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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 8, 2017 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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as we go on into western coasts, as we go on into sunday, the wind switches round to more of a northerly. for most, dry, bright but decidedly chilly. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2.00: ordered out of africa: the prime minister tells priti patel to come home — her cabinet future now in doubt over her controversial trip to israel. a pre—budget plea from the boss of nhs england — "give us the money promised by the brexiteers." a high—stake visit — president trump arrives in china for talks likely to be dominated by tensions over north korea. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport: puppies are the issue? —— poppies. fifa have said that they are not political symbols. thanks, and ben has all the weather: if there was a sheep don't like the
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weather at the moment, it is going to change pretty soon. —— if those sheep don't like the weather. i'll have the details pretty soon. also coming up — who kn—ewe? the sheep that can recognise human faces from photographs. and we're not pulling the wool... hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. usually, flights home are a moment to relax and prepare for a warm welcome from familiar faces. not this one. as priti patel‘s plane approaches london, she knows that the prime minister wants to see her — and is probably about to sack her from her cabinet job, having told her to head straight home from africa. she'd only been there for a few hours, but the controversy over her trip to israel had caught up with her.
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this report from our political correspndent, leila nathoo. another high—level meeting off the books. this time, with the israeli minister for public security, in parliament in september. in august, while on holiday in israel, priti patel said she had taken the opportunity to meet a number of people. among them — charity leaders, israeli politicians, and even the country's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu. a secretary of state apparently disregarding strict ministerial procedure, holding meetings arranged outside the usual channels, with no british government officials present. when reports of her august meetings emerged last week, priti patel initially claimed the foreign office did know in advance about her visit. on monday, she corrected the record, admitting 12 separate meetings and that the fco only became aware of her trip while it was under way. she was summoned to downing street and reminded of her obligations under the ministerial code.
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and after that reprimand, theresa may considered the matter closed. but now she has been recalled to number ten after two further meetings with israeli government representatives in september were disclosed. she is a member of the british government. what she did secretly from the british government is discussed with a foreign powers government how best to get something out of the british government. as a collective, which is what the british government is, she should have kept everybody informed and not conducted her own foreign policy. after priti patel returned from her august trip, unknown to theresa may until yesterday, she proposed sending taxpayers‘ money to the israeli army, to treat wounded syrian refugees. a controversial suggestion, in a part of the world fraught with political sensitivities. these are bear traps for politicians. if you depart one iota from the agreed government position, there is a reason why government positions are resolved with collective discussion very carefully about what the implications
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are of any departure from the government position. and she was getting herself into danger. that danger has not passed. she has been recalled from official business in east africa at the request of downing street. at the start of the week, theresa may said she had accepted priti patel‘s apology for the way she had handled her visit to israel. and would look at tightening the ministerial code. but now it appears the international development secretary did not reveal to the prime minister the true extent of her freelance diplomacy. priti patel‘s fate now seems clear. theresa may could be facing her second cabinet departure in a week. another blow for her fragile government. our political correspondent vicki young is in westminsterfor us now. what do you think is going to be happening in the next few hours?
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i think the fact that priti patel has been ordered back from a foreign trip means that downing street are seriously thinking about ending her job in the cabinet. i think she was given a chance of course after the first revelations, there are many in westminster who find it surprising she was not sacked on the spot them. having had a face—to—face meeting with theresa may on monday, i think the problem now for priti patel is that other things have emerged, it seems that at least one of the meetings in september was not known to theresa may, and there is the report in the israeli newspaper that priti patel my back in august have visited the golan heights, an area thatis visited the golan heights, an area that is not recognised as legitimate by the british government. that would be quite an extraordinary visit if it were true. so it is good to be very hard for theresa may if all of these things turn out to be
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case “— all of these things turn out to be case —— the case, to give priti patel another chance. particularly as she has told —— pretty much told her to turn around at the airport, she hasn't done any of her assignments. yes, the jewish of her assignments. yes, thejewish chronicle has a story which they claim has been sourced by two different sources, which they said downing street told priti patel not to include one of those meetings on the list, they also say the british government did know about priti patel‘s meeting with the israeli prime minister, so we are getting into claim and counterclaim. i still think it will be very difficult for priti patel to hold onto herjob, although given she is a very forceful personality, it is very possible she will get off that flight and make a very straightforward case for keeping her job. she may well fight these accusations. but this is of course com pletely accusations. but this is of course completely distracting for the prime minister, we have heard over the
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last week when it comes to other claims going around westminster, why can't other people just get on with theirjobs? theresa can't other people just get on with their jobs? theresa may can't other people just get on with theirjobs? theresa may must be thinking about that right now, she has a lot on her plate, but she is being distracted, and it will be pretty disc —— extraordinary if she loses to cabinet ministers in a week, the last time was under tony blair in 1998. theresa may does not have the luxury of the huge parliamentary majority tony blair had, nor his popularity in the opinion polls. so this would be very destabilising if she does feel forced to sack priti patel. many people say it is just damaging, never mind distracting. it doesn't give the sense of a government that is stable, so for theresa may, with brexit talks going on, it has been a while, simon, since we discussed that. we haven't
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been talking about it because we have been talking about the misdemeanours of cabinet ministers, and that is not a good place for any government to be. a lot of talk about when priti patel‘s flight lands. one website is saying that more than 22,000 users are currently tracking that particular flight are currently tracking that particularflight en are currently tracking that particular flight en route to london, the suspicion that that is the flight carrying priti patel. let's ta ke the flight carrying priti patel. let's take you to that website now. scheduled to arrive we understand just after 3pm this afternoon. so a lot of journalists and just after 3pm this afternoon. so a lot ofjournalists and photographers are at heathrow on the basis that she will be arriving in the next hour or she will be arriving in the next hourorso, and we she will be arriving in the next hour or so, and we will keep you updated on that story. the head of the nhs in england, simon stevens, has warned that the budget for the health service next year is well short of what's needed. he told a conference in london that the public expects the government to honour promises made by the vote leave campaign on health spending
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during the eu referendum, such as an extra £350 million a week for the nhs. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. the nhs in england is under unprecedented strain. based with the tightest sustained financial settlement in its history, it is failing to keep up with patients demand. today, its boss spoke bluntly about the impact on patients next year if significant extra funding was not made available. on the current funding outlook, the nhs waiting list will grow to 5 million people by 2021. that is an extra million people on the waiting list, one in ten of us waiting for an operation. the highest number ever. during the referendum, the leave campaign made controversial claims that breaking from the eu would mean an extra £350 million a week for the nhs. mr stevens said today
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it was a crucial deciding factor for those who voted brexit, and must be respected. by the end of the next financial yearfor the nhs, march 2019, the united kingdom will have left the european union. trust in democratic politics will not be strengthened if anyone now tries to argue, "you voted brexit for a better "funded health service, but precisely because of brexit, "you now cannot have one." at the same conference, the health secretary said there could be no commitment because of the uncertainty of the brexit outcome. it was not a government promise, it was a promise by the vote leave campaign. but what i very much agree
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with is that if there is a brexit dividend, if we end up having less pressure on public finances, because of the fact that we are not making net contributions to the eu, then i believe that the nhs should be the first port of call. the plea for a cash boost for hospitals, ambulance and community services was reinforced today by three major think tanks. they insist an extra £4 billion is essential for next year, if the nhs is to provide adequate care for patients. and if you want to find out what waiting times are like at your local hospital service — go to the bbc‘s nhs tracker page on the website. you just need to put in your postcode. president trump has arrived in the chinese capital, beijing, on the latest stop of his 12—day tour of asia. he was given a lavish welcome at one of the country's most important historic sites — the forbidden city — by president xijinping. mr trump is expected to use the visit to press china to do more to enforce sanctions on north korea,
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as john sudworth reports. at china's historic forbidden city, a meeting of the world's first and second most powerful men. but some are beginning to wonder which one is which. while president trump is beset by domestic woes and seen to be lacking a coherent foreign policy, president xi enjoys a tight grip on power and growing influence abroad. it is no coincidence that the visit starts here behind the walls of the old imperial palace. from a time when china had huge influence on the world stage. the symbolism could not be clearer. china's time has come again. forget second place — president xi is seeking a new relationship of equals with his american counterpart. a few hours earlier, in the south korean capital, mr trump once again underlined his priority for this trip, the crisis in north korea. today, i hope i speak not only for our countries, but for all civilised nations
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when i say to the north, do not underestimate us. we call on every nation, including china and russia, to fully implement un security council resolutions. but china may not be willing to dance to mr trump's tune. in a leader who prides himself on his deal—making, it sees the opportunity to drive a hard bargain. john sudworth, bbc news, beijing. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant — a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. he told mr sargeant to leave his post last week because of unspecified allegations about his behaviour. one labour member of the welsh assembly said in the last few minutes, mr sergeant
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bob —— mr sargeant‘s family have issued a statement. our wales political correspondent james williams is at the welsh assembly in cardiff. what have the family said? last monday a number of allegations we re last monday a number of allegations were made to carwynjones‘s office. his office contacted the women who made allegations about carl sa rg ea nt‘s made allegations about carl sargeant‘s behaviour. on his return from holiday on friday last week, he met carwyn jones from holiday on friday last week, he met carwynjones who was conducting a wider government reshuffle at the time, and was told by the first minister about the allegations, and that he was sacked from his job as the communities secretary. now, carl sa rg ea nt the communities secretary. now, carl sargeant issued the communities secretary. now, carl sargea nt issued a the communities secretary. now, carl sargeant issued a twitter statement saying that it was right that he should step aside while this investigation was underway, but that he didn't know the exact nature of
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the allegations, but he was helping to clear his name and return to government. he was helping —— his solicitors had written to the welsh labour party over the weekend asking for more detail, and we have had a statement from carl sargea nt‘s family today talking about a correspondence between the solicitor and the family, sorry, and the party, and in it, they say that the allegations made against carl sa rg ea nt allegations made against carl sargeant related allegations made against carl sargea nt related to, allegations made against carl sargeant related to, and i'm quoting here, unwanted attention, inappropriate touching or grouping. they confirm there were no parallel investigations, that is to say police investigations. a spokesman says, up to the point of his tragic death on tuesday morning, car was not informed of any of the allegations. the correspondence also discloses the solicitor‘s concerned that media appearances by the first
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minister on monday were prejudicing the inquiry. the family wish to disclose the fact that mr sargeant protested his innocence and categorically denied any wrongdoing. the pressure of not being able to defend himself meant that he was not granted any justice. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines the international development secretary, priti patel, is ordered to cut short an official trip to africa, amid speculation that she's about to be sacked over meetings with israeli officials. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. donald trump tours the forbidden city in beijing with his chinese counterpart xijinping, amid rising tensions with north korea. in a moment: we'll be live in northern ireland where a memorial has been unveiled
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on the 30th anniversary of enniskillen, when an ira bomb killed 12 people at a cenotaph. england and germany will both were poppies on black armbands, after fifa changed their rules. the anti—doping agency say they are worried about an ongoing case against tyson fury, who tested positive for a banned substances last year. it is crunch time for england's women in australia. a must win test of the ashes is lost. i will be back just after half past two. clarence house has defended the prince of wales after he was criticised for failing to disclose an investment by his private estate in an offshore company. the revelations come from a number of leaked documents about tax havens, known as the paradise papers. it's the second time this week that a member
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of the royal family has been named. but prince charles‘ private estate — the duchy of cornwall — insists that the prince had no direct involvement in its investments. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. later, prince charles and camilla began a visit to india, while supporters at home defended his failure to declare a shareholding in a company that stood to benefit from its environmental campaigning. on the right care and smack on the right, a director of sustainable forestry management limited. the company wanted to trade in carbon credits, but tropical rainforests we re credits, but tropical rainforests were not included in carbon credit training schemes, so it needed to have the rules changed. in february 2017, the duchy bought
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50 shares in his company. at that time, sfm's directors agreed to keep the shares confidential. soon, the prince was making speeches campaigning for changes to two international agreements on carbon credits. in june 2008, international agreements on carbon credits. injune 2008, the duchess sold its shares for $325,000, a profit of more than 200,000 dollars. there is potential conflict of interest if on the one hand the duchy of cornwall is making profits oi'i duchy of cornwall is making profits on investments in one sector, and on the other, the prince of wales is lobbying in that same area. but at the end of the day it boils down to whether the prince of wales knew that the duchy of cornwall was making these investments. clarence house said the prince does not have any direct involvement in the investment decisions taken by
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the investment decisions taken by the duchy of cornwall, and he certainly has never chosen to speak out on a subject simply because of a company that he makes —— it may have invested in. he has been talking about environmental issues since the 19705. if environmental issues since the 1970s. if anybody goes back online over 852 speeches, they are all there to see. there is no suggestion of illegality, northern prince charles‘s campaigning caused the share price of his friends company to rise. nor is it that the duchy of corn or was seeking to avoid cash. —— the duchy of cornwall. it is an important visit in the anglo indian context, post—brexit, he is seeing the indian prime minister at the moment. his officials say they are comfortable there was no conflict of interest over these shareholdings by implication suggesting he had no knowledge of the shareholding, and of course that he did not speak up
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in support of increasing their value. more broadly of course, this and the earlier disclosures about the queen'soffshore holdings have renewed calls for greater transparency of royal finance, and a register if you like of royal financial interests. but i think would be strongly resisted by the royal household, they would regard this as private income, in the queen'scase, from the duchy of lancaster, in the prince's, the duchy of cornwall. but whether they could ever be regarded as private investors and accorded the privacy they would expect of course, is a moot point. members voted to accept the plans. go via thames link says it is pleased they can move ahead and deliver stability. the dispute
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started in april last year, causing major disruption for 3000 passengers. to britain's energy suppliers are to merge. the new firm will be roughly the size of the market leader, british gas. the deal is expected to be completed by early 2019, subject to approval from shareholders and the regulator. relatives of those who died in enniskillen have been gathering today to remember the explosion. 12 people lost their lives. this became known as the poppy day bombing. yet if you think about the changes in
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the last three decades in northern ireland, the idea that someone would come, and deliberately kill at a time whenever they themselves were paying resemblance, —— remembrance, gives you an idea how far the peace process and political process has come. today, 30 years on, a memorial was unveiled to remember the dead of night —— 1987. in1987, in 1987, the service was held to honour the dead of two world wars. today's ceremony was to remember those murdered as they stood here at enniskillen cenotaph. each of the 12 names was read out. all victims of
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an ira attack that stood out as shocking, even amid the series of shootings and bombings of two simply known as northern ireland's troubles. bodies were left buried in rubble after the explosion. the dead we re rubble after the explosion. the dead were left lying alongside the dozens injured. a day that caused huge grief and has never left the families of those killed. the loss is just so terrible. and somebody just said to me that grief is the price of love, and i never thought of that until i heard that. and it truly is. the great granddaughter of a couple killed during that poppy day bombing sang during the service. despite the presence of politicians and police
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officers, this was an event for the families. a message was read by the queen, in which she talked of the irreplaceable loss suffered by each of the families. they will gather again here in this town this weekend, as is still traditional on a remembrance sunday. those who were around remember it vividly, and the ira lost a lot of support worldwide after this attack. yes, andi support worldwide after this attack. yes, and i think it wasjust support worldwide after this attack. yes, and i think it was just the shocking nature of it. the other thing that people remember so clearly is also about the families at that time. and particularly a man called gordon wilson, whose 19—year—old daughter marie was killed, a student nurse, but he talked on the days afterwards of forgiveness for those who committed this crime, who killed 11 people and another man who would died 13 days later after never recovering from a
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coma. i think that was also important in giving a sense of a community trying to seek help of a future that did not involve violence. i mentioned before that three decades on, things have changed in northern ireland. the families gathered today to remember all of those who died, but also i think reflect on how much has changed. i should say there is one piece of controversial issue that has not been dealt with here today, because i'm standing between the cenotaph and where that memorial was unveiled. they have not been given planning permission to have it put here beside the cenotaph, it was unveiled here, but already it has had to be removed, and that has upset the relatives who feel they should be able to remember here a place their loved ones came to a member once, and where they want to come to remember them. will they be able to put it there eventually? i don't think they will is the simple answer. at the moment there
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are some who were against the memorial being here, this is a role which started in this town already, and it has been discussed at length. even today i have had people coming up even today i have had people coming up to me and saying "we want the chance to have those names, those 12 names put here." notjust a something for people to remind them just what happened here in 1987, but also a place for them to come to remember their loved ones. and as a result you can imagine it is being discussed widely in this time, and today as it was being unveiled, there were families aware that it was going to be removed. a little later, we hope to hearfrom one of those families. now, bbc local radio was 50 years old today. —— is 50 years old. bbc radio leicester went on air in november 1967 as part
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of what was then called a two year "experiment" , funded by local councils, not the bbc. it was judged a success, and by 1971 20 bbc local radio stations were broadcasting, rising to more than a0 today. don't forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. time for a look at the weather. here's ben. if you look higher up in the sky, we had the northern lights last night. ididn't had the northern lights last night. i didn't see them! people who live in places like oban had a glorious light display last night. it was scotland really that had the best of it, it is where charged particles from the sun hurtled charged particles from the sun hu rtled towards charged particles from the sun
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hurtled towards us, and as they interact with the atmosphere they produce these beautiful light displays. in the south as i mentioned we don't tend to see it except in rare cases, and further north tonight there will bea and further north tonight there will be a lot of cloud, but as we take the clock forward into the early hours across scotland, the skies should clear, so it may well be that people in scotland if they are up and about early enough, might be able to see that. but for everyone else, it is different? i am doing yourjob for you! yes. shall we stick at that or carry on? it's cloudy in the south east, and then we've got more clouds rolling in across the northwest. as we head on through the rest of the afternoon, whether you have cloud or sunshine, temperatures will struggle. six to 10 degrees at best.
