach. we know it needs more investment and more funding and as soon investment and more funding and as soon as investment and more funding and as soon as the economy is able to afford it we will put that extra investment in. with me now is professor john appleby — chief economist at the health think tank the king's funds. arguably, the most political speech ever delivered by an nhs leader and
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certain a bold move by simon stephens to bring that speech back to one of the defining images of the referendum, the vote leave battle bus. iam from bus. i am from the nuffield trust, not the kings trust. a very strong speech and rightly pointing to the general point that the nhs is really struggling in terms of funding. we know that because it has had seven years of restricted funding growth, it has done pretty well up until now with improving productivity and so on but the collective view of britain's three leading health think tank ‘s is we are reaching a point now is it is we are reaching a point now is it is actually getting very difficult to keep up with the target headline waiting times on the current funding. tell us more about the analysis you
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have done that says the government needs to find an extra £4 billion next year for the nhs. that is just for next year, 4 billion over the current continuation plans for funding. there are a number of ways to look in the future. we have taken the office for budget of responsibility for spending pressures on the nhs and the future and that is worthy for building comes from but it is notjust 2018, it is the following years as well. we are looking at a gap are based on current plans of around £25 billion. at4 current plans of around £25 billion. at 4 billion for next year alone is eight times more than what is projected to be spent? not a times, the government planned to spend 1 billion or so extra next year but it is not enough. —— it is not eight
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times. it isjust is not enough. —— it is not eight times. it is just a fraction over covering extra cost. there aren't more people in the country, people are getting older, more people using the health service. jeremy hunt in that clip saying as soon as economic jeremy hunt in that clip saying as soon as economic conditions allow the government will spend more but would you say spending more now will ultimately save money? you need to invest a save and we have not seen that investment over the past few yea rs. that investment over the past few years. in 2010 this is the same story the nhs was told, which until the economy recovers and it will be all right. the nhs had a plan to get through to 2015, it essentially did that but then was asked to do it all again and now looks like it is being asked to do all again. a third phase of austerity. when the comedy —— when the economy is not doing too
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well demands on the nhs do go up and people's health suffers. thank you. donald trump has arrived in beijing, as he continues his tour of asia. the american president took a tour of the forbidden city in the capital, alongside his chinese counterpart, xi jinping. mr trump is expected to press china to cut its financial links with north korea. speaking in south korea earlier, mr trump urged all countries to join forces to isolate pyongyang, saying the world could not tolerate a rogue nation that threatened nuclear devastation. the weapons you are acquiring are not making you safer. they are putting your regime in grave danger. every step you take down this dark path, increases the peril you face. yet despite every crime you have committed against god and man, you are already to offer and we will do that.
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we will offer a path to a much betterfuture. 0ur correspondentjohn sudworth joins us from beijing. first of all tell us about the sort of welcome donald trump has received in china. china is a rolling out the red carpet, as you would expect. donald trump has been welcomed at the forbidden city, a symbol of its past greatness and some might suggest it is meant as a message about how china sees its future. this parity of esteem, this great power relationship which chinese state media has been talking about so much ahead of this visit. and north korea and this appeal from donald trump for china to sever financial links
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with north korea, what sort of healing will be chinese give him on that? it is interesting as much of donald trump's speech we have heard before from other us presidents, top of north korea being a dark and evil place and the need for sanctions to be enforced as well as the offer of dialogue if north korea were to choose that path. what is new with donald trump is somehow china might be convinced to turn off the tap and showed the north korean economy to death. the problem with that is china has so far shown no interest in pursuing that path, it does not wa nt to in pursuing that path, it does not want to see a north korean collapse and it doesn't believe that it —— the tighter north korea is squeezed to be more incentive it is given to develop nuclear weapons and nothing in what donald trump has said on this asian trip has offered is given to develop nuclear weapons and nothing in what donald trump has
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said on this asian trip has offered a way of squaring the circle and an incentive that might make beijing meet his demands. thank you. cabinet minister priti patel‘s future in doubt as theresa may orders her back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. donald trump arrives in beijing and tours the forbidden city with his chinese counterpart xijinping, amid rising tensions with north korea. in sport, england and germany will both wear poppies for their friendly on friday after fever changed their rules to allow players to wear poppies —— after fifa. tyson fury tested positive for a banned steroid
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last year and the association worry if they sue him it will bankrupt them. andy murray has made a return to court after last playing at wimbledon in july. more on all those stories just after 11:30am. the prince of wales has been criticised for failing to disclose an investment by his private estate in an offshore company. the revelations come from a number of leaked documents about tax havens known as the paradise papers. it's the second time this week that a member of the royal family has been named. andy verity reports. prince charles was camping on the environment for decades and a
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special the rainforest and today he is due to arrive in india as criticism grew at home of his failure to disclose a secret financial stake in the company in bermuda. 0n the right is one of the prince's oldest friends who was a director of act—mac sustainable forestry management limited. the managed tropical rainforest, managed in bermuda. tropical rainforest were not included in carbon credit trading schemes so it needed rules change. in february 2007 the dutch bought shares in the company —— the duchy. they agreed to keep this confidential. soon the prince was making speeches campaigning for changes to international agreements
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on carbon credits. injune 2008 the duchy sold its shares for a profit of more than 200,000.|j duchy sold its shares for a profit of more than 200,000. i think it's a serious conflict of interest between his own investments and what he is trying to achieve publicly. clarence house said... there is no suggestion of illegality or law that his campaigning cause the share price of his friends company to rise and nor is it suggested he was to avoid tax. —— seeking to avoid tax. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph is at clarence house for us this morning. are we expecting further comment from clarence house? it has been an
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uneasy a few days for the royal family court firstly from the links to the queen and now the prince of wales. prince charles is currently ona tourof wales. prince charles is currently on a tour of south—east asia and at an event in malaysia the bbc attempted to talk to him about some of these issues. so no comment from the prince of wales at that event in malaysia but officers at clarence house have been more forthcoming in his defence. 0n using duchy of cornwall money to invest in offshore funds they say the prince is not directly involved in any way in any of the big investment is the duchy makes. 0n theissue investment is the duchy makes. 0n the issue of investing in the company of his friend, clarence house said it was not an investment
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made with view to financial gain, it was made because of the friends sharing in the interest of a particular company, in this case about the environment and sustainability of the rainforest. clarence house see those have been long—term interests of the prince of wales and consistent with his long—term interests so it was not a quick investment on an issue he had not shown any interest in before. but what all this has done is raised tricky issues for the royal family. firstly on the transparency of royal finances. there accounts are made public every year but should there be more detail about where investments are being made. secondly, the difficulties that arise in the prince of wales, who is arise in the prince of wales, who is a campaigner activist and in some senses a lobbyist, and that can expose him sometimes to a conflict of interest. the first minister of wales,
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carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant — a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. he told mr sargeant to leave his post last week because of unspecified allegations about his behaviour. 0ne labour member of the welsh assembly said there was "deep unease" in the group. we can hear more about this now with that wales correspondent who is in cardiff. tell us more about this unease and do we expect to hear any more from the first minister? that is the question at the moment i better‘s blitz. there was a deep sense of shock and sadness in the assembly was the news broke yesterday lunchtime that police had found carl sargea nt‘s yesterday lunchtime that police had found carl sargeant‘s body at his home in the north—east of wales at 11:30am yesterday and as we
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understand it he did take his own life. i had never seen the assembly like it was yesterday, it has been rocked by this story. the flags are at half—mast at all business has been suspended for the rest of the week. sadness yesterday but there is a growing sense of concern and some angerfrom some a growing sense of concern and some anger from some people about the process that led to carl sargeant losing hisjob as process that led to carl sargeant losing his job as the welsh government's committee secretary. last monday some accusations were made to the first minister's office, they spoke to the real woman and asked about the allegations of misconduct, carl sargeant was in new york on holiday with his wife. 0n his return he met with the first minister and was told by carwyn jones there were allegations against him, he would be sacked and
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suspended as well from the labour party pending investigation. carl sa rg ea nt party pending investigation. carl sargeant released party pending investigation. carl sargea nt released a party pending investigation. carl sargeant released a statement on twitter saying it was right he should step aside while the investigation was underway and he did not know the exact nature of the allegations but he would try to clear his name and get back to government. as we understand it his solicitor sent a letter to welsh labour over the weekend asking them to specify the details of the allegations but as we understand it until his death he did not know the specifics. we have heard a lot from welsh labour politicians today. the mp who shared an office with carl sa rg ea nt mp who shared an office with carl sargeant said, it was right to investigate the allegations but the accused should also be made aware of the nature of the allegations. another said carl sargeant clearly was not dealt with firmly in the most basic sense and another said
