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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 9, 2017 6:00am-8:29am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. pressure on the prime minister as she loses another cabinet minister — the second in a week. priti patel‘s resigned last night over unauthorised meetings with israeli officials — labour says the government is in chaos and theresa may is losing her authority. good morning, it's thursday the ninth of november. also this morning — the first minister of wales will respond to criticism over his handling of harassment allegations against the former minister carl sergeant who apparently took his own life. some police control rooms are struggling to meet demand because of a surge in calls — the inspector of constabulary warns that budgest cuts are putting forces under "significa nt stress". another day and another update on house prices — but this one is different.
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it says house prices are falling. so what's really happening to the property market? i'll get an expert view. in sport, a match english women can't afford to lose. australia is batting first. they have lostjust one wicket. and carol has the weather. a cloudy start the day for many of us a cloudy start the day for many of us but patchy light rain drizzle. the skies will filter slowly southwards as a go through the day. more details in 15 minutes. good morning, first, our main story. theresa may is under pressure to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. the departure of ms patel has fuelled opposition accusations that the government is in chaos, and mrs may is losing her authority. here's our political correspondent, alex forsyth. arriving in london, priti patel
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could have guessed herfate. she had been summoned back from kenya by number ten, an official trip to africa cut short. she entered downing street by the back door and left having lost her job, resigning after failing to disclose details of unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. in her letter to the prime minister, she said: i accept my actions fell below the high standards that are expected of a secretary of state. for the second time in just over a week, theresa may must now decide how to fill a gap around the top table. michael fallon quit as defence secretary last week over his personal conduct. this team was carefully chosen to represent different tory views over brexit, and some are keen that is maintained. there is a divide between people who want brexit to mean we are basically staying within the eu. they are essentially
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the remainers who are unchanged. and they give a veneer of acceptance but haven't truly accepted. there are quite a lot of people who were quite balanced when they made the decision as to which side to support, who are now really rather enthusiastic about brexit and want to get on with it properly. whatever the prime minister's decision about who should now sit in her cabinet, she will face intense scrutiny over her choice. let's speak to our political correspondent, leila nathoo, who's in westminster for us this morning. as we heard, scrutiny is paramount. all eyes will be on theresa may's choice. she welcomed priti patel‘s resignation but it was clear she was forced to go. theresa may make that
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clear. she had to re—establish authority over her cabinet and be seen to be doing something. it seemed that she would got a way with just a reprimand and it was only since new information came to light that theresa may made it apparent she must go. it does throw the light on who theresa may will choose to replace her. remember, we had and other cabinet replacement last week, michael fallon was forced to resign over sexual assault allegations. then there is the delicate brexit balance. accept talks start again today and acra won a key leave supporter and —— priti patel. it gives ammunition to those who think the wheels are coming off this government. later, we'll be getting reaction from the former conservative leader and cabinet minister,
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iain duncan smith. that's at 07:10. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today. it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely to centre around the uk's financial obligations and the rights of british people living in the eu. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is to issue a statement today amid criticism of the way he handled misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who is believed to have taken his own life. the family of carl sargeant — who'd been accused of inappropriate touching — say he was denied natural justice because he wasn't given details of the allegations which led to his sacking. our reporter tomos morgan is at the welsh assembly for us this morning. we believe it will be happening at
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some time today. this is one of the biggest challenges carwynjones has faced since being first minister of wales, we believe. he will be coming here to cardiff bay and discuss the events of this week with labour assembly members here. it began last wednesday when a member was sacked from his ministerial role for his conduct. yesterday, we saw the —— between carl sargea nt‘s —— between carl sargeant‘s family. last night, a former cabinet member and former ally of carwynjones criticised carwyn jones and former ally of carwynjones criticised carwynjones saying he believes the process had not been
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followed. the labour back party believes in line with the procedure the nature of the allegations were outlined to carl sargea nt the nature of the allegations were outlined to carl sargeant over the last few days. the biggest challenge that has faced welsh politics and ca rwyn that has faced welsh politics and carwyn jones that has faced welsh politics and carwynjones in that has faced welsh politics and carwyn jones in his that has faced welsh politics and carwynjones in his ten year time in parliament. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. if you report a crime this is where your call is dealt with. the control room. it is the nerve centre of police operations. there are more than 8 million 999 calls every year, with millions of others on the non—emergency number, 101. the inspector of constabulary says that police are struggling to cope. he says that problems retaining control room
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staff and an overreliance on outdated technology are to blame. some requests for police to deal with crimes, including criminal damage and assault, go unanswered. in devon and cornwall, many callers hang up because they have to wait so long. the control rooms are right at the heart of what our police forces do. the focus on getting that right is really important for chief constables, and we encourage them to continue with this. the reporting into police efficiency says the service is under significant stress. it says forces will spend 6% less on policing in the next three years and will lose more than 4,000 officers and staff from the police workforce. that is why many chief constables say they need extra resources to deal with the increased demand. mike cunningham says it would be a good thing for police to have more money, but he says the service needs to show the benefits extra funding will bring, and he says there is scope for forces to use their existing resources more efficiently. us president donald trump has urged
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the chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. the two leaders held more talks this morning, on the second day of mr trump's visit to china. 0ur beijing correspondent, stephen mcdonnell has been following events. stephen, the two men had lots of praise for each other — how much co—operation will there be going forward do you think? it has been quite something to see the world's two most powerful people standing together and pledging to work with one another on winding down north korea's nuclear weapons and boosting trade between these two very powerful nations and certainly, china has turned it on in terms of a welcome for donald trump with honour guards and banquets and the like. when they spoke today, it wasn't a
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press c0 nfe re nce when they spoke today, it wasn't a press conference because she xin ping does not answer questions, they both spoke and xi jinping spoke of the billions of dollars worth of deals have been signed to coincide with donald trump's visit. it is ha rd to with donald trump's visit. it is hard to tell how many would be in the member of understanding category and how many would be real. donald trump with distressing north korea and, now is the time to read the region of the north korean menace. i'm not sure of that means regime change because that would worry china. but they are in the greens of getting rid of nuclear weapons. —— they are in agreeance. an extended ban on a group of controversial pesticides will be supported "in principle" by the uk government, according to the environment secretary michael gove. environmentalists have been campaigning for tighter controls over the use of neo—nicotinoids which they say are harming bees and other pollinators.
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the government has previously resisted eu restrictions but mr gove says he recogises the mounting body of evidence against the chemicals. now what's the first thing you'd do if your numbers came up on the lottery? smile. have a cup of tea? i don't know. hand your notice in? that's exactly what six hospital kitchen workers south wales have done after scooping 25 million on the euromillions. the women have been playing as a work syndicate for the past six years. they're currently planning a dream holiday together to las vegas. good that they have all stayed friends. another question for you. can the former president of the united states be called up forjury service? yes, he can! barack 0bama arrived for duty at a chicago courthouse yesterday, and joined other prospective jurors waiting to see if they would be chosen to serve. while he took the time to shake a few hands and sign some autographs, the former commander—in—chief wasn't required and was dismissed.
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if he'd been selected, he would have been paid the princely sum of 13 pounds a day. yeah. have you ever donejury service? rola no. they end up picking a spokesperson. you would imagine no one would really argue with him. —— no. it would be tricky. we have a massive test match. crucial in deciding which way the ashes series is going to go. it is a points system, they changed it. they play one test match and there is assist —— series of 20 20 matches. there is only one test match that is played. do they do that the men's cricket? only the women's format. but with the amount of points
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available, they must win this because they are trailing currently in the series. it is a big day. they are one wicket down on the opening day. they have made a good start on a put it that way. an historic moment for northern ireland who are preparing for the first leg of their world cup play off with switzerland —— this is a match they cannot afford to lose. remember this moment? this generation of players they cup layoff with switzerland later. hoping to reach back—to—back tournaments for the first time in their history. both england and germany will wear black armbands bearing poppies for tomorrow's friendly at wembley after rules were changed last month, allowing the home nations to wear a poppy if opposing teams and the competition organiser agrees to it.
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chelsea women are a step closer to the last eight of the champions league. how about this for a goal, from fran kirby, one of three unanswered goals they scored to beat rosengard last night to take control of their last sixteen tie. at manchester city play again later. both flying in the women's super league. i always think it is lovely to see the sunshine, it is that time of year when it is nice to see. we need that reminder on these cold and dreary mornings. you knowl am usually quite anti— windsor and anti— cold, but when the sun shines ona anti— cold, but when the sun shines on a cold winter morning, i like it
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-- anti- on a cold winter morning, i like it —— anti— winter. on a cold winter morning, i like it -- anti- winter. and just when it is starting to get too much, the winter kicks them. and we are looking through some of the front pages. on the daily telegraph, these images of priti patel, who went through that ordeal of the journey back from africa, where she had all those meetings, to downing street, and the resignation. something we will be talking about throughout the morning this morning. another day, another crisis. we will be talking to iain duncan smith, cabinet member, later on in the programme. she is also on the front page of the daily mail. we are also expecting a statement from ca rwyn are also expecting a statement from carwyn jones after are also expecting a statement from carwynjones after labour leaders we re carwynjones after labour leaders were accused of failing the minister who was found dead after being accused of sexual misconduct. that was carl sergeant, and his family
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had said they had warned the party of their fears over his fragile mental state. so first minister —— first minister carwyn jones mental state. so first minister —— first minister carwynjones expected to give a statement later today. of course, another cabinet minister going and on the front page of the mirror, they are highlighting a number of calls made to the child line, children being abused or suffering. we saw an interest rate rise last week. yes, it seems like a long time ago. the first in more than ten years and one of the markets which is obviously affected is the housing market. whether it helps temper prices. slow and steady is what we have been told about interest rate rises are already it is about perception and sentiment in the housing market, and already some suggestion that it could be too soon. we will be talking in half an hour about this story, estate agents
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growing gloomier over sales. it seems every day we have a different verdict on the housing market, but the royal institute of chartered surveyors has said that optimism has affected the market, and that could mean that prices stagnate or start to fall, and that contrasts with the suggestion that prices are rising in most parts of the country but not in london and the south—east. most parts of the country but not in london and the south-east. which is the survey which is given the most credence? it seems every day there isa credence? it seems every day there is a different... it is difficult because they look at different parts of the process. so the royal institute of chartered surveyors looks at sales. 0ther institute of chartered surveyors looks at sales. other organisations looks at sales. other organisations look at selling prices, so it looks at different stages of that process. some look forward and stumbled backwards. it is not always easy to compare like for like. talking about a crucial world cup play—off to come, and the steps managers undertake to protect their players.
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so ahead of a crucial qualifier against holland, they took to kidnapping george best, days before their game, so that he didn't go missing. knowing that he was their best player. was this in response to concerns about his social activities? it may have come into it. three days before they kidnapped him and looked after him so when they played against holland, they knew that he would do the business on the pitch. i am sure they don't need to go to those kinds of length these days. it sort of makes sense. does, doesn't it, protecting your interest. and the story from the times this morning. uber and uber nasa. -- times this morning. uber and uber nasa. —— uber and times this morning. uber and uber nasa. —— uberand nasa. we
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times this morning. uber and uber nasa. —— uber and nasa. we talk about this vision of the future and all these things flying around our head, but uber are in a position where they could launch a autonomous flying taxis, but not before 2020. and i have seen this with my own eyes, it never ceases to amaze me, these pictures. this is a ban which has finally come in in the centre of venice. you look out over the cityscape and you see these cruise ships which more right next to the square. and now venice has finally banned them from coming in quite so close —— moor. banned them from coming in quite so close -- moor. i am amazed that can be so deep so close to the shore, as well. if you are enjoying your coffee, or whatever it is. well. if you are enjoying your coffee, or whatever it islj well. if you are enjoying your coffee, or whatever it is. iwould sit with my back to it.