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we will keep some clear skies towards the south—east for a time, that will allow a touch of frost to develop. in that it will be quite a chilly night across the south—east, three degrees even in the centre of london but in the countryside it could well get down to freezing or a touch below, and then later in the night it will get quite chilly in northern scotland. so not a great feel to the weather at eight o'clock in the morning, because as well as cold air there will be a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain as well, but with the clouds across the south west of england, wales, into the midlands, temperatures will be climbing very slowly. brighter skies though into the far north of england, scotland and northern ireland. but some hefty, blustery showers across the far north of scotland. as we head on through the day, the cloud will break up eventually across the southern half of the country, best of the sunshine through northern england, northern
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ireland and scotland. across the far north of scotland there will be continue to be a feed of very heavy showers on a strong westerly wind. a little bit milder in the south, then things change again into friday. mild in the south, but much colder further north, then we see cloud and rain spreading into northern ireland, associated with this wriggling weather front which is going to hang around during friday night and saturday. once it clears, follow these white lines all the way up follow these white lines all the way up to the arctic, that is where our air is coming from. so it will be cold air diving across the country on saturday, some showers into the west, some sunshine elsewhere. by sunday the window switches round, just a subtle change, more of a northerly wind, not as many showers down the west coast and look at these temperatures, seven in glasgow, ten in london. so through the weekend, it will be quite bright, quite cold as well, but
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there will be some showers especially around the coast. if you don't like the weather you've got right now, just wait a while because it will probably change! this is bbc news — our latest headlines. ordered back from africa by the prime minister — priti patel‘s future as international development secretary hangs in the balance after a series of unsanctioned meetings with israeli politicians. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. donald trump is in beijing for talks with his counterpart xi jinping. amid rising tensions with north korea, he is expected to ask for all financial links to be cut. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. the broadcaster sky has threatened to shut down sky news, if the news channel becomes a stumbling block in its proposed merger with 21st century fox. in a moment... is ' how sheep can be trained to recognise a familiar
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face from a photo — including barack obama and our very own fiona bruce. sport now on afternoon live. tyson fury‘s big fight seems to be with uk anti—doping? tyson fury‘s big fight seems to be with uk anti-doping? it is at the moment, an ongoing legal battle. we have heard that uk anti—doping are a bit worried that the case might end up bit worried that the case might end up encrypting them. it says that tyson fury took a banned steroid lastjune. tyson fury took a banned steroid last june. tyson tyson fury took a banned steroid lastjune. tyson fury says he failed his test because he was eating unasked rated wild poor. what ever it takes to be the best boxer in the world, i guess! the anti—doping authority says if he wins his case against them it would get very expensive for them and it could cause financial difficulties. more on that in a couple of minutes. cause financial difficulties. more on that in a couple of minutesm raises a few questions but i won't ask them here. england and germany,
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the for rory there has been over the past about wearing poppies, it has been sorted? yes, whether or not it isa been sorted? yes, whether or not it is a political symbol. fifa have changed their classification and as a result of england and germany will be wearing poppies on black armbands when they play in the friendly on friday. it can be worn now as an active remembrance provided the opposing team agrees to it. fifa has now decided they're not political symbols. added has also been confirmed that video assistant referee and will be used for the first time in an official match in the uk. the uk anti-doping agency as i was saying fear they could be bankrupted i was saying fear they could be bankru pted by an i was saying fear they could be bankrupted by an ongoing case against former heavyweight champion tyson fury. there are concerns that if he wins his legal battle he may sue the authority for the loss of earnings and they might ask the government to underwrite the case
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of. richard conway our sports correspondent says they are determined to pursue the case against tyson fury, however. determined to pursue the case against tyson fury, howeverlj understand against tyson fury, however.” understand that discussions have been held with the garment. there is no intention to drop his case. it is the intention as i understand it to see it through, that might require the government to underwrite the case if indeed uk anti—doping go on to lose it. but it would seem they are confident in their case. we will see what happens in the months ahead, but that is the decision. ahead of test matches against scotla nd ahead of test matches against scotland and england later this month, samoan rugby has been declared bankrupt. they have asked members of the public to donate money to keep the sport alive in the country. i asked our rugby union reporter how damaging this was for the game. that is the doomsday
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scenario, that a rugby nation with a rich history like samoa, which has provided so many great players for leagues around the world, if they we re leagues around the world, if they were to fizzle away it would be an enormous shame. i think world rugby is determined not to let that happen. the samoan prime minister is also the head of the samoan rugby union. world rugby point out that they have given £1.5 million of investment to samoan rugby in 2017. they paid for the costs for the players to fly over for their tours at this time of the year. but there are issues which need to be resolved between world rugby and the samoan by between world rugby and the samoan rugby union. as for the games this month the club bit of talk around them being in doubt. that will not be the case, world rugby will underwrite any issues including logistics and insurance. england will also contribute a goodwill gesture towards a samoa. the test match in november will go ahead. but going forward, some issues to
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resolve to make sure this great by resolve to make sure this great rugby nation stays as strong as it can be. in rugby league, jermaine mcg illva ry can be. in rugby league, jermaine mcgillvary has been cleared of writing lebanon captain robbie farah during the game in sydney. he was facing a ban of up to 12 weeks if found guilty. but now he will be free to play against france in perth on sunday. the england women are completing their final day of preparation before their must win ashes test in sydney. they're currently 11—2 down against australia. if they lose the test which starts tomorrow, england cannot win the series. mark stoneman, dawid malan and joe root have scored half—centuries against a cricket australia xi. that's the sport for now. she fled syria two years ago after her home was destroyed in the civil war. less than a year later, yusra mardini, who is now 19 found herself competing at the rio olympics as part
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of the refugee team. now settled in germany, the teenager has her sights firmly set on tokyo 2020. our sports correspondent alex capstick has been to berlin to meet her — a warning that there are flashing images in his report. you know that you might lose your life on the way. yusra mardini, olympian and refugee who saved lives, including her own. the teenage swimmer who fled war—ravaged syria to pursue her sporting dreams. a 25—day nightmare, which featured a sinking boat full of migrants heading for greece. yusra and her sister jumped into the sea to help keep it afloat. i know that of course i was afraid, it was dark and, yeah, i was just seeing the island but never reaching it. not that i was the hero who was pulling a rope, you know. ok, i helped the boat, but it was not only me or only my sister.
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yusra mardini eventually arrived in berlin. already a promising swimmer, she joined this club at the city's olympic park. incredibly, just 11 months later, she was in rio on the biggest sporting stage of all, competing for the first ever refugee team. before when they were telling me i was leaving to the olympics it was such a surprise after only one year. i'm a refugee in germany and i'm going. and there was a refugee olympic team, it was incredible. yusra's remarkable back story means she's now a teenager in demand, with an expanding entourage befiting her growing stature on the world stage. i'm just hoping to get the idea to people that, yeah, they are normal people and they had a normal life and they were forced to flee their country because of violence. and you're making a movie, or a movie's being made about you. how exciting is that?
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stephen daldry's directing it. yeah, it's amazing. i'm really excited. who would you like to play yusra mardini? but above all, yusra mardini is focused on training hard. she wants a place at the 2020 olympics in tokyo, and doesn't mind who she represents. my ambition is just to be an athlete. if i'm going to start for germany or for my country, or for the refugee olympic team, i'm going to do the best i can and it will be my pleasure. in a life full of twists and turns, the way to tokyo may not be straightforward, but it's clear this determined 19—year—old will rise to whatever challenges lie ahead. alex capstick, bbc news, berlin. the trial has begun of a woman charged with murdering her ex—boyfriend following a suspected acid attack. thejury has heard mark van dongen was left paralysed from the neck down and lost his left leg, ear and eye. he ended his life in a euthanasia clinic 15 months later, saying he couldn't bear the pain any longer. he died in belgium at the start of this year, more than a year after the attack took
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place in bristol. our correspondentjon kay reports from the trial in bristol. mrvan mr van dongen was an engineer from holland, she was a fashion student from south africa. they were together for five years living in this bristol flats. the prosecution claims that in september 2015 she bought sulphuric acid online and threw it over him while he was sleeping injust a pair of threw it over him while he was sleeping in just a pair of shorts. thejury sleeping in just a pair of shorts. the jury was told that she laughed, saying, if i can't have you, no—one will. she was said to be unhappy the relationship had broken down and that mark van dongen had a new partner. berlinah wallace wept as the case against her was outlined. she denies murder and throwing a corrosive fluids. the jury was told that she claimed she thought the liquid was a glass of water. the court heard that mark van dongen was taken to southmead hospital in bristol nearly his injuries were
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described as horrific and catastrophic. he was said to be grotesquely scarred by the acid, paralysed from the neck down. he lost in eye and needed a leg amputated. the prosecution said that 15 months after the incident, mark van dongen decided he could take it no longer. after being repatriated to be near his family in belgium, he asked a euthanasia clinic there to help end his life. three doctors assessed him and judged his physical and psychological suffering to be unbearable. he died on the 2nd of january this year. the prosecution said that the suffering sustained by mark van dongen drove him to euthanasia, and they say therefore that berlinah wallace is guilty of murder, something she denies. and usually, the defence made some opening remarks as well. they said the couple's relationship was turbulent and emotionally complicated, and we heard earlier that they both had hiv. thejury complicated, and we heard earlier that they both had hiv. the jury has also been shown part of an interview police carried out with mr van
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dongen as he lay in his hospital bed injuly of last dongen as he lay in his hospital bed in july of last year dongen as he lay in his hospital bed injuly of last year here in bristol before he went back to belgium. the judge told them that they might find this shocking and upsetting. you could see some of the scarring to his body. berlinah wallace denies both counts that she faces here, and the trial continues. a survey of 12 so—called portas pilot towns found many retail establishments had closed. so, this one's empty?
