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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 8, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm carole walker. the headlines at 8pm... priti patel resigns as international development secretary after meeting with the prime minister at downing street. theresa may says the decision was right. it follows controversy over undisclosed meetings with israeli government officials. ms patel was ordered back to the uk from africa, where she'd been on an official trip. the scandal is the latest to hit the government as it battles with the allegations of sexual harassment and criticism of the foreign secretary. in other news, the actor kevin spacey faces another allegation of sexual misconduct as a woman comes forward with accusations he abused her son. the head of the nhs pushes the government for an extra £350 million per week — as promised by the leave campaign. also ahead this hour, president trump arrives in beijing for a three day state visit of china. talks with the chinese president
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xijinping are likely to be dominated by tensions over north korea. and they're not as stupid as you might think — new research suggests sheep are capable of facial recognition. good evening and welcome to bbc news. in the last hour, priti patel has resigned from her post in the government as international development secretary. last friday the bbc revealed that ms patel had held several unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians while on holiday in the country this summer. she apologised for that on monday — but earlier today more questions about other meetings she did not disclose emerged —
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and she was recalled back to the uk from an official trip to africa. as her resignation was announced priti patel issued a letter which she had written to the prime minister. in her two—page resignation letter ms patel said it had been a tremendous privilege to serve in the cabinet. but perhaps the most significant line came on the second page where she apologised for her conduct and said... "while my actions were meant with the best of intentions, my actions also fell below the standards of transparency and openness that i have promoted and advocated. i offer a fulsome apology to you and to the government for what has happened and offer my resignation." responding to the letter the prime minister said, "now that further details have come to light, it is right that you have decided to resign and adhere to the high standards of transparency and openness that you have advocated." our chief political correspondent
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vicki young is in westminster for us. vicki young is in westminster for us. this was inevitable?” vicki young is in westminster for us. this was inevitable? i think it was. i think many at westminster felt priti patel was fortunate not to have been sacked on the spot—on monday when she had the first meeting with theresa may, these undisclosed meetings she had not run past the foreign office or her own department, going to israel on holiday, having these meetings, no civil servants present. this is all about propriety, transparency, access that very senior ministers give to people, lobbying. it is not the right thing, it probably contravenes the ministerial code that she could have these meetings and no one knows what they were talking about behind closed doors. that was the initial problem, if you like. she was very lucky not to be sacked when that happens, then the
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idea that she was not fully open and honest with the prime minister when they met face to face earlier in the week did leave a certain amount of enever that —— inevitability about this when she was ordered back from a visit, this long flight tracked by all sorts of people and having to go to downing street, i think it meant she did not have much of a chance when there was a notion that there was at least one of the meeting in september that downing street did not know about, and also not confirmed but reports in an israeli newspaper that she had visited the golan heights, an area not even recognised by the british government. i think with all that, there was no way she could survive. she has been given the opportunity to resign, but from theresa may's letter it is very clear she would have been sacked if she had not gone. it allows her to leave with at least a little dignity, saying she has resigned as opposed to being sacked outright? it does, but this is the
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end at the moment to her cabinet career, she rose very rapidly through the ranks. i think the problem for her is that this is and was a terrible error ofjudgment and i think many people watching and hearing what she did over the last few days will really be thinking what was she thinking? did she really think this was the right and proper thing to do, did she really think she could get away with this? for her i think there are some questions to answer, what it leaves theresa may with is another headache almost a week to the minute since michael fallon, the former defence secretary, also resigned for com pletely secretary, also resigned for completely different reasons. it is very unusual for cabinet ministers to be forced out not in reshuffles but because of other things they have done wrong, you have to go back to 1998 under tony blair for the last time it happened. theresa may does not have the luxury that tony blair had of a huge parliamentary majority, and riding high in the opinion polls. she now has to look
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at how she has another cabinet reshuffle. and she will have, in priti patel, a forthright and ambitious politician, a very strong campaigner for brexit on the backbenches, and a pose that she has to try to fill while retaining that very delicate balance in the cabinet over brexit? there are many who were on the leave side of the referendum who really saw priti patel as a voice speaking up for their views in the cabinet, and it is very finely balanced. i think with the replacement they will have to bring in either position in the department for international development or by moving someone around, she will probably had to bring in somebody with similar views to priti patel. that is always the problem, this balancing act trying to assert higher authority. would she go further into a wider reshuffle ? she go further into a wider reshuffle? there was speculation about that. she might do that after