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here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. for some of us, a crisp, sunny start, but by no means is it like that everywhere. it is a cloudy start. we have some patchy light rain and drizzle but we will see some sunny rain and drizzle but we will see some sunny spells developing initially in the north, and as this weather fronts sinks southwards, the cold front will be colder behind it but we will see that sunshine coming through. it will not be until much later in the day we see that in the south. first thing this morning we have some rain around, we have some drizzle, we have a lot of cloud as well, some patchy mist and fog here and there, but not particularly cold for most. in the far south—east it isa for most. in the far south—east it is a bit nippy and as we travel further north, where we have the clear skies, again it is a wee bit on the nippy side if you are stepping out first thing. the other thing we have a quite a lot of
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showers in the north and west, and here they are blustery. it is quite windy, especially in the far north of scotland. through the day you can see how the sunshine comes out kind this weather front, scooting see how the sunshine comes out kind this weatherfront, scooting down towards the south—east, so it will be quite dull for much of the day across parts of southern england. but look at these temperatures, they are not bad at all for this time of year. the average is nine to ii but in any sunny breaks in south—west england we could see 13 or 1a. as we head on through the evening and the overnight period, a lot of clearer skies coming in from the west. some rain will be introduced on the hills, as it continues its descent southwards. showers coming across scotland, over the hills, some of those are likely to be wintry as well. tomorrow we have a weather front sinking down towards the south once again, taking its cloud and ran with it. behind it, it brightens up. ina with it. behind it, it brightens up. in a north—westerly flow by tomorrow, you can see that by the direction of the wind arrows, here we will be blowing in some showers. and again, on the hills in scotland we are likely to see some of those being wintry in nature. cool,
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following on behind the weather front. six to eight in the north. as we push down towards the south, 12 and 13. as we head into the weekend, we continue with some changeable weather. we have the remnants of tropical storm rina. it will have lost its tropical storm elements by then, so what we will have as a band of cloud and rain courtesy of this, pulling away during the course of saturday, armistice day. it brightens up quite nicely, some showers in the north and again it will feel quite nippy if you are stepping out. for remembrance sunday, another dry and bright day. temperatures ranging from six in the north to ten or 12 in the south, so almost bang on for this time of year. and as we head into the early pa rt year. and as we head into the early part of next week we are back in the atla ntic part of next week we are back in the atlantic weather fronts coming our way, so it will not feel as cold. so to a nswer way, so it will not feel as cold. so to answer your question about whether it is cold or not, we have a little bit of everything over the next few days. that is what we like, carol, you give us everything we need. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may is under pressure after losing another
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cabinet minister. priti patel resigned last night, as new details emerged about unauthorised meetings with israeli officials. the first minister of wales is to respond to criticism over his handling of harassment allegations against the former minister carl sergeant, who is believed to have taken his own life after being sacked. tomorrow is the deadline for people who have applied for the personal independence payment to submit details of their experience to a group of mps. the work and pensions committee is looking into the scheme, which was introduced in 2013 to help people with the extra costs associated with long—term illness or disability. pips have been controversial since their creation, and disability rights campaigners claim some people are being denied the payments they need. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been speaking to one woman about her experience of the system. pips are notjust a familiar sound
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to daisy, she is reliant upon them. personal independence payments. they keep her financially afloat it was her disability means she is at home, unable to work. so i have lupus, and i have another syndrome, so a lot of heart problems. i dislocate a lot, mobility is pretty appalling, as is everything else. and how important are the personal independence payments, which you get? they are essential. it is the only way i could afford to be disabled. but at first, daisy was refused benefit. pip was introduced in 2013. the idea was to ensure benefits go to those with the greatest need. the big change is the use of face—to—face assessments to decide who gets the money. assessors make a judgement as to how well a candidate can carry
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out everyday tasks such as dressing, cooking and moving about and these assessments are carried out by private companies. daisy, what was your experience? pretty dehumanising, whether i could live my knees up, how far i could live my arms, and it was done by a paramedic. he would have had no professional knowledge of my condition or understanding of a disability or fluctuating chronic illness. took off and put on her jumper. average build, casually dressed, did not appear to be trembling. so you think these criteria are used to decide that you don't qualify for these payments? yes, at best they are irrelevant. at worst, they are a cynical justification of trying to deny needed money. daisy appealed, and thejudge agreed, overturning needed money. daisy appealed, and the judge agreed, overturning the original decision. according to the department of work and pensions, since pip was introduced, more than
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2.4 million decisions was made, and of these, 8% were appealed, 4% overturned. there is obviously one or two robbins with that report. we will try and bring you the completed version later on this morning. tim muffett discussing the criteria for pip benefits, there. we will examine more about the resignation of priti patel. was it forced, and as the prime minister's cabinet in chaos? we will talk to iain duncan smith. still to come this morning: as the bbc news website celebrates its 20th birthday, we will look at how digital services have transformed the way people get their headlines. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. a memorial service is due to take place today in new addington to pay tribute to those who died in the croydon tram crash. seven people died and 51 people were injured when the tram
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overturned speeding on a tight corner near sandilands. those injured on board say the last year has been difficult. igo i go for igofora igo forajob, i go for a job, and there are a load of people lined up to do the same job, they will cross them off the list, as well. he had this head injury, and we have ten people with the right credentials and everything for a job, so who are they going to cross off the list first? it is going to me. —— is going to be me. so even when i get my hgv license, it is going to be a battle. a coroner has agreed to a pre—inquest review into the 1974 guildford pub bombings, after a legal bid by lawyers. five people were killed and 65 injured in the ira blast, and inquests were never concluded. a law firm acting for families of some of the victims and those wrongly convicted made submission to surrey‘s coroner. hundreds of south london homes have been without gas for five days after heating systems in four tower blocks were turned off due to safety concerns.
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it is the third time in two years residents have been affected by issues with the communal heating in four blocks on the grantham road estate. about 360 homes were cut off after a potential leak was detected. hyde housing, who have provided electric heaters, said it was doing everything it can. let's take a look at the travel situation this morning. 0n the tubes, there is a large suspension on the central line, with no service eastbound between northolt and ealing broadway to leytonstone, because of signalfailure. 0nto the roads, and there is northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. it is slow from the woolwich road flyover. 0n the a13, traffic is building westbound from dagenham into barking. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it is not a very cheery start to the day. in fa ct, very cheery start to the day. in fact, it is a rather cold and drizzly outdoors. temperatures got close to freezing last night. they are starting to come up now but we've also got some outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle coming as well. things could
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brighten up, however, as we had through the afternoon, particular towards the north. but, to begin with it is rather chilly. we have an awful lot of low cloud around. some outbreaks of patchy rain and drizzle as you can see from this, dragging its way south and eastwards towards south—eastern areas of the capital, where it won't brighten up much of the day. the best chance of any brightness as we head towards sundown will be towards the north—west, temperatures around ten or 11 celsius here. now, overnight tonight, again it should stay mostly dry. certainly some clear skies at first. temperatures could drop off and they will come up again into tomorrow morning but the same is sort of start again tomorrow. some outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle at this weather front pushes its way southwards. but tomorrow we stand the best chance of seeing the brightness, and in the best that we will see highs of 12 celsius. it is going to come wet began on friday night. the rain will clear on saturday morning and after that it is going to become dry and chilly with a northerly wind for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. as theresa may loses her second cabinet member in a week — we'll ask former tory leader iain duncan smith where the latest departure leaves the prime minister. scientists say that wounds sustained during the day heal much more quickly than those suffered at night. we'll find out how our internal body clock affects every aspect of our lives — from sleeping to healing. he's best—known for transforming homes across britain with the help of his "diy sos" team — now nick knowles has teamed up with pudsey for a special children in need challenge.
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he'll be right here on the sofa. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. theresa may is under pressure to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. the departure of ms patel has fuelled opposition accusations that the government is in chaos, and mrs may is losing her authority. here's our political correspondent, alex forsyth. there is a divide. there are essentially remainers who are unchanged and haven't truly accepted. i think there are quite a lot of people who work quite in the balance when they made the decision
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who are now really rather enthusiastic about brexit. and we will be seeking with iain duncan smith at ten past seven. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today. it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely to centre around the uk's financial obligations and the rights of british people living in the eu. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is to issue a statement today amid criticism of the way he handled misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who is believed to have taken his own life. the family of carl sargeant — who'd been accused of inappropriate touching — says he was denied naturaljustice because he wasn't given details of the allegations which led to his sacking. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog
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says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. us president donald trump has urged chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. discussions on how to deal with north korea's threats to the region have dominated the agenda during mr trump's tour of asia. this morning he warned that "time is quickly running out" to deal with the north korean nuclear threat. we agreed on the need to implement all security resolutions and to exert pressure on north korea to abandon it reckless and dangerous path. an extended ban on a group of controversial pesticides will be supported "in principle" by the uk government, according to the environment secretary michael gove. environmentalists have been campaigning for tighter controls over the use of neo—nicotinoids
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which they say are harming bees and other pollinators. the government has previously resisted eu restrictions but mr gove says he recogises the mounting body of evidence against the chemicals. now what's the first thing you'd do if your numbers came up on the lottery? hand your notice in? that's exactly what six hospital kitchen workers south wales have done after scooping 25 million on the euromillions. the women have been playing as a work syndicate for the past six years. they're currently planning a dream holiday together to las vegas. good for them! s what have we got in sport? apart from taking you all out for a meal, maybe i would take you to australia. i don't think that would be the first thing you would do, take us all out for a meal. you would
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probably keep it under wraps, wouldn't you ? a probably keep it under wraps, wouldn't you? a fancy car and a lovely —— is a gift away. —— would bea lovely —— is a gift away. —— would be a giveaway. it's ben a good morning so far for england, they've lostjust the one wicket. if they lose, the series is over. but they have started well. what a catch in the field. tammy beaumont reached the boundary with this shot. england were 100 41. —— 100/1.
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they're playing their second warm up match ahead of their ashes series, beginning on the 23rd of this month. northern ireland manager michael 0'neill says he believes his players won't waste their opportunity to qualify for the world cup. they face switzerland tonight in at windsor park in the first leg of a play—off, with the second leg on sunday. the winners are off to russia next summer. the players have done fantastically to get into this situation. i see in the squad and opportunity they don't wa nt to the squad and opportunity they don't want to waste but equally, they have done everything so far and anticipated they will do everything over the next two games to try and make it a reality. elsewhere tonight scotland host the netherlands in a friendly. england and germany players meanwhile will wear black armbands bearing poppies for tomorrow's friendly at wembley. it comes after rules were changed last month, allowing the home nations to wear a poppy if opposing teams and the competition organiser agree to it. wales will also wear black armbands bearing poppies for tomorrow's friendly against france in paris.
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eniola aluko, the england striker turned fa whistleblower says she's ‘disappointed and surprised' her national teammates haven't backed her highlighting wider issues at the organisation. the chelsea forward, who hasn't played for england in 18 months, has been in a dispute with the football association over racial discrimination. it's been very divisive and very adversarial and i think the players have been trapped into it. the players have their own mind, though. they should be able to say, actually, maybe step back from this and see how this may benefit. if i have a problem, if they have a problem, they have a process that is going to protect them. they won the first leg of their tie, this, the pick of the goals. what a finish to put the blues on their way. david moyes says he's on ‘a mission'
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and has something to prove in his newjob at west ham united. moyes faced the media for the first time since replacing slaven bilic and says he wants to restore his reputation after being relegated with sunderland last season. do you know something? i do have a point to prove. i do. they think maybe i have to do that. sometimes you have two repair things and maybe... and honest assessment of the job he faces at west ham. lewis hamilton won't let the controversy lewis hamilton won't let the co ntrove rsy over lewis hamilton won't let the controversy over his tax affairs rattle him. he is one of the ho —— high—profile figures who came under scrutiny in the paradise papers. nothing can really dented. —— dent
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it. try to win this race this weekend. i still have two races to go. don't really have anything to add to the whole scenario that is happening. he certainly cuts are relaxed figure. the pressure is off. he needs to go out and do what he does best. he seems to perform best when the pressure is on. some people really perform well to that. —— respond well. every year, police in england and wales receive more than eight million 999 calls. but a report by the policing watchdog claims that some of those calls — including requests to deal with cases of criminal damage and assault — are going unanswered. the inspectorate of constabulary says it recognises that forces are under "signifca nt stress", but says they could make further efficiencies to meet demand. matthew scott is from the association of police and crime commissioners.