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yes, we still have a number of empty units in the town centre that still need filling. joe is the man behind getting portas town status for stockport. he put the successful bid together and ran the pilot for five years. the portas pilot in stockport has gone pretty well and we've managed to attract new interest into the old town especially, but across the whole town centre we still have a big problem with shops and it's a question of more retailers going online. what kind of retailers are going to fill them? we have to think of creative solutions to really solve this problem on our high streets. the barometer of a healthy high—street is to look at its vacancy rate. it has fallen in ten of the 12 towns, but is still higher than the national average in most. in stockport, it's more than double the national average. but the council here thinks reshaping the town centre is one solution to getting that down.
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it is hard to believe thatjust 18 months ago, this square looked like this. the council demolished the shops that were here and created this new, more attractive area for shoppers. it is important to the people of stockport, and important for visitors, but it's important for the retailers as well because they really benefit from having the kind of environment where people do want to spend time, so if there's a nice area to sit and meet friends, relax, places to eat, then they are more likely to do their shopping here as well. we asked a company which monitors the health of high streets to review the portas project. one thing they found was that most of the towns have more independent shops than they did before. in the last five years, nearly 1,000 jobs have disappeared from the 12 portas towns. that's one closing every 22 days. a town centre with fewer shops doesn't necessarily mean it's in decline. more and more empty units are being converted into other uses. there's a contraction required
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of retail within the town centres, and therefore you then have to fill that with an appropriate use, and residential, driving people into the towns to utilise and bring forward all of the ideas of what a town centre is. that's what we are trying to achieve. we think we can get three or four town houses here and six or seven apartments, but with a terrace overlooking. as our shopping habits change and more of us shop online, the traditional high street has to adapt if it's going to survive. our main headlines... ordered out of africa, the prime minister tells priti patel to come home, her cabinet future now in doubt over her controversial trip to israel. the boss of nhs england wants the money promised by the brexiteers. a
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high—stakes promised by the brexiteers. a high—sta kes visit promised by the brexiteers. a high—stakes visit — president trump arrives in china for talks likely to be dominated by tensions over north korea. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. sse has confirmed it is merging its british domestic business with npower to form a new energy company. the uk's second—largest energy supplier also reported a big fall in its adjusted pre—tax profits of almost 14% in the six months to september. the deal knocks the country's big six energy firms down to five. has marks lost its sparks? the retailer announced they will open fewer simply food shops than planned after same store food sales fell. and will speed up their plans to close or reposition 105 of its shops. but the figures aren't as bad as expected, and they logged an increase in full—price clothing and home sales. sky has threatened to shut down sky news if the channel is an obstacle to the takeover bid by rupert murdoch's 21st century fox. fox already owns 39% of sky, but wants full control.
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regulators are investigating the deal over concerns that mr murdoch's media empire could become too powerful. monarch airlines has lost its high court battle over valuable runway slots it wanted to exchange with other carriers. now, let's have a chat about snap, they floated that in march and you can tell us how it is going? yeah, not great, actually. losses of more than £337 million, lower—than—expected revenue and lower—than—expected revenue and lower—than—expected user growth. it is not what investors wanted to hear. in trading last night after hours, once these figures came out, it fell to below $13 per share. but
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the market can be a tricky place for tech companies. facebook share is are now worth around $180 per share and the company is finally making a profit. on the flip side, twitter‘s shares are now worth $20 a share. snap shares are now worth $20 a share. s na p really shares are now worth $20 a share. sna p really wa nts shares are now worth $20 a share. snap really wants to be following the facebook trajectory rather than the facebook trajectory rather than the twitter trajectory. samira hussain is on the street in new york. what is the snap price doing now? so, snap has actually recovered a little bit from after hours trading. they had fallen some 20% as soon as we heard from the company. they are now hovering around 10%, as trading hasjust they are now hovering around 10%, as trading has just opened they are now hovering around 10%, as trading hasjust opened on the new york stock exchange. i am glad you mentioned facebook, because facebook
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isa mentioned facebook, because facebook is a big part of snap's story and why they're not doing as well. facebook is basically eating snapchat's lunch, because they've implemented some of the features that you have on snap. that's really having an impact in terms of snap trying to get more users. and we saw that reflected in their earnings. some of the reasons why snap was so attractive was because you had so many young people using it. but now that does growth has not really been serialising as much, investors are not looking very happy. we mentioned the difference between the share price with facebook and twitter, but twitter fighting back, they price with facebook and twitter, but twitterfighting back, they want price with facebook and twitter, but twitter fighting back, they want to do well — what have they done today, big change to their platform? yes, well, if you have been a twitter userand well, if you have been a twitter user and trying to send out tweets and getting in trouble because you have more than 140 characters, well,
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some users are now able to send 280 characters, so they've nearly doubled the limit on that. it is really an effort to try and generate more users. and to try and generate more users. and to try and generate more engagement by users. 50 on more users. and to try and generate more engagement by users. so on the one hand the number of people who have signed up for the app but on the other hand you actually need people to use it on a daily and monthly basis, and that's what twitter is trying to do. in the interest of accuracy, can you tell is exactly where you are in new york? sure! i am standing right in front of the new york stock exchange. normally you would see me on the floor of the stock exchange but i am just outside of it on the street corner. you will notice there isa street corner. you will notice there is a lot of tourists and people walking by. it's a place that lots of people come to to look at some of these buildings around here. added
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colour! that's what you get with the bbc! you're going to be interviewing a certain michael stipe later? yeah, lead singer of rem, and you can see that tomorrow. you said it yesterday, and it has happened. we've got this merger, six becomes four? six come five. and today sse have confirmed the merger, yes. it might be flagged up with the competition and markets authority, but it might not be, because back in 2011 there were only eight energy providers in the uk, now, there's around 60. so, there's much more competition. but the big six, or big five as it will become, still have about 81% of the market. when in
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power and sse merge, they will be about the same size as rajesh gas, the biggest provider. what about consumers, is there concerned? that is the concern, that it could reduce competition. simon jack spoke is the concern, that it could reduce competition. simonjack spoke to the chief operating officer of sse and asked him whether consumers should be concerned? asked him whether consumers should be concerned ? fundamentally asked him whether consumers should be concerned? fundamentally we would see it differently, we think this is really good for competition. there are 60—odd companies in the market will compete fiercely. the number of people switching is up massively. and we think that by being more efficient as an organisation we can price better and also in the future develop new products to meet customers‘ needs and it gives variety and opportunity in the future. that was tony keeling from sse. now, let‘s have a look at the
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markets, because it is a busy time? it is. with merger news like that, you would expect it to be up, and it was up. and then they delivered yet more news. marks & spencer is, profits are still happening at marks & spencer is, but some concerning news saying that food sales are slowing. and food has always been a bright spot for marks & spencer. when you think you understand the markets, you don‘t, it is weird how people respond? plenty more from you later. thank you, rachel. let‘s have a look at the weather. a lot of cloud around today. as you
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can see from the satellite picture we have had this slice of sunshine today across central areas. now, it‘s all eyes to the north—west, as thickening cloud rings outbreaks of rain during the night. before that arrives, across this south—eastern corner it is going to turn very cherry indeed. out in the countryside, down to freezing or even just below. later in the night, as the skies clear across northern scotland, it will turn chilly here as well. it will be feeling decidedly chilly for the commute to work in the south—east tomorrow. in the south—west of england we will see a the south—west of england we will seeafairamount the south—west of england we will see a fair amount of cloud. a bit
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milder here in the rush—hour. across northern england generally a lot of cloud, and then we are back into brighter skies across scotland and northern ireland. but windy in the far north, with some hefty showers, which could contain some hell and thunder later in the day. all the while that cloud in the south will be retreating and there will be more sunshine developing. then we head into friday, more changes cloud rolling in from the west later in the day. this lingering by the front will continue to hang around as we head into the start of the weekend. but once we lose that front, those white lines go all the way up to the arctic and they will be bringing some very cold air in our direction. feeling very chilly on saturday. on
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sunday the wind directions lifts slightly, moreover northerly wind. if you can avoid those showers close to the coast, most of us will see some sunshine. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3pm: ordered out of africa — the prime minister tells priti patel to come home — her cabinet future now in doubt over her controversial trip to israel. a pre—budget plea from the boss of nhs england — give us the money promised by the brexiteers. a high—stake visit, president trump arrives in china for talks likely to be dominated by tensions over north korea. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with kat. germ and england will wear poppies on their armbands for their friendly. fifa decided they are an act of remembrance and not a political symbol. i will have more
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at 3.30pm. thank you, kt and ben has the weather. if you don't like the weather you have got at the moment, don‘t worry. it will probably change. all the details coming up. thanks, ben. also coming up, who kn—ewe? the sheep that can recognise human faces from photographs. and we‘re not pulling the wool! hello everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. usually — flights home are a moment to relax and prepare for a warm welcome from familiar faces — not this one. as priti patel‘s plane approaches london she knows that the prime minister wants to see her and is probably about to sack her from her cabinet job, having told her to head straight home from africa. she had only been there for a few hours, but the controversy over her trip to israel had caught up with her.
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this report from our political correspondent leyla nathou. another high—level meeting off the books. this time, with the israeli minister for public security, in parliament in september. in august, while on holiday in israel, priti patel said she had taken the opportunity to meet a number of people. among them — charity leaders, israeli politicians, and even the country‘s prime minister, benjamin netanyahu. a secretary of state apparently disregarding strict ministerial procedure, holding meetings arranged outside the usual channels with no british government officials present. when reports of her august meetings emerged last week, priti patel initially claimed the foreign office did know in advance about her visit. on monday, she corrected the record, admitting 12 separate meetings and that the fco only became aware of her trip while it was under way. she was summoned to downing street and reminded of her obligations under the ministerial code. and after that reprimand, theresa may considered the matter closed.
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but now she has been recalled to number ten after two further meetings with israeli government representatives in september were disclosed. she is a member of the british government. what she did secretly from the british government is discussed with a foreign powers government how best to get something out of the british government. as a collective, which is what the british government is, she should have kept everybody informed and not conducted her own foreign policy. after priti patel returned from her august trip, unknown to theresa may until yesterday, she proposed sending taxpayers‘ money to the israeli army, to treat wounded syrian refugees. a controversial suggestion, in a part of the world fraught with political sensitivities. these are bear traps for politicians. if you depart one iota from the agreed government position, there is a reason why government positions are resolved with collective discussion very carefully about what the implications are of any departure from a government position.
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and she was getting herself into danger. that danger has not passed. she has been recalled from official business in east africa at the request of downing street. at the start of the week, theresa may said she had accepted priti patel‘s apology for the way she had handled her visit to israel, and would look at tightening the ministerial code. but now it appears the international development secretary did not reveal to the prime minister the true extent of her freelance diplomacy. priti patel‘s fate now seems clear. theresa may could be facing her second cabinet departure in a week. another blow for her fragile government. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster. the jewish chronicle thejewish chronicle are standing by their story which suggested the foreign office and number ten knew about some of the visits and trips?