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there were questions for the first minister over this. we had a statement yesterday from him expressing his sadness about the loss of his friend but we are waiting to hear from loss of his friend but we are waiting to hearfrom him publicly. james, thank you very much. it is exactly 30 years since the ira bomb exploded at the cenotaph at enniskillen in county fermanagh. eleven people died and more than 60 were injured in what became known as the poppy day bomb. this morning a memorial was unveiled. our correspondent chris buckler is in enniskillen now. it is worth reflecting first of all though one has ever been brought to court to face any charges in relation to the bombing. the police say they are still committed to investigating and finding those responsible for this ira attack 30 years ago but no one has ever been prosecuted for the murders. three decades on from that
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attack in 1987 people have been again gathering here today in enniskillen. a service has been going on to remember those who died, who themselves came here to pay tribute to people killed in two world wars. they died when an ira bomb exploded close to the cenotaph. many were buried in rubble. people we re many were buried in rubble. people were shown having to be carried out and taken were shown having to be carried out and ta ken away were shown having to be carried out and taken away from underneath the rubble. the dead lying alongside the dozens who were injured. 11 people killed and a 12 person dying 13 yea rs killed and a 12 person dying 13 years later, having never recovered from a coma, dying from his injuries suffered that morning. chris, how did the people of enniskillen feel on this anniversary, knowing the name of the town has become synonymous with that event? i think it is worth remembering
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during all the years of the northern ireland troubles and the series of shootings and bombings there was something about this attack that really stood out and short, an attack on people gathering for an act of remembrance. people standing here paying tribute. it was something about that that stood out and also worth reflecting the words of one of the men whose daughter died in that attack, gordon wilson. he forgive those who carried out the attack in the days afterwards and that really struck. what you have today from the service that has just taken place today from the service that has just ta ken place is today from the service that has just taken place is a quiet dignity amongst those whose families are still suffering as a result of the attack in 1987. some of them have been talking about how the pain has the gone away, how they still suffer asa the gone away, how they still suffer as a result of that. family was a very important part of the service
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today and the great granddaughter of two of those killed, she performed a soldier in the service, we had the names of each of the 12 people killed as a result of usborne read out during the service. this was about ensuring they are remembered ina time about ensuring they are remembered in a time that has become connected to an attack and has its name associated with the bombing but a town that it's all so proud of that day of remembrance, whenever they came to pay tribute to really show their support for people who died before them and today this town came out, not just the families before them and today this town came out, notjust the families but dignitaries and people who live here, to once again stand and remember in this case 12 people who died. chris, thank you. marks and spencer has revealed a 5.3% fall in profits for the first six months of its financial year. pre—tax profit fell to £219 million over the period,
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but sales rose 2.6% to £51 billion. the falls in food, clothing and homeware sales were less than analysts expected. and there will be more on those results in the business news in half an hour. new research indicates that sheep can learn to recognise human faces. a flock of welsh mountain sheep was trained to pick out the faces of celebrities, including jake gyllenhaal and emma watson, and the former us president, barack 0bama. the animals were tested to see if they could identify the famous faces among other photos. researchers say it proves sheep possess similar facial recognition abilities to primates. i wasn't that surprised they could make the decisions because we have
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done lots of cognitive testing on sheep and we are good at decision making. the photographs were a step up. i work on huntington's disease and we have a sheep model that was developed in australia. these animals don't show any symptoms at all. we have been trying to devise ways of testing their cognitive function. 0ur semiautomated system you saw in the video allows us to test the decision—making of the sheep without interference from the operator. we have some tasks, usually we use letters, colours and shapes, a standard way of testing human cognitive function, the face recognition is an additional level. i love how interested the sheep look at the approach those photographs. the tennis star andy murray and his wife kim have announced the birth of their second child. kim gave birth to a baby girl; the couple already have a daughter, sophia, who was born in 2016. time for a look at the weather. it
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was a cold, crisp sunny start today across many parts of the uk. further east, we have had workload, courtesy ofa east, we have had workload, courtesy of a weather front still with us, further north and west we have gotten workload, courtesy of this weather system moving its way in. that will continue to bring cloud across scotland, northern ireland and outbreaks of rain this afternoon, particularly in western scotland. it will remain cloudy across east anglia and the south—east of england but elsewhere it will be sunshine, barely a cloud in the sky, but feeling quite chilly. through tonight, cloud will move its way southwards and with that cloud cover it would be as cold or frosty as it was this morning. perhaps just a bit chilly in the far east of england, temperatures typically about six, 7 degrees. thursday is quite cloudy for many, that disappears and there will be
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good spells of sunshine particularly in the northern half of the uk and temperatures not quite as low as they will be this afternoon. about 11, 12 celsius. goodbye. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: the prime minister orders priti patel back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials, casting doubt over her future as international development secretary. the public want promises made during the eu referendum campaign on health care funding honoured by the government — that's the warning from the head of nhs england. president trump arrives in beijing on his five—nation tour of asia — mr trump is expected to ask his chinese counterpart xi jinping to cut financial links with north korea. pressure is mounting on the welsh first minister, carwynjones, to release details about his decision to sack carl sargeant — a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday.
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30 years on — a new memorial is unveiled to remember the victims of the ira bombing at enniskillen. 12 people died and more than 60 were injured in what became known as the poppy day bomb. in a moment... the broadcaster sky has said it will consider closing sky news if it becomes a stumbling block in its proposed merger with 21st century fox — we'll be talking to a former member of the news team. let's get the latest sports now with katherine downes. it's been announced that both england and germany will wear poppies on black armbands when they meet for a friendly at wembley on friday. fifa changed their rules last month to allow players to wear poppies as an act of remembrance — provided the opposing team agree to it. the home nations were all fined for wearing poppies last year, but now fifa has decided they are not political symbols. its also been confirmed that video assistant refereeing will be used at the game,
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for the first time at an official match in the uk. the uk anti—doping agency say they could be bankrupted by an ongoing case against former heavyweight champion tyson fury — and they're understood to have asked the government to underwrite the case. for more on this — our sports news correspondent richard conwayjoins me from our london newsroom. what are the details of this case? why are they worried about this case against tyson fury? we should make it clear, they haven't said anything officially, they say they cannot comment on an ongoing case. what i understand from talking to sources in and around the story, the unconcerned about the potential if they do lose this case eventually against tyson fury, it has been going on for some time, tyson fury tested positive for a banned steroid backin tested positive for a banned steroid back in june tested positive for a banned steroid back injune of 2016. the defence,
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tyson fury and his cousin, hugh, is that the aid uncastrated wild boar, apologies if you're having an early lunch. that is one of the facts of the case. the merit of the case is going to go forward to a tribunal next month, but the concerns within uk anti—doping is that if we do lose this case then eventually tyson fury and his team may seek a damages claim for loss of earnings, given their budget is around £8 million that could be a significant issue, because tyson fury errands around £5 million per site. that is one of the big concerns that has been looked at. it raises questions about the integrity of the anti—dumping process , integrity of the anti—dumping process, especially when going up against high—profile sports stars who have significantly more financial means than the watchdog themselves. is there a case whereby themselves. is there a case whereby the uk anti—doping agency are forced
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to drop it because they cannot have an outcome? from what i understand, discussions have been held within the board and with the department for culture, media and sport. there is no intention to drop this case, it is the intention to see it through. that may require the government to underwrite this case, if indeed they go on to lose it. they are confident it would seem in the case. we will see what happens in the months ahead. certainly that is the position as has been outlined. richard, thank you for that. england wingerjermaine mcgillvary has been cleared of biting lebanon captain robbie farah during saturday's world cup group game in sydney. the huddersfield player was facing a ban of up to 12 weeks had he been found guilty, but his exoneration means he will be free to play in england's final group match against france in perth on sunday. in rugby union...
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ahead of test matches against scotland and england later this month, samoan rugby has been declared bankrupt. the nation's prime minister has asked members of the public to donate money to keep the sport alive — and the rfu has said it will cover all of samoa's costs while they are in england. england's women are completing their final day of preparation before their must—win ashes test in sydney. they're currently 4—2 down against australia. if they lose the test, which starts tomorrow, england cannot win the series. meanwhile, england's men have been playing one of their two warm—up games before their ashes series starts. mark stoneman, david malan and joe root have both scored half centuries against a cricket australia eleven. england are currently 278 for eight. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. sky has threatened to shut down sky news if the news channel proves to be a major obstacle in its takeover bid by rupert murdoch's 21st century fox. regulators are investigating the deal amid concerns that mr murdoch's media empire could become too powerful.