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can you give us a sense of the problems? both of the numbers' calls have increased drastically. we are seeing police being contacted more eco— ther are new and different challenges facing residents and the country as a whole. where forces have been under significant strain, they are struggling to cope with some of that demand. police forces have been asked to provide evidence to the government of this significant challenge. this independent report has backed up this. they need to back us with this extra resources . this. they need to back us with this extra resources. your particular area, extra resources. your particular area , you extra resources. your particular area, you are in kent, if you are in
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area, you are in kent, if you are in a control room day in, day out, and you find your officers can't cope with the demand, what is happening on the ground at that moment in time? the very next day, do you have the ability to put another officer on the line and react in any way? what we have seen in my area in kent, we have increased the number of police officers in the last year that not all police officers have beenin that not all police officers have been ina that not all police officers have been in a position to do that. we are prioritising 999 emergency calls and people who are vulnerable, making sure they get the service they deserve. what we are seeing is they deserve. what we are seeing is the impact where 999 calls are projected over 101 calls, it's when 101 calls increase. the police force is doing a good job and we are trying to meet the challenges that
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it is becoming harder. the reality, this morning, someone will be making the emergency call and the reason they are making the call is because it is important for them. it could be any number of offences. the assumption people make is that something will happen as a result of making that call. what we are realising is sometimes nothing at all happens. the calljust takes place and nothing happens the odd that. i can speak for my own area and make sure every crime is investigated. most police forces doedee that the sure we are prioritising emergencies. —— most police forces do that. we need to make it a priority to prioritise. as a police and crime commission is, we have put a bid in to the government for extra funding that will increase
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the number of firearms officers so we can do that. there are significant are the challenges that people are phoning 999 and 1014. ——1 01. there needs to be an awareness campaign around racy sure 999 and 101 are being used to the right reasons. “— 101 are being used to the right reasons. —— making sure. 101 are being used to the right reasons. -- making sure. in kent, your area, reasons. -- making sure. in kent, yourarea, andi reasons. -- making sure. in kent, your area, and i understand you can't speak for other areas, you are saying every 999 call is investigated. that is a bold call considering in this report examples have come out where nothing is done to investigate things including violence and criminal damage. what i said was every crime in kent is investigated. a do a lot of work by
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telephone to understand what the issues are so telephone to understand what the issues are so every telephone to understand what the issues are so every crime in kent is investigated. performance in other forces has been looked into... you are saying, "raised some concerns". raising some concerns in this case, i could call up 909 and report a violent crime and then nothing is done. well, that shouldn't be the case. that this report is saying it is the case. yes. it isn't -- it shouldn't be the case will stop we have to make sure that victims of crime in ourareas have to make sure that victims of crime in our areas get the services they deserve and that is what i do and that is what my colleagues do. -- it and that is what my colleagues do. —— it shouldn't be the case. and that is what my colleagues do. -- it shouldn't be the case. matthew scott, thank you very much.
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you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may is under pressure after losing another cabinet minister. priti patel resigned last night, as new details emerged about unauthorised meetings with israeli officials. the first minister of wales is to respond to criticism over his handling of harassment allegations against the former minister carl sergeant, who is believed to have taken his own life after being sacked. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, though. good morning to you. that is absolutely right. the next few days' weather is changeable, and into the weekend it is going to turn much colder and the beginning of next week, with atla ntic beginning of next week, with atlantic fronts coming our way, it won't feel as cold. this morning is a great start to the day for many
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parts. patchy rain and drizzle, brighter, clearer skies in the north, but through the day you will find that as this weather front traverses southwards, the rain will move southwards as well, arriving late afternoon and in the evening time. first thing this morning we have a weak weather front producing lots of cloud and some spots of rain in the south. before that arrives in the extreme south—east, if you are out early you will notice it is quite chilly. as we move northwards, again, still a quite chilly. as we move northwards, again, stillafair quite chilly. as we move northwards, again, still a fair bit of cloud around. some patchy, light rain and some drizzle on that. but for northern england, northern ireland and scotland, by the time we get to 8am, it will be brightening up quite nicely, with the exception of some showers across north and west of scotland. getting off eventually into the dover straits and behind it we have this clear and brighter weather coming in. so an improving picture if you like the sunshine. still blustery across the north of the country, and temperatures ranging from eight in the north to
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14 in parts of wales in south—west england in sunshine. through the evening and overnight, we start off with clearer skies and it will be chilly first thing. a weather front coming in from the west introducing thicker cloud and rain, and that will be pushing eastwards and southwards as we go through the course of the night. where it was wet to start with it will be dry, clear and cold. in scotland we are looking at widespread frost as well as all those showers. tomorrow, we will still hang the showers across scotland. some of them will be wintry on the hills. a weather front sinks south and clears more readily from the south than it will do today. behind it, not a bad day, actually. a lot of sunshine around. it will feel chilly in the northern half of the country. temperatures five to about eight or nine. in the south, still into double figures. we are looking at ten to about 13 or 14. as we head into the weekend, this is when it turns that bit colder. for starters, we have the re m na nts of
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colder. for starters, we have the remnants of ex— tropical storm rina coming our way. it will have lost its tropical components but it will bring us some cloud and rain. that will move across us during the course of saturday morning, armistice day. behind it, we are looking at brighter conditions, some sunshine, but it will feel cold in the north in particular. it will feel cold wherever you are on saturday, and as for sunday, a different story. if you are going to any outdoor services, you will need to wrap up wobbly. feeling cold, temperatures in the north about six or seven. as we temperatures in the north about six or seven. as we come temperatures in the north about six or seven. as we come south, we might squeeze out a ten or 12 and as we get into the early part of next week, the weather front comes back from the atlantic in the shape of weather front so we are looking at it not being as cold. —— weather fronts. are house prices going up or down? we seem to get a lot of updates on the property market, but they all show different things. ben is trying to get to the bottom of what is actually happening.
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i will try and explain why they show different things. good morning to you. today's figures are from the royal institution of chartered surveyors, and they suggest that sales are falling, rather than just slowing down, and that has meant that prices were pretty stagnant across the country. and that is much more downbeat than what we have heard from the rest of the industry. on tuesday, the uk's biggest lender, the halifax, said that a shortage of homes for sale pushed house prices in october up by 4.5% — the fastest rate since february. and, earlier this month, the nationwide said prices were going up 2.5% because of that shortage of houses and cheap mortgages. so what is really going on? lucian cook is with me. he is head of research at property group savills. good morning. what is going on? why do all these surveys say different things? well, the industry groups often measure different things, so halifax and nationwide reflect what they have seen recently is the deals
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which have actually been done. the rics tends to be a better indicator of what has actually been done, so it is slightly more up—to—date. in totality it is suggesting the market is relatively subdued, there is relatively little upward treasure on house prices and both buyers and sellers are relatively cautious. so, as much as people are not actively out their bidding, nor are they necessarily bringing a lot of property to the market. so why are cautious? a lot of things have gone on at the moment. talk me through it. a lot of it is uncertainty about the economic backdrop, things going on with brexit, and the mortgage sector has been hit very hard. it is paying higher rates of stamp duty and just beginning to see the effects of mortgage regulation, and other tax measures are holding that back. and then there is london. we talk about house prices as a whole but there is big regional variation, and that london market which has had
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and that london market which has had a bullish run, 65 to 70% house price growth in the last ten years, it is just hitting the limits of what people can afford. that is london and the south—east, and trends would dictate that afterwards the rest of the country catches up. are we seeing that happening? the country catches up. are we seeing that happening ?|j the country catches up. are we seeing that happening? i think over the next five years, we are forecasting at savills that house prices as a whole will go up 14% but the strongest growing region is likely to be the west, at around 14%, london much lower at 7%. that really is a reflection of where we sit in the cycle. the level of catch—up is much slower than we have seen catch—up is much slower than we have seenin catch—up is much slower than we have seen in previous cycles, we are anticipating, and that is against the context of increasing mortgage regulation and the degree of uncertainty, as well as interest rate rises. what about the north—west means it is the standout region for you? part of it is about manchester as a city, and what that brings. the economic vibrancy and the range of the economy and the
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services provided through manchester. we see that on the rise. pa rt manchester. we see that on the rise. part of it is simply looking at trends as to what has happened in the past. you tend to find in any pa rt the past. you tend to find in any part of the cycle that the strong as performing market is either london or the north of the country, and the rest sits somewhere in the middle. and as promised, a word on interest rate rises. we had that first rate rise in more than ten years recently. i guess it is too early to see what effect that has on the market, but there is a psychological effects, first of all. i think that first increase is small, it is not significant, it will not put any families under significant financial pressure but it does signify that rates are going to go up over the period of the next five years, and that i think we'll really constrained house price growth at the back end of the next five—year period. not necessarily because people can't afford their mortgage and bring property... can't afford that mortgage and therefore have to sell their property, but it is much more that when they go to get a mortgage, their ability to get a mortgage, their ability to get a mortgage becomes more constrained and so their buying power is that
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much less. it is good to talk to you. thank you for explaining all of that. i hope that explains some of the role of view, and for you, charlie. it is worthwhile, because it is confusing. you hear one thing one day, and a different thing the next day. they all measure slightly different things, so look at it all. the bbc news channel and bbc news online were both launched 20 years ago this week, marking a watershed in how people consume their news. here is nick higham, with a look back to those early days, and at the impact online digital services have had on the way we get our headlines. hello, and welcome for the first time the bbc news 24. i am gavin esler. and i am sarah montague. november the ninth 1997 and bbc news the evil goes on air. the first time, bbc viewers did not have to wait for the news at 6pm or nine p.m.. it was available on tap.|j wait for the news at 6pm or nine p.m.. it was available on tap. i was hoping that it would just become something people would turn on when they wanted to know the news. why
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should we tell them when they had to sit down and watch the news? i thought it would be a truly a utility that once we started it would never go off air. was that what happened ? would never go off air. was that what happened? it went off air almost immediately because of technical difficulties. the computers didn't work. it took time, but they did overcome the technical problems. you may have heard that air fronts... problems. you may have heard that air fronts. .. jane hill, problems. you may have heard that air fronts... jane hill, the problems. you may have heard that air fronts. .. jane hill, the only original presenter still on air, recalls they came of age when an air fronts concorde crash in —— near paris. it was the first time we were simulcast and the channel ran on bbc 0ne simulcast and the channel ran on bbc one and bbc two, because the controllers of those big national channels took the view that that was such a big, unexpected story that the audience appetite wanted to watch that story unfold. we have some remarkable pictures coming in from new york, which we can go to now. since then, the channel has covered many major stories. now,
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some breaking news. reports arejust coming in of an explosion at liverpool street station here in london. london fire brigade has confirmed they are dealing with this serious fire in a tower block at latimer road in west london. the bbc was late getting into the business of rolling television news. cnn had started in america in 1980. sky news here in britain in 1989. but where the bbc was a pioneer was in providing news on the web. for really significant events, that week in november 1997, was the launch of bbc news online. it started modestly but soon grew rapidly, deliberately trying to appeal to a new, younger audience. the idea was that online would start to reintroduce young people the news, because they were using computers, and it was so successful that very soon it became difficult technically to keep up with the demand. because it was being pumped down, you know, victorian copper telephone lines,
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basically. these days, online and digital services are at the heart of the bbc‘s newsroom. there has been a fundamental shift in the way people get their news, often through social media like twitter and facebook. that worries some. when you were just consuming your news maybe three times a day from the television bulletin, you were obliged to look at things that you didn't know you didn't know, or didn't know you might be interested in. but now we have already, to some extent, decided what we are going to be interested in, and who we are going to wa nt interested in, and who we are going to want to discuss with and receive news from. and that is a real problem with the social media news phenomenon. the webolution in news that started 20 years ago may not be over yet. that is one of those things that... when you say that feels like yesterday. and some things don't change, do they? technical problems? it is true that some things are
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outside of our control, and they remain the same. it is true, it's true. how to make friends! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. it will all be fine. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. a memorial service is due to take place today in new addington to pay tribute to those who died in the croydon tram crash. seven people died and 51 people were injured when the tram overturned speeding on a tight corner near sandilands. those injured on board say the last year has been difficult. i'll go for a hgvjob, and they've got a load of people lined up to do the same job. they'll cross them off the list, as well, because they've got to know the histories, as well. he had this head injury, and we have ten people with the right credentials and everything for a job. so who are they going to cross
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off the list first? it's going to be me. so, even when i get my hgv license, i don't think that's going to be the end of the battle. hundreds of south london homes have been without gas for five days, after heating systems in four tower blocks were turned off due to safety concerns. it is the third time in two years residents have been affected by issues with the communal heating in four blocks on the grantham road estate. about 360 homes were cut off after a potential leak was detected. hyde housing, who have provided electric heaters, said it was doing everything it can. let's take a look at the travel situation this morning. 0n the tubes, there is severe delays eastbound on the central line, because of an earlier signal failure, while south wimbledon station is closed to northern line services. 0n the trains, rmt strike action continues today with reduced services on south—western railway and southern trains. 0nto the roads, and there is northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. it is slow from the woolwich road flyover. 0n the a13, traffic is building westbound from dagenham into barking. and in brixton, acre lane remains partly blocked westbound outside lambeth town hall for
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emergency water work. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's not a very cheery start to the day. in fact, it's rather cold and drizzly outdoors. temperatures got very close to freezing last night. they're starting to come up now, but we've also got some outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle coming, as well. things could brighten up, however, as we head through the afternoon, particular towards the north. but, to begin with it's rather chilly. we've got an awful lot of low, grey cloud around. some outbreaks of patchy rain and drizzle, as you can see from this, dragging its way south—eastwards. towards south—eastern areas of the capital, where it won't brighten up much through the day. the best chance of any brightness as we head towards sundown will be towards the north—west. temperatures at around ten or 11 degrees celsius here. now, overnight tonight, again it should stay mostly dry. certainly some clear skies at first. temperatures will drop off, and then they'll come up again
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into tomorrow morning. but the same sort of start again tomorrow. some outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle, as this weather front pushes its way south—eastwards. but tomorrow we stand the best chance of seeing the brightness, and in the best of that we'll see highs of 12 celsius. it is going to come wet again on friday night. the rain will clear on saturday morning, and after that it's going to become dry and chilly, with a northerly wind for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. pressure on the prime minister as she loses another cabinet minister — the second in a week. priti patel resigned last night over unauthorised meetings with israeli officials — labour says the government is in chaos and theresa may is losing her authority. good morning, it's thursday the ninth of november.