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the jewish chronicle about some of the visits and trips? thejewish chronicle have the story. they say they have could different sources who have stood this up and they are sticking by it. let‘s go through what they are suggesting. they are claiming that number ten instructed priti patel not to mention a meeting she had with an israeli official on 18th september. they‘re saying they said don‘t put it on the list because it will embarrass the foreign office. they‘re also claiming that they are saying that priti patel‘s meeting with binyamin netanyahu, although it was not authorised in advance, they are claiming the british government was made aware of it within hours. now, the reason for saying that is that the foreign office minister alistair birt was this israel and the meeting that priti patel had was mentioned in front of him and this information was conveyed to number ten. now, downing street, a spokesman for downing street
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com pletely spokesman for downing street completely denies any of that. there is also the issue of a second meeting in september, which it seems, that priti patel did not mention to theresa may. i think the point here is that after the initial actions came to light, there are many in westminster who suspect that in any othertime, many in westminster who suspect that in any other time, priti patel would have been sacked on—the—spot for what she did. she wasn‘t. she was given another chance and she had that meeting face—to—face with theresa may. if she hasn‘t been com pletely theresa may. if she hasn‘t been completely open about everything in that meeting, then i think that is where she is in deep trouble and that, i suspect, where she is in deep trouble and that, isuspect, is where she is in deep trouble and that, i suspect, is why she is currently coming into heathrow on an aeroplane having been ordered back by downing street to explain herself. there is the other issue being reported in an israeli newspaper that priti patel also visited the golan heights. that would be controversial to go there. it is disputed territory and it is not recognised legally by the british government. so that would be another major problem, i think, for
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priti patel. it looks like having been given a lot of leeway the first time around, she may not get that this time. as you speak, we are showing a plane that arrived at heathrow. we cannot be sure if she is on board. if she looks out, she will see some news helicopters and realise her arrival is much anticipated. i‘m wondering is there anticipated. i‘m wondering is there a formal process here, if she is about to lose herjob, she has to go to downing street, theresa may has to downing street, theresa may has to see her face—to—face? to downing street, theresa may has to see her face-to-face? not necessarily. i don‘t think there is any pattern for this kind of thing. she could do it on the telephone, i suppose, i presume that theresa may is giving her another chance to give her side of the story, but it doesn‘t have to be done face—to—face. i wouldn‘t imagine for one minute that she will make her walk up downing street. that‘s normally for cabinet appointments rather than dismissals. so we don‘t know how this will be done. we still, let‘s face it, do not know the outcome. priti patel is a forceful character. she may well go
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in and orspeak forceful character. she may well go in and or speak to theresa may on the phone and give a side of the story which somehow persuades theresa may. the main thing is the prime minister has probably got other things she could be getting on with. we will be back to you later on. tom newton dunn is the political editor of the sun. it would appear she is home. what sort of welcome is she going to get from the prime minister? not a friendly one. i don‘t think there will be much small talk about priti‘s trip around kenyan airports over the last 24 hours. i don‘t think she will see the prime minister until after 6pm tonight for various different commitments the prime minister has, but it is interesting i suppose, we believe that the outcome of their meeting will be priti patel we leaved of her cabinet responsibilities, but it is interesting the pm believes she clearly needs to afford priti patel
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the dignity of coming in, hearing her out and giving her a chance to have her say rather than a summary execution which she could have done over the phone, to herfirst thing this morning. there is at least some de—corus going on there, but every noise we hear coming out of number ten is extremely unhappy with priti patel, not least because certain number ten sources said they went out of their way to help her and give her every chance to save her job. of give her every chance to save her job. of course, the difficulty for theresa may in the next few hours she, any authority that she has potentially to lose over this is something she needs to hang on to sth well, absolutely, and this is the wider argument, i think. from a lay man‘s point of view, we have had the borisjohnson affair over iran this week. you have had michael fallon and damian green‘s problems with the sex scandals and obviously priti patel now with the israel mess. i mean all three entirely
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unrelated, but to readers and your viewers, it presents an image of a cabinet out of all control really and extremely senior ministers running around doing very bizarre and unauthorised and wrong and stupid things on some accounts which the prime minister has no control over. she desperately now, i think, needs to be seen that this is a government, she is still in charge of, more than just name and government, she is still in charge of, more thanjust name and one government, she is still in charge of, more than just name and one way of, more than just name and one way of doing that would be to wield the axe. as we speak, i'm just seeing that the conservative mp, mark garnier put out a statement breaking his silence since that story about having a former secretary to buy two sex toys from a soho shop. he says the events have been reported outside the context and the circumstances at the time we were friends and i did not force or pressure her into anything. i apologise to my constituents that
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this situation as occurred. again, timing, not exactly helpful for theresa may because it does just raise another aspect to this whole crisis? it does. i mean you have seen that sometime, i haven‘t. there is no mention in that statement of him resigning. there absolutely isn‘t. him resigning. there absolutely isn't. so that i would read as almost certainly he feels he is going to get a clean bill of health from the cabinet office inquiry ongoing into whether he broke the ministerial code by asking his secretary to buy sex toys. it would appear that that is now coming to a conclusion that he simply has to apologise and make a public apology which he has done and that may well be him in the clear. i maybe wrong, but that‘s my reading of it. so potentially that‘s a better bit of news for theresa may, but i don‘t think many of us thought that mark garnier was in need of losing his job, but you‘re right, it has been the most extraordinary last two weeks really. three different substantial scandals which have
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brought down cabinet ministers already and you know, will bring down more by the end of the day we predict. i want to pick you up on that. the prime minister has to brexit talks, the sixth round tomorrow, this is far too much for any prime minister to have to contend with in any single band width. she would not relish the idea of having priti patel on the backbenches? that's why priti patel has got a considerable amount of leeway already this week. arguably she could have been forced to resign on monday having, you know, quite clearly broken the ministerial code and embarrassed the government and potentially even tried to rewrite government policy on something as sensitive as whether israel has a right to be in the golan heights. the reason priti patel hasn‘t gone and number ten the reason priti patel hasn‘t gone and numberten in the reason priti patel hasn‘t gone and number ten in my view has bent over backwards to try and defend her until today, or certainly last night, is because the prime minister cannot afford to have very prominent figures from the leave campaign,
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priti patel, borisjohnson, michael gove as well, languishing on the backbenches and if you pardon the phrase, doing an act of going to the bathroom from outside the tent in, rather than inside the tent out! these are strange times. the prime minister is not at all in total control of her cabinet and in total control of her cabinet and in total control of her government and who would be. i think we got what you meant there. apologies for the crudity. tom, thank you very much. the head of the nhs in england, simon stevens, has warned that the budget for the health service next year is well short of what‘s needed. he told a conference in london that the public expects the government to honour promises made by the vote leave campaign on health spending during the eu referendum such as an extra £350 million a week for the nhs. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. the nhs in england is under unprecedented strain. faced with the tightest sustained
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financial settlement in its history, it is failing to keep up with patient demand. today, its boss spoke bluntly about the impact on patients next year if significant extra funding was not made available. on the current funding outlook, the nhs waiting list will grow to five million people by 2021. that‘s an extra million people on the waiting list, one in ten of us waiting for an operation. the highest number ever. during the referendum, the leave campaign made controversial claims that breaking from the eu would mean an extra £350 million a week for the nhs. mr stevens said today it was a crucial deciding factor for those who voted brexit, and must be respected. by the end of the next financial yearfor the nhs, march 2019, the united kingdom will have left the european union. trust in democratic politics
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will not be strengthened if anyone now tries to argue, "you voted brexit for a better funded health service, but precisely because of brexit, you now cannot have one." speaking at the same conference, the health secretary said there could be no commitment because of the uncertainty of the brexit outcome. it wasn‘t a government promise, it was a promise by the vote leave campaign. but what i very much agree with is that if there is a brexit dividend, if we end up having less pressure on public finances, because of the fact that we are not making net contributions to the eu, then i believe that the nhs should be the first port of call. the plea for a cash boost for hospitals, ambulance and community services was reinforced today by three major think—tanks.
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they insist an extra £4 billion is essential for next year, if the nhs is to provide adequate care for patients. if you want to find out what waiting times are like at your local hospital service, go to the bbc‘s nhs tracker page on the website, you just need to put in your postcode. southern railway drivers have voted to accept a deal to end their long running dispute over driver operated trains members of the aslef union voted 4—1 to back the plans, which include a 28.5% pay rise over the next five years. govia thameslink, which runs southern, says it‘s pleased it can move ahead and deliver stability. the dispute started in april last year, leading to a series of strikes by drivers which caused major disruption for southern‘s 300,000 passengers. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: ordered out of africa, the prime minister tells
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priti patel to come home, her cabinet future now in doubt over her controversial trip to israel. a pre—budget plea from the boss of nhs england — give us the money promised by the brexiteers. a high—stake visit — president trump arrives in china for talks likely to be dominated by tensions over north korea. england and germany will wear poppies on black armbands in a friendly on friday. the uk anti—doping agency are worried about an ongoing case against tyson fury. and it is crunch time for england‘s women in australia. a must—win test or the ashes is lost. i will be back with more after 3.30pm. we are going to go to heathrow
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because that plane we were showing you earlier believed to be carrying priti patel. well, it has landed and as you can see there are a couple of rather distinguished cars at the top of your shot. we believe there is a strong possibility that that there isa strong possibility that that there is a ministerial car. suggesting that that is there to collect the overseas secretary, development secretary. it would look as though there are flashing lights there as well. because if indeed, that‘s what it is, she can expect to be driven back to london and we are suspecting, although there is no confirmation, but we are expecting if she is on board that she will get into the one of those cars and will then head up to london for a meeting at some stage with the prime minister. so, that‘s the situation live. if there is any sign of clarification from there, we will return there, but it does very much look as though
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a vip is on board and those cars are expected to whisk whoever it is away. any developments on that and we will take you straight back to heathrow airport. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. he told mr sargeant to leave his post last week because of allegations about his behaviour. in the last few minutes, mr sargeants‘s family have said the minister was not informed of the details of the accusations, denying him the opportunity to defend himself. our wales political correspondent james williams who is at the welsh assembly in cardiff has been following developments. last monday a number of allegations we re last monday a number of allegations were made to carwynjones the first minister‘s office by a number of women. his officials contacted those women. his officials contacted those women and when, who made allegations about carl sargea nt‘s behaviour. women and when, who made allegations about carl sargeant‘s behaviour. he was at the time on holiday in new
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york with his wife, but on his return on friday of last week, he met the first minister, carwyn jones, who was conducting a wider government reshuffle at the time and he was told by the first minister about the allegations and that he was sacked from his job as the communities secretary in the welsh government. now, carl sargeant issued a twitter statement that afternoon saying that it was right that he should step aside while this investigation was under way, but that he didn‘t know the exact details of the allegations, but he was hoping to clear his name and return to government. now we understood that his solicitors had written to the welsh labour party over the course of the weekend asking for more detail about those allegation and we have had a statement from carl sargea nt‘ family talking about a correspondence between the solicitor and the family, the solicitor sorry and the party and they have released this statement and in it they say that the allegations that were made
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against carl sargeant related to, "u nwa nted against carl sargeant related to, "unwanted attention, inappropriate touching or groping." they confirmed that there were no parallel investigations, ie there were no police investigations under way. a spokesperson for the family said up to the point of his tragic death on tuesday morning, karl was not informed of the details of the allegations against him, despite requests and warnings about his mental welfare. the correspondence says that media appearances by the first minister on monday were prejudicing the inquiry. the family wish to disclose the fact that carl maintained his innocence and he categorically denied any wrongdoing. the distress of not being able to defend himself properly against the unspecified allegations mean he was not afforded common courtesy, decency or naturaljustice. that‘s the statement from carl sargeant‘ family that‘s just been released in the last hour. a pretty explosive statement, it must be said. president trump has arrived in the chinese capital,
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beijing on the latest stop of his 12—day tour of asia. he was given a lavish welcome at one of the country‘s most important historic sites, the forbidden city, by president xijinping. mr trump is expected to use the visit to press china to do more to enforce sanctions on north korea as john sudworth reports. at china‘s historic forbidden city, a meeting of the world‘s first and second most powerful men. but some are beginning to wonder which one is which. it‘s no coincidence that the visit starts here behind the walls of the old imperial palace, from a time when china had huge influence on the world‘s stage. the symbolism could not be clearer. china‘s time has come again.
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forget second place — president xi is seeking a new relationship of equals with his american counterpart. a few hours earlier, in the south korean capital, mr trump once again underlined his priority for this trip, the crisis in north korea. today, i hope i speak not only for our countries, but for all civilised nations when i say to the north, do not underestimate us. we call on every nation, including china and russia, to fully implement un security council resolutions. but china may not be willing to dance to mr trump‘s tune. in a leader who prides himself on his deal—making, it sees the opportunity to drive a hard bargain. relatives of those who died in the enniskillen bombing have been gathering in the town today to mark the 30th anniversary
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of the explosion. the ira attack was one of the most notorious of the troubles — 12 people lost their lives. our ireland correspondent chris buckler reports. the cenotaph is somewhere that‘s very different. it is a place where people come to really remember, but of course, today was about remembering those who died when they stood tribute here 30 years ago. a very difficult day for families to remember, but one they felt it was important to come and share together as they unveiled a new memorial isn't owe eggs ctly 59 years? agntfidgyem place, in the same town, in an act of remembrance. the last post
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in 1987 the service was held to honour those who had died in two world wars. today‘s ceremony was to remember those murdered as they stood in tribute here at the cenotaph in enniskillen. wesley armstrong... each of the 12 names was read out. bertha armstrong... all victims of an ira attack that stood out as shocking even amid the series of shootings and bombings, all too simply known as northern ireland‘s troubles. bodies were left buried in rubble after the explosion. the dead left lying alongside the dozens injured. a day that caused huge grief that has never left the families of those killed. the loss is just so terrible. and someone just said to me this last year that grief is the price of love and i never thought of it until i heard that.
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and it truly is. the great granddaughter of a couple killed during that poppy day bombing sang during the service. despite the presence of politicians and police officers this was an event for the families. a message was read from the queen talking of the irreplaceable loss suffered by each of the families. they will gather again in this town this weekend as is still traditional on a remembrance sunday. well, among those relatives who were here to remember is stephen gault whose father samuel was killed and you were here that day back in 1987. just give us your memories of what happened. my memories of that day chris will stick with me the rest of my life. just over my right shoulder where the clinton centre is where i
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stood with my father and the other people caught up in the blast and i remember, i never heard the bomb, but i remember going forward with a shove in the back up against blue railings and my first initial reaction was when i came round where my dad was and i remember looking to my dad was and i remember looking to my right and i saw a body covered in dust and rubble and i recognised it was my dad by the shiny signature shoes and then i saw the awful sight as an 18—year—old should never have witnessed, it was his decapitated head. it was the way you take the top off an egg, his head was missing andi top off an egg, his head was missing and i knew he had been killed.” watched today as we were reporting on this, some of the old footage, that video of what happened that day. but for you, all of that, people buried in rubble, it must be sear nood your mind? it's embedded. as we speak i‘m visualising what happened 30 years ago this day and
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just i remember being pulled out of the rubble and all i wanted to do was to go back to my dad. the soldiers that rescued me, didn‘t me to make more bad memories and i remember stepping over at least six people that had been laid out with coats over them and they had been murdered and the screaming and children crying and to this day, i can still taste the rubble in my mouth. we have got schoolchildren wandering about us here behind you. one of the most remarkable things though is that in the series of ira attacks that happened, they are all in the past. and does it say something that we can gather today in northern ireland to remember this and not be fearful that that kind of and not be fearful that that kind of an attack can happen? nobody wanted peace more than the actual victims and those that have suffered at the hands of terrorism. schoolchildren now need to be educated in what went on in this town 30 years ago, not just in enniskillen, but other towns
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throughout the province and this memorial was telling the story of what happened here 30 years ago. and i have to talk about that memorial because it should be or it was at one stage today just because it should be or it was at one stage todayjust over your shoulder outside the clinton centre, but there is no planning permission for it. so it has been removed shortly after the service? well, no, the planning permission has been got and the planning permission has been approved. the stumbling block is the owner‘s of land that the clinton centre sits on which is the catholic church and unfortunately the catholic church have not given us consent to place the memorial on the edge of their footpath at the front of the clinton centre so we have had planning permission and the planning permission application was started injanuary and permission application was started in january and they were permission application was started injanuary and they were made permission application was started in january and they were made well aware and after six months later, they still, there was no objection coming forward from the st michael‘s diocese trust, a memorial was dedicated and unfortunately has to
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be removed and that‘s traumatising for the innocent families who has their loved ones names on the memorial. are you hopeful that the memorial. are you hopeful that the memorial should be put here? memorial. are you hopeful that the memorial should be put here7m memorial. are you hopeful that the memorial should be put here? it will eventually. we should be talking about the memorial being in place in the town of enniskillen. is it because the inscription on it states what happened that there was 12 innocent civilians murdered at the hands of the ira on remembrance sunday. is there people in this community that don‘t want to have that as a constant reminder of what happened here 30 years ago? stephen gault, thank you very much for joining us and giving us a vivid memory of what happened here in 1987. 30 years ago is not that long, imean, and 1987. 30 years ago is not that long, i mean, and as you watch the schoolchildren wandering around, you do get a reminder ofjust the generations of change that there has been, but for a lot of families, all of those memories are still very real and they still have an effect. si—month—old. and just to update you on the travel
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arrangements of priti patel. we showed you the plane arriving which we thought she was on board. if you look at the top of your picture you can see a ministerial car, and getting into the back, we believe thatis getting into the back, we believe that is priti patel, for what may well be her last journey that is priti patel, for what may well be her lastjourney in a ministerial car which most people believing that priti patel faces the sack when she meets the prime minister at some stage. we don‘t know exactly what time. we‘re keeping an eye on things and if there are any changes to that story we will bring them to you. news just
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newsjust coming in news just coming in from the press association. celebrity chef antonio carluccio has died at the age of 80, according to his agent. a successful broadcaster and businessman, with a number of restaurants bearing his name. that news just reaching us and we will be trying to talk to some of his former colleagues. anyone who has seen him on television will remember the cheery, smiley face of antonio carluccio. you‘re watching
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afternoon live. we will be bringing you more on the priti patel situation. but first let‘s catch up with the weather. a lot going on with the weather. a lot going on with our weather at the moment, things changing all the time. the cloud in the south—east has been breaking up. and overnight in this area it is where we will have some of the coldest weather. outbreaks of rain sinking southwards and eastwards. it will be getting quite chilly in northern scotland. even down towards the south—east, where we keep hold of those clear skies, we keep hold of those clear skies, we could have a touch of frost. tomorrow the cloud will roll in across the south—east are very quickly. things brightening up through the day for scotland and northern ireland and northern england. hefty showers into the north, where it will also be windy. friday, not a bad day for many, but still some hefty showers in the north. the weekend looks bright and
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cold, with some showers are close to the coast. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. ordered back from africa by the prime minister — priti patel lands in london to face questions over herjob as international development secretary after unsanctioned meetings with israeli politicians. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. president trump arrives in china, where he will call on the chinese leader xijinping to put pressure on north korea over its nuclear ambitions. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. the broadcaster sky has threatened to shut down sky news if the news channel becomes a stumbling block in its proposed merger with 21st century fox. in a moment...