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the summer. these things are so fraught even for prime ministers in a very secure position, they often go wrong. we saw what happened last week when she replaced michael fallon with the then chief whip evan williams, so avoiding a further reaching reshuffle is probably what she will do. a fine balancing act yet again, not a position theresa may wants to be in. i am sure she has many other thing she would like to do. when she appointed gavin williamson is defence secretary, that was the name nobody expected. but who at this stage appeared to be the likely contenders for the now vacant post at the department for international development? if she is looking at replacing like with like, if you wa nt to replacing like with like, if you want to put it in that way, somebody like penny mordaunt, she has been a defence minister and is at work and pensions, she was pretty prominent on the leave side of the referendum campaign, she is a possibility. but
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then i think you would have to look at the next rung down, ministers of state, people from the brexit side. there are not that many. a lot of people are talking about alistair burt, incredibly experienced, he has beenin burt, incredibly experienced, he has been in the foreign office and is back there now. he could fit straight back in the role that he was not just on straight back in the role that he was notjust on the remain side, he was notjust on the remain side, he was one of ten or 15 tory mps very much threatening to rebel over the whole issue of article 50, so i do not think that is political... politically possible. i am sure they are sitting right now in downing street with their bits of paper, going through the possible people might be. many thanks for the latest from westminster. on the line is stephen pollard, editor of the jewish chronicle. thank you very much forjoining us. let me ask you for your reaction to
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priti patel‘s resignation? let me ask you for your reaction to priti patel's resignation?” let me ask you for your reaction to priti patel's resignation? i think it was inevitable. i think it was pretty obvious to everyone that she was not long for the cabinet, as it were. your newspaper had claimed that ms patel had actually told theresa may about some of these meetings in israel, including the meetings in israel, including the meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. meeting with prime minister benjamin neta nyahu. that has meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. that has been specifically denied by number ten. do you stand by that? we had to mac resources , do you stand by that? we had to mac resources, i had too much resources contact me who both had the same story. —— we had two sources. that was that at a meeting held between priti patel and the prime minister before the un general assembly in september, one of the things they discussed was the idea that priti
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patel had herself earlier discussed with benjamin neta nyahu. patel had herself earlier discussed with benjamin netanyahu. the meeting between them came up, as it were, in that meeting. so the prime minister was aware that she had met benjamin netanyahu, according to my two separate sources, in september rather than, as downing street keep insisting, just last friday. there was one other aspect to my story which was that the list that she put out on monday, that priti patel put out on monday, that priti patel put out on monday, that priti patel put out on monday, that supposedly clarified the various meeting she had held in israel, the thing that has basically done for her now was that another two meetings have emerged that were not on that list. now my sources, and since i published a story i have had a third source come to me and say this is exactly correct, that priti patel, according to my three sources, did tell number ten on monday about at least one of those meetings, a
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meeting with a senior official from the israeli foreign office, but that's number ten asked her not to put that in the list. i don't know what the reason for not putting it in the list was, one source said to me it was to avoid embarrassing the foreign office. i don't know why it would embarrass the foreign office, iam not would embarrass the foreign office, i am not making accusations or speculating as to the reasons behind this, but i am saying that my sources remain very clear and adamant. i went back to two of the sources after the statement from number ten rejecting my views to say let's be doubly clear, am i right? is this information correct? i am absolutely assured that the inspiration is correct. number ten has said categorically that those two claims from your newspaper were not true. i understand what you were saying, you are sticking with that story, do you think in that case that she was
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u nfa i rly think in that case that she was unfairly pushed out?” think in that case that she was unfairly pushed out? i don't, actually. i think her position was untenable from the moment it became clear just how heavily untenable from the moment it became clearjust how heavily she had breached the ministerial code. my story was not, as some people have tried to suggest, an attempt to excuse priti patel, it is a story about number ten's behaviour. the fa ct about number ten's behaviour. the fact is you can't as a senior cabinet ministerjust go around and have those kinds of meetings informally, you have to in advance that the government no, let the government machine no. she behaved very stupidly and i think her position was untenable. stephen pollard from thejewish chronicle, many thanks for talking to us this evening. joining me now from our westminster studio isjoe watts, political editor of the independent. this resignation was a pretty
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strongly expected one. the long, drawn—out journey back strongly expected one. the long, drawn—outjourney back from uganda seemed to simply prolong the agony for priti patel? it was one of the more bizarre days ofjournalism in recent history, and that is saying something. there have been lots of bizarre days. everyjournalist in westminster was watching a small yellow dot move along a map from africa and europe and back to london as they tracked priti patel's movements back from her trip, which she had onlyjust movements back from her trip, which she had only just left movements back from her trip, which she had onlyjust left for. but eve ryo ne she had onlyjust left for. but everyone knew she was sitting on the plane without any wi—fi, without any phone contact, and the moment she touched down she would realise she was in the middle of a storm, pretty much of her own making. it seems as though priti patel has managed to turn this into a resignation rather than a sacking, which is what many people had