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sky told the competition and markets authority that the regulator should not assume "the continued provision" of sky news. with me now isjoeyjones, a former deputy political editor at sky news, and a former spokesperson for theresa may. so we'll touch on the situation with priti patel in a minute. first of all, thank you for coming in. we will talk about this thread to shut down sky news. is it a tactic did you think? it has to be viewed as a tactic, but then equally people would have to take it at face value as something that could have a certain fairly ruthless commercial logic to it. we know there are a lot of people at sky and fox who want the steel to go through it and people who have become frustrated at the way it has been getting bogged down. i think this demonstrates the acute nature of that frustration,
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that sky is coming out and seeing its news channel could be closed down if it was an impediment. what they seem to be saying is, look, if they seem to be saying is, look, if the whole issue is about market dominance and the area of news, just stop doing news. but it does fly in the face of all the investment that sky has made in a sky news over many yea rs, sky has made in a sky news over many years, right from the start obviously. even over the past few months they have built a massive new studio, embedding sky news right at the heart of the portfolio of sky channels. that is contradictory but must be causing a massive amount of unease amongst your former collea g u es unease amongst your former colleagues and friends. the channel is being touted as some sort of sacrificial lamb, potentially? i remember when this bid first was mooted. it was a very different dynamic at that time. at that time, it was all in the teeth of the phone hacking scandal, it was very hotly politicised. it was a massive story, actually, at that time, an unusual
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one for me and my colleagues to find ourselves reporting on. what was most gratifying at that period was the extent of support there was for sky news out there in the nation, not just sky news out there in the nation, notjust from general viewers, sky news out there in the nation, not just from general viewers, but other media organisations and above all politically. i think this is where ultimately seeing this is a risky move. it risks inflaming a backlash. it will be interpreted by those people who are hostile to the proposed takeover, they will interpret it as a threat. the risk for those people who want the bed to go ahead is that might politicised the situation even more, because at the situation even more, because at the moment it has been a bit under the moment it has been a bit under the radar, compared with what five or six years ago. you have been speaking about the value of the channel, the sense of it be in competition with the bbc. some people are saying this could be just about trying to save money because news channels don't make money, they
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lose money. i think that is a com plete lose money. i think that is a complete red herring. sky has seen the broader value of having a news channel and having sky news right from the start, and the feel that as acutely known as the ever have done over the period back to 1989. let's talk about priti patel. what do you think theresa may is going to be thinking at this stage? she has lost one minister already in the space of the week with the stepping down at michael fallon, criticism of herfor not backing borisjohnson, no issue we have another crisis. is there anything she can do to avoid sacking priti patel? 0r anything she can do to avoid sacking priti patel? or would she want to avoid sacking her? half an hour ago, i thought everything seemed to be pointing in only one direction. that is based on the idea that priti patelin is based on the idea that priti patel in her face—to—face meeting with theresa may earlier on in the week didn't front up, she wasn't entirely upfront with what had happened on that trip to israel.
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however, there is no a different version of events. this is stephen pollard, a very highly respected journalist, intimating that somebody was in downing street did no more of the details. i don't know what the hail is going on at the moment. that is not an issue. the problem is, it feels as though nobody in downing street knows what is going on. that should concern us all. from the prime minister's point of view, that isa prime minister's point of view, that is a dreadful situation. they need to get their stories sorted. i still think it seems likely, based on all the mood music that has played out over the past few hours, and since last night, that priti patel will be on her way out because she hadn't, apparently, told everything about what was going on. at the moment, i would wait to see until she gets back of the plane. we are focused, just a final thought, on a priti patel‘s future. if we look in the
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medium term, what does this mean for theresa may and her staying in a job as prime minister? ifelt after the general election dealt such a catastrophic blow to her authority, the time to go was actually then. but she decided to stick it out. she said to be part, i served at your pleasure. i will continue to do my duty. i think now she is actually in there for the long haul, the hall at least. she is committed to thatjob, she has made that commitment, the tory party doesn't seem to feel there is another option on the table. iam there is another option on the table. i am sure lots of head scratching has been going on over the past few months. she has to stick it out and ultimately what we have seen going on over the past couple of days with priti patel and borisjohnson couple of days with priti patel and boris johnson under considerable pressure, it is nothing to do with her. that is not her fault. pressure, it is nothing to do with her. that is not herfault. 0k, thank you very much for that. joey jones, former deputy political
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editor at sky and former spooks man for theresa may. we will be talking to the editor of the jewish chronicle, stephen pollard, do stay with us for that. the number of homeless people in england has risen by nearly 14,000 in the last year, according to new research. the homeless charity, shelter, found more than 300,000 homeless people in the country and warned that the true figure is likely to be much higher. ali fortescue reports. i don't like telling people where i live because people, they just automatically judge. i would just say to people that we live in, like, a flat. gemma and her daughter live in a hostel in cheshire. they have been homeless for the last 18 months. i loss my house, i lost myjob, and i split with my partner of seven years, probably in the space of about six months. so everything just came crashing down. you were just crying your eyes out when we left, weren't you? i kept saying to myself, it will only be for a couple of months, but that's definitely not the case.
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the shelter study found that more than 250,000 people in england are homeless. that is nearly 14,000 more people than last year. the top ten highest rates are in london. in newham, one in 25 people are classed is homeless. outside of london, luton, brighton and manchester have some of the highest figures. shelter are putting the rise down to a lack of affordable homes and welfare cuts and, with the cold winter months coming, they say this is the moment to tackle homelessness. homelessness is one of the most appalling experiences anyone can go through. a lot of those people will be children. and, you know, it is a call, really, that something has to be done. the government says it is investing £950 million to tackle homelessness. but, for gemma and keira, the wait continues, as they try to find a new home and a new start. ali fortescue, bbc news. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: cabinet minister priti
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patel‘s future in doubt — as theresa may orders her back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. donald trump tours the forbidden city in beijing with his chinese counterpart xijinping, amid rising tensions with north korea. i'm jamie robertson. in the business news... sky has threatened to shut down sky news if it proves to be a major obstacle in a takeover bid by rupert murdoch's 21st century fox. regulators are investigating the deal amid concerns that mr murdoch's media empire could become too powerful. sky has told the competition and markets authority that the regulator should not assume ‘the continued provision' of sky news. sse's shares are on the rise following news that one of the uk's
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‘big six' energy providers is to merge with rival npower. sse's shares have jumped 3.7% to trade at £14.59. marks and spencer is speeding up the closure of its uk clothing and home stores. it wants instead one—third of non—food sales to be online. but food isn't doing much better — it's slowing down the roll—out of new simply food stores. in the first half of the year, profits fell 5% and the shares are down 2%. so, m&s still failing to show any real progress in its turnaround plan. it was started by chief executive steve rowe a year ago, and to be fair it's still got another four years to run. and it's trying to revive its fortunes at a time when life on the high street is getting tougher by the day. on top of that, it's also lost two members of senior management — today chief financial officer helen weir said she was leaving and last month the head of the clothing
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division jo jenkins also resigned. joining us now is natalie berg, retail analyst, at planet retail. we will get onto the numbers and a second. justin rose senior resignations, the chairman is actually a pretty recent addition to the fold. it is a huge change at the top, is that good or a problem?” think it is good overall, the bringing in the heavy hitters in the retail sector, you have archie norman, they have brought injill mcdonald to head up the clothes and coal division. i think the change is a good thing and i think in order for m&s to prove, we will see some radical changes. let's look at how it is trying to improve. its food is looking weaker than we thought and the close stores, that is slowing down quite seriously. the results we re down quite seriously. the results were a mixed bag this morning. the decline including field wasn't as bad as we initially feared. that was
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good news. what was a particular concern was the decline in food sales, particularly because we are in an inflationary environment, the fa ct in an inflationary environment, the fact that sales are dropping really indicate that shoppers are cutting back, tightening their belts and perhaps putting one less ready meal in their baskets. is there a plan moving more online? that's right. for any retailer today, a fundamental rule is that you have to be relevant to your customers. m&s over the past few years has really failed to keep up with changing shopping habits. they have too many stores, they moved online as online as quickly as they should have and we haven't invested in the stories in the same way as their competitors have. it is right the alex the store closure plan and focusing their effo rts closure plan and focusing their efforts on line. it is a five year plan, we are only at the end of year one. do you think it's going in the right direction? we have only seen of it. i think the only thing in the
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right direction. m&s is faced with a perfect storm, consumer spending is weak, the clothing sector is contracting, shoppers are buying fewer clothes and spending the money on experiences and not on material goods. that is the real shift in consumer mindset. not only is the sector contracting but it is very crowded. m&s isn't the cheapest, not the most fashionable, they play in a dangerous middle ground. it makes sense for them to reassess their store portfolio and ultimately i think we will see them relying less on the dependence on the high street. the shares are a fairly weak, aided by the moment for shares? i am not qualified to say, but i think they are moving in the right direction. 0k, but i think they are moving in the right direction. ok, thanks very much. sse has confirmed it is merging its british domestic business with npower to form a new energy company. sse, the uk's second—largest energy supplier, which also reported a big fall in its adjusted pre—tax profits of 13.9% in the six months
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to september, revealed the merger talks on tuesday. the deal knocks the country's "big six" energy firms down to five. earlier we asked the chief operator whether it was going to be bad for competition generally in the sector. fundamentally, we see it differently. we think actually this is really good for competition. so there are 60 odd companies competing in the market today. they do compete fiercely. if i look at september this year, over 500,000 customers switched to the market, that was up massively on last year. we think by being more efficient as an organisation, competitively priced better, and also in the future develop new products and propositions to meet customers' needs today. but also in the future, that's good for competition, it gives variety and opportunity. they started up and now they are
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down. very little moved. not really going very far very fast. that is business for the moment. jamie, thank you very much. two years ago, 17—year—old yusra mardini fled syria, travelling by boat to greece. she ended up swimming for her life when it began to sink, saving 19 fellow passengers in the process. less than a year later, she competed at the olympics in rio. perhaps unsurprisingly, her story is being made into a film, but the teenager has her sights firmly set on a place at the tokyo 2020 olympics. 0ur sports correspondent alex capstick went to meet her in berlin. you know that you might lose your life on the way. yusra mardini, 0lympian and refugee who saved lives, including her own. the teenage swimmer who fled war ravaged syria to pursue her sporting dreams. a 25 day nightmare, which featured a sinking boat full of migrants heading for greece. yusra and her sister jumped into the sea to help keep it afloat.