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tiny clutch of crocodiles, the smallest of their species, hatch at a zoo smallest of their species, hatch at a zoo in california. sport now on afternoon live, with katherine downes. tyson fury‘s diet is perhaps one way of discussing one of these stories? yes, he has failed a drugs test and he is being investigated by uk anti—doping. they say that he tested positive for a banned steroid. he says he had been eating uncastrated wild boar. but the problem is that if he sues ukad for loss of earnings, it is proved that that is what he was eating, they are worried that he could encrypt them if he wins the case. —— he could bankrupt
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them. i will have some more on that inafew them. i will have some more on that in a few minutes. now, on the pitch, the appearance of the bonny. now, on the pitch, the appearance of the poppy, and this time it is a sanctioned? yes, the controversy over poppies seems to be over because it has been announced that both england and germany will be wearing poppies on black armbands when they play on friday. it is now decided by fifa that they can be worn as an active remembrance provided both sides agree to it. fifa has decided that are not eligible symbols. it has also been confirm that video assistant referee and will be used at the game for the first time in an official match in the uk. now, the tyson fury story. ukad fear they could be bankrupted ryan ongoing case against the former
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heavyweight champion. there are concerns that if he wins his legal battle he might suit ukad for loss of earnings. and they have been asked to ask the government to underwrite the case. from what i understand, discussions have been held within the ukad board in recent weeks and with the government, with the department for i am media and sport. there is no intention to drop this case, it is the intention as i understand it to see it through. —— the department for culture media and sport. they are confident it would seem in that case we will see what happens in the months ahead but certainly that is the position as has been outlined. rugby league, and england wingerjermaine mcgillvary has been cleared of biting lebanon captain robbie farah during the game in sydney at the weekend. he could have been facing a ban of 12 weeks.
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but his exoneration means he will be free to play against france in perth on sunday. ahead of test matches against scotland and england later this month, samoan rugby has been declared bankrupt. the nation‘s prime minister has asked numbers of the public to donate money to keep the public to donate money to keep the sport alive. and the rfu has said it will contribute to samoa‘s costs while they are in england. earlier i asked our rugby union reporter how damaging this was for the game. that is the doomsday scenario, that a rugby nation with a rich history like samoa, which has provided so many great ways for leagues around the world, if they we re leagues around the world, if they were to fizzle away that would be an enormous shame. i think world rugby are determined not to let that happen. part of the problem is that the samoan prime minister is also the samoan prime minister is also the head of the rugby union. world by the head of the rugby union. world rugby have pointed out that they have given £1.5 million towards samoan rugby in 2017. they paid for
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the players to fly over for their tours at this time of the year. but there are issues that need to be resolved between world rugby and the samoan rugby union. as for the games this month, they are not in doubt. world rug by this month, they are not in doubt. world rugby will underwrite any issues such as insurance and logistics. england will also contribute some costs as a goodwill gesture. so the test in november will certainly go ahead. going forward however was some issues to be resolved to make sure this great by be resolved to make sure this great rugby nation stays i strong as it rugby nation stays as strong as it should be. england women are currently 4—2 down against australia and if they lose the game which sta rts and if they lose the game which starts tomorrow they cannot win the series. mark stoneman, dawid malan and joe root have scored half—centuries against a cricket australia xi. that‘s the sport for now. let‘s just update you on that
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breaking news, that antonio carluccio, the television chef and rest return, has died at the age of 80. he was awarded the obe and also the italian equivalent, he was known as the godfather of italian gastronomy. his career stretched back more than 50 years. he was best known for his performing together with genaro conn told. also a hugely successful businessmen. the trial has begun of a woman
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charged with murdering her ex—boyfriend following a suspected acid attack. thejury has heard mark van dongen was left paralysed from the neck down and lost his left leg, ear and eye. he ended his life in a euthanasia clinic 15 months later saying he couldn‘t bear the pain any longer. he died in belgium at the start of this year — more than a year after attack took place in bristol. our correspondentjon kay reports from the trial in bristol. mr van dongen was an engineer from holland, she was a fashion student from south africa. they were together for five years living in this bristol flats. living in this bristol flat. the prosecution claims that in september 2015, she bought sulphuric acid online and threw it over him while he was sleeping
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in just a pair of shorts. the jury was told that she laughed, saying, if i can‘t have you, no—one will. she was said to be unhappy the relationship had broken down and that mark van dongen had a new partner. berlinah wallace wept as the case against her was outlined. she denies murder and throwing a corrosive fluid. the jury was told that she claimed she thought the liquid was a glass of water. the court heard that mark van dongen was taken to southmead hospital in bristol, where his injuries were described as horrific and catastrophic. he was said to be grotesquely scarred by the acid, paralysed from the neck down. he lost in eye and needed a leg amputated. the prosecution said that 15 months after the incident, mark van dongen decided he could take it no longer. after being repatriated to be near his family in belgium, he asked a euthanasia clinic there to help end his life. three doctors assessed him and judged his physical and psychological suffering to be unbearable.
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he died on 2nd january this year. the prosecution said that the suffering sustained by mark van dongen drove him to euthanasia, and they say therefore that berlinah wallace is guilty of murder, something she denies. unusually, the defence made some opening remarks as well. they said the couple‘s relationship was turbulent and emotionally complicated, and we heard earlier that they both had hiv. the jury has also been shown part of an interview that police carried out with mr van dongen as he lay in his hospital bed injuly of last year here in bristol before he went back to belgium. the judge told them that they might find this shocking and upsetting. you could see some of the scarring to his body. berlinah wallace denies both counts that she faces here, and the trial continues. she fled syria two years ago after her home was
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destroyed in the civil war. less than a year later, yusra mardini, who is now 19, found herself competing at the rio olympics as part of the refugee team. now settled in germany, the teenager has her sights firmly set on tokyo 2020. our sports correspondent alex capstick has been to berlin to meet her — a warning that there are flashing images in his report. you know that you might lose your life on the way. yusra mardini, olympian and refugee who saved lives, including her own. the teenage swimmer who fled war—ravaged syria to pursue her sporting dreams. a 25—day nightmare, which featured a sinking boat full of migrants heading for greece. yusra and her sister jumped into the sea to help keep it afloat. i know that of course i was afraid, it was dark and, yeah, i was just seeing the island but never reaching it. not that i was the hero who was pulling a rope, you know. ok, i helped the boat,
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but it was not only me or only my sister. yusra mardini eventually arrived in berlin. already a promising swimmer, she joined this club at the city‘s olympic park. incredibly, just 11 months later, she was in rio on the biggest sporting stage of all, competing for the first ever refugee team. before, when they were telling me i was leaving to the olympics, it was such a surprise after only one year. i‘m a refugee in germany and i‘m going. and there was a refugee olympic team, it was incredible. yusra‘s remarkable back story means she‘s now a teenager in demand, with an expanding entourage befiting her growing stature on the world stage. i‘m just hoping to get the idea to people that, yeah, they are normal people and they had a normal life and they were forced to flee their country because of violence.
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and you‘re making a movie, or a movie‘s being made about you. how exciting is that? stephen daldry‘s directing it. yeah, it‘s amazing. i‘m really excited. but above all, yusra mardini is focused on training hard. she wants a place at the 2020 olympics in tokyo, and doesn‘t mind who she represents. my ambition is just to be an athlete. if i‘m going to start for germany or for my country, or for the refugee olympic team, i‘m going to do the best i can and it will be my pleasure. in a life full of twists and turns, the way to tokyo may not be straightforward, but it‘s clear this determined 19—year—old will rise to whatever challenges lie ahead. alex capstick, bbc news, berlin. the boss of nhs england says, give
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us the boss of nhs england says, give us the money promised by the brexiteers. president trump arrives in china for talks likely to be dominated by tensions over north korea. sse has confirmed it is merging its british domestic business with npower to form a new energy company. the uk‘s second—largest energy supplier also reported a big fall in its adjusted pre—tax profits of almost 14% in the six months to september. the deal knocks the country‘s big six energy firms down to five. has marks lost its sparks? the retailer announced they will open fewer simply food shops than planned after same store food sales fell. and will speed up their plans to close or reposition 105 of its shops. but the figures aren‘t as bad as expected, and they logged an increase in full—price clothing and home sales. sky has threatened to shut down sky news if the channel
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is an obstacle to the takeover bid by rupert murdoch‘s 21st century fox. fox already owns 39% of sky, but wants full control. regulators are investigating the deal over concerns that mr murdoch‘s media empire could become too powerful. monarch airlines has lost its high court battle over valuable runway slots it wanted to exchange with other carriers. the airline ceased trading last month and its administrators‘ lawyers called the slots its most valuable asset. we keep talking about driverless ca rs we keep talking about driverless cars but they are beginning to happen? yes, this looks like a significant development. we are talking about waymo, a company owned by google‘s parent company alphabet. in the past they have tested cars with human city drivers in them. they have now ditched the human safety driver. they have ditched
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humans out of the front seat, someone who can grab the wheel if necessary. and also they‘re going to let members of the public in the back. watch this. i wouldn‘t, would you get in the back of one of those? no, if i'm honest! they have done this before, they have tested it on short routes before but this is essentially a taxi service, so they don‘t know where people are going to go. they played a soothing music, but if it was road to hell! if you will see on the video there is a red button on the video there is a red button on the back seat which you can press if you want the vehicle to stop. but your point is very eschewed joker who would get in there? it requires a certain mindset. the people who will be using this service, they have signed up and they‘re
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preapproved, but they will be the early adopters. they will be the people saying, guys, it is fine, embrace it. earlier my colleague ben thomson spoke to rachel burgess, news editor of autocar.” thomson spoke to rachel burgess, news editor of autocar. i think the people who will be getting into these cars to begin with are people who have signed up to be the early adopters of. these are people who can't wait to be in an autonomous car. their stories will help raise public acceptance. the other thing is that we must remember that a lot of cars as standard today have semi—autonomous systems. so, a lot of people are using this as a stepping stone to full autonomy without even realising it. overall amount of years that will help public acceptance. there is a huge difference between cruise control and getting into the back of a car with nobody at the wheel. yes, currently i wouldn‘t! with nobody at the wheel. yes, currently i wouldn't! now, marks & spencer, not the best of figures?