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expected? i suppose there is an interesting point in that, if you look at their letters. she says she is offering her resignation, if you look at theresa may's letter it says it is right that you resign. but if you are back at the last couple of days, i think it is blatantly clear to anyone looking at the story that yesterday and certainly on monday priti patel was not going to resign, despite most of these meetings. they we re despite most of these meetings. they were kept secret previously, then they where in the public domain and reveal to downing street, she was not going to resign. that has changed the last hours because downing street got angry that there we re downing street got angry that there were further details she had not revealed to them, and it is that anger on the part of downing street that has led to her being forced to resign, i think is possibly the best way to put it. stay with us for a moment, joe, we havejust had some reaction in from the foreign
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secretary, borisjohnson. reaction in from the foreign secretary, boris johnson. he reaction in from the foreign secretary, borisjohnson. he was speaking to answer a reporter on a chip to washington. let's listen to what he said. priti patel has been a very good colleague and friend for a long time and a first—class secretary of state for international development and, it has been a real pleasure working with her, and i'm sure she has a great future ahead. thank you very much. borisjohnson going thank you very much. boris johnson going back thank you very much. borisjohnson going back tojoe watts from the independent. a few supportive words from boris, they we re very supportive words from boris, they were very much fellow campaigners in the leave campaign?” were very much fellow campaigners in the leave campaign? i suppose you could look at it that way. if he we re could look at it that way. if he were being much more cynical, and some people in westminster are, you could say there are two other points underlining his words. one is there was an ongoing turf war between priti patel and borisjohnson, she being the cabinet minister for the department for international development, which also deals with
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some foreign affairs, and he being the foreign secretary. obviously her trip to israel to meet the israeli prime minister steps on his toes quite heavily. that is one point. looking at it from our respect, he has come out of this better. earlier in the week his head also looked to be on the chopping block after he made a really bad gas to do with a british woman imprisoned in iran. earlier this week it looked like both he and priti patel, both of their positions were in question, but the focus has shifted to priti patel. she has been pushed out, and perhaps somewhere deep in his heart boris is quite happy that the focus is not on him. for the prime minister, a whole new set of problems. she will have a pretty strong willed and ambitious backbencher to contend with in priti patel, and of course she has to replace at the department for international developer trust retaining that very delicate balance
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over brexit. just fairly briefly, who is your top tip to replace her? alistair burt is the name that keeps coming up from the people i speak to, ithink coming up from the people i speak to, i think there is a movement from a lot of tory mps to get the person he was simply write for the job, sweeping aside anything to do with brexit or anything else and get the most brexit or anything else and get the m ost sta ble brexit or anything else and get the most stable and best person to do thejob. many thanks, joe. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:a0pm in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the broadcaster and author dame joan ba kewell and camilla tominey, political editor of the sunday express. the headlines... priti patel resigned as international development secretary after meeting the prime minister at downing street. theresa may says the decision was the right one.
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it follows controversy over undisclosed meetings with israeli government officials. ms patel was ordered back to the uk from africa, where she had been on an official trip. the actor kevin spacey faces another allegation of sexual misconduct as a woman comes forward with accusations he abused her son. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sports centre, let's join hugh. good evening. chelsea ladies are in action in the champions league this evening, laying at sea rose and guard of sweden at kings meadow. before the game the rose and got players felt they would be the underdogs. things have not gone their way in underdogs. things have not gone theirway ina underdogs. things have not gone their way in a fairly tight affair so their way in a fairly tight affair so far. fran kirby of england with a moment of magic to put chelsea 1—0 up moment of magic to put chelsea 1—0 up on the night, that remains the score just over ten minutes up on the night, that remains the scorejust over ten minutes into up on the night, that remains the score just over ten minutes into the second half. northern ireland face a huge two—legged world cup play—off with switzerland.
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the first leg comes tomorrow night at windsor park, with michael o'neills's side aiming to reach the tournament for the first time since 1986. whatever happens, when you look back, we don't have any regrets, regardless of if it goes our way or not. at the end of the day we know the prize is massive, we know what it would mean to everyone in northern ireland, the players, staff, everybody associated, the media, everyone in northern ireland. our primary focus is on how we get through the two games, that is where i see real through the two games, that is where i see real assurance through the two games, that is where i see real assurance in the players. lots of work for new west ham manager david moyes. the new manager of west ham united, david moyes, says he has some things to repair after returning to football. moyes was relegated from the premier league with sunderland last season and takes over in east london with west ham in the bottom three. unlike some of the club's fans, he sees his appointment as positive.