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also this morning — the first minister of wales will respond to criticism over his handling of harassment allegations against the former minister carl sergeant who's believed to have taken his own life. some police control rooms are struggling to meet demand because of a surge in calls — the inspector of constabulary warns that budgest cuts are putting forces under "significa nt stress". sainsbury‘s has just said sainsbury‘s hasjust said profit sainsbury‘s has just said profit is down. supermarkets could be forced to raise prices. be talking to the boss shortly. good morning in sport. a match england's women cannot afford to lose their ashes hopes hinge on the outcome of today's test with australia, batting first they've lostjust the one wicket at tea. we will find out what different in the speed that wounds heal can tell
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us the speed that wounds heal can tell us about the power of our internal body clock. and carol has the weather. patchy light rain and drizzle but bright, clear skies in the north and three the course of the day, the bright skies will push further south, getting into the far south of england late afternoon early evening. more details in 15 minutes. first, our main story. theresa may is under pressure to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. the departure of ms patel has fuelled opposition accusations that the government is in chaos, and mrs may is losing her authority. here's our political correspondent, alex forsyth. arriving in london, priti patel could have guessed herfate. she had been summoned back from kenya by number ten, an official trip to africa cut short. she entered downing street
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by the back door and left having lost her job, resigning after failing to disclose details of unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. in her letter to the prime minister, she said: i accept my actions fell below the high standards that are expected of a secretary of state. for the second time in just over a week, theresa may must now decide how to fill a gap around the top table. michael fallon quit as defence secretary last week over his personal conduct. this team was carefully chosen to represent different tory views over brexit, and some are keen that is maintained. there is a divide between people who want brexit to mean we are basically staying within the eu. they are essentially the remainers who are unchanged. and they give a veneer of acceptance but haven't truly accepted. there are quite a lot of people who were quite balanced when they made the decision as to which side to support, who are now really rather enthusiastic about brexit and want to get on with it properly. whatever the prime minister's decision about who should now sit
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in her cabinet, she will face intense scrutiny over her choice. let's speak to our political correspondent, leila nathoo, who's in westminster for us this morning. this has left the prime minister in a problematic position, hasn't it? as we heard in that report, theresa may is left with another big decision to make in amongst a pretty chaotic situation. absolutely. she is not out of the woods yet. she will be watched closely for who she replaces priti patel with as international development secretary shall. she has tried to move quickly by effectively forcing priti patel to resign to try and rein in her ministers and keep some semblance of control. but there is, as you heard, remains a balance in the cabinet. she is under pressure to replace carl sargeant. —— priti patel. the
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talks begin again today for brexit. sir michael fallon's there will be scrutiny. this whole episode goes to underline how fragile the government is. in a moment we'll speak to the former conservative leader and cabinet minister, iain duncan smith — that's at ten past seven. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is to issue a statement today amid criticism of the way he handled misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who is believed to have taken his own life. the family of carl sargeant — who'd been accused of inappropriate touching — says he was denied naturaljustice because he wasn't given details of the allegations which led to his sacking. 0ur reporter tomos morgan
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is at the welsh assembly for us this morning. we are expecting a statement or reaction from the first minister. this is undoubtedly one of the biggest challenges that the first minister of wales carwyn jones will have faced. in his eight—year reign. he has faced criticism from within his own party for the way that he handled this process when mr sargent was sacked from the cabinet for alleged allegations on friday and the process which led to his death on tuesday. just last night, a former cabinet secretary in carwyn jones's former government here in cardiff bay, heaped more criticism on carwynjones cardiff bay, heaped more criticism on carwyn jones and cardiff bay, heaped more criticism on carwynjones and said he was angry with the fact carwyn jones had
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conducted media interviewsjust on monday, the day before carl sa rg ea nt‘s monday, the day before carl sargeant‘s death monday, the day before carl sargea nt‘s death and monday, the day before carl sargeant‘s death and he believes that carwyn jones sargeant‘s death and he believes that carwynjones had not sargeant‘s death and he believes that carwyn jones had not followed the chew process. 0ther that carwyn jones had not followed the chew process. other parties within wales have also called for ca rwyn within wales have also called for carwyn jones to resign. within wales have also called for carwynjones to resign. the family of carl sargea nt carwynjones to resign. the family of carl sa rg ea nt wa nt carwynjones to resign. the family of carl sargeant want it as well. the labour party said in line with the procedure, the nature was outlined to mr sargent that he will meet with people today in cardiff bay and issue a statement. sainsbury‘s half—year results have just come out this — ben's here with more. just got off the phone with them telling us that profits are at 9% and that is for the half of the year, the last six months. like—for—like sales are up a little
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bit. this is interesting because sales are rising but profits are falling. there has been well—documented issues for all of the supermarkets. the cost that they pay are going up as well. sainsbury ‘s case, it is interesting because remember they bought argos last year. they have had to merge all of those operations into their business. sainsbury‘s has been keen to point out that it is always quite before this time of year. nonetheless, a familiar picture. sainsbury‘s is the uk's second largest. it has nearly 16% of the market. we know there has been a lot ofjob cut market. we know there has been a lot of job cut and market. we know there has been a lot ofjob cut and cost cut. they have changed the shift patterns including
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not working overnight to save some money. i will ask the boss what he is doing next. he has indicated he wa nts to is doing next. he has indicated he wants to save even more money so i will ask him how that is going to happen. us president donald trump has urged the chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. the two leaders held more talks this morning, on the second day of mr trump's visit to china. 0ur beijing correspondent, stephen mcdonnell has been following events. stephen, the two men had lots of praise for each other — how much co—operation will there be going forward do you think? what did they say? they basically just came out and made a couple of statements. the two most powerful people on the planet were heaping praise on one another. we had donald trump saying that xi jinping's people were proud of him. his critics would say how donald trump
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is able to establish that is unclear. he also said that china, if it really wanted to, could quickly and easily solve the north korean nuclear problem. there were some audible gasps to be heard earlier ron went donald trump said i don't blame china for the trade imbalance between the two countries. he blames the former american administrations. as for xi the former american administrations. as forxijinping, he the former american administrations. as for xijinping, he has been pointing to the trade deals that have been signed. apparently $250 billion worth, between the two countries, to coincide with his visit. some of those are in more of the memorandum of understanding category and not solid contracts with delivery dates and the like. and yet he is saying that the two leaders are going to the able to steer the world through the rough seas ahead and we should all feel much better about that.