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they‘re still making profits. and full price clothing and home where was up channel 4 encouraging. but we‘ve got this beautiful food here, food sales have always been a bright spot for marks & spencer, it‘s the treat at the end of the week. when you compare it to like—for—like sales with some of the other supermarkets, theirs have all been up, which is concerning. we can hear now from natalie berg, retail a nalyst now from natalie berg, retail analyst at planet retail. for any retailer today, a fundamental rule is that you have to be relevant to your customers. m&s over the past few years has failed to keep up with changing shopping habits. too many stores, they haven't moved online as quickly as they should have and they haven't invested in their stores like some of their competitors have. i think it is absolutely right that
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they're accelerating their store closure plan and focusing their efforts online. let's have a look at the markets. and they are up, as you can see. investors have liked what they have said they‘re doing. they‘re going to reposition and close about 105 stores. for the markets it is more about, what are they going to do about it? they say, we have a plan, and investors like that. and sse, one of the companies which is going to be merging? yes, merging with npower. they have said today that the merger is definitely happening. but we have seen it fall because they also issued some very disappointing figures for the last six months. for some reason the
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traders are liking the plan for m&s but not so much so for sse. and centrica, which owns british gas...? they were down yesterday, when news of this possible merger came through. news of the merger was confirmed today and sse gave their figures and centrica have come back up. we can bring you some first reaction to the sad news that antonio carluccio, the italian chef, has died at the age of 80. we have had a statement from the ceo of carluccio‘s. they say... he built his business from one restaurants to the fantastic round it is today. it is not just the fantastic round it is today. it is notjust antonio‘s name above outdoors, it is his heart and soul, his zest for life and sense of humour will be greatly missed. it
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finishes — the loss of antonio will be felt by all of our team who have been with him from the beginning. our thoughts are with his family and friends. sheep can be taught to recognise the faces of people they‘ve never met. researchers from cambridge university trained a flock of welsh mountain sheep to pick out the faces of celebrities, including the actors jake gyllenhaal and emma watson, and the former us president, barack obama. researchers say it proves the animals possess similar facial recognition abilities to primates. tom burridge reports. the sheep pauses and then correctly picks the former us president. next, please. shum of the sheep tested
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have huntingdon‘s disease. researchers wanted to know if those with a genetic mutation which causes the disease still have a properly functioning brain. what i am interested in is measuring their cognitive function and their cognitive function and their cognitive flexibility, and face recognition is a very complex human task, so we thought it would be good to see whether or not sheep were capable of doing it. identifying the correct face equals food. so, it turns out sheep are not as stupid as we all thought. so, my friends, which is 007? any takers? no. what about, who is this lady? so, when you next yet that stare, remember, she might remember your face. we‘re going to be talking to a
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shepherd in the next hour. and we will have much more on that later in the afternoon. a clutch of baby crocodiles have hatched at california‘s san diego zoo. they‘re west african dwarf crocodiles, the smallest known species of crocodile. little is known about how they live in the wild. at least one of them had to be hoped from its shell. they‘re now being cared for by staff. now, time for the weather. a lot going on with the weather at the
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moment, things changing all the time. via spells in the south—east overnight will be to some of the cold est overnight will be to some of the coldest weather. further north, outbreaks of rain sinking southwards and eastwards. it will be getting quite chilly in northern scotland. even down towards the south—east we could see a touch of frost. cloudy across much of the southern half of england and wales. hefty showers in the north, where it will also be windy. friday, not bad day for many, but still some hefty showers in the north. and rain swinging in from the west later in the day. for the most pa rt west later in the day. for the most part the weekend looks bright and cold, with some showers close to the coast. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy.
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today at 4pm: ordered out of africa — priti patel returns home to meet the prime minister — her cabinet future now in doubt over her controversial trip to israel. a pre—budget plea from the boss of nhs england — give us the money promised by the brexiteers. chef, restaurateur and tv‘s greedy italians, antonio carluccio, has died at the age of 80. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. and poppies allowed on the pitch? yes, good afternoon, simon. finally it seems some sense from fifa regarding the wearing of poppies. they had fined several home nations for doing so last year, but they agree they are not a political similar billion and that means both england and their visitors germany will wear the symbol of remembrance on friday night at wembley. ben has all the weather. it isa it is a beautiful sky. some people had sunshine and others haven‘t been
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lucky. if you didn‘t like what you got today, well stick with it because things will change a lot over the next few days. i will have the details coming up. thanks, ben. also coming up who knew? the sheep that can recognise human faces from photographs. and we‘re not pulling the wool! hello everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. usually flights home are a moment to relax and prepare for a warm welcome from familiar faces. not this one! in the past hour priti patel‘s plane arrived back at heathrow after she was told by theresa may to return from africa to answer further questions about her meetings with israeli officials. she‘d only been there for a few hours. but the controversy over her trip to israel has caught up with her, and she‘s now expected to face the sack. this report from our political correspondent leila nathou.
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another high—level meeting off the books. this time, with the israeli minister for public security, in parliament in september. in august, while on holiday in israel, priti patel said she had taken the opportunity to meet a number of people. among them charity leaders, israeli politicians, and even the country‘s prime minister, benjamin netanyahu. a secretary of state apparently disregarding strict ministerial procedure, holding meetings arranged outside the usual channels with no british government officials present. when reports of her august meetings emerged last week, priti patel initially claimed the foreign office did know in advance about her visit. on monday, she corrected the record, admitting 12 separate meetings and that the fco only became aware of her trip while it was under way. she was summoned to downing street and reminded of her obligations under the ministerial code and after that reprimand, theresa may considered the matter closed. but now she has been recalled
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to number ten after two further meetings with israeli government representatives in september were disclosed. she‘s a member of the british government. what she did secretly from the british government is discuss with a foreign powers government how best to get something out of the british government. as a collective, which is what the british government is, she should have kept everybody informed and not conducted her own foreign policy. after priti patel returned from her august trip, unknown to theresa may until yesterday, she proposed sending taxpayers‘ money to the israeli army to treat wounded syrian refugees. a controversial suggestion in a part of the world fraught with political sensitivities. these are bear traps for politicians. if you depart one iota from the agreed government position, there is a reason why government positions are resolved with collective discussion very carefully about what the implications are of any departure from a government position
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and she was getting herself into danger. that danger has not passed. she has been recalled from official business in east africa at downing street‘s request. at the start of the week, theresa may said she had accepted priti patel‘s apology for the way she had handled her visit to israel, and would look at tightening the ministerial code. but now it appears the international development secretary didn‘t reveal to the prime minister the true extent of her freelance diplomacy. priti patel‘s fate now seems clear. theresa may could be facing her second cabinet departure in a week. another blow for her fragile government. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster. we know priti patel is in a ministerial car. there are two questions, one, where is it going
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and secondly, will it be her last trip in one? we don't know where it is going, but theresa may will meet priti patel face—to—face at some point this afternoon. we don‘t know where it will take place. i‘m sure she won‘t make her walk up downing street in front of the cameras, but for priti patel that must have been a long and lonelyjourney home. the suggestion that she hasn‘t been totally open about the full extent of her meetings with israeli officials, after she was given what many people see as a very, very big and generous second chance. on monday she met the prime minister and they had a meeting and i think we can probably assume that theresa may said i want assurances that there is nothing else that is going could come out. there appears to be other meetings, one in september that downing street weren‘t aware. there are allegations and some suggestions from the jewish chronicle that downing street told priti patel not to add to her list of meetings with a meeting she had
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in new york on 18th september because it might embarrass the foreign office. now that has been denied by downing street, but we are ina denied by downing street, but we are in a situation really of claim and counter claim and i‘m sure part of what theresa may will need to do this afternoon is yet again try and clarify what has gone on. it is a mark of what many see as theresa may‘s weakness that one of the issuesis may‘s weakness that one of the issues is whether she wants priti patel to be sitting on her own backbenches? i don't think we should do do it. i don‘t think there is a big team of people behind priti patel about to launch her leadership campaign, she is a strong personality and someone who led a leading role during the referendum and the brexit campaign and there is and the brexit campaign and there is a lot of talk about making sure that the cabinet is pretty balanced when it comes to those who are on one side or another of that referendum, but i suppose, having been given the chance of being a cabinet minister, if she now is to lose herjob because of some alleged impropriety,
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that‘s not a problem for theresa may. i think what is the problem is that this is a huge distraction. it is destabilising. she lost michael fallon this week, accused of allegations of sexual impropriety. if she is forced to sack another cabinet minister that would be another destabilising effect. vicki young, thank you. a minister accused of inappropriate behaviour towards a member of his staff has apologised to his constituents. trade minister mark garnier said events involving his then secretary had been reported "outside of context" but that the public rightly expects high standards of conduct. he is currently under investigation by the cabinet office. the head of the nhs in england, simon stevens, has warned that the budget for the health service next year is well short of what‘s needed. he told a conference in london that the public expects the government to honour promises made by the vote leave campaign on health spending during the eu referendum such as an extra £350 million a week for the nhs. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. the nhs in england is under unprecedented strain.
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faced with the tightest sustained financial settlement in its history, it is failing to keep up with patient demand. today, its boss spoke bluntly about the impact on patients next year if significant extra funding was not made available. on the current funding outlook, the nhs waiting list will grow to five million people by 2021. that‘s an extra million people on the waiting list, one in ten of us waiting for an operation. the highest number ever. during the referendum, the leave campaign made controversial claims that breaking from the eu would mean an extra £350 million a week for the nhs. mr stevens said today it was a crucial deciding factor for those who voted brexit and must be respected. by the end of the next financial yearfor the nhs, march 2019, the united kingdom will have left the european union.
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trust in democratic politics will not be strengthened if anyone now tries to argue, "you voted brexit for a better funded health service, but precisely because of brexit, you now can‘t have one." speaking at the same conference, the health secretary said there could be no commitment because of the uncertainty of the brexit outcome. it wasn‘t a government promise, it was a promise by the leave campaign. but what i very much agree with is that if there is a brexit dividend, if we end up having less pressure on public finances, because of the fact that we are not making net contributions to the eu, then i believe that the nhs should be the first port of call. the plea for a cash boost for hospitals, ambulance and community services was reinforced today by three major think—tanks.
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they insist an extra £4 billion is essential for next year, if the nhs is to provide adequate care for patients. if you want to find out what waiting times are like at your local hospital service, go to the bbc‘s nhs tracker page on the website, you just need to put in your postcode. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. he told mr sargeant to leave his post last week because of allegations about his behaviour. our wales political correspondent james williams who is at the welsh assembly in cardiff has been following developments. the family put out a statement, but it is still confusing?ing yes, let
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me try and explain simon what happened over the last week. last monday, accusations were made to ca rwyn monday, accusations were made to carwyn jones the monday, accusations were made to carwynjones the first minister‘s office. his officials spoke to the releva nt office. his officials spoke to the relevant women and discussed to those allegations made about carl sa rg ea nt‘ those allegations made about carl sargea nt‘ con those allegations made about carl sargeant‘ con duct. he was on holiday in new york with his wife. on his return last friday, carwyn jones who was conducting a wider reshuffle of his welsh government cabinet spoke to carl sargeant and said there have been allegation made against you and i‘m going to have to sack you as communities secretary and therefore that was that. carl sargeant, and therefore that was that. carl sargea nt, after and therefore that was that. carl sargeant, after that announcement, released a statement on twitter saying it was right that he should step aside while an investigation was under way. he was suspended from the labour party by the way, but he said that he didn‘t know the exact details of the allegations, yet he would try to clear his name and return to government in time. that was last friday and of course, the news broke yesterday afternoon that
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north wales police had found carl sa rg ea nt‘ north wales police had found carl sargeant‘ body at his home in north—east wales at 11.30am and bbc wales understands that he had taken his own life and it led to much shock and sadness at this place, business, in the assembly has been suspended for the week, but sadness has given way somewhat to concern over the process and indeed some angerfrom some over the process and indeed some anger from some as to what exactly happened. it has come to a head with the family releasing a series of e—mails and letters between carl sargeant, his solicitor, and the labour party that was sent back and forth on friday of last week and monday of this week and from the correspondence we know that he had been accused of, "unwanted attention, inappropriate, touching or groping." attention, inappropriate, touching orgroping." ina attention, inappropriate, touching or groping." in a separate e—mail we‘re hearing from the solicitor that he accuses the first minister, ca rwyn that he accuses the first minister, carwyn jones, that he accuses the first minister, carwynjones, of that he accuses the first minister, carwyn jones, of prejudicing that he accuses the first minister, carwynjones, of prejudicing the inquiry because of an interview he
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gave to bbc wales on monday in which he talked about the discussions between his officials and those that had made the allegations against carl sargeant. and had made the allegations against carl sargea nt. and therefore, had made the allegations against carl sargeant. and therefore, we have had this family statement released this afternoon and i will read it to you, "the family wish to disclose the fact that carl maintained his innocence and he denied any wrongdoing. the distress of not being able to defend himself properly against the unspecified allegations meant he was not afforded common courtesy, decency or natural justice." the afforded common courtesy, decency or naturaljustice." the first minister is under a lot of pressure. the leader of ukip, neil hamilton called for him to resign as has the mp for the conservatives in breakons said that he should resign, but we have yet to hear from the first minister publicly other than a statement he issued saying that he was saddened by the loss of his friend and colleague, carl sargeant. james, thank you. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. ordered out of africa, priti patel
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has returned home to meet the prime minister. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum. antonio caluccio has died at the age of 80. and in sport, england and germany will both wear poppies on black armbands for their friendly on friday, after fifa changed their rules to allow players to wear the symbol as an act of remembrance. the uk anti—doping agency are worried tyson fury could send them bankrupt if he successfully sues the body for loss of earnings. and it is crunch time for england‘s women in australia. they must not lose their ashes test tomorrow or the series win will be out of their grasp. i will be back with more on those