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i know that of course i was afraid, it was dark and, yeah, i was just seeing the island but never reaching it. not that i was the hero who was pulling a rope, you know. ok, i helped the boat, but it was not only me or only my sister. but you can imagine that they told you, "it's a 45 minute trip," and you stay three hours and a half. what did you have with you? nothing. myjeans and my t—shirt. my shoes were also gone. yusra mardini eventually arrived in berlin. already a promising swimmer, she joined this club at the city's 0lympic park. incredibly, just 11 months later, she was in rio on the biggest sporting stage of all. competing for the first ever refugee team. before when they were telling me i was leaving to the olympics was such a surprise after only one year. i'm a refugee in
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germany and i'm going. and there was a refugee 0lympic team, it was incredible. yusra's remarkable back story means she's now a teenager in demand, with an expanding entourage befitting her growing stature on the world stage. there have been meetings with major global figures. she's addressed the un and given talks at other high—profile events, highlighting the plight of refugees. i'm just hoping to get the idea to people that, yeah, they are normal people and they had a normal life and they were forced to flee their country because of violence. and you're making a movie, or a movie's being made about you. how exciting is that? stephen daldry‘s directing it. yeah, it's amazing. i'm really excited. who would you like to play yusra mardini? to be honest, i have no idea. i would like yusra mardini to play yusra mardini, but i cannot act! but above all, yusra mardini is focused on training hard.
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she wants a place at the 2020 olympics in tokyo, and doesn't mind who she represents. my ambition is just to be an athlete. if i'm going to start for germany or for my country, or for the refugee olympic team, i'm going to do the best i can and it will be my pleasure. in a life full of twists and turns, the way to tokyo may not be straightforward, but it's clear this determined 19—year—old will rise to whatever challenges lie ahead. alex capstick, bbc news, berlin. record breaking tennis champion roger federer took to the court in a kilt at a charity match in glasgow last night. the world number two beat a tartan hat—wearing andy murray at the sse hydro. the match was the first time murray has played in public since suffering a hip injury at wimbledon earlier this year.
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i think they had a lot of fun and raise some money for charity in the process. we will be talking to the political editor of thejewish chroniclejust political editor of thejewish chronicle just after 12 o'clock about the priti patel story. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two, first we leave you with for a look at the weather. hello. thank you very much. we have had a lovely crisp, cold, sunny start of the day across many parts of the uk. when i was in the raf, we used to call today a gin day, gin clear, across south—west england, up into the north—east of england. you notice mcleod towards the north and west and in the outer hebrides, that cloud is also bringing outbreaks of rain. a very different scene here at the moment. that weatherfront
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rain. a very different scene here at the moment. that weather front will continue eastwards, giving us more rain across western scotland. another week weather system in the east bringing my client, staying played each into this afternoon. across much of northern england, we will see a sunny skies continuing. it is quite chilly, temperatures this morning were down close to freezing, seven, eight celsius this afternoon. the odd spot of rain across sussex and kent, otherwise quite cloudy across eastern areas and further west those blue skies will continue well into the afternoon. with that sunshine, it averages seven, eight celsius. in northern ireland, the sunshine is slowly disappearing. more cloud moving in. by 4pm, a lot of cloud around, some spots of rain moving in. the most persistent rain will be across western scotland during this afternoon. a little bit drier towards eastern and southern areas. through tonight, this whole area of cloud and rain will move its way
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southwards, and with more cloud over night tonight, it's not good to be as cold as last night, the cloud a cts as cold as last night, the cloud acts like a blanket keeping temperatures up at about four, 6 degrees. frost free to take us into thursday morning. thursday will be a rather grey start to the day, especially for england and wales. that cloud will disappear. there will be sunny spells developing. particularly across wales, eastern and northern england, scotland, northern ireland and not quite as cold as this afternoon. through its thursday night into friday, we have got this area of low pressure, it is going to shift north of this area of high pressure, slowly moving in for friday. for friday, starting off on a dry and bright note. the sunshine. it is later in the day when the rain will come in across northern ireland, wales and south—west england by the end of the day. the rain will clearfor the england by the end of the day. the rain will clear for the weekend where it is looking bright, breezy
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and turning quite cold again. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 12: cabinet minister priti patel‘s future in doubt as theresa may orders her back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials. it is up to the prime minister what she does, she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. the nhs was not on the ballot paper, but it was on the ballot bus. vote leave for a better funded health service, £350 million a week. donald trump tours the forbidden city in beijing with his chinese
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counterpart xijinping, amid rising tensions with north korea. the first minister of wales is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant — a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. also this hour: who ewe looking at? how sheep can be trained to recognise a familiar face from a photo — including barak 0bama and the bbc‘s fiona bruce. the future of the international development secretary is in doubt after details emerged of further undisclosed meetings she had with israeli politicians.