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i think it is good for us both. it is good for me, i am back—in, what i love doing, it is what i do. i want to get back, want to do well, want the team to do well. i think it is good for west ham as well, i think they have a good manager. england say they will be motivated by revenge when they face australia in the test match element of their multi—format ashes series later on. the match begins in the early hours of thursday in sydney, and is the first ever day—night women's test. andy swiss reports. time to grin and win. for heather knight's england team, this is a test with no room for error. they came to australia as the newly crowned world champions, the hosts, though, have won two of the first three games and their confidence is very clear. beat england as a rallying cry, but that bullishness mightjust backfire. does it give you extra fire in the
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belly, when you see banners like that? of course, that is the aussie marketing campaign, it is quite interesting and funny for us as a tea m interesting and funny for us as a team to see, it is all about us and how we perform over the next few days, if we can win this game it stands is in good stead. the spotlight will be on england in more ways than one. this will be the first day/ night test, men's or women's, in ashes history. for the players, a whole new ball game. ora pink ball game, players, a whole new ball game. or a pink ball game, to players, a whole new ball game. ora pink ball game, to be players, a whole new ball game. or a pink ball game, to be precise. easier to see under the lights, never previously used in women's international. at england and australia are no strangers to innovation. after all, they played the very first women's tests more than years ago. now they will share another piece of sporting history. both teams are looking forward to it. we don't play a lot of test cricket and you only have the opportunity to be part of history
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wa nts, opportunity to be part of history wants, so i think both teams will be extremely excited. it is australia on the front foot. win here and they retain the ashes. england will have to hope they do not live up to their billing. meanwhile, england's men have been playing one of their two warm—up games before their ashes series starts in a fortnight‘s time. mark stoneman, dawid malan and joe root all scored half centuries against a cricket australia 11. play ended on day one with england 278—8. chelsea ladies still leading 1—0 in the champions league, you can follow it on the bbc website. i will be back with more in sportsday at 10:30pm. the hollywood actor and theatre director kevin spacey is facing fresh allegations of sexual misconduct tonight. the us journalist heather unruh has told reporters that her son was sexually assaulted by mr spacey last year. mr spacey has not responded to any of the allegations. the actors union equity told the bbc that the problems of sexual
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harassment were endemic in the industry. our special correspondent lucy manning reports. injuly 2016, actor kevin spacey sexually assaulted my son. the tears of a mother in boston today, revealing what she claimed happened to her son. the victim, my son, was a starstruck straight 18—year—old young man, who had no idea that the famous actor was an alleged sexual predator or that he was about to become his next victim. journalist heather unruh‘s tweet about kevin spacey last month triggered all the allegations against him. today, she went public and the police are now investigating. to kevin spacey, i want to say this — shame on you for what you did to my son. the bbc has interviewed
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more alleged victims. chris nixon didn't have to speak out but wanted to make clear kevin spacey‘s behaviour was part of a pattern. it's not just sleazy, it's predatorial, it's... he did what he did because he knew he'd get away with it. the one—time barman met kevin spacey in london in 2007, when he alleges the actor groped him. kevin spacey sat down on the sofa next to me, asked if that was my girlfriend, then reached over, grabbed... he then describes a sexually explicit action and words. a couple of weeks after the party at his place, he was in the bar, reached forward, grabbed my waistband and said something to the effect of, "if i can make it up to you," or, "let me make it up to you." so i went back upstairs, i was standing behind the bar thinking, "what the helljust happened?" i was in work so i couldn't make a scene about it. and told him in no uncertain terms where he could go. the bbc also spoke to an american film—maker who didn't want to be fully identified.
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in the 1990s, he was a junior crew member on a film kevin spacey directed. he claims the actor sexually harassed him, something he mentioned to another man working on the film. he said, "you too, huh?" and i was like, "what do you mean, ‘you too'? what do you mean?" and he goes, "he was touching you and flirting with you?" i said, "yeah, it was awful!" and he said, "yeah, he did that to me." in the first week we were all out of the bar, and he grabbed my butt, and i turned round, and i said to him, "kevin, if you ever do that again, i will kick your ass, so leave me alone." in the uk, the actors' union says sexual harassment in the industry is endemic. can those at the old vic theatre, where kevin spacey worked for 11 years, really have been in the dark? the theatre initially said it had no complaints against him, but it has now appointed external advisers to investigate. kevin spacey has not responded to any of the latest allegations. previously, he said he needed
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to examine his own behaviour. lucy manning, bbc news. today bbc local radio is 50 years old. originally funded by local councils, the number of stations grew from 20 in the early 70s to more than a0 now. radio leicester was the first to go on air. leicester city have created history! for decades, local radio has provided a soundtrack to communities across the country. it was 50 years ago today that the bbc launched local radio from its hub in leicester. and what a day, we've had the postmaster general to open the station, the lord mayor of leicester's had a say... that was the brainchild of frank gillard, a veteran war correspondent who had been inspired by local media in america and canada.
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it's a very special day for us, of course, our 50th birthday... over 30 million of us listen to commercial or bbc local radio stations every week, including this morning's breakfast show in bbc leicester. herdle white is a legend of local raido, having joined bbc leicester two months after it launched. people get involved, it's their own local radio station. that creates a bond with people, "yeah, it's my own local radio station," sort of a thing, so, you know, that kind of thing resonate. like all media, local radio is being buffeted by technological forces. the audience is getting older, and younger listeners have choice as never before. despite that, local radio has remained remarkably resilient. that suggests that its power to chronicle and cajole local communities will only grow in importance as other kinds of local media decline. local media such as newspapers. over 200 local titles have shut in the past two years alone. the coventry telegraph, which is 126 years old, is reaching more people than ever
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before through the web, but making a profit through local news is dauntingly tough. the audience is shifting, but as the audience shifts, so they're moving away from print, so print revenues are falling, and we do need to replace those print revenues with digital revenues, and we're working very hard to build a really large and engaged and local, loyal audience here. whatever the platform, to survive another 50 years, local media will have to continue connecting with its audience on a personal level. hi, patrick, i hope you're doing ok there. well done, rich in alderman's green, who had a fantastic time riding the two—tone taxi today... amol rajan, bbc news. tonight, the director—general of the bbc, lord tony hall, has announced a renaissance the bbc local radio. as the service marks its 50th
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anniversary, lord hall confirmed that his speech in coventry that the £10 million saving targets for local radio set out as part review have been cancelled. the bbc says it will instead invest in local radio, with the aim of making it even more local and more creative. now let's catch up on the latest weather forecast. it turned out to be a half decent day for many parts of the british isles, but signs of a change already in hand, with increasing cloud, wind and rain piling into scotland, northern ireland and through the night the belt will be pushed towards the south and east. before the cloud arrives, temperatures will dribble away across east anglia and the south—east. late in the night, as the cloud clears from the north—west of scotland, here perhaps a touch of frost. come thursday we will push that figure frontal crowd... cloud further south. brighter skies chasing and behind that rain. all the while, breezy to say the least across the north of scotland, copious showers.