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after 4.30pm. we saw the plane bringing priti patel arrive home back, we saw her get into a ministerial car and we believe she is heading into london. our political editor laura kuenssberg tweeted that theresa may and priti patel are going to meet face—to—face later on. that‘s a tweet coming in 25 seconds ago! let‘s speak to kate ossomore. how do you think the meeting should go? well, priti patel is sacked. she has clearly lied and decided that now is a time to tell us what really happened... can ijust a time to tell us what really happened... can i just pick a time to tell us what really happened... can ijust pick you up on that? you say she has clearly lied, there is a difference between clearly lying and fully briefing someone while on holiday? she said she had informed the foreign office and the foreign office said they found out after the meeting, i see that as a lie. what do you make of,
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well the jewish chronicle that as a lie. what do you make of, well thejewish chronicle say that as a lie. what do you make of, well the jewish chronicle say that they understand that priti patel was told by number ten not to include details of the extra meetings not to embarrass the foreign and commonwealth office? bearing that new information in mind if the meetings were minuted and if somebody from the — if somebody was there to record what was discussed then we would know whether or not it was the truth. at this point there has not been an investigation and because there hasn‘t been an investigation we don‘t know who to believe. what sort of investigation do you want? to make sure that any secretary of state, wherever they 90, secretary of state, wherever they go, they have an aide with them that is able to record what happened, there needs to be a list of meetings which are available for anyone to see and at this point in time that wasn‘t the case. what we found out is after the fact what happened. we still don‘t know what was discussed. so what the jewish chronicle still don‘t know what was discussed. so what thejewish chronicle have said, no one can dispute that because at this point in time we
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don‘t know what was discussed because at this point in time we don't know what was discussed can i look at what‘s in the public interest? is it in the public interest? is it in the public interest to see another cabinet minister facing interest to see another cabinet ministerfacing this interest to see another cabinet minister facing this sort of pressure at a time when there are lots of things going on where we need to have a government that deal with them surely? it's in the public interest to respect the roles that we have. we are all elected and we have been elected by the public. a secretary of state needs to conduct herself or himself in such a way that the public can trust us and can know when we are out doing business for them, on behalf of the country we do it with them in mind, we do not do it with ourselves in mind. yes, we are going through some serious negotiations around brexit and we have the international eyes on us. they are watching us. they are expecting the cabinet to conduct #24e78 selves in a —— themselves in a trustworthy way which respects the prime minister. at this point of time in, the prime minister is being undermined and she is taking too long to respond to this inappropriate, unacceptable behaviour and the sooner she gets
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rid of priti patel, i think it will put her in good stand with the public. at this point of time, she is showing that she is too weak to do so. do you have any sympathy with prit who was let‘s face it —— priti patel who was let‘s face it was on holiday? i'm the shadow secretary of state and if i‘m travelling out of the uk, i let the foreign office know. if i was the secretary of state, i would expect to do the same. so i believe that she has ignored those rules and the reason that they are there is to protect her, so this doesn‘t happen, but she has not done that so it‘s not about sympathy, it is about her ignoring a code which has been there for many yea rs code which has been there for many years and it is there to protect all of us so transparency always prevails. thank you very much for joining us. thank you. southern railway drivers have voted to accept a deal to end their long running dispute over driver operated trains members of the aslef union
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voted 4—1 to back the plans, which include a 28.5% pay rise over the next five years. govia thameslink, which runs southern, says it‘s pleased it can move ahead and deliver stability. the dispute started in april last year, leading to a series of strikes by drivers which caused major disruption for southern‘s 300,000 passengers. the trial has begun of a woman charged with murdering her ex—boyfriend following a suspected acid attack. thejury has heard mark van dongen was left paralysed from the neck down and lost his left leg, ear and eye. he ended his life in a euthanasia clinic 15 months later saying he couldn‘t bear the pain any longer. he died in belgium at the start of this year — more than a year after attack took place in bristol. our correspondent sarah ransome is at bristol crown court. a very distressing case? yes, it is. and of course, thejury a very distressing case? yes, it is. and of course, the jury has and of course, thejury has been hearing the start of that today, the defendant who was sitting in the dock and mark van dongen had been
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together five years, dock and mark van dongen had been togetherfive years, simon dock and mark van dongen had been together five years, simon and the jury together five years, simon and the jury were told it was a turbulent and complicated relationship. and they heard that when they broke up in 2015 the prosecution says the 48—year—old part—time fashion student was distraught. she was very upset that he had moved out and in fa ct upset that he had moved out and in fact moved on. he had got a new girlfriend. now, in the three weeks before the attack, the prosecution said she bought sulphuric acid online. this afternoon the jury were shown distressing police interviews with mark van dongen. obviously from his hospital bed. he said he had gone round to the flat on the night of the attack and that he had stayed over, that his former girlfriend was very jealous, he over, that his former girlfriend was veryjealous, he said and they had an argument. he went on to say that later that evening in the small hours of the morning, she had thrown acid over him, while he was sleeping. he said she had laughed and said, "if i can‘t have you, no one can " and said, "if i can‘t have you, no
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one can." now, the defendant denies murder and throwing a corrosive substance. she says she thought the liquid in the glass was actually wur. actually water. mark van dongen was badly injured in the attack. he was badly injured in the attack. he was paralysed and lost a leg and eye, as well as burns to 25% of his body. he stayed in bristol, in hospital, for a time and was moved to gloucester and then repatriated to gloucester and then repatriated to belgium to be near his family and it was the jury that he chose to end his life in an euthanasia clinic in belgium because he could no longer bear the pain from his horrific injuries. well, the trial will continue and it is set to last more about four weeks. sair ration thank you very much. the celebrity chef and restaurateur antonio carluccio has died aged 80. he was known for his italian restaurant chain carluccio‘s, which he founded in 1999, and for his television appearances. he wrote more than a dozen best—selling books and received the commendatore, the italian equivalent of a knighthood, in 1998. on the line is russell grant a
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friend and colleague of antonio carluccio. everybody who looks at the picture, remembers a smiley, happy and a charming man? yes, i think the way, i have been trying to think the way, i have been trying to think of one word, simon and i think the word jovial really does come out. i met him a number of times on brea kfast out. i met him a number of times on breakfast and morning television, a lwa ys breakfast and morning television, always charming, always lovely to chat to and he just radiated such warmth and a kind man. nothing was too much trouble. his generosity was renowned as well. when i finished strictly come dancing, i went into a big show in the west end and i remember walking through covent
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garden one day and he was out by his restau ra nt. garden one day and he was out by his restaurant. he called me in, "come on in, russell. come on in." i remember talking about strictly. he fed me and we chatted and he is just the most interesting and very loving man and then last year, i did a charity event with him over in hertfordshire. and again, he was just the kindest and loveliest man to be with. he was also very good, wasn‘t he? not for no reason did he manage to set up a huge business? that‘s right, he was the man who turned me on to olive oil which i wasn‘t on before and i remember he gave me a great big jar when i left one of his restaurants. the two greedy italians, what fun that was, when you look at that on television. you are drawn in to wherever they we re you are drawn in to wherever they were that day. it was just that
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brilliant personality of his which many people say came out through his cooking and his food too. he didn‘t take himself too seriously. i think it was more that he was such a lover of food and so passionate about his cookery and where he came from in italy that i think that his personality dues fused with the food and that‘s why it was joy sitting with him and talking with him. every mouthful would bring another story. what was your favourite? well, i think, i woos never into pasta very much, to be honest with you. when it comes, when he gave me the whole scene about pasta, i certainly got very excited by pasta which i never was before. well, russell, you certainly are
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now. we are grateful for your time. russell grant, thank you very much for joining russell grant, thank you very much forjoining us. thank you, simon. now — this might sound like wooly thinking — but new research indicates that sheep can learn to recognise human faces. no, i‘m not baa—rking mad, a flock of welsh mountain sheep was trained to pick out the faces of celebrities, including jake gylenhaal, emma watson, and the former us president barack o—baa—ma. the animals were tested to see if they could identify the famous faces among other photos. researchers at the ewe—niversity of cambridge say it proves sheep possess similar facial recognition abilities to primates. there is one person who knows what is going on here. tom heap prner of country scel file joins me from bristol. tom, you and i are old
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mates. you have been bleating on about this for sometime, yourself, this isn‘t a surprise to you, is it? no, a lot of farmers would say i could have a professorship at cambridge university because quite clearly, when you go into a farmer goes into a field the sheep can tell the difference between him and me and that‘s despite me appearing on the tele and notjust youtube going on about sheep! so yes, i think farmers would not quite seriously be surprised that sheep can tell the difference between one person and another and i wouldn‘t think that was because they had been to cambridge university and the sheep must be sharp! what the university saysis must be sharp! what the university says is different about this. it is the ability to pick it out from photographs? that takes a different pa rt photographs? that takes a different part of the brain apparently?m does. i mean, a two—dimensional image, it is believed, that animals see differently from a three—dimensional image, but in the end they are respond to go an image
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and if they can recognise thighs that image and i have my suspicion that image and i have my suspicion that it was an image as a spoon as opposed to a fork, if they chose the spoon and chose the spoon again and got a food reward t not a million miles from the food reward experiment done many decades ago. it isa experiment done many decades ago. it is a lot of fun and the researchers believe it could have some serious appliance ins terms of tackling some of our neuro generative diseases like parkinson‘s. of our neuro generative diseases like parkinson's. which is the purpose of the research, the serious side of it, but that‘s pretty good because if, well i don‘t know about you, if i walked into a field of sheep, i wouldn‘t able to pick one from another. well, i must say i thought i could take advice from the sheep. my advancing years i struggle to tell the difference between different people myself. maybe i could take a hint from them! but i mean, it‘sjust could take a hint from them! but i mean, it‘s just that thing of being able to identify a difference in something and doing do it repeatedly
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and the fact that they have chosen, barack obama, fiona bruce and emma watson, that‘s got to be the god given line up for one man and his dog. you said youtube. i suspect you have sat down and written a few more of those. let‘s have them. have sat down and written a few more of those. let's have them. the spent the whole of the m5 thinking up puns for you. i thought the sheep involved has to be called ramsey‘s. clearly they were watching the films on youtube. that has to be the case. the one thing i fear though, on youtube. that has to be the case. the one thing ifear though, there are 33 million sheep in this country. and if they are as bright as they seem, maybe we shouldn‘t ta ke as they seem, maybe we shouldn‘t take them for granted. tom heap, what a pleasure. good to talk to you. follow that. there is one person who has got to, ben rich.
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there is a camera in the way at the moment. that's about to move and it will reveal the northern lights of ben rich in one shot. amazing. bottom yes, northern lights. we have had some impressive pictures in from last night, from our viewers in scotla nd last night, from our viewers in scotland particularly. this came from oban. have you seen the northern lights? no, it was available in scotland, we would all be up there. it was available last night and for some, it might be available tonight, but you will have to wait a while. in the south, not much chance of seeing it. it is rare for us to see... there is rain. it is up here. we will get to that bit. you can see this is the first—half of the night, the cloud and the rain across the north, but watch what happens by the end of the night, the rain clears away. we will start to see clear skies across northern scotla nd see clear skies across northern scotland and that is where we may,
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may get another glimpse of the aurora. so you will need cloud—free skies to see that. on the satellite picture, there is a lot of cloud rolling in across scotland and northern ireland. we had a lot of cloud towards the south east, but in between, we have had a slice of sunshine. as we follow that area of clear skies southwards and eastwards during the evening, it is underneath that that we will see temperatures dropping away. an early frost across parts of the south—east. then we see the cloud and rain sinking its way in and up to the north, the skies will clear again by the end of the night. so some spots getting down to minus two. some spots in the south east won‘t be too far behind and after that cold start with the cloud rolling in through the morning rush hour, it is not going to feel that great across east anglia or the south east for the commute tomorrow morning. further west, a lot of cloud. through the south—west and into wales and the midlands, temperatures beginning to nudge up and sunnier skies beginning to return by this stage across the far
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north of england and scotland and northern ireland, but for the far north of scotland, here there will bea north of scotland, here there will be a scattering of showers. across the southern half of the country, the cloud should break up. further north, scotland and northern ireland and northern england, sunny skies match of the day and still feeling fairly chilly. this is friday‘s weather chart, quite a breezy day. notice the temperatures dipping away by this stage in northern areas. then some rain coming in across northern ireland, associated with this weather front, which will take a while to move away from the south on saturday morning. a chilly north—westerly wind on saturday. wintry showers over the
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high ground in scotland. for sunday, a change in the wind direction, moreover northerly wind. if you have had a lot of cloud during today, it will be getting brighter but it will also feel quite a lot colder. you‘re watching bbc news. our main headlines... ordered back from africa by the prime minister — priti patel lands in london to face questions over herjob as international development secretary after unsanctioned meetings with israeli politicians. the head of nhs england says the public expect the government to deliver the extra money promised during the eu referendum campaign. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is under pressure to give details about his decision to sack carl sargeant, a member of his cabinet who was found dead yesterday. tributes are being paid to the chef
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antonio carluccio, who has died at the age of 80. time for the sport now. tyson fury‘s diet is coming under some scrutiny? yes. over the yea rs under some scrutiny? yes. over the years we‘ve had some fairly elaborate explanations for failed drugs tests. i remember a player claiming he had actually taken his wife‘s diet pills, another claiming their drinks were spiked, but tyson fury claims an adverse finding of the banned stimulant nandrolone came from him eating uncastrated wild bore. i‘m not sure where they serve that but i think the wild boar farmers would have raised eyebrows about that one as well, simon schama and the main story is what is happening on the pitch in terms of what the players are wearing, and both england and germany are being allowed officially to wear poppies this time? yes. fifa have changed their ruling. they will be able to
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wear the poppies on friday when they play each other at wembley. the new rules allow players to wear poppies as an actor of remembrance. —— as an act of remembrance. it has also been confirmed that video referee and will be used in the game, the first time in an official match in the uk. the new manager of west ham united, david moyes, seems to have a glint in his eye after returning to football. there is a sense that his difficult times at manchester united and sunderland might be behind him. he‘s been speaking to the media at large for the first time since his appointment and believes his new clu b appointment and believes his new club have acquired a good manager andi club have acquired a good manager and i think it is good for us both. it's and i think it is good for us both. it‘s good for me because i am back m, it‘s good for me because i am back in, it‘s what i want to be doing,