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priti patel is flying back from africa, after being ordered to return to the uk by the prime minister. she apologised to theresa may on monday about a series of unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians in august, but it appears she did not reveal details of further meetings she held in september. joining us from westminster is our assistant political editor norman smith. since i spoke to you last time the situation perhaps not as clear, i can use that phrase, not quite as clear—cut as we thought. it could yet get quite messy if reports and thejewish chronicle are accurate, which suggest theresa may was aware of the meeting between priti patel and benjamin netanyahu
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and she was aware with an hours, it is claimed, of the meeting on august 24 and in september at the un general assembly meeting priti patel told the prime minister and discussed a meeting with mr netanyahu discussed a meeting with mr neta nyahu and also discussed a meeting with mr netanyahu and also apparently discussed her aid plans to provide uk cash for, amongst other things the israeli army on the golan hates to help injured syrian refugees —— golan heights. it is suggested downing street told priti patel not to disclose these two meetings because it would embarrass downing street. now, these are allegations and we have had no response yet from number ten were suggest to me that they are hunkering down until priti
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patel returns this afternoon when it is expected she will be summoned to see the prime minister to explain why she did not disclose all the details of the contacts with israeli politicians and then, i imagine, be sacked. but it is extraordinarily difficult to get any information. the new defence secretary, gavin williams, was pressed about what was going on in brussels this morning and he was not usually forthcoming. is it right priti patel should be sacked? i am focused on the issues here at the nato conference for ministers and making sure they understand our commitment to european defence is a resolute. with one minister on the verge of departure, the foreign secretary floundering, a defence secretary very new to the job, it does not give much confidence for button's
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overseas ministerial footprint. we are focused on ministerial matters here today. can you speak to rumours that you had involvement in getting rid of michael fallon? the prime minister makes all decisions on who serves in her cabinet. she makes her own decisions and always does so. thank you ever so decisions and always does so. thank you ever so much for your time. the expectation at westminster, despite the lack of official words or reaction from other ministers, is it is very hard to see how theresa may cannot sack priti patel because she has already had to issued a clarification about who she met in israel and who she told about those meetings and she has also had to apologise for her conduct and been formally reprimanded by the prime minister. i don't think anybody
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expects she is coming back for anything but to be dismissed. even brexit backing mps seem resigned to her dismissal. 0ne conservative mp who was prepared to go on the record playing a straight bats when it comes to priti patel‘s survival. it is totally in the gift of the prime minister to any minister, any cabinet minister, should serve in government. priti patel was brought into number 10 downing st, i think she realised the seriousness of her mistake, she has apologised and put out a statement of all her meetings during her holiday in august in israel which the foreign office, you're quite right, did not know in advance therefore could not coordinate, which is wrong, but did know while the trip was taking place. it is up to the prime minister what she does. she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. the one thing i would remind you of yours is this isn't a visit to some enemy states
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or in minister doing something contesting. priti has already apologised for this. 0ne one word of caution about this is sackings, reshuffles are really go according to plan and if the claims in thejewish chronicle are correct this one could get much messierfor theresa may, and the last one was not perhaps the triumph she hoped for, when michael fallon walk the plank and gavin williamson was his replacement, to a chorus of groans from many in the tory party. so this one may have some way to go yet. from many in the tory party. so this one may have some way to go yetm appears downing street are denying the report in thejewish chronicle that the prime minister knew earlier
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than has been suggested about these other meetings between priti patel and benjamin netanyahu. this is where priti patel‘s kenya airways flight where priti patel‘s kenya airways flight is at the moment, it is due to land at london heathrowjust after 3:30pm. you can see it isjust over the lease at the moment. very closely watched flight —— just over greece at the moment. the head of the nhs in england is challenging the government to find an extra £350 million for the health service every week, as promised during the eu referendum campaign. simon stevens used the controversial claims used by vote leave to put the case for more money in a speech at the nhs providers conference. in his keynote address, he also warned that operation waiting lists could reach their highest levels ever. 0n the current funding "it is going
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to be increasing the hard to expand mental health services or improve cancer care, mental health services or improve cancer ca re, services mental health services or improve cancer care, services the public need and want and, crucially, on the current funding outlook the nhs waiting list will grow to 5 million people died 2021. that is an extra 1 million people on the waiting list. 0ne million people on the waiting list. one in ten of us waiting for an operation, the highest number ever. the nhs was not on the ballot paper but it was on the ballot bus vote leave for a better funded but it was on the ballot bus vote leave for a betterfunded health service, £350 million a week. here is what the campaign director of vote leave said injanuary. "mps kept saying why isn't full brief arguing about living standards and
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the economy but they did not realise the economy but they did not realise the hundred 50 million for the nhs was, for many people about living standards and the economy. it was the crucial argument with almost every demographic. would we have won what's out that 350 million for the nhs? all our research and the close result suggest no. some people thought this was cynical and we never intended to spend more on the nhs." rather than never intended to spend more on the nhs. " rather than criticising never intended to spend more on the nhs." rather than criticising these promises entered into by cabinet ministers and msp mps the public will no doubt want to see them honoured. the health secretaryjeremy hunt said the government was committed to investing in the nhs. it was not a government promise, it was a promise by the leave campaign. what i very much agree with is if
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there is a brexit dividend and end up there is a brexit dividend and end up having less on public finances because of the fact we are not making net contributions to the eu, then i believe the nhs should be the first port of call because it is our most important public servers, the one british people care about the most and when they voted to leave the eu, in many people's minds, it was one of the reasons why they wa nted was one of the reasons why they wanted to switch resources. i think we do have to bear that in mind but there is a big if and that is we are in the middle of these difficult negotiations and we do not know what the outcome will be. donald trump has arrived in beijing, as he continues his tour of asia. the american president took a tour of the forbidden city in the capital, alongside his chinese counterpart, xi jinping. mr trump is expected to press china to cut its financial links with north korea. speaking in south korea earlier, mr trump urged all countries to join forces to isolate pyongyang, saying the world could not tolerate
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a rogue nation that threatened nuclear devastation. the weapons you are acquiring are not making you safer. they are putting your regime in grave danger. every step you take down this dark path, increases the peril you face. yet despite every crime you have committed against god and man, you are already to offer and we will do that. we will offer a path to a much betterfuture. earlier i spoke to our correspondentjohn sudworth who gave me this update from beijing. china is rolling out the red carpet, as you would expect. donald trump has been welcomed at the forbidden city, china's old imperial palace and a symbol of its past greatness.
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some might suggest it is meant as a message about how china sees its future, this parity of esteem, this great power relationship that chinese state media has spoke so much about ahead of this visit. 0n north korea and this appealfrom donald trump for china to sever financial links with north korea, what sort of hearing will be chinese give him on that? it is interesting, much of donald trump's speech we have heard before from other us presidents, sort of north korea being a dark anti—bush leaves and the need for sanctions to be enforced as well —— dark and evil place, as well as the offer of dialogue if north korea chose that path. but what is new is the idea that china might be convinced to com pletely that china might be convinced to completely turn off the tap to north korea but the problem is so far
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china seems to have had no interest in pursuing that path. it does not wa nt to in pursuing that path. it does not want to see a north korean collapse and does believe that the tighter but north korea is squeezed the more incentive it has to develop nuclear weapons. nothing in what donald trump has said on this trip to asia has offered a way of squaring the circle, and incentive that might make beijing meet his demands. cabinet minister priti patel‘s future in doubt as theresa may orders her back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. the nhs was not on the ballot paper, but it was on the ballot bus. donald trump tours the forbidden city in beijing with his chinese counterpart xijinping, amid rising tensions with north korea. time for sport. it has been
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announced both england and germany will wear poppies and black armbands during theirfriendly on will wear poppies and black armbands during their friendly on friday. fifa changed their rules to allow players to wear poppies act of remembrance, all the home nations we re remembrance, all the home nations were fined for wearing poppies last year but fifa have decided to allow it. it has also been confirmed var will be used, for the first official time in the uk. the anti—doping association fears they will be bankrupted by a legal battle with tyson fury, as they fear if peace use them and wins for loss of earnings it will bankrupt them. they say they're still determined to
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pursue the case against tyson fury. i understand discussions have been held and within the government —— with the government and there is no intention to drop this case and they intend to see it through but that may require the government to effectively underwrite this case if they lose it. they are confident in their case, it would seem. england winger has been cleared of biting the lebanon captain during saturday's rugby league world cup group game. he was facing a ban of up group game. he was facing a ban of up to 12 weeks if found guilty but he will now be free to play in england's final group match in paris against france. in rugby union, i head of test matches against scotland later this month ‘s own rugby has been declared bankrupt. the union has asked the public to donate money to keep them
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alive. england's woodburn are confident the final day of preparation for their must win ashes test in australia. —— england's women. if they lose tomorrow they cannot win the series. england's men have been playing one of two warm up games ahead of their ashes series. play has now ended and day one and ended at 270 848. that is all we sport for now. i will be back at1:30pm. -- 278 —— 278 for eight. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant — a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. he told mr sargeant to leave his post last week because of unspecified allegations about his behaviour.