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reports from hollywood says kevin spaceyis reports from hollywood says kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before it is to be released. kevin spacey who is in the thriller all the money in the world will be replaced by christopher plummer. an extended ban on a group of controversial pesticides will be supported "in principle" by the uk government, according to the environment secretary michael gove. environmentalists have been campaigning for tighter controls over the use of neo—nicotinoids which they say are harming bees and other pollinators. the government has previously resisted eu restrictions but mr gove says he recogises the mounting body of evidence against the chemicals. can the former president of the united states be called up forjury service? yes, he can! barack 0bama arrived for duty at a chicago courthouse yesterday, and joined other prospective jurors waiting to see if they would be chosen to serve. while he took the time to shake a few hands and sign some autographs, the former
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commander—in—chief wasn't required and was dismissed. if he'd been selected, he would have been paid the princely sum of 13 pounds a day. those are the main stories this morning. for the second time in a week, theresa may has a vacancy in her cabinet. last night, priti patel, the international development minister, resigned after growing pressure over unauthorised meetings in israel. her departure follows the resignation of the former defence secretary, sir michael fallon, over his personal conduct. so what next for the prime minsiter, and what do these latest events say about the health of the government? we're joined by the former conservative party leader, iain duncan smith. thank you for your time this morning. two cabinet ministers gone ina morning. two cabinet ministers gone in a day. this is a cabinet in chaos? no, not really. when michael fallon went, there was a fast all around parliament. there was
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investigations into people's behaviour across all parties. in it put that into context and that is what that was all about. dirt priti patel issue is different. —— the pretty patel issue. —— priti patel issue. the prime minister realise she didn't have the full facts when she didn't have the full facts when she is first spoke to her and priti patel realised her behaviour was unacceptable and came back and resigned and that is exactly what should have happened. she put out a letter sent she is deeply sorry for any damage she may have caused. she said she will be the strong supporter of the prime minister going forward. the prime minister is faced with a choice to make now this morning which she needs to work out who to replace priti patel with. you say this is a normal problem. it seems like two out of two cabinet ministers don't know how to judge their own behaviour. but keep this
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in context. michael fallon resigned in the midst of what was rocking every single party. an abuse of power. you see resignations, departures, sadly you have seen a death in wales as a result of this. all of that is what he resigned about. it was about things that happened many years ago. it wasn't to do with theresa may's cabinet or anyissues to do with theresa may's cabinet or any issues around that. quite the opposite. let's not get this as though it is aligning to separate issues together. this issue is about, and it happens time and again, somebody gets it wrong and has to go because they made a set of errors which are themselves in breach of the ministerial code. also in the way they conduct themselves ina cabinet in the way they conduct themselves in a cabinet which has collective responsibilities. theresa may's focus is on taking that forward. another point worth remembering,
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this is a government with one of the highest votes of most governments coming in, a minority government. it doesn't have a working majority. you are going to see lots of turns and lots of changes in the course of that but that is the nature of what the british public voted for. why would you see a lot of changes in cabinet when you are a minority government? they don't have the power to drive changes through. so you will see people essentially making changes to policy. all that sort of stuff is natural in a government which is, as i say, reliant on other people's votes to get its business through. that is what the people voted for. they did not vote for a clear majority of the conservative government, and the conservative government, and the conservative government, and the conservative government got the highest number of votes so the idea they will be this incredible smack of strong process will not be the case. that is the nature of where we are. but the prime minister is in full charge of this cabinet and i
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have no doubt the appointment today will reflect that and the government will reflect that and the government will get on with its business. the daily telegraph just one of the papers saying the government is in crisis and dysfunctional. your reaction? i don't agree with it at all, i'm afraid. every cabinet minister knows what they have to do and the reality is that what you saw in the last couple of days is that, ifa in the last couple of days is that, if a cabinet minister transgressors and doesn't get it right and breaches the code, then they like any other person in work or business would have to go. theresa may made perfectly clear to priti patel that there were questions you need to answer, and priti patel realised the only course available to her was to resign because she had brought the cabinet into question by her behaviour. so that is the right thing to have done and i think theresa may now can get on and make sure she gets the balance right in her cabinet. and who will the
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replacement be? much has been made of priti patel being pro— brexit and a balance needed in cabinet. will that sway the decision regarding her replacement? well, the number one thing the prime minister has to do, of course, is find the person most able to do the job. we always tend to lose sight of this. in any walk of life you have to choose the right person for the right post. that will be her first consideration person for the right post. that will be herfirst consideration but i think instinctively she will want to make sure that the balance of cabinet as it stands at the moment remains much the same. this is not a cabinet reshuffle. the difference between this and a cabinet reshuffle is in between this and a cabinet reshuffle isina between this and a cabinet reshuffle is in a cabinet reshuffle you can change the balance, you can change where you want to put your emphasis on priorities by who you put in the post. this one is someone went and someone post. this one is someone went and someone has to go into the post. to that extent, my instinct is she will not really change the balance of that, otherwise that would necessitate a fuller reshuffle, and thatis necessitate a fuller reshuffle, and that is not plan, as i understand that, at the moment. you say that is
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not her instinct. you spoken to theresa may about this?|j not her instinct. you spoken to theresa may about this? i haven't, andi theresa may about this? i haven't, and i would consider it slightly impertinent to call her and say here is my advice. she knows what she has to do. my is a replacement, rather like last time round when michael fallon, as you referred to earlier on, had to go, she looked at someone who would not upset the balance at all, and she put him in the post and thatis all, and she put him in the post and that is my instinct is to wear this will go sometime today. if not tomorrow, i don't know. iain duncan smith, thank you forjoining us on bbc breakfast. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this morning across parts of the south—east of england it isa parts of the south—east of england it is a cold start. it is also pretty chilly in the north of the country, but in between there is a lot of clout. some patchy light rain and drizzle and that will give way through the day to some sunshine. the sunshine arriving in the far
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south of england much later in the afternoon. what is happening is the cloud and rain and drizzle produced by this weather front. behind that we see colder conditions coming our way. equally there will be some sunshine as well. first thing this morning we got the figure cloud and some rain and drizzle in the south—east. temperatures before that arrives around about freezing to about three celsius, that is where they are at the moment but they will go they are at the moment but they will 9° up they are at the moment but they will go up as the cloud comes in. a bit of cloud across wales, into the midlands, parts of lincolnshire and yorkshire with some light rain and drizzle but for the rest of northern england, northern ireland and scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland it is a dry and bright start, barring the showers across the north and west of scotland. and here as well the showers will be blustery in nature. as our weather front unused to trundle down towards the south—east, you can see how the brighter skies and sunny spells coming right behind it and it is not until late afternoon and evening we see that in the far south—east. for south—west england, south wales, for example, in any sunshine we could
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hit 13 or 14 celsius. that is better than we would expect at this stage in november. through the evening and overnight, a lot of clear skies to start the night. weatherfronts coming in from the west will introduce the cloud and rain heading in an easterly and southerly direction. behind that, where it clears up we will have some frost, particularly across scotland, and a plethora of showers blowing in in the wind in the north and west of scotland. tomorrow some of those will be wintry, but it willjust be on the hills and you can see how our weather front sinks down to the south of england and clears more readily than the one today. here as well it will brighten up. a scattering of showers coming in on the north—westerly wind. starting to feel cooler as well. temperatures in the north five to nine, in the south tend to 14. the next weather front waiting in the winds will be coming our way through friday and towards saturday. embedded in this are the re m na nts of saturday. embedded in this are the remnants of ex— tropical storm rina. all the tropical elements will have
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gone and all we will have as a band of cloud and rain which will clear early on saturday, armistice day, leaving most of us with a dry day, some sunny spells and a few showers. it will be feeling much colder, as it will on remembrance sunday. they're that in mind if you are standing outside. a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine as well. temperatures of six to seven and eight in the north. ten to 12 further south. as we head on into tuesday, we start to import atlantic fronts, which are not quite as colder direction for us. thank you very much, see you later on. tomorrow is the deadline for people who have applied for the personal independence payment to submit details of their experience to a group of mps. the work and pensions committee is looking into the scheme, which was introduced in 2013 to help people with the extra costs associated with long—term illness or disability. pips have been controversial since their creation, and disability rights campaigners claim some people are being denied the payments they need. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been speaking to one woman about her experience of the system.
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heart monitor beeps. pips aren'tjust a familiar sound to daisy. she is reliant upon them — personal independence payments. they keep her financially afloat because her disability means she is at home, unable to work. so i have lupus, and i also have another syndrome, so a lot of heart problems. i dislocate a lot, mobility is pretty appalling, as is everything else. and how important are the personal independence payments which you get? they're essential. it's the only way i could afford to be disabled. but, at first, daisy was refused benefits. pip was introduced in 2013. the idea is to ensure that benefits go to those with the greatest need. the big change is the use of face—to—face assessments
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to decide who gets the money. assessors make a judgement as to how well a claimant can carry out everyday tasks, such as dressing, cooking, and moving about, and these assessments are carried out by private companies. daisy, what was your experience? it was pretty dehumanising — whether i could lift my knees up, how far i could lift my arms. and it was done by a paramedic. he would have had no professional knowledge of my condition, or much understanding clinically of a disability or fluctuating chronic illness. "took off and put on herjumper." "average build, casually dressed, did not appear to be trembling." so you think these criteria were used to decide that you don't qualify for these payments? yes. at best, they're irrelevant. at worst, they're a cynical justification for trying to deny needed money. daisy appealed and a judge agreed, overturning the original decision.
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according to the department of work and pensions, since pip was introduced, more than 2.4 million decisions was made, and of these, 8% were appealed, 4% overturned. the department says that in most cases that happened after people submitted more oral or written evidence, but the latest figures from the ministry ofjustice show that for three months this year, the successful appeal rate was 65%, so more than half of appeals are resulting in decisions being overturned. despite this, some believe change was overdue. we need to find a balance between those who need to have the right amount of money to get that sort of independence they need, and also the taxpayers who are paying for this. there are certain areas that have gone very there are certain areas that have gone very well, and that is always to be expected, unfortunately, when government embarks on these enormous things. the department of work and pensions stressed that... tomorrow
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is the deadline for submitting evidence to the house of commons work and pensions committee, who are investigating the issue. daisy has already made her views clear. still to come on breakfast: as scientists find that wounds sustained during the day heal much more quickly than those suffered at night, we will find out how our internal body clock affects every aspect of our lives, from sleeping to healing. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. a memorial service is due to take place today in new addington to pay tribute to those who died in the croydon tram crash. seven people died and 51 people were injured when the tram overturned speeding on a tight corner near sandilands. those injured on board say the last year has been difficult. i'll go for an hgvjob, and they've got a load of people
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lined up to do the same job. they're going to cross me off the list, as well, because they've got to know the histories, as well. he's had this head injury, and we've got ten people with the right credentials and everything for a job. so who are they going to cross off the list first? it's going to be me. so, even when i get my hgv license, i don't think that's going to be the end of the battle. hundreds of south london homes have been without gas for five days after heating systems in four tower blocks were turned off due to safety concerns. it is the third time in two years residents have been affected by issues with the communal heating in four blocks on the grantham road estate. about 360 homes were cut off after a potential leak was detected. hyde housing, who have provided electric heaters, said it was doing everything it can. let's take a look at the travel situation this morning. 0n the tubes, there are minor delays on the central line eastbound from leytonstone to epping. also minor delays on tfl rail,
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while south wimbledon underground station is closed to northern line services due to faulty escalators. 0n the trains, rmt strike action continues today, with reduced services on south—western railway and southern trains. 0nto the roads, and there are long eastbound delays on the marylebone road following a collision opposite harley street, with traffic trailing back over the marylebone flyover. 0n the a13, traffic is building westbound from dagenham into barking. and there are anticlockwise delays on the m25 heading towardsjunction 3 at swanley following a collision in the outside lanes. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's not a very cheery start to the day. in fact, it's rather cold and drizzly outdoors. temperatures got very close to freezing last night. they're starting to come up now, but we've also got some outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle coming, too. things could brighten up, however, as we head through the afternoon, particularly towards the north. but, to begin with it's rather chilly. we've got an awful lot of low, grey cloud around. some outbreaks of patchy rain and drizzle, as you can see from this, dragging its
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way south—eastwards. towards south—eastern areas of the capital, where it won't brighten up much through the day. the best chance of any brightness as we head towards sundown will be towards the north—west. temperatures at around ten or 11 degrees celsius here. now, overnight tonight, again it should stay mostly dry. certainly some clear skies at first. temperatures will drop off, and then they'll come up again into tomorrow morning. but the same sort of start again tomorrow. some outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle, as this weather front pushes its way south—eastwards. but tomorrow we stand the best chance of seeing the brightness, and in the best of that we'll see highs of 12 celsius. it is going to come wet again on friday night. the rain will clear on saturday morning, and after that it's going to become dry and chilly, with a northerly wind for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga
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munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the prime minister will announce her new international development secretary this morning as she tries to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. priti patel stepped down last night after more questions were raised about meetings she held during a personal trip to israel. theresa may is facing calls to replace her with someone who backs brexit to maintain the delicate political balance of the cabinet. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today. it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely to centre around the uk's financial obligations and the rights of british people living in the eu. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is to issue a statement today amid criticism of the way he handled misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who is believed to have
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taken his own life. the family of carl sargeant — who'd been accused of inappropriate touching — says he was denied naturaljustice because he wasn't given details of the allegations which led to his sacking. reports from hollywood say kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before its release — following the recent allegations of sexual assault. spacey, who plastean paul getty in the thriller, "all the money in the world", will be replaced by the oscar—winning canadian actor, christopher plummer. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. earlier on breakfast matthew scott from the association of police and crime commissioners told us that lack of funds was an issue for policing. in terms of making sure we are
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prioritising emergencies, they look at that threat, the risk and the harm to the individual involved and make an assessment as to what they need to be prioritising. but as you pointed out, it's getting harder and harder to do with fewer police officers which is why as lease and crime commission is, we have put in a bid to the government for extra funding which will increase the number of police officers, increase the number of firearms officers and thomas so we can do that. us president donald trump has urged chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. discussions on how to deal with north korea's threats to the region have dominated the agenda during mr trump's tour of asia. this morning he warned that "time is quickly running out" to deal with the north korean nuclear threat. an extended ban on a group of controversial pesticides will be supported "in principle" by the uk government, according to the environment
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secretary michael gove. environmentalists have been campaigning for tighter controls over the use of neo—nicotinoids which they say are harming bees and other pollinators. the government has previously resisted eu restrictions but mr gove says he recogises the mounting body of evidence against the chemicals. now what's the first thing you'd do if your numbers came up on the lottery? hand your notice in? that's exactly what six hospital kitchen workers south wales have done after scooping 25 million on the euromillions. the women have been playing as a work syndicate for the past six years. they're currently planning a dream holiday together to las vegas. coming up on the programme, carol will have your weather forecast. that's in about ten minutes' time. that picture behind us, it doesn't look like australia. you can't feel
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the heat. you can tell a country from its cricket pitch? we need some beautiful sydney sunshine. the sun is shining on england. a good partnership. we will show you in a moment. it is a crucial match. a must win. it is a points system. england must get something out of it. and we are doing ok? yes. good morning and a good day so far. although they have lost that three wickets in the final session of the day. warren wingfield was the first to fall early on. look at this for a catch. that was the first dismissal for england. since that point, they
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have moved on well. tammy bowman and the captain heather knight have both scored half centuries in the last few centuries. —— in the last few minutes. do you remember this moment? norman whiteside scoring for northern ireland at the 1986 world cup. well the current crop of players will attempt to take the nation to a first world cup in 32 years, with victory over switzerland in their play off, the first leg of which is tonight at windsor park. the players have done fantastically so far to get to this point. at the end of the day, there's eight countries left in europe and we're the smallest one going into this situation. i see in the squad an opportunity that they don't want to waste but equally, they have done everything so far and anticipated they will do everything over the next two games to try and make it a reality.