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it‘s what i do. and i want to get back and i want to do well and i wa nt back and i want to do well and i want the team to do well. i also think it‘s good for west ham, i think it‘s good for west ham, i think they‘ve got a good manager. the uk anti—doping agency fear they could be bankrupted by an ongoing case against former heavyweight champion tyson fury. there are concerns that if he wins his legal battle he might soon uk anti—doping for the loss of earnings. it is understood they have asked the government to underwrite the case of. sports correspondent says ukad are still determined to pursue the case against him. from what i understand discussions have been heard in recent weeks with the government, with the department for culture, media and sport. there is no intention to drop this case, it is the intention as i understand it to see it through. that may require the government to underwrite this case, if indeed ukad go on to lose it. but they are confident it would seem in their case. we will see what happens in the months ahead. but
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certainly that is the position which has been outlined. england player jermaine mcgillvary has been cleared of whiting the lebanon captain in the rugby league group game in syd ney last the rugby league group game in sydney last weekend. he was facing a ban of up to 12 weeks had he been found guilty. but his exoneration means he is free to play in england‘s final group match against france in perth on sunday. ahead of test matches against scotland and england later this month, samoan rugby has been declared bankrupt. the nation‘s prime minister has asked numbers of the public to donate money to keep the sport alive. and the rfu has said it will contribute to samoa‘s costs while they are in england. earlier i asked our rugby union reporter how damaging this was for the game. that is the doomsday scenario, that a rugby nation with a rich history like samoa, which has provided so many great players for leagues around the world, if they were to fizzle away, that would be an enormous shame. i think world rugby are determined
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not to let that happen. part of the problem is that the samoan prime minister is also the head of the rugby union. world rugby have pointed out that they have given £1.5 million towards samoan rugby in 2017. they pay for the players to fly over for their tours at this time of the year. but there are issues that need to be resolved between world rugby and the samoan rugby union. as for the games this month, they are not in doubt. world rugby will underwrite any issues such as insurance and logistics. england will also contribute some costs as a goodwill gesture. so, the test in november will certainly go ahead. going forward, however, some issues to be resolved to make sure this great rugby nation stays as strong as it can be. that‘s the sport for now. now on afternoon live,
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let‘s go nationwide, and see what‘s happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. tara mills is in belfast. just remind people what happened 30 yea rs just remind people what happened 30 years ago in that horrific attack in enniskillen. it was a sunday and the bomb exploded as people gathered at the cenotaph for a remembrance day service. 11 people died on the day and a 12th person died several years later. even though northern ireland was experiencing high levels of violence at the time, this was still unexpected for two main reasons. firstly that it happened during such a sombre event on such a sensitive day for many people. it was also unexpected because people in enniskillen largely lived and worked together side by side without the serious sectarian tensions experienced in other places across northern ireland at the time. the former editor of the local paper
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said today that enniskillen held its breath that day, that the eyes of the world were focused on them to see what happened and no—one was really sure what the impact would be on the community. but it turned out to be the forgiveness and generosity of spirit so many of the families which really became the story in the aftermath, in particular gordon will soon, whose daughter died that day, when he said he would pray for her killers. many people around the world admired his compassion in such dreadful circumstances. the bombing was also seen as a pivotal moment in what was to become the peace process. gerry adams told the irish times at the time that it was a terrible mistake and it was seen as a turning point in many minds that politics had to replace the violence that had lighted society here for many years. and what is happening today to commemorate that 30th anniversary? a temporary memorial was unveiled today and the great—granddaughter of one of the
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victims was at the service. what has struck many people today has been the very vivid memories of those caught up in the explosion. the son and daughter of a couple who both died that day spoke movingly about losing their parents that they. their son was only 16 at the time. it reinforced for them and people like them that really 30 years is no time at all. tara mills in belfast, thank you very much. now, we can speak to thank you very much. now, we can speakto an thank you very much. now, we can speak to an adult if in in salford about a day of birthday celebrations for sir ken dodd, how has he been marking it? he has been celebrating in his home city of liverpool, a city that he has never left. he still lives in the house that he grew up in. he was honoured today at a civic lunch in the city. they put on some wages, and they had diddy
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pies and children from a local school saying one of his biggest hits to him. as well as the comedy he has had a huge career as a singer. his number one song tears was the third biggest selling single in the 1960s. he has been speaking to rogerjohnson about his childhood and his remarkable career and how it has lasted so far for 60 years. britain, we are an island race... i don't do dirty. i can't... i don't know how to spell the words! you have approximately 30 seconds to make friends with the audience. you play an audience like you play an instrument. know where the hotspots are, where it needs coaxing, where you can flirt... at midnight tonight, ladies, your husband or
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boyfriend — or both of them... anybody who has been to one of his shows knows that he goes on and on and on — but he shows no sign of slowing up onto which he doesn‘t. there can‘t be many entertainers at his age who have his sheer energy and stamina. he is still performing today, in fact he‘s in the middle of a tour at the moment. anyone who goes to one of his live shows really would be wise not to bother booking a taxi for a particular time to be picked up, because his shows to go on and on. they can last for more than five hours. in fact the joke is, if you are going to one of ken dodd‘s shows, you‘re best to take bla nkets dodd‘s shows, you‘re best to take blankets and breakfast with you. as he said to roger, he doesn‘t do dirty jokes, he said to roger, he doesn‘t do dirtyjokes, so i shall end with a classic... did you hear about the shrimp that went to the prawn cocktail party? he pulled a muscle. thanks very much for that! you can
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watch more of that interview on full north—west tonight at 6.30. and if you would like to catch up with any of the items that we‘ve been covering on news nationwide, just go to the iplayer and you can watch it there. she fled syria two years ago after her home was destroyed in the civil war. less than a year later, yusra mardini, who is now 19, found herself competing at the rio olympics as part of the refugee team. now settled in germany, the teenager has her sights firmly set on tokyo 2020. our sports correspondent alex capstick has been to berlin to meet her — a warning that there are flashing images in his report. you know that you might lose your life on the way. yusra mardini, olympian and refugee, who saved lives, including her own. the teenage swimmer who fled war—ravaged syria to pursue her sporting dreams. a 25—day nightmare, which featured a sinking boat full of migrants heading for greece.
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yusra and her sister jumped into the sea to help keep it afloat. i know that of course i was afraid, it was dark and, yeah, i was just seeing the island but never reaching it. not that i was the hero who was pulling a rope, you know. ok, i helped the boat, but it was not only me or only my sister. yusra mardini eventually arrived in berlin. already a promising swimmer, she joined this club at the city‘s olympic park. incredibly, just 11 months later, she was in rio on the biggest sporting stage of all, competing for the first ever refugee team. before, when they were telling me i was leaving to the olympics, it was such a surprise — after only one year, i‘m a refugee in germany, and i‘m going. and there was a refugee olympic team, it was incredible.
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yusra‘s remarkable back story means she‘s now a teenager in demand, with an expanding entourage befiting her growing stature on the world stage. i‘m just hoping to get the idea to people that, yeah, they are normal people and they had a normal life and they were forced to flee their country because of violence. and you‘re making a movie, or a movie‘s being made about you. how exciting is that? stephen daldry‘s directing it. yeah, it‘s amazing. i‘m really excited. but above all, yusra mardini is focused on training hard. she wants a place at the 2020 olympics in tokyo, and doesn‘t mind who she represents. my ambition is just to be an athlete. if i‘m going to start for germany or for my country, or for the refugee olympic team, i‘m going to do the best i can and it will be my pleasure. in a life full of twists and turns, the way to tokyo may not be straightforward, but it‘s clear this determined 19—year—old will rise to whatever
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challenges lie ahead. alex capstick, bbc news, berlin. in a moment, the business news, with rachel. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. pretty patel has returned home to meet the prime minister, her cabinet future now in doubt. nhs england —— the head of nhs england says it expects the government to deliver the extra money list during the eu referendum campaign. chef antonio carluccio has died at the age of 80. here is your business headlines on afternoon live. sse has confirmed it is merging its british domestic business with npower to form a new energy company. the uk‘s second—largest energy supplier also reported a big fall in its adjusted pre—tax profits of almost 14% in the six months to september.
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the deal knocks the country‘s big six energy firms down to five. has marks lost its sparks? the retailer announced they will open fewer simply food shops than planned after same store food sales fell. and it will speed up its plans to close or reposition 105 of its shops. but the figures aren‘t as bad as expected, and they logged an increase in full—price clothing and home sales. sky has threatened to shut down sky news if the channel is an obstacle to the takeover bid by rupert murdoch‘s 21st century fox. fox already owns 39% of sky, but wants full control. regulators are investigating the deal over concerns that mr murdoch‘s media empire could become too powerful. that is quite a tough threat, isn‘t it? that's right. it is an interesting 24 hours for 21st
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century fox, because yesterday we we re century fox, because yesterday we were thinking about how disney were interested in buying its assets, and today, the rather credible threat that sky news, if it was an obstacle for the takeover by 21st century fox, that they would shout it down. it is interesting, because sky news hasn‘t been making as much money in the last five years or so. we have got a changing media landscape, with for and ways of consuming news. got a changing media landscape, with for and ways of consuming newsm is very much part of the british landscape, and top journalism, everybody is saying it would be a huge loss? it would, and incredibly scary time for people who work there as well. but he is clearly very keen on this merger to go through. now, marks & spencer, fewer simply food stores to be open? that's right. some people described simple food as
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a paradise, convenient place to get your food. but apparently they have not been doing too well. it has been down about half a percent on sales, which is not a huge amount but it is a sign of things to come and the shop is worried about it. and therefore they‘re going to close a few more and not go ahead with some store openings. i was talking to rachel about this yesterday, the merger of two of the big six energy companies? yep six become five, with sse going ahead with its merger with npower. we have got an interview with the ceo tony keeling, simon jack spoke to him earlier... fundamentally rethink actually this is really good for competition. there are 60—odd hump unease in the
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market today and they do compete fiercely. this year over 500,000 switched in the market. and we think by being more efficient as an organisation, in the future, we can develop new products and propositions to meet customers' needs and we think in the future it gives a variety and opportunity and it is good for competition. we are joined by a senior analyst from hargreaves lansdown. joined by a senior analyst from hargreaves la nsdown. first joined by a senior analyst from hargreaves lansdown. first of all, sky news, the threat from 21st century sky news, the threat from 21st ce ntu ry fox ? sky news, the threat from 21st century fox? yeah. the context of this is of course the takeover which is going on. there has been a lot of hostility to that and kickback, not least from numbers of the government and also from the competition and market authority. so this is probably a shot across the browse trying to push that through. how is this going to impact the bid by disney? yesterday we were all
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reporting about how that was potentially on the cards, and how disney were wanting to acquire fox‘s assets — where does that put this?” think disney needs to up its game. if you look at where it was a couple of years ago, it started supplying netflix with its own content, which helped to boost netflix‘ figures and disney itself now needs to up its game and that is where it stands in terms of this merger. moving on to marks & spencer, simple food, the premium end, however, analysts have been saying today how they have not been saying today how they have not been as price friendly — have they been as price friendly — have they been suffering from that? to a certain extent. it is towards the higher end of the spectrum in terms of its food offering. and we know
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that there is a consumer slow down. consumer wages are not rising as fast as inflation, and a lot of that has come down to the brexit vote and the fall in sterling. marks & spencer itself has lots of structural problems which it has had for a while and the new management tea m for a while and the new management team is trying to turn the business around. it is a problem for them in that it has got these structural problems, and at the same time there has been a bit of an economic slowdown in the high street. thank you very much forjoining us. let‘s have a look at the markets before we go. the ftse ending in positive territory. marks & spencer shares we re territory. marks & spencer shares were up, despite those sales being down and then wanting to close at shops. but presumably investors are trying to counter that drop in sales. the ftse is storming up, what‘s going on? sales. the ftse is storming up, what's going on? generally it is to do with sterling but also they have
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had some good positive movements today. sse shares were up earlier on and that might have boosted it. thank you very much. you‘re watching afternoon live. and update on the story concerning the family of the welsh labour minister carl sargea nt. they have said he was deprived of natural justice. they have said he was deprived of naturaljustice. he they have said he was deprived of natural justice. he was they have said he was deprived of naturaljustice. he was found dead yesterday. a spokesman for carwyn jones, the first minister of wales, has said, this is a difficult time for everybody, particularly the family of carl sargeant. bike everybody in the welsh labour family, he says he is deeply upset by the death of his friend. tomorrow smb members will meet in the assembly to remember carl sargeant and discuss the tragic events of the past week. carwyn jones will and discuss the tragic events of the past week. carwynjones will make a further statement following that meeting... so, that newsjust coming in. —— assembly members. that‘s it
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from the afternoon live team. let‘s have a look at the weather. that no two days of weather are the same at the moment. further north we have had some spells of sunshine. this was how it looked in york earlier on. we‘ve had this sunshine today across central areas. now, on. we‘ve had this sunshine today across centralareas. now, it on. we‘ve had this sunshine today across central areas. now, it is all eyes to the north—west. before the cloud and rain arrives across this south—eastern corner, it‘s going to turn very! indeed. down to 4 degrees in the centre of london, even below freezing out in the countryside. later in the night it will turn chilly across northern scotland as the skies clear tomorrow there will
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be quite a lot of cloud rolling in across the south—east. it will be feeling decidedly chilly for the commute to work. across northern england generally a lot of cloud tomorrow before we return to brighter skies. but windy in the far north, with some hefty showers. they could be containing some hail and thunder. in the south we will see more in the way of sunshine developing. actually for most places, not a bad day. heading into friday, more change, as it starts off fine for many. still some heavy showers in the north, and then we see cloud coming in from the west later in the day with outbreaks of rain. that front will hang around as we head into the start of the weekend. but once we lose that front, you can see the white lines
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going all the way up to the arctic and we will be getting some very cold aircoming in and we will be getting some very cold air coming in our direction. the north—westerly wind bringing showers across scotland and down into north wales. on sunday the wind direction shifts slightly, more northerly wind. if you can avoid those showers close to the coast, most of us will see some sunshine through the weekend. today at 5. the fate of priti patel hangs in the balance — as she is summoned back to the uk from africa following unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. the international development secretary has been accused of breaking ministerial rules — downing street denies the prime minister was aware of the discussions. ms patel landed back in the uk this afternoon amid increased speculation that she‘s going to be sacked — the opposition is already calling for her to go. at this point in time the pm is being undermined,
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she‘s taking far too long to respond to this inappropriate, unacceptable behaviour, and the sooner she gets rid of priti patel, i think it will put her in good stand with the public. we‘ll have the latest from downing street. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the head of the nhs in england challenges the government to find
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