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0ne labour member of the welsh assembly said there was "deep unease" in the group. earlier i spoke to our wheels correspondence and asked him if we expect to shoot more from the first minister —— wales correspondence. that is the question on everyone's lips. there was a deep sense of shock and sadness at the assembly yesterday when the news broke around about lunchtime that police had found carl sargeant's body in his home at the 30 yesterday morning. as we understand it he took his own life. i have never seen the assembly like it was yesterday, it is completely rocked by this news, probably the biggest story to have had this place since the start of the pollution in 1999. the flags at half— mast and business the pollution in 1999. the flags at half—mast and business has been suspended for the rest of the week —— since the start of devolution. there is a growing sense of concern
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and some anger about the process that led to carl sergeant losing his job as communities secretary. last monday accusations were made to the first minister's office. they spoke to the relevant women and asked about the allegations are found carl sergeant who at that time was on holiday in new york with his wife. 0n holiday in new york with his wife. on his retirement last friday he met the first minister and was told by ca rwyn the first minister and was told by carwynjones and the first minister and was told by carwyn jones and there were allegations against him, at the would be sacked and suspended from the labour party pending investigations. carl sergeant released a statement on twitter that afternoon that said it is right he should step aside while the investigation was underway and he did not know the exact nature of allegations but he would try to clear his name and get back the government. as we understand it and solicitors sent a letter to welsh labour over the weekend asking them
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to specify the details the allegations and as we understand, until his death he did not know the specifics. we have held from labour politicians in wales today. one, who shared an office with carl sergeant, said it was a right to investigate the allegations but the accused should also be made aware of the nature of those allegations. another said carl sergeant clearly was not dealt with fairly in the most basic sense. another said there are questions for the first minister over this. we have not yet heard from them publicly, there was a statement yesterday expressing his sadness about the loss of his friend and colleague but we are waiting to hear from him publicly. marks and spencer has revealed a 5.3% fall in profits for the first six months of its financial year — down to £219 million, despite an increase in sales. the retailer also says it will cut back plans to open more food stores,
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and continue to slim down its clothing and homeware business to lower costs and push more sales online. kate hardcastle is a retail analyst and is in our leeds studio for us now. thank you forjoining us. let's talk about the food sector sales for marks and spencer, a big concern because traditionally marks and spencer food has done well. that has been a surviving elements for marks and spencer, seeing growth in other areas have not but it is clear they have seen the cannotjust rely on food. we know consumers are watching their purses and we know the competition is doing luxury food so much better, including the big grocery brands. they are scaling back the idea they will be a predominant food retailer with their
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big plan for 200 extra simply food stores to be scaled back. the decline in clothes sales not as bad as feared but that is faint praise because it is very much still struggling in that sector. what impact will that have on their plans to close stores, combined with the news on food sales? it is significant because reading between the lines on the report they have put himself out as an essential holding provider, using terms to describe the areas they are successful at, the must haves, denims, school where. this means they see them not as a fashion competitive retailer any more and it will be a mix and the legacy stores that will be a mix of essential foods, close to my clothing and household items but that will be scaled back compared to the force they once were on the high street.
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more broadly, what can we say and learn from the results. will retailers be more concerned because of these results in the run—up to christmas? absolutely, this is classed as a golden quarter, where most retailers look forward to doing the most successful trading. it is clear they understand it will be a challenging time ahead. this is a turnaround plan and is mainly proving successful but with archie normanjoining as proving successful but with archie norman joining as chair proving successful but with archie normanjoining as chair in september, previously of asda, it will be very much a leaner plan and they will look for low—cost ways to do their retailing going forward so perhaps the traditional customer will miss the marks and spencer of old that they once had. let's return to the nhs and its boss in england has challenged the government to find an extra £350 million for the health service every week, as promised during the eu
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referendum campaign. simon stephens told a conference people will lose faith in the democratic process if the government does not deliver. joining me now is the shadow health secretary. the highly political speech from simon stephens. what will labour be doing to try to ensure that sort of money is delivered to the nhs, as the brexit negotiations continue? we have been calling for extra investment and at the election we announce plans to allocate an extra £37 billion across parliament to the nhs. let's be clear what simon stephens has said today. he has said there will be consequences for patients if the government fails to provide the nhs with extra funding in the upcoming budget. he said waiting list will go up 1 in the upcoming budget. he said waiting list will go up1 million, cancer ca re waiting list will go up1 million, cancer care will deteriorate, mental health pledges will not be met and
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we may not meet the 18 week target ona we may not meet the 18 week target on a permanent basis. these are very serious warnings and theresa may cannot go on bedding her head in the sand and refusing to give the nhs the level of investment it needs to provide the best quality of care. the health foundation and king ‘s fund and nuffield trust said, based on their analysis, £4 billion is needed for next year alone to make sure health care does not deteriorate for patients. labour was struggled to find that, would it not? in the election campaign we would have allocated more than that for the next financial year because we recognise the pressures it is under. government is about choices and this government has chosen to cut corporation tax by billions, chosen to give £1 billion away in inheritance tax cut and chosen to find £1 billion for the dup in order to secure their support in the house
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of commons. the money is available, if the government chooses to make it available which is why we are saying and the budget reverse some of those taxation decisions and allocate the money to the nhs. as we heard, in the starkest possible terms, i the nhs gets more money, patient care will suffer and i do not think that is right —— unless the nhs gets more money. we heard jeremy hunt saying once economic conditions improve then the government will find more money for the nhs. that is the way to sustain a refund the nhs, focus on building the economy. investing in the nhs contributes to economic growth. when you invest in hospitals you are investing in some of the very best equipment, the skills of people and we also talk about giving a pay rise to the million workers in the niches that will boost the economy. —— workers in the nhs. nhs is a social policy
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and is about improving the social conditions of society but given the levels of innovation and skills that investing in the ats entails it is also a good economic policy that contributes to economic growth and to regional development. the argument you have to wait until the economy improves i think is a wrong—headed one. investing now strengthens the economy long term. i want to ask it of one of our other main stories, priti patel and number ten is denying the report in the jewish chronicle that claimed the prime minister knew about some of these meetings that priti patel had in israel or with israeli interests. what do you think the prime minister needs to do? should she sack her? yes, but this is becoming an extraordinary spectacle that priti patel‘s spin doctors are now accusing the prime minister's spin
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doctors of lying. it speaks to a bigger issue about this government, they have become shambolic and hatless, this united and cannot deliver for the british hatless, this united and cannot deliverfor the british people. cliff priti patel —— priti patel clearly has to go as added that she knew what she was doing and lied or did not know she drew she was doing and was incompetent. but there is doubt questions for theresa may now as well and it shows how incompetent this government has become. it is exactly 30 years since the ira bomb exploded at the cenotaph at enniskillen in county fermanagh. eleven people died and more than 60 were injured in what became known as the poppy day bomb. this morning a memorial was unveiled. they say they are still committed to investigating and finding those
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responsible for this attack 30 years ago but no one has ever been prosecuted. three decades on from that attack in 1987 people have been again gathering today in enniskillen. behind me is cerberus has been going on to remember those who died, —— behind me is a service. they died when an ira bomb exploded close to the senate half, many were buried in rubble and the pictures of the time showed people having to be carried out and taken away from underneath that rubble, the dead alongside the dozens who were injured. 11 people killed that day and a 12 person dying 13 years later, having never recovered from a coma, died from injuries he suffered that day. how do the people of enniskillen feel on this anniversary, knowing the name of the town has become synonymous with that
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event? i think it is worth remembering during all these years of the northern ireland troubles, the shootings and bombings, there was something about this attack that stood out and really shocked. an attack on people gathering for an act of remembrance. people who were standing here paying tribute. there was something about that which stood out. it is worth reflecting the words of one of the men whose daughter died in that attack, gordon wilson. he forgave those who carried out an attack in the days afterwards and that really struck. what you have today from the service that has just taken place is a quiet dignity amongst those whose families are still suffering as a result of that attack in 1987. some of them have been talking about how the pain has
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never gone away and they are still suffering as a result of that. family was a very important part of the service today. the great granddaughter of two of the victims, she performed a solo during the service, we had the names of each of the 12 people killed from this bomb read out during the service. this is ensuring that they are remembered in a time of has become connected to an attack —— in a town. but a town that is proud of the day of remembrance, whenever they come to pay tribute and really show their support for those that came before them and today the town came out, families, dignitaries and local people, to stand and remember the 12 people who died. let's ta ke
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let's take a look now at the weather forecast, heading over to ben rich. good afternoon. it is one of those weeks where no two days are the same. the weather is changing all the time. places that have started off cloudy will brighten up, particularly decide east of england, some areas that have started sunny, northern england and wales, will see increasing amounts of high cloud. ahead of this weather system bringing rain. that is all you're going to get this afternoon, eight, 10 degrees. this evening, keeping clear skies down towards the south—east it will turn chilly, more cloud further west, not as cold here but temperatures in the countryside down to around three, 4 degrees and turning cold again across northern scotla nd turning cold again across northern scotland as the skies clear once again. that leads us into a day of sunshine, some clouds clearing away across the southern half of the country, shoppers are blowing into
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scotland, temperatures, nine in aberdeen but 14 in cardiff. friday, a breezy day, very windy in the far north, still some showers, sunny spells for many, plenty of changes through the next few days. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines: the prime minister orders priti patel back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials, casting doubt over her future as international development secretary. the public want promises made during the eu referendum campaign on health care funding honoured by the government — that's the warning from the head of nhs england. president trump arrives in beijing on his five—nation tour of asia — mr trump is expected to ask his chinese counterpart xi jinping to cut financial links with north korea. pressure is mounting on the welsh first minister, carwynjones, to release
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details about his decision to sack carl sargeant — a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. 30 years on — a new memorial is unveiled to remember the victims of the ira bombing at enniskillen. 12 people died and more than 60 were injured in what became known as the poppy day bomb. —— bombing. let's get more now on our top story. the international development secretary priti patel has been summoned back to the uk from africa by the prime minister. it's to do with the continued controversy over her meetings with israeli politicians and officials. we can talk about this now with sam coates, the deputy political editor at the times, and isabel hardman, assistant editor of the spectator. thank you very much for your time.