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we'll bring you a great goal from the women's champions league and chelsea ladies in a moment, but before we do their forward eni aluko, has said she's ‘disappointed and surprised' her national teammates haven't backed her more following the racist remarks made to her by the former women's manager mark sampson. the fa have since apologised. it's been very divisive and very adversarial and i think the players have been dragged into that. but the players have theirown mind and they should be able to say, actually, let me step back from this and see how this may benefit. if i have a problem, ie if they have a problem, they have a process that is going to protect them. aluko was on the bench last night as her club side chelsea took a huge step towards the champions league quarterfinals. they won the first leg of their last sixteen match 3—0 against swedish side rosengard. this superb effort from england forward fran kirby put the blues on their way.
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david moyes says he's on ‘a mission' and has something to prove in his newjob at west ham united. moyes faced the media for the first time since replacing slaven bilic and says he wants to restore his reputation after being relegated with sunderland last season. do you know something? i do have a point to prove, yeah? i do. i think i've got, i think maybe i have to do that and show it and sometimes you have two repair things and maybe i've got a little bit to repair. lewis hamilton says he won't let the controversy over his tax affairs "distract" him as he heads into the final two races of this season. hamiltonof course wrapped up his fourth f1 title last weekend and is one of the high—profile figures whose tax situation came under scrutiny in the ‘paradise papers‘. i‘ve just come from this great period of time with my family and friends and i have this huge wave of positive energy and nothing can really dent that.
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yeah, i‘m just solely focused on trying to win this race this weekend. i still have two races to go. don‘t really have anything to add to the whole scenario that‘s happening. we are bringing you something out of the ordinary this morning. this is from laguna park in redding. an attempt for the fastest speed in a jet engine powered suit. it's like a bond film. blair is that real speed? yes. 32 mph. i know you would say what you would do few won the lottery. you would buy one of those, wouldn‘t you ? lottery. you would buy one of those, wouldn't you? no one would ever leave me in charge of a jet pack. they would never, ever do that.|j
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they would never, ever do that.” would guarantee you, charlie, no one would guarantee you, charlie, no one would disagree with you on that. he landed perfectly. no grey skies in sydney. andy swiss, the lucky man, enjoying the sydney sunshine. and he has company. the crucial test match. a great start for england on the opening day. a decent start. they lost a couple of wickets though. 148 — three. england won the choice —— the toss. just about. lauren wingfield out for just four. a brilliant catch. at that stage, the australian bowlers we re that stage, the australian bowlers were on top and then a century stand
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from captain heather knight and tammy beaumont. they both reached their centuries. heather knight went for 62 and tammy beaumont out for 70. the floodlights havejust for 62 and tammy beaumont out for 70. the floodlights have just come on. this is a historic night. the first—ever day— night test in test cricket and also women‘s cricket. they are 148—3. cricket and also women‘s cricket. they are 148-3. we want to put it in a bit of context. the women‘s ashes series is run on a points —based system which is different to the men‘s test which we have coming up. it is keenly poised because england are trailing 4—2 and it is important they win this test match because a lot of points are available, aren‘t they? that's right. just briefly explain the format. seven matches in total. 31—day games and then a 1—off
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test match and then 32020 games. australia won three and a lead 4—2. —— and then three t20 matches. the pressure is on. they are the world champions. they won the world cup in the summer and that should give them huge experience in the hope they can turn that around. they will have to rebuilt after the loss of those couple of quick wickets. as i said. they have made it decent start. andy swiss, live in sydney, take you very much. andy putting it into context which shows how important this test matches. it's always funny when there is someone in the way. matches. it's always funny when there is someone in the waym would be a live cross without it. there is someone in the waym would be a live cross without itm could be about your circadian rhythms. stick around to hear about
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it. scientists in cambridge have discovered that wounds sustained during the day heal much quicker than those sustained at night. they found a 60% difference in the time it took patients to recover, and they think it‘s all down to the human body clock. the study‘s author, john o‘neill is here, along with the circadian rhythms expert, andrew loudon. could you explain... research found that someone who sustained wound during the day compared to someone who sustained a wind during the night, the wind sustained during the day was healed quicker. it took fewer days for those wounds and these are burns wounds suffered by nhs patients across the country and the burns wounds took on average 17 days to heal compared to those that we re days to heal compared to those that were sustained during the night which took on average 28 days to heal. what is the crucial difference
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between what happens during the day thatis between what happens during the day that is so different to what happens at night? your body clock is at a different type of day. you will be aware of your body clock. it makes you feel sleepy at night and gets confused when you have jet lag. what many people are not aware of is there is a biological clock inside every cell of the body. that is equally true of your skin cells. i could take a scraping of your skin cells and i would ask you first of course. . . cells and i would ask you first of course... and grow them in a petrie dish ina course... and grow them in a petrie dish in a lab and we would still observe and approximately 24—hour rhythm in which various dialogical processors are active competitive in inactive. ash biological. we were intrigued to see that lots of processors associated with cell movement were changing over the 24—hour cycle. that movement were changing over the 24— hour cycle. that led movement were changing over the 24—hour cycle. that led to a prediction that if you wound those cells in a dish or in skin slices,
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we would predict the skin cells will move faster to repair the wind when that happens during the active phase compared to when it happened strength in active phase. that's what we observe. we saw the same was true in mice. of course, mice are nocturnal. the whole thing is flipped in mice. they heal faster at night convicted sharing the day. that is what has led us to get in touch with colleagues in the nhs and say it, do you have any records we could use to test this idea and we we re very could use to test this idea and we were very fortunate that colleagues of andrew's in manchester had access to this database of burns patients and what the nhs began to do in 2012 was record not only the time of day the injuries were incurred but the numberof the injuries were incurred but the number of days until healing and succeeded. —— healing has succeeded.
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some of the layman might not be aware of the idea about your body is doing different insert different times. a thinkerjohn's work is a wonderful example of the growing awareness we have , wonderful example of the growing awareness we have, the extraordinary extent to which the body clock syste m extent to which the body clock system drives a sickly pretty well everything in our biology and it not only controls our behaviour but also it controls many aspects of our normal biology. the ability to deal with food and metabolise food and all of the consequences of the light, dark circle. it is profound. evenif light, dark circle. it is profound. even if we know that, you don‘t control when you get an injury. there is a limit to what you can do with it. we can know it may be does heal better at a certain time of day but you can‘t control that. heal better at a certain time of day but you can't control that. that is perfectly true but there are some
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wonderful steps forwards we can now do as wonderful steps forwards we can now doasa wonderful steps forwards we can now do as a result ofjohn's work. we can identify the mechanism and then using drugs and other things, we can probably adopt new techniques... somehow replicate that so the body is almost tricked into it? absolutely and the prime candidates are steroid hormones. labs have shown they regulate a biological clock. circadian rhythms, i mean, that is what this comes down to, your internal body clock. why are some people better at getting up early? la rks people better at getting up early? larks and 0wls. this is a natural distribution you see in the population, and it changes between individuals because of our different genetic make—up. we know some of those genes but it also changes as we age. and so young people before
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they hit adolescence naturally tend to wa ke they hit adolescence naturally tend to wake up earlier. they are early rises or larks. and as you get older, into your teenage years and early 20s, naturally you tend to wa ke early 20s, naturally you tend to wake up later. it is not that teenagers are being lazy. they naturally have a programmed later relationship with the cycle of day and night. as we grow older again we get earlier and earlier. at adults are different. i understand teenagers need less asleep. they are growing, they are physically changing. but i can talk to half of my friends and they would say i could never get up at the time you get up and if they do they are a wreck for the day. 0thers get up and if they do they are a wreck for the day. others are absolutely fine. one thing which is emerging now is there appears to be extraordinary variation in human populations, and some peoplejust have a naturally early set clock and others have a naturally late set clock. research by colleagues on the clock. research by colleagues on the clock fields such as john
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clock. research by colleagues on the clock fields such asjohn and myself are starting to unravel some of the genetic mechanisms behind that and there have been some fabulous studies in the last few years which give us some insight into the ways in which alan genetic make—up controls our natural timing with respect to dawn and dusk. —— our natural genetic make—up. it may turn out that? —— that you two up genetically predisposed to it. all we drinka genetically predisposed to it. all we drink a lot of coffee. thank you for taking us through the science of that. i wonder what carol's circadian rhythms are like. do you find it easier to get up at ridiculous o'clock, when we do?” find it easier to get up at ridiculous o'clock, when we do? i am a night owl rather than an ea rlybird, a night owl rather than an earlybird, so i am in completely the wrong job and have been for the last 20 years, actually. but a mac you are perfect for it, trust me. bless you, naga. it is not as cold as it
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was yesterday. manchester, the current temperature 12 celsius. this time yesterday it was minus one. so a13 time yesterday it was minus one. so a 13 degrees hike in temperature. as we come south under clear skies it is nippy as you step out. weather fronts thinking southwards will take some cloud across and it won‘t feel as cold as we go through the rest of the day. for many of us we will see sunny spells developing behind weather front, which is sunny spells developing behind weatherfront, which is continuing its dissent down in the southern counties. behind it, the sun comes out, and a pleasant day for most parts of the uk —— descent. this weather front sinking southwards with its patchy rain and drizzle. quite a few showers being blown in ona quite a few showers being blown in on a blustery wind and you can see how the sunshine follows that weather front down in the southern counties. for the south—east it will be later on in the afternoon and into the early part of the evening when we see the back edge of that cloud clear. this afternoon at 3pm
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this is what we expect. a bit of cloud across the south, brightening up cloud across the south, brightening up across cloud across the south, brightening up across parts of norfolk, through the midlands, for example, some of the midlands, for example, some of the home counties and across northern england. a fair bit of sunshine for you, but it will feel quite cool. for scotland, a fair bit of sunshine around. a peppering of showers under that blustery wind in the north and west and for northern ireland find a head for you, again with some lengthy sunny spells. lengthy sunny spells following on behind the weather front in wales. in south wales and parts of south—west england, in any sunshine we could hit 13 or 14 celsius. that is above average for this stage in november. through the evening and overnight we start with clear skies but wet and windy weather coming in from the north—west. it will sink south eastwards as we go through the course of the night, leaving behind clearer skies. that means scotland is looking at a widespread frost and a plethora of showers coming in on the wind. some of those will be wintry in the hills, notjust overnight into tomorrow. tomorrow, a