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asimilar copious showers. a similar prospect for friday, not a bad day, the best of the brightness away towards the eastern side, away from the south—west, quite a bit of ground, an old frontal system giving heavy rain into the weekend —— overnight into the weekend. the weekend will feel much colder than of late. hello, this is bbc news, the headlines at 8:30pm. international development secretary priti patel has resigned from the cabinet amid controversy over authorised meetings with israeli politicians. —— unauthorised. ms patel apologised for her actions and stepped down from her post after a meeting with theresa may. hollywood actor and theatre director kevin spacey faces fresh allegations of sexual misconduct tonight. the us journalist heather unruh has told reporters that her son
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was sexually assaulted by mr spacey last year. the head of the nhs in england has challenged the government to find more cash for the health service following the promise of an extra £350 million a week during the eu referendum campaign. simon stevens told the nhs providers' conference that health funding must rise to avoid escalating waiting lists. and tributes have been paid to chef, restaurateur and cookery writer antonio carluccio, who has died at the age of 80. dubbed the godfather of italian gastronomy, he was known for his popular television programmes and the chain of restaurants he co—founded. simon stevens — the chief executive of nhs england is challenging the government to find an extra £350 million for the health service every week, as promised during the eu
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referendum campaign. in his keynote address simon stevens also warned that operation waiting lists could reach their highest levels ever. the nhs was not on the ballot paper, but it was on the ballot bus. vote leave for a better funded but it was on the ballot bus. vote leave for a betterfunded nhs service, £315 million a week. here is what the campaign director of vote leave said earlier this year. quite, pundits and mps kept saying why isn't totally arguing about the economy and living standards? you didn't realise that for millions of people 350 million for the nhs was about the economy and living standards, that was why it was so expect since. it was crucial, not just with the swing, but with every democratic. would we have one
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without the 350 million for the nhs. all our research and the close results strongly suggest, no. some people claimed this was cynical and we never intended to spend more on the nhs, wrong. and quite. —— and. the health secretaryjeremy hunt said the government was committed to investing in the nhs. this government's approach to the nhs is very simple. it is our most important public service. we want to invest more in it. we need more investment and funding going forward because of huge demographic treasures we face. as soon as the economy is able to afford it, we will put that extra investment in. we spoke earlier to professorjohn appleby, chief economist at the health think tank, the nuffield trust who shared his reaction to the speech by simon stevens.
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a very strong speech from the chief executive of nhs england. i think rightly pointing to to the general point which is the nhs is really struggling now in terms of funding. we know that because it has had seven we know that because it has had seve n yea rs we know that because it has had seven years of very restricted funding growth, since 2010, it is done pretty well up to now in terms of improving productivity. but the collective view and the view of the three leading think tanks, is that we are reaching a point now that it is actually getting really difficult to keep up with the target headline, waiting to iron —— times. and if you want to find out what waiting times are like at your local hospital service go to the website and put in your
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postcode. now to a new report highlighting the plight of the homeless in england. the charity shelter says the number of people rough sleeping, staying in hostels or temporary accommodation is more than quarter of a million. since 2010, the number of people sleeping on the streets in england alone has increased by 13a%,' more than a hundred thousand children in england are living with theirfamilies in temporary accommodation. our correspondent michael buchanan has been to one industrial estate in london that is now housing dozens of families. in the world's sixth richest nation, increasingly, people cannot afford a home. in newham in east london, one in every 25 people is homeless, according to today's report. rising levels of rough—sleeping are the most obvious sign. but homelessness is not always apparent. this is the willow lane trading estate in south london. it's busy and noisy — and home to dozens of young families. they live here, connect house, a former office block —
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scores of families sent by nearby councils. for victoria and her daughter daisy, this cramped room is home. do you want some soup, darling? they've been here since april — seven months of sheer hell. all i have to do to electrocute myself here is turn the tap on fully. the water comes out and drips everywhere, all over electrical stuff. they became homeless when their landlord sold their property and they could not find another home. i have malnutrition. and it's a struggle. i need to eat protein. and i need an oven. they do have a microwave. but it's no substitute for home cooking and quite dangerous to use. it's heartbreaking. i have never seen her so sad in her entire life. sometimes if she's really tired, i lift her legs into bed and tuck her in. this building is a damning indictment of britain's
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housing crisis. more than 80 families, easily more than a hundred children, are living here, and each family is paying hundreds of pounds each week to live in a converted office. the landlord here gets almost £1 million a year in housing benefit. they say they have costs such as maintenance and that no—one is forced to stay here. but still, some are desperate to leave. was he able to breathe on his own? no. angellie facey shows me the prized photos of her son kilani. he died, aged a0 days, of several complications. among his mum's regrets is that the ambulance couldn't find this obscure office block when her labour started, forcing her to have the child in the car park. when i came back from the hospital, when i came back to the estate, i still saw all the blood on the floor. every time i come here, i just feel so weird at being here, you know.