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sam, this is extraordinary, labyrinthine and it just sam, this is extraordinary, labyrinthine and itjust gets more complicated. i have never known a slow motion sacking, i have seen fast, car crash sackings. the last timei fast, car crash sackings. the last time i checked, priti patel was somewhere above greece, flying home having been summoned home by theresa may over what she did and didn't disclose to downing street and the foreign office when she went on that now infamous holiday in august to israel. we found out on monday that priti patel had withheld details of the 12 meetings that she had while she was there, including with the israeli prime minister. 0vernight, we learned there were two additional meetings that she has held since she got back from that without top ranking israeli officials, with the honorary chair of the conservative friends of israel and somebody who runs, has a senior position in a
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corporate lobby firm, in attendance. there was a bit of confusion whether or not downing street had known about them or not, they insist this is new information, i think priti patel will land just after three o'clock, returned to downing street and lose her job. o'clock, returned to downing street and lose herjob. do you concur or do you think there is any way in which theresa may won't want to sack her, any reason she would want to? it is very difficult to see how priti patel can hold onto herjob, we have been so strongly brief she is on her way back to the uk basically to be sacked. some of the allegations overnight about when downing street knew about 30 metres, when ministers had been made aware of pretty patel's meeting with benjamin netanyahu, they have completed it somewhat. the focus has switched from being about what priti patel told downing street and what she withheld to what downing street knew when it knew and when it choose to tell other people including the press corporations about this.”
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to tell other people including the press corporations about this. i am just going to bring in stephen pollard, political editor of the jewish chronicle, hejoins us pollard, political editor of the jewish chronicle, he joins us from north—west london. stephen, downing street is flatly denying your story, suggesting that number ten, you have two sources telling you number ten knew about the priti patel meeting with benjamin neta nyahu knew about the priti patel meeting with benjamin netanyahu earlier than was suggested. what is your response, do you stand by that?” totally sta nd response, do you stand by that?” totally stand by my story. they would say that, wouldn't they? the story i have from two separate sources is that there was a meeting before the un general assembly in september between priti patel and the prime minister, at which they discussed some of pretty patel‘s ideals of sharing it with israel, at that meeting priti patel topped about having had a meeting with benjamin netanyahu, the israeli prime minister. before that, on the
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22nd of august, the middle east minister was on clay in israel on an official visit, had a meeting with the senior member of benjamin netanyahu's the senior member of benjamin neta nyahu's private office. the senior member of benjamin netanyahu's private office. at that meeting, the transcript apparently shows that the official from the israeli payments to's offers told mr burt that the israeli prime ministers had just hours before had a very constructive meeting with priti patel. those are two meetings, one of which meant that the foreign was aware of the meeting with benjamin netanyahu and the second one in september before the un general assembly which shows the prime minister was aware of the meeting with benjamin netanyahu. number ten are denying that is the case. they would, wouldn't they? do you have any idea according to your sources why this wasn't raised, as we understand it, when priti patel met theresa may on monday to talk about her actions? there is a second
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element to my story. when priti patel issued a statement on monday, which listed 12 meetings she held with the israelis, the other story i have been told by my two separate sources is that she did mention this meeting that she held with the official from the officialfrom the israeli foreign minister in new york, an official from the israeli foreign ministry in new york again before the un general assembly. for some reason, assembly. forsome reason, number ten asked her to leave that meeting off the list. we can speculate as to why that was the case, i find the whole story, this whole mess to be really, deeply puzzling. i was told by two separate sources, both of whom have no particular reason to spend me about anything that number ten did or didn't do. stephen, do stay with us. going back to westminster. stephen is standing by
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his story, standing by what those two sources have told him in direct contradiction to what member ten is saying about all of this. if that was the case, this would be an extraordinary mess for number ten as well as priti patel. there are some areas of overlap between what stephen and numberten areas of overlap between what stephen and number ten are saying. i don't think number ten dispute there was a conversation about priti patel talking about the un meeting on friday. the area of difference seems to be who decided not to put it on the list of 12 engagements, not to admit toa the list of 12 engagements, not to admit to a 13th engagement. number ten seem to imply that was different, stephen imply that was memberten. in the different, stephen imply that was member ten. in the end, different, stephen imply that was memberten. in the end, it is different, stephen imply that was member ten. in the end, it is right to point the finger a bit at downing street, but i don't think this changes the fundamentals of where we are today. i think priti patel didn't disclose in the proper way the meetings she was going to have
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in advance, they're worried officials there or briefed. i think numberten was officials there or briefed. i think number ten was shocked by the scale of what went on, it adds up to thinking that when she lands, despite the competitions around the edge, priti patel will lose her despite the competitions around the edge, priti patelwill lose herjob. if she doesn't lose herjob, what does this mean —— if she does, the loss of a second cabinet mr in less than a week, with questions reading about boris johnson, to?” than a week, with questions reading about boris johnson, to? i do do think the row about pretty patel‘s behaviour or abolished johnson's comments to the foreign and defence select committee last week, neither of them would have happened had to reason may be a strong, i by minister. i don't think ministers would think they could get away with being careless, in a borisjohnson's case, or having the weirdest holiday ever, in priti patel‘s is. she looks like she's about is that priti patel, i think that is the right
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thing to do because you cannot suggest you other ministers that you canjust do suggest you other ministers that you can just do whatever you want without consequences. what is the minister have to do to get sacked? if the answer is hold unscheduled and undeclared meetings with a foreign government, that sets the bar still quite high for misbehaviour, but at least there is a suggestion there is consequences from this behaviour which i suspect borisjohnson from this behaviour which i suspect boris johnson and priti from this behaviour which i suspect borisjohnson and priti patel fought there were not. back to stephen pollard from thejewish chronicle, what has been the reaction were broadly to all of this in terms of the uk's policy towards the middle east and with some ministers believing that priti patel was somehow running her own agenda on foreign policy? that as a whole separate issue about what was going on in separate issue about what was going onina separate issue about what was going on in a more broader context. my story is not about priti patel, anyway. i am story is not about priti patel,
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anyway. lam not story is not about priti patel, anyway. i am not in any way excusing what she did, i think she has to go, she acted unwisely. my story is about numberten. my she acted unwisely. my story is about number ten. my sources are very clear something strange has happened in numberten. i'm not going to start throwing allegations around, but there are certainly questions number ten needs to answer. a straightforward denial is exactly what you would expect, but it doesn't answer the questions. stephen pollard there from the jewish chronicle and isabella hardman and sam coates for us at westminster. thank you very much all of you for your time today. the head of the nhs in england is challenging the government to find an extra £350 million for the health service every week, as promised during the eu referendum campaign. simon stevens used the controversial claims used by vote leave to put the case for more money in a speech at the nhs providers conference. in his keynote address, he also warned that operation waiting list could reach to their highest levels ever. with me now is phillippa hentsch — head of analysis from nhs providers. she is in our burning studio. tell
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us the first of all about that analysis on waiting lists. she is an error of birmingham studio. analysis on waiting lists. she is an error of birmingham studiom analysis on waiting lists. she is an error of birmingham studio. it says by 2021, there will be 5 million people waiting longer on the waiting list. that is a million more than are currently waiting. does your analysis also look at what level of funding you think you need to actually keep providing a decent service for people, that analysis from a number of health think tank suggests it is £4 billion in the next financial year alone. absolutely. we are facing a gap in nhs ban sides dobey finances next year. we have had a 4% funding
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increase since the start of the nhs. the gap is so big we need to fill that next year. looking ahead, if we don't do anything about it, we are facing a 20 billion funding gap by 2022, 20 three. a very political speech, summing up one of the defining images of the referendum campaign, the vote leave battle bus. that is the strength of feeling amongst nhs leaders about their concerns over the funding crisis. absolutely. nhs leaders don't want to be in this position, they want to be funded for the services they are providing. we don't want any patient to be waiting longer than they have two for the care they are providing. we are any position where is not keeping pace with demand and we recognise that funding note needs an urgent injection from next year. an urgent injection from next year. an urgent injection from next year. an urgent injection you say. what is your response when the health secretary says that as the economy im proves secretary says that as the economy improves more money can be delivered