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weather front clears the south of england more readily than the one today, and began the sun comes out behind it. it will start to feel that it colder, and you can see out towards the west the first signs of our next weather front coming our way. here it is here, and embedded in this are the remnants of ex— tropical storm rina. lost its tropical storm rina. lost its tropical qualities by then, it will just be a set of weather front sinking southwards, and bringing rain as it does so. for armistice day, some showers in between brighter skies. 0n day, some showers in between brighter skies. on sunday, a fair bit of shower tween saturday —— a fair few showers between saturday and sunday, and much colder than it has been. sainsbury‘s has just reported theirfigures. number two numbertwo in number two in the market, losing a bit of market share to stores like
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aldi and lidl. it is an indicator of what we are spending money on and how much we have at the rest of the week. we have just how much we have at the rest of the week. we havejust heard how much we have at the rest of the week. we have just heard from sainsbury‘s that profits are down by 996 sainsbury‘s that profits are down by 9% for the first half of the year. they have come in at £251 million. all of that despite a 1.6% rise in sales. we can talk to mike coupe, chief executive of sainsbury‘s. very good morning to you. good morning. let's start with these figures, because profits down 9%. a similar picture to what we heard yesterday from marks & spencer. it isa yesterday from marks & spencer. it is a tough market out there right now and there is a big fight going on between all of the big retailers. it isa on between all of the big retailers. it is a tough market, but our numbers have eaten the consensus market forecasts out there, and we have good momentum in our business and we are serving more customers than ever. but as you say, the nature of our customers‘ shopping habits are changing, and that is reflected in our numbers as well. good growth in our consumer
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business, up 8%, in our online growth grocery business, and without acquisition of argos, we have a service called fasttrack, which brings goods to our customers within 24 hours. i wanted to talk about that argos issue. you bought it last year and have been trying to integrate it into the sainsbury‘s business, putting some of those argos stores in the sainsbury‘s stores. at that has cost you a lot of money, and now your profits are down 9%. argos makes a loss in its first half and usually does, it makes most of its money in the christmas period, so a critical trading period now. as you say, we will have 165 argos stores in sainsbury‘s stores, between now and christmas, click and collect points, and if you are brave enough you can order your christmas gifts on christmas eve at 1pm and still have them arrive by six p.m.. we think thatis them arrive by six p.m.. we think that is a fantastic service. the wea ker that is a fantastic service. the weaker pound which we have all been facing, and a lot of retailers are
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contending with, means it is more expensive, and you are passing those prices on to us as expensive, and you are passing those prices on to us as consumers. expensive, and you are passing those prices on to us as consumers. what things will get more expensive? what will i notice in my supermarket ask it is going to cost more? food price inflation as measured by the government is around 2%, and inevitably, as you say, the things we import tend to be things like fresh foods, which get more expensive on the back of that. we are probably through the worst, if the truth be told, and even today prices are about the same as they we re prices are about the same as they were two years ago. we as a business have done a good job of protecting our customers from the more extreme challenges of inflation, and the currency movements. at what point do those imported prices, that rising price from stuff you buy abroad make you think we will buy more in the uk? we already source virtually everything we can from the uk, so our fresh everything we can from the uk, so ourfresh meat, everything we can from the uk, so our fresh meat, many everything we can from the uk, so ourfresh meat, many of everything we can from the uk, so our fresh meat, many of the everything we can from the uk, so ourfresh meat, many of the produce products we sell, our dairy products, they are all sourced from the uk. of course, you can‘t grow
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bananas or citrus fruits or tomatoes out of season in the uk, so the reality is we import a reasonable amount of food in the uk, and it is impossible to replace from uk sources. i am looking at your results and you talk about wanting to deliver £540 million of cost savings by the end of this year. that is a lot of money. you have already cut 2000 jobs in the business. how will you save the rest of that money? there are any number of that money? there are any number of initiatives, whether it is energy—saving initiatives like led lighting, for example, we have invested in technology which enables us invested in technology which enables us to run our business more efficiently, and things like reducing product waste in our business, that is a big issue more widely in our society and we have done a good job of managing our supply chains and reducing jobs in that area of the business. it is not one initiative, it is lots of individual initiatives adding up to a large number. should we expect
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morejob cuts? a large number. should we expect more job cuts? as i say, the nature of the work in our business is changing, and inevitably jobs of the work in our business is changing, and inevitablyjobs will disappear but equally, newjobs are created. we employ a lot more people in our convenience business and our online business. the important thing is that we talk to our colleagues in our business before we make any changes. a lot of colleagues will be watching this this morning, getting ready to spend money for christmas. they are working out what their budget will be. what commitment do you have the them that they will have a job in the new year? as i say, all the changes in our business we are open and transparent with our collea g u es we are open and transparent with our colleagues on. they should be confident in our business and one of the benefits of working in a company like sainsbury‘s is you get a substantial discounts on the product you buy in our business. so they should be confident in their christmas shopping. thank you for joining us. more on all of that, and we have a whole load of other results from other retailers this morning, just after eight a.m.. still to come on breakfast: he is the nation‘s best—loved bear, and now paddington is swapping his marmalade sandwiches
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for birthday cake. we will hear how peru‘s finest export is celebrating his 60th year with a final picture book. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sara 0rchard. a memorial service is due to take place today in new addington to pay tribute to those who died in the croydon tram crash. seven people died and 51 people were injured when the tram overturned speeding on a tight corner near sandilands. those injured on board say the last year has been difficult. i‘ll go for an hgvjob, and they‘ve got a load of people lined up to do the same job. they‘re going to cross me off the list, as well, because they‘ve got to know the histories, as well. he‘s had this head injury, and we‘ve got ten people with the right credentials and everything for a job. so who are they going to cross off the list first? it‘s going to be me.
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so, even when i get my hgv license, i don‘t think that‘s the end of the battle. hundreds of south london homes have been without gas for five days after heating systems in four tower blocks were turned off due to safety concerns. it is the third time in two years residents have been affected by issues with the communal heating in four blocks on the grantham road estate. about 360 homes were cut off after a potential leak was detected. hyde housing, who have provided electric heaters, said it was doing everything it can. let‘s take a look at the travel situation this morning. 0n the tubes, there are severe delays on tfl rail, while south wimbledon underground station is closed to northern line services due to faulty escalators. 0n the trains, rmt strike action continues today, with reduced services on south—western railway and southern trains. 0nto the roads, and there is are long eastbound delays on the marylebone road, following a collision opposite harley street, with traffic tailing back over the marylebone flyover. there is northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. and, on the m25, there are anticlockwise delays towards junction five sevenoa ks, following a breakdown near the clacket lane services. let‘s have a check on the weather
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now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it‘s not a very cheery start to the day. in fact, it‘s rather cold and drizzly outdoors. temperatures got very close to freezing last night. they‘re starting to come up now, but we‘ve also got some outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle coming, too. things could brighten up, however, as we head through the afternoon, particularly towards the north. but, to begin with it‘s rather chilly. we‘ve got an awful lot of low, grey cloud around. some outbreaks of patchy rain and drizzle, as you can see, from this weather front, dragging its way south—eastwards. it‘s going to head towards south—eastern areas of the capital, where it won‘t brighten up much through the day. the best chance of any brightness as we head towards sundown will be towards the north—west. temperatures at around ten or 11 degrees celsius here. now, overnight tonight, again it should stay mostly dry. certainly some clear skies at first. temperatures will drop off, and then they‘ll come up again into tomorrow morning. but the same sort of start again tomorrow. some outbreaks of light,
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patchy rain and drizzle, as this weather front pushes its way south—eastwards. but i think tomorrow we stand the greater chance of actually seeing some brightness, and in the best of that we‘ll see highs of 12 celsius. it is going to come wet again on friday night. the rain will clear on saturday morning, and after that it‘s going to become dry and chilly, with a northerly wind for the weekend. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. pressure on the prime minister as
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she loses another cabinet minister — the second in a week. priti patel resigned last night over unauthorised meetings with israeli officials — labour says the government is in chaos and theresa may is losing her authority. good morning, it‘s thursday the 9th november. also this morning. the first minister of wales will respond to criticism over his handling of harassment allegations against the former minister carl sergeant, who‘s believed to have taken his own life. some police control rooms are struggling to meet demand because of a surge in calls — the inspector of constabulary warns that budgest cuts are putting forces under "significant stress". sainsbury‘s says profits are down 9%, despite a rise in sales. the boss told me that supermarkets could be forced to raise prices. i‘ll have the details.
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in sport, in sydney right now the england women‘s captain heather knight leading from the front on the opening day of their ashes test with australia, a match which could decide the outcome of this years series. a disappointing wicket there which fell in the last few minutes. it‘s ground—breaking, or should that be water—breaking. images of life under the sea are captivating sunday night viewers — we‘ll speak some of the team behind blue planet ii, and get an exclusive sneak preview of the latest show. it‘s the largest single building diy sos has ever tackled — nick knowles will be here to tell us about the team‘s very special challenge for children in need. and carol has the weather. good morning. it‘s a fairly cloudy start to the day for many of us with patchy light rain and drizzle, but brighter skies in the north of the country spreading south through the
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course of the day. not getting into the far south—east of england until late in the afternoon, early evening. good morning, first, our main story. the prime minister will announce her new international development secretary this morning as she tries to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. priti patel stepped down last night after more questions were raised about meetings she held during a personal trip to israel. theresa may is facing calls to replace her with someone who backs brexit to maintain the delicate political balance of the cabinet. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth has more. arriving in london, priti patel could have guessed herfate. she had been summoned back from kenya by number 10, an official trip to africa cut short. she entered downing street by the back door and left having lost herjob, resigning after failing to disclose details of unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. in her letter to the prime minister, she said: "i accept my actions fell below the high standards that are expected of a
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secretary of state." for the second time in just over a week, theresa may must now decide how to fill a gap around the top table. michael fallon quit as defence secretary last week over his personal conduct. this team was carefully chosen to represent different tory views over brexit, and some are keen that is maintained. there is a divide between people who want brexit to mean we are basically staying within the eu. they are essentially the remainers who are unchanged. and they give a veneer of acceptance but haven‘t truly accepted. there are quite a lot of people who were quite balanced when they made the decision as to which side to support, who are now really rather enthusiastic about brexit and want to get on with it properly. whatever the prime minister‘s decision about who should now sit in her cabinet, she will face intense scrutiny over her choice. let‘s speak to our political correspondent, leila nathoo, who‘s in westminster for us this morning.