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sometimes i think i've seen my little one in the bed next to me, cos i was meant to to bring him home to this address. following our enquiries, angellie says has been offered a move. but her room will be quickly filled — the councils who send people here say they've few other options. ministers say they're determined to end all homelessness, though no—one expects it to happen any time soon. michael buchanan, bbc news. we're joined now by greg beales, director of policy at homelessness charity shelter. how significant the think this report is? one of the worst things that can happen to you is to become homeless. today's report reveals for the first time that more than 300,000 people in britain are struggling with the reality of being homeless tonight and this winter. i think it should be a wake—up call for government and all of this in society that this is a real and
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pressing problem we have two address. what is your explanation for why it has got so much worse? what is happening is that people are caught between two thinks. a chronic lack of affordable homes that people can rent on the amount they are earning plus the squeeze on benefits that we are seeing which has come about from this freeze on benefits that we have in place. this is pushing more and more families to this situation and the situation where they lose their home and can't afford to get another one. what would you like to see the government doing to address what appears to be quite a serious problem with winter approaching? the government is talking a lot about housing at the moment and there are a lot of practical things they can do. in the short run we need to end the freeze on benefits that means people's rent is going up that the money that stays in their pocket is frozen. that is the most immediate short—term thing that can make a difference. and along run we need much more affordable housing. that
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requires investment from the government and a proper plan to get the homes built. those are obviously both things that are going to take some time whatever we here for example in the budget. is there a needin example in the budget. is there a need in the short—term for more shelters, more cases where people could go? yes, i would encourage people, if the weather turns and gets colder, i would ask people to make a donation to shelter. they can do it online at the website which will get the people we help so no one has to face homelessness this winter on their own. some people do hesitate before giving money to homeless people. they are concerned that the might spend it on a drink, a ruse from the supermarket? is that something you encourage people to
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do? the best thing you can do for street homelessness is to contact a charity to get someone to them straightaway and to get them the help they need. that is what i encourage people to do if they see someone encourage people to do if they see someone helpless. and if they want to do some practical this winter they can donate to our campaign. thank you. the trial has begun of a woman charged with murdering her ex—boyfriend following a suspected acid attack. the jury has heard that mark van dongen was left paralysed from the neck down and lost his left leg, ear and eye. he ended his life in a euthanasia clinic 15 months later saying he couldn't bear the pain any longer. our correspondentjon kay reports from bristol crown court. together for five years. mark van dongen, who was an engineer from holland, and berlinah wallace, a fashion student from south africa. they lived in this bristol flat. the prosecution claims that she bought a bottle of sulphuric acid on the internet and threw it over him as he lay in bed.
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he spent more than a year in hospital. paralysed from the neck down, he lost a leg and an eye, and was said to be grotesquely scarred. the court heard he screamed when he saw himself in a mirror. before the jury was shown videos of mark van dongen speaking to police, they were warned they might be shocked and upset by it. in the footage, they saw the engineer propped up in a hospital bed, struggling to speak, with scars across his face and his upper body. he told a police officer that he'd woken up that night to see berlinah wallace standing there laughing. he claimed she was jealous about another woman he'd started to see, and that she threw the acid at him saying, "if i can't have you, no one will." the a8—year—old denies murder and throwing a corrosive fluid. the jury was told she thought it was a glass of water, and her barrister asked them to keep an open mind. the prosecution said, after 15 months, mark van dongen returned to his family in belgium and asked to die at a legal euthanasia clinic.