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to the nhs? but clearly it doesn't sound as though it's going to be fast enough. it is important to recognise as well as needing to fund nhs services properly, the nhs is an absolutely crucial employer, local, nationally and employs over1 million people, its economic investment to be making in terms of investing in the nhs, notjust a source investing in the nhs, notjust a source of funds for the public sector. we have got to put it in context of the nhs delivering record levels of productivity. they can demonstrate genuine efficiency from the funding being put into the service. an investment in the service. an investment in the service next year would be money very well spent. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: cabinet minister priti patel‘s future in doubt — as theresa may orders her back from africa to face questions over meetings with israeli officials. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. donald trump tours the forbidden
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city in beijing with his chinese counterpart xijinping, amid rising tensions with north korea. choices for shoppers in english town centres are shrinking, according to research for the bbc. a survey of 12 government—funded "portas pilot" towns found nearly a thousand shops had disappeared in five years. the towns were awarded a share of a £1.2 million fund, government support and access to retail guru mary portas. bbc radio 4's you and yours reporter, samantha fenwick has been to one "portas town" — stockport. this one is empty? yes, we still have a number of empty
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units in the town centre that still need filling. joe barrett is the man behind getting portas town status for stockport. and then there are more empty units here and here. yeah. he put the successful bid together and ran a pilot for five years. the portas pilot in stockport has gone pretty well and we've managed to attract new interest into the old town especially, but across the whole town centre we still have a big problem with empty shops and it's a question of more retailers going online. what kind of retailers are going to fill them? we have to think of creative solutions to really solve this problem on our high streets. the barometer of a healthy high—street is to look at its vacancy rate. it's fallen in ten of the 12 towns, but is still higher than the national average in most. in stockport, it's more than double the national average. but the council here thinks reshaping the town centre is one solution to getting that down. it's hard to believe thatjust 18 months ago this square looked like this. the council demolished the shops that were here and created this new,
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more attractive area for shoppers. it's important for the people of stockport, it's important to visitors, but it's important for the retailers as well because they really benefit from having the kind of environment where people do want to spend time, so if there's a nice area to sit and meet friends, relax, there are places to eat, then they are more likely to do their shopping here as well. we asked a company which monitors the health of high streets to review the portas project. one thing they found was most of the towns have more independent shops than they did before. in the last five years, nearly 1,000 jobs have disappeared from the 12 portas towns. that's one closing every 22 days. a town centre with fewer shops doesn't necessarily mean it's in decline. more and more empty units are being converted into other uses. there's a contraction required of retail within the town centres and therefore you then have to fill that with an appropriate use,
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and residential, driving people into the towns to utilise and bring forward all of the ideas of what a town centre is. that's what we are trying to achieve. we think we can get three or four town houses here and six or seven apartments, but with a terrace overlooking. as our shopping habits change and more of us shop online, the traditional high street has to adapt if it's going to survive. two years ago, 17—year—old yusra mardini fled syria, travelling by boat to greece. she ended up swimming for her life when it began to sink, saving 19 fellow passengers in the process. less than a year later, she competed at the olympics in rio. perhaps unsurprisingly, her story is being made into a film, but the teenager has her sights firmly set on a place at the tokyo 2020 olympics. alex capstick went to meet her in berlin.
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this report contains flashing images. you know that you might lose your life on the way. yusra mardini, 0lympian and refugee who saved lives, including her own. the teenage swimmer who fled war ravaged syria to pursue her sporting dreams. a 25 day nightmare, which featured a sinking boat full of migrants heading for greece. yusra and her sister jumped into the sea to help keep it afloat. i know that of course i was afraid, it was dark and, yeah, i was just seeing the island but never reaching it. not that i was the hero who was pulling a rope, you know. ok, i helped the boat, but it was not only me or only my sister. but you can imagine that they told you, "it's a 45 minute trip," and you stay three hours and a half. what did you have with you? nothing. myjeans and my t—shirt. my shoes were also gone. yusra mardini eventually
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arrived in berlin. already a promising swimmer, she joined this club at the city's 0lympic park. incredibly, just 11 months later, she was in rio on the biggest sporting stage of all. competing for the first ever refugee team. before when they were telling me i was leaving to the olympics was such a surprise after only one year. i'm a refugee in germany and i'm going. and there was a refugee 0lympic team, it was incredible. yusra's remarkable back story means she's now a teenager in demand, with an expanding entourage befitting her growing stature on the world stage. there have been meetings with major global figures. she's addressed the un and given talks at other high—profile events, highlighting the plight of refugees. i'm just hoping to get the idea to people that, yeah, they are normal people and they had a normal life and they were forced to flee their country
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because of violence. and you're making a movie, or a movie's being made about you. how exciting is that? stephen daldry‘s directing it. yeah, it's amazing. i'm really excited. who would you like to play yusra mardini? to be honest, i have no idea. i would like yusra mardini to play yusra mardini, but i cannot act! but above all, yusra mardini is focused on training hard. she wants a place at the 2020 olympics in tokyo, and doesn't mind who she represents. my ambition is just to be an athlete. if i'm going to start for germany or for my country, or for the refugee olympic team, i'm going to do the best i can and it will be my pleasure. in a life full of twists and turns, the way to tokyo may not be straightforward, but it's clear this determined 19—year—old will rise to whatever challenges lie ahead. alex capstick, bbc news, berlin. new research indicates that sheep can learn to recognise human faces.
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a flock of welsh mountain sheep was trained to pick out the faces of celebrities, including jake gyllenhaal and emma watson, and the former us president, barack 0bama. the animals were tested to see if they could identify the famous faces among other photos. researchers say it proves sheep possess similar facial recognition abilities to primates. the lead researcher professorjenny morton said she wasn't surprised at the results and explained why they are useful. i wasn't that surprised they could make the decisions because we have done lots of cognitive testing on sheep and they are quite good at decision making. the photographs were a step up. i work on huntington's disease and we have a huntington's disease sheep model that was developed in australia. these animals don't show any symptoms at all. we have been trying to devise ways of testing their cognitive function. 0ur semiautomated system you saw in the video allows us to test the decision—making
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of the sheep without interference from the operator. we have some tasks, usually we use letters, colours and shapes, which is a standard way of testing human cognitive function, the face recognition is an additional level. the tennis star andy murray and his wife kim have announced the birth of their second child. kim gave birth to a baby girl; the couple already have a daughter, sophia, who was born in 2016. in a moment, the news at one with sophie raworth. first, the weather. good afternoon. it seems that no two days of whether are the same at the moment. things are changing all the time. a lot of cloud around today across parts of the south—east, further north spells of sunshine, that's how it looked in your. as you
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can see, we have had a slice of sunshine during today across central areas, some cloud that was slow to break on south—east, all eyes to the north—west as thickening cloud brings outbreaks of rain, site and eastwards during the night. before the cloud and rain, it is to turn very chilly in the south—eastern corner, in the centre of london, down to 4 degrees, and then late in the night as the skies clear across northern scotland, it will turn chilly as well. into tomorrow morning, after that cold start, there will be quite a lot of cloud rolling and across the south—east, it will feel chilly for the kidney to work, some spots of rain and drizzle. across the south—west into wales, afairamount drizzle. across the south—west into wales, a fair amount of cloud, something a little bit milder here as we head through the morning rush hour. across northern england, a lot of cloud and then back into brighter skies for northern ireland and
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scotland. windy in the far north, some hefty showers. it could well contain some hail and some thunder. all the while, our cloud in the side will be retreating and we will see more in the way of sunshine developing. for most places, not a bad day, temperatures around nine, 14 degrees at best. into friday, will change as we start of fine, spells of sunshine, blustery, heavy shower in the north and then a cloud rolling in from the west. 0utbreaks of rain. along a weather front which will continue to hang around as we head into the start of the weekend. 0nce head into the start of the weekend. once we lose that front, follow the white lines, wiegele all the way up there to the arctic, we will be bringing some very cold air in our direction. chilly on saturday, many places dry with sunshine that a north—westerly wind bringing showers across western scotland and into north wales. the wind direction shifts on a sunday, more northerly, bringing shivers down the east coast, share are a wintry over high ground. if you can avoid the showers
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close to the coast, most of us will seek some sunshine through the weekend. 0rdered back from africa by the prime minister — priti patel looks set to be sacked, after a series of unsanctioned meetings with israeli politicians. pressure has been growing on the international development secretary since it was revealed she had a number of unsanctioned meetings in israel while on holiday. it is up to the prime minister what she does. she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. she is already tightening the ministerial code even further. she's due to land in london in a couple of hours' time. we'll have the latest from westminster. also this lunchtime: the boss of nhs england says the health service should get the cash boost it was promised during the eu referendum. the nhs was not on the ballot paper, but it was on the ballot boss. vote leave for a better funded health service, £350 million a week.
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