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we spoke to iain duncan smith earlier, he seemed to play down the so—called chaotic cabinet that many newspapers are alluding to but theresa may still under extreme scrutiny. i think there is no doubt this is extremely tricky political territory of the theresa may. this is her second cabinet resignation in a week, and she is facing the prospect of another reshuffle. her choice of defence secretary last week to replace sir michael fallon didn‘t go down well on the tory backbenchers. the promotion of a chief ally. she has a difficult choice to replace priti patel as international development secretary. reshuffles a re international development secretary. reshuffles are difficult at the best of times, let alone when a government is so fragile as theresa may‘s is. i do think she‘ll be tempted to carry out fireworks today in terms of a major reshuffle. certainly the departure of priti
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patel leaves a hole in the cabinet in terms of a big leave supporting figure. the expectation is theresa may will replace her with another leave backing minister to keep that delicate balance. remember the latest round of brexit talks begins again today. that is always in the backdrop for this administration. this whole episode is underlining how fragile her government is. thank you. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is to issue a statement today amid criticism of the way he handled misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who is believed to have taken his own life. the family of carl sargeant — who‘d been accused of inappropriate touching — says he was denied naturaljustice because he wasn‘t given details of the allegations which led to his sacking. 0ur reporter thomos morgan is at the welsh assembly for us this morning. we had those comments from carl
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sa rg ea nt‘s we had those comments from carl sargea nt‘s family we had those comments from carl sargeant‘s family and this is the first opportunity for the first minister to respond. yes, this is undoubtedly one of the biggest challenges carwyn jones undoubtedly one of the biggest challenges carwynjones has had to face as the first minister of wales during his eight—year tenure as first minister. he has faced criticism from within his own party over the handling of the process. he has faced calls from politicians from other parties in wales to resign, and last night a former key ally of his, a former assembly member and a former member of his cabinet leighton andrews had more pressure on him, saying he was angry at the way that mr sargent had been treated during this affair and said he didn‘t agree that due process had been followed. if carwyn jones he didn‘t agree that due process had been followed. if carwynjones had made tv interviews the day before
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carl sa rg ea nt‘s made tv interviews the day before carl sargeant‘s death. made tv interviews the day before carl sargea nt‘s death. ca rwyn made tv interviews the day before carl sargeant‘s death. carwynjones will come here to discuss the events with labour assembly members and also issue a statement. thank you. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significant stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. us president donald trump has urged the chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. the two leaders held more talks this morning, on the second day of mr trump‘s visit to china. 0ur beijing correspondent, stephen mcdonnell has been following events. stephen, the two men had lots of praise for each other, how much co—operation will there be going forward do you think? the thing is, will this translate into a positive political outcome? well, this actually is the big
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question. gushing praise from both of these leaders for each other, especially donald trump. he said of xijinping your people especially donald trump. he said of xi jinping your people are really proud of you. china have asked the us president how are you able to establish whether the chinese people are proud of their leader? xi jinping was talking about the dawning of a new era of relations between these two great powers. there is disagreement over north korea. for example donald trump said that china, if it really wanted to, could quickly and easily fix the north korean problem. and trade, it was quite interesting. he said today in front of a group of business people from china and the us that he didn‘t blame china for the trade imbalance between the two countries. very different to the fire and brimstone donald trump when he was trying to become president of the us. when he said this there was a
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bit of a gazprom the audience. both leaders are saying they are going to be able to move forward and trade and that this is going to be good for the whole world —— there was a bit of a grasp from the audience. reports from hollywood say kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before its release — following the recent allegations of sexual assault. spacey, who plastean paul getty in the thriller, "all the money in the world", will be replaced by the oscar—winning canadian actor, christopher plummer. an extended ban on a group of controversial pesticides will be supported "in principle" by the uk government, according to the environment secretary michael gove. environmentalists have been campaigning for tighter controls over the use of neo—nicotinoids which they say are harming bees and other pollinators. the government has previously resisted eu restrictions but mr gove says he recogises the mounting body of evidence against the chemicals. it's
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it‘s that lottery question. what is the first thing you would do if your numbers came up the first thing you would do if your numbers came up on the first thing you would do if your numbers came up on the lottery? a lot of people say they would quit work. that‘s what six hospital kitchen workers in south wales have done after scooping £25 million on the euro millions. they‘ve been playing as a syndicate for the last six years. now they are staying together and planning a dream holiday to vegas. that‘s going to be a big trip! thank you for getting in touch telling us what you do. dave says he would go and buy a beer. he‘s going to go to a local brewery and commissioned them to make a new beer and he‘s going to call it "dave won the lottery beer". another view was that he would hugger flight australia, travel to melbourne,
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queensland, sydney and then visit aquariums —— he would book a flight. you‘d think family and friends would benefit the most but not if you‘re stephen. the cat gets the cream. he‘s going to get the best champagne that money could buy and live every day like it was his last, and he‘ll have people waiting hand and foot and his beautiful cat. we‘ll get the weather from carol shortly but first let‘s return to alamein story. —— our main story. the prime minister is under pressure as she considers who‘ll replace priti patel within the cabinet. the former international development secretary quit yesterday, after news emerged of unauthorised meetings with israeli officials. some political commentators say theresa may will be looking to maintain the fine balance within her top team between those that support brexit and those who don‘t. but how important, and how achievable is this? joining us now is kate mccann — senior political correspondent at the telegraph. thank you for your time this
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morning. i‘m just looking at your front page. i'm having a slight problem with my earpiece but it‘s fine. i'm looking at the front page of the daily telegraph. another day, another crisis it says. what makes this a crisis as opposed to a member of your cabinet making a mistake? it's of your cabinet making a mistake? it‘s the second time in a week theresa may has lost one of the most senior members of her government. couple that with the fact brexit talks start again today in brussels. you‘ve got what looks like from the outside complete chaos. i was talking to some of my colleagues who worked here in parliament for 10—20 yea rs worked here in parliament for 10—20 years and they‘ve never seen anything like it. yesterday theresa may allowed priti patel to resign but in effect she was sacked over her trip to israel and the nondisclosure of meetings. in the end she didn‘t disclose all of the meetings when the prime minister asked her to do so and that‘s what led to her resignation. theresa may
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has got to appoint somebody to replace her but seven days ago when she tried to replace michael fallon, she tried to replace michael fallon, she chose gavin williamson and that didn‘t go down well at all with conservative backbenchers. they‘ve already got their shots in early. jacob rees—mogg saying it should be a brexit supporting minister, theresa may needs to choose probably another woman to replace priti patel otherwise she‘ll get into questions over the balance of female and male ministers in her cabinet. she‘s got a lot of questions to answer and it‘s really not what she wanted. some of what you‘re talking about is the stuff politicaljournalists love to talk about. the intricacies. the bigger picture in a way it is about what people are thinking when they look at this government. they look at theresa may and i‘m not sure what difference that makes. all the wise heads i know say nothing is going to change anyway. she‘s going to carry
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on as prime minister, we are in the position we are in. she probably will carry on as prime minister, not least because nobody who wants to challenge and there are many conservative ministers and mps who would like a shot at the top job, none of them want to take that on until the brexit talks concluded in 2019 because it‘s such a poisoned chalice. we‘re probably unlikely to see a change prime minister but that doesn‘t mean it doesn‘t feel like chaos in downing street. theresa may‘s pitch to the country originally was that she would be a strong and stable leader, the opposite of whatjeremy corbyn was going to be. the labour we were expecting chaos, financial markets plummeting, and we are seeing theresa may in downing street not doing much better than what she said jeremy corbyn would do. it is what political journalists jeremy corbyn would do. it is what politicaljournalists like to gossip about and a lot of this stuff does go on behind—the—scenes. how may people really cared whether priti patel resigned was sacked, but it contributes to this idea that the government isn‘t strong and stable
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at all, it is chaotic. if you think about what‘s going on in the world at the moment, that‘s a really bad thing for this country. we are trying to put ourselves into a position with europe where we are credible, strong and a country to be reckoned with, a force to be reckoned with, a force to be reckoned with, a force to be reckoned with, because we are about to leave the european union. if theresa may wants to secure a good deal, she needs to portray and she needs to go about her business with the idea that she‘s not going to be around for only another year and a half. the front page of the times today says there are suggestions in brussels that there might even be contingency planning for if she doesn‘t continue as prime minister and that is really not where she needs to be right now. a moment ago you said a change prime minister is the least likely option but is there a three strikes and you‘re out thing in relation to cabinet ministers? if there something else that emerges, could that change things?” there something else that emerges, could that change things? i think it‘s unlikely. you‘re right, there
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are it‘s unlikely. you‘re right, there a re lots of it‘s unlikely. you‘re right, there are lots of issues behind—the—scenes in westminster. sexual harassment scandal we haven‘t even touched on. some of theresa may‘s most senior ministers are implicated. damian green still has questions to answer. in ordinary times that would be a real problem for a prime minister. going back to what i said earlier, you have to remember the backdrop. this is the context of the eu negotiations, we are also talking about a cabinet which is relatively new in itself. david cameron didn‘t leave very long ago. there isn‘t a particularly organised effort to replace theresa may. even if she does see another resignation it is unlikely she would be forced to leave as prime minister, because the complications behind—the—scenes with the conservative party are huge. that‘s not to say people like priti patel won‘t be planning for the next stage of the party leadership on the backbenches. that is already going on at the moment. will we see another prime minister in the next couple of weeks or months, i think probably not. thank you, i
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appreciate your efforts with your earpiece. you get the award for the most capable on air live person holding their earpiece in! that‘s an interesting award! ijust made that up. i have probably given it to carol in the past, that particular award. laughter bless you, charlie! this morning is not quite as cold as it was yesterday for many parts of the uk but of course there are exceptions. a lot of cloud around first thing and also some patchy light rain as well. britos guys in the north of the country which will follow behind this front through the course of the day, sunny spells to develop. behind this front, cooler conditions from the north but in the south where we have cloud it will not feel is cold. this is the front heading down towards the south—east.
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the son following hot on its heels with one or two showers but a real rush of showers across the north and west on a blustery wind. into the afternoon, still cloud in southern areas, the rain tending to fizzle. across hampshire and into the isle of wight, heading towards kent, essex and parts of east anglia and the main lens. writing up in norfolk and the north midlands and northern england, seeing a fair bit of sunshine and just light breezes. for scotland, a fair bit of sunshine as well but still quite blustery across the north with those showers in the north and north—west and in northern ireland, a fine day, and again a lot of sunshine around. as we have across wales. behind the weather front it will brighten up and in south wales and parts of south west england, in any sunshine we could see temperatures around about 13 or 14 celsius, higher than they should be at this time in november. then we will see the clear skies replaced
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through the night with rain and thicker cloud from the west, also quite windy. as that happens, clear skies behind that band, so widespread frost across scotland. again, a lot of showers coming in, wintry not just by again, a lot of showers coming in, wintry notjust by night but by day tomorrow. quite a blustery day, the weather front continuing its descent southwards into the channel islands. clearing southern areas more readily than the front today and allowing a lot of sunshine to develop with a lot of sunshine to develop with a lot of sunshine to develop with a lot of showers coming in on the north—westerly wind. feeling cool in the north, still hanging on the double figures in terms of temperatures in the south. then you can see this next front starting to come our way. this is it on the pressure chart. embedded in this we have the remnants of ex—tropical storm but all that will do will bring us some rain. back to you, naga and charlie. thanks, carol. a drop in profits for
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sainsbury‘s and ben will be bringing us sainsbury‘s and ben will be bringing us that news... good morning. sainsbury‘s says profits fell 9% in the first half of this year. sainsbury‘s is the uk‘s second largest supermarket but has been losing market share to discount rivals including aldi and lidl. last month it announced 2000 job cuts and says more could be on the way as it attempts to save another £500 million in costs. the boss told me on breakfast a little earlier the food price inflation could be easing off it. as measured by the government food price inflation is around 2%, and as you mentioned earlier, the things we import, fresh foods, they get a little more expensive on the back of that, but if the truth be told we are probably through the worst, and actually today prices are about the same as they were two years ago, so asa same as they were two years ago, so as a business we have done a very
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good our customers from the more extreme challenges of inflation and currency extreme challenges of inflation and currency movements. lots of other results to update you on this morning, including these. regional airline flybe says its profits came in following a loss of £20 million earlier this year after previous expansion plans proved too ambitious. flybe said it would cut the number of aircraft because of slowing consumer demand. profits at car and bike store halfords have been hit by the weak pound again. has reported pre—tax profits down almost 10%. and the lastest study of the property market says prices could be stagnating because of a slowdown in demand. the royal institution of chartered surveyors study — which is seen as an advance indicator of what could happen next in the market — contrasts with studies
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from the nationwide and halifax which still show prices rising. it is all a bit complicated but they say you should look at the picture of all those studies taken together, not just of all those studies taken together, notjust one. more from me later. how is your ornithology, your bird—watching and bird hearing skills? terrible. do you know any bird sounds, other than an owl? i could probably do a spiral or a bluetit, maybe. and you could distinguish between them? —— a sparrow or a distinguish between them? —— a sparrow or a bluetit. you‘re not going to ask me? well, anyway, we can play you are bittern... 0h, going to ask me? well, anyway, we can play you are bittern... oh, it was supposed to be a quiz but i have just given it away, but this is what it sounds like. low sound low rumbling sound
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if you hadn‘t guessed it, that‘s the booming call of the bittern. it sounds a bit muffled. let‘s hear it. it sounds a bit like you, walking around in the morning, mumbling, it is you! it was once as very rare sound in the british countryside. it was once a very rare sound in the british countryside. it‘s hoped we‘ll be hearing a lot more of it very soon. the bittern was almost driven to extinction in the uk, but a new survey shows there are growing numbers of the bird after intensive efforts to bring it back. we‘re joined now by tom clare from the wildfowl and wetlands trust. good morning, tom. tell us about this bird. can we get a picture up? theatres, behind us. can you tell us about this bird? it was effectively extinct, is that right? yes, it was extinct, is that right? yes, it was extinct from the uk in the late 18005, extinct from the uk in the late 1800s, then we slowly started
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getting, around breed and habitat. bitterns really breed and nest in these tee we started and we started were nd ”ii, 1! iii"... ”i! f then for food . then for food. a then for toad. a bit back then as well. for food, a bit 2 big are back then as well. for food, a bit hess big are they? tall, 55.5. to 5 55 5555 to upright 5
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the reed beds, to é— do i5~~~ ~ , 5 you real 555§ 168 or 55555 ~ you or 77— q- 7 555555 a my tamafi bi rd a ny it fiai5 bird any it can bird any ; it can travel nird - any ; it can travel for - any ; it can travel for miles. iy birdsong? it can travel for miles. 0na nice
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birdsong? it can travel for miles. on a nice day if you are walking through these fantastic reed bed wetla nd through these fantastic reed bed wetland areas, you can hear it. you normally associate birds with a sharper zone. yes, very deep call, sounds like flown away. hear it? no. it‘s gone, flown away. oh, there it is. saying goodbye. we will leave you with that, well you get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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