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the prosecution argues he was driven to that point by his suffering, and that berlinah wallace is therefore guilty of murder. the trial continues. jon kay, bbc news. let's return to the priti patel scandal. she stood down from her post after a meeting with the prime minister this evening. after a series of unauthorised meetings in israel. with me is matthew parris, former conservative mp, broadcaster and columnist for the times. it seemed inevitable she would have to go, just whether a question of if she would resign or be sacked? to go, just whether a question of if she would resign or be sacked7m to go, just whether a question of if she would resign or be sacked? in a way this issue isn't really now about priti patel, what she did was
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wrong, it wasn't just a about priti patel, what she did was wrong, it wasn'tjust a little bit wrong, it wasn'tjust a little bit wrong, or arguably wrong, wrong, it wasn'tjust a little bit wrong, orarguably wrong, it wrong, it wasn'tjust a little bit wrong, or arguably wrong, it was way, way offside. in any normal circumstances she would've fallen straightaway on her sword. the question is, is theresa may tough enough to deal with this in the way it needs to be. she has finally been persuaded that priti patel must go. what she needs is a proper cabinet reshuffle. one or two people need moving around. my suspicion is that she doesn't think her position is strong enough to move many people at once and she will try and slot somebody in two priti patel's job without any major revision of the cabinet. it is only putting off what is really needed, the stamp of prime minister real authority over her cabinet. of course, priti patelwas a strong campaigner to leave cpu. we know theresa may seems to be trying
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to maintain the balance around the cabinet table. does that mean she will have two replace her with another brexiteer? i suppose it does. that again is a sign of the weakness. you should be, if you are appointing a new development secretary, you should be looking for the best person. rory stewart is obviously very good at it, that he isa obviously very good at it, that he is a remain. people are thinking we should not have a remain are replacing a lever. it is a weak government that is having to make its calculations in that way. she surprised everyone with a replacement for michael fallon when she appointed gavin williamson. do you think she will be looking here at above all, to put in someone who will be loyal and close to her?” think that loyalty is the thing that will preoccupy think that loyalty is the thing that will preoccu py her think that loyalty is the thing that will preoccupy her most. or at least someone will preoccupy her most. or at least someone who isn't going to make any trouble. i think it is the fear of a
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viper to the buzz and so to speak, or the fear of someone... that theresa may most worries about. the trouble is that this has all been done to the exclusion of government policy and the national grid. that isa sign policy and the national grid. that is a sign of weakness. theresa may is a sign of weakness. theresa may is absolutely beset by problems. there is a very difficult brexit negotiations, proceeding at a snails pace. we have a budget coming up, very little money to splash around. questions over the foreign secretary borisjohnson. it does appear to be a government limiting from one crisis to the next. cumulatively they do look daunting if you list them. but they are basically secondary problems, the real problem is the conservative party. the conservative party, which is in government, cannot agree on what sort of brexit it once. it is split
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down the middle on that issue. everything just tiptoes around that huge potential split in the party, trying to avoid it and put it off a little longer. in the end it has to come, in the end theresa may has to decide what she wants to do. we can talk about a transition period, but what are we transitioning to? that is what the party can't agree. the party is in government and that is at the root of the government's weakness. thank you. relatives of the 12 people who died after an ira bomb exploded at a remembrance service in enniskillen, have held a memorial service in the town to mark the 30th anniversary of the explosion. a plaque was unveiled and the names of those killed were read aloud. the queen sent a message saying the memorial was a poignant reminder of a terrible event. the headlines on bbc news: priti patel resigns as international
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development secretary — after meeting with the prime minister at downing street. theresa may says the decision was ‘right‘. it follows controversy over undisclosed meetings with israeli government officials. ms patel was ordered back to the uk from africa where she'd been on an official trip. and the actor kevin spacey faces another allegation of sexual misconduct — as a woman comes forward with accusations he abused her son. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. which is 007? any takers? in a moment... putting sheep to the test. find out how some are smarter than face value. the chef and restaurateur
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antonio carluccio has died, at the age of 80. he was well known for his italian restaurant chain carluccio's, which he founded in 1999, and for his television appearances. he wrote more than a dozen best—selling books — and received the commendatore, the italian equivalent of a knighthood, in 1998. we spoke to aldo zilli earlier today. first of all, my thoughts go with his family and very close friends. i particularly was one of them, a close friend. we spoke every so often. but with antonio, it was one often. but with antonio, it was one of those things that you didn't see him fora of those things that you didn't see him for a while and then you saw him and picked up where you left off. i met him in the 90s, for me he changed the face of casual dining.
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he also opened probably one of the best italian restaurants in london called carluccio, his namesake. he was an amazing man, full of life at all times, up to the end iron sure. so much so, we were going to the italian scottish awards ceremony this weekend, which i am the ambassadorfor. this weekend, which i am the ambassador for. we were going to award him the lifetime achievement award. we had tickets and were going to fly together. unfortunately, i heard the news just as you guys called me. a buy—to—let tycoon in kent who banned indian and pakistani tenants from renting his properties has been ordered to ditch the policy. landlord fergus wilson made the request to his letting agent via email — in court he denied the content of his messages was racist. our correspondent daniel henryjoins us now.
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tell us more about the e—mails and the case? the e-mails which she denied as being racist. let's read about, no coloured people because of the smell of currie, the end of the tenancy. that is what fergus wilson said to his letting agent last year, ordering them to block applications from indian and pakistani ‘s from his properties. that e—mail was then lea ked his properties. that e—mail was then leaked to a tabloid newspaper who then published it, the equality and schumann rights commission brought a case of dissemination heard at crown court today. mr wilson represented himself, he discovered the case as political correctness gone mad. he spoke to the bbc shortly after the hearing. what now for mr wilson? what will happen next is that he will have to pay costs ofjust over
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£2000, a drop in the ocean for somebody who has a property portfolio worth £250 million. if he is caught from trying to stop anyone from renting a property on the grounds of race which was shown to be the case here, he will have broken the terms of that injunction and will be called back to court. thejudge was saying and will be called back to court. the judge was saying that he described it that policies like this have no place in our society. the equality and schumann rights commission say that the comments we re commission say that the comments were unlawful and add foreign. when you think about it, what this ruling saysis you think about it, what this ruling says is that the courts will respond to these kinds of things, but there are more subtle forms of racism that still need to be dealt with.” are more subtle forms of racism that still need to be dealt with. i think we can hear what mr wilson had to say. let's listen. it gets into the carpets and waltz. before now we have had to read past walls, and frankly we just want the hassle.
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most landlords will be the same, i am here because i said it. most people do it but don't say it. we heard from mr wilson himself there. asi heard from mr wilson himself there. as i was suggesting, those comments suggest to us that this guy has been caught, he has publicly been caught, but as the government race audit published just last month illustrated, there are more subtle forms of racism that affect lives up and down the uk. thank you. let's go back to our main story, the resignation of priti patel after that series of unauthorised meetings in israel. we can now talk to mark durham, the chair of priti patel's constituency committee. tell us your
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reaction to the news that she has stood down from her ministerial post? i am very sad that she has thought that she had to resign. clearly, i am not privy to the discussions that she had with the prime minister. but i honestly think that the government has lost an extremely able, conscientious cabinet member. it does seem though that she disobeyed or the usual rules when she went around israel having these meetings with senior figures including the prime minister, without even having told the foreign office or the prime minister what she was up to?” the foreign office or the prime minister what she was up to? i guess that will be the subject of the enquiry that no doubt the prime minister will carry out. in my position as the constituency chairmen, it only concern is what the priti patel does to the constituents. it does seem though that she was put in a position that
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she had no option to resign?m certainly seems that way. i have not managed to speak to her yet. clearly there has been a lot happening today. she has obviously taken that very difficult decision for her to give the prime minister her resignation. what do you think will be the wider reaction from her constituents in essex?” be the wider reaction from her constituents in essex? i think, be the wider reaction from her constituents in essex? ithink, and as we have already seen, some of the people already interviewed on the bbc did today, she was such a good constituent mp that they are really sad. i have had phone calls today from people that are worried that she is not going to be their mp because she has done such a lot of good work in her constituency. i have had to reassure them that whatever the situation is with her cabinet position, she will still remain theirmp at cabinet position, she will still remain their mp at westminster. thank you. let's stay with this, on
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the line is the shadow minister for the line is the shadow minister for the cabinet office, give us your reaction first of all? it has been clear since last week that the ministerial code of conduct had been breached by priti patel and i think her fate was sealed. i don't know what the government has dithered around for so long. in relation to this matter it was a clear—cut case andi this matter it was a clear—cut case and i think she should have been dismissed on day one. we have had this ridiculous opera for the last few days which could have only had one outcome, her departure. she has issued a fulsome apology as she said in her resignation letter. do you think it does damage the uk's relations in a very sensitive part of the world given the meeting she had in israel? clearly, this is one of the most sensitive areas in the
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world. and for somebody to go across there, i'm briefed and unaccompanied to meet senior politicians is obviously deeply disturbing. and then somehow or another to come back having met senior israeli politicians, suggesting her department that they might consider giving british taxpayers money to effectively the israeli armed forces on territory that britain doesn't recognise as the state of israel, clearly that was a very serious blunder. what is very bad is that the prime minister knew nothing about it until she turned the radio one so we are about it until she turned the radio one so we are told, and heard it on the bbc. this is a minister that has blundered from one situation to another. sorry my phone is ringing! ...and another. sorry my phone is ringing! and has left everyone in a
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extremely difficult position inside the government. thank you very much for joining the government. thank you very much forjoining us. you are obviously much in demand! time for a look at the weather. iam not i am not sure if my weather is in demand but you will get it anyway! that is the way of it! the cloud will be moving of the british isles overnight. before it arrives, the temperatures will lower, we could get some frost. then the club rosin and the temperatures will lift. it goes the other way across the north west of scotland where it will be windy throughout thursday. a copious supply of showers after a dull start for england and wales, things brighten up through the day. we are looking at temperatures in double figures for many parts. this is friday, again cloud and rain has to equip the scene from southern
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britain before we see brighter skies for a good part of the british isles. northern ireland has wet weather later in the day. it looks as though the weekend will shape up to bea as though the weekend will shape up to be a mixture of bright and breezy weather. there will be showers around and wherever you are spending the weekend, it will feel much colder. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. another senior british minister resigns — priti patel is accused of not telling the prime minister about highly sensitive meetings with top israeli politicians. on the first anniversary of president trump's election, democrats sweep the polls in the us. we will hear from katty kay. president trump's spent the day in china — we scour the country's social media to find out what they're saying about him. hollywood star kevin spacey faces a new allegation of sexual misconduct — we hear from an alleged victim. welcome to outside source.
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quite a day for uk politics.

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