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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  November 9, 2017 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello, it's thursday, it's 9 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. as theresa may loses her second minister in a week, her opponents claim her government is in chaos. priti patel resigned as international development secretary last night after all those unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. the prime minister's colleagues say that mrs may has it under control. theresa may is in full charge of this cabinet, and i have no doubt at all her appointment today will reflect the nature of that, and we'll be able to get on with our business. as theresa may works on another reshuffle of her top team, do you think she can withstand this latest crisis? could virtual reality be used to treat mental health conditions? tests are under way to see whether vr can heal our minds and help conquer anxieties like fear of heights. after that session i did go out and put myself into some positions where you are sort of facing heights, and i was really really surprised at how differently i felt about it. we will bring you that film at about
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9:45am. plus, is the government's anti—radicalisation programme worked? figures out later will show how many far right and islamist extremists have been referred to the scheme. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until ”am this morning. if you're a conservative voter, are you worried about the latest crisis to hit the government or are you confident theresa may has it under control. what is your advice to theresa may? what is your advice to theresa may? what would you suggest to her this morning? also this morning, has owning a pet changed your life? a little later we'll be talking to a group of people who say their animals have made a huge difference to them, but we want to hear from you too — and send us a picture! you know i am partial to those! do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning —
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use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. the prime minister will announce her new international development secretary today as she tries to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. priti patel stepped down last night after more questions were raised about meetings she held during a personal trip to israel. theresa may is facing calls to replace her with someone who backs brexit to maintain the delicate political balance of the cabinet. our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. arriving in london, priti patel could have guessed herfate. she had been summoned back from kenya by number ten, an official trip to africa cut short. she entered downing street by the back door and left having lost herjob, resigning after failing to disclose details of unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. in her letter to the prime minister, she said. "i accept my actions fell below
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the high standards that are expected of a secretary of state." for the second time in just over a week, theresa may must now decide how to fill a gap around the top table. michael fallon quit as defence secretary last week over his personal conduct. this team was carefully chosen to represent different tory views over brexit, and some are keen that is maintained. there is a divide between people who want brexit to mean we are basically staying within the eu. they are essentially the remainers who are unchanged. and they give a veneer of acceptance but haven't truly accepted. there are quite a lot of people who were quite balanced when they made the decision as to which side to support, who are now really rather enthusiastic about brexit and want to get on with it properly. whatever the prime minister's decision about who should now sit in her cabinet, she will face intense scrutiny over her choice. our political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminster. how bad is this for theresa may? on
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one hand theresa may has managed to stand some authority on the situation. there were a couple of days when it looked like priti patel was going to walk away from these claims with just a reprimand from downing street. it was only after these other allegations came to light that she finally felt she had to resign. in one sense theresa may is trying to get control of the situation. she has the opportunity now to make joints situation. she has the opportunity now to makejoints in situation. she has the opportunity now to make joints in the replacement of priti patel, to try and steadied the ship —— to make a choice in the replacement of priti patel. her key ally gavin williamson came into michael fallon‘s role. there is no doubt this whole episode gives ammunition to the opposition, who are suggesting this looks like a government in chaos and the wheels are coming off this operation. we've got two more cabinet ministers under pressure. borisjohnson
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got two more cabinet ministers under pressure. boris johnson over comments concerning a british iranian woman held in teheran and damian green who is also under investigation over his conduct. this isa investigation over his conduct. this is a very tricky political territory for theresa may and i think reshuffles a re for theresa may and i think reshuffles are difficult at the best of times, let alone when this government is so fragile. of times, let alone when this government is so fragilem of times, let alone when this government is so fragile. if you are a conservative voter what is your advice to theresa may? if you vote for other parties you are welcome to give your advice as well. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. if you report a crime this is where your call is dealt with. the control room. it is the nerve centre
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of police operations. there are more than 8 million 999 calls every year, with millions of others on the non—emergency number, 101. the inspector of constabulary says that police are struggling to cope. he says that problems retaining control room staff and an overreliance on outdated technology are to blame. some requests for police to deal with crimes, including criminal damage and assault, go unanswered. in devon and cornwall, many callers hang up because they have to wait so long. the control rooms are right at the heart of what our police forces do. the focus on getting that right is really important for chief constables, and we encourage them to continue with this. the report into police efficiency says the service is under significant stress. it says forces will spend 6% less on policing in the next three years and will lose more than 4,000 officers and staff from the police workforce. that is why many chief constables say they need extra resources to deal with the increased demand.
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mike cunningham says it would be a good thing for police to have more money, but he says the service needs to show the benefits extra funding will bring, and he says there is scope for forces to use their existing resources more efficiently. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is to issue a statement today amid criticism of the way he handled misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who is believed to have taken his own life. the family of carl sargeant — who'd been accused of inappropriate touching — says he was denied naturaljustice because he wasn't given details of the allegations which led to his sacking. 0ur reporter tomos morgan is at the welsh assembly for us this morning. do you have any idea what we are expecting to hear from carwynjones? sorry, i'm told we don't have tomos
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at the moment but will bring you more on that story later. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today. it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely to centre around the uk's financial obligations and the rights of british people living in the eu. us president donald trump has urged chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. discussions on how to deal with north korea's threats to the region have dominated the agenda during mr trump's tour of asia. this morning he warned that "time is quickly running out" to deal with the north korean nuclear threat. the united states is committed to the complete and permanent
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denuclearisation of north korea. china can fix this problem easily and quickly, and i am calling on china and your great president to hopefully work on it very hard. i know one thing about your president, if he works on it hard, it will happen. there's no doubt about it. reports from hollywood say kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before its release — following the recent allegations of sexual assault. spacey, who plastean paul getty in the thriller, "all the money in the world", will be replaced by the oscar—winning canadian actor, christopher plummer. the release will still go ahead as planned on december the 22nd. house prices are now falling in four areas of the country, according to the latest report from chartered surveyors. the royal institution of chartered surveyors has said that prices are declining in london, the south east, east anglia and north—east england. across the country as a whole, it said prices were flat. the survey though appears to contrast with data
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from the halifax, which said earlier this week that house price growth had risen to 4.5% in the year to october. scientists say skin injuries — such as cuts — heal quicker if they happen during the day. researchers found that people who suffered burns after 8pm took an average of 28 days to get better — compared with 17 for the daytime injuries. they think the human body clock is reason why. a self—driving shuttle bus in las vegas was involved in a crash on its first day of service. the vehicle — which was carrying several passengers — collided with a lorry driving at slow speed. nobody was injured in the incident which officials say was the fault of the lorry driver. the shuttle is the first of its kind to be used on public roads in the united states. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive
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and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. the ashes are at stake for england's women. they've been out in australia for a couple of weeks already. they trail 4—2 after the one—dayers. there are four points for the winners of the one—day test. england cannot afford to lose, because a tied series would be the best that england could then hope for. australia would retain those precious ashes. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss is in sydney. good evening and e. has it been a good day for england's women so far? yes, as you can see the floodlights are on here. instead of the tea break we've just had the dinner break. england with a bit of rebuilding, they are currently
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188-4. rebuilding, they are currently 188—4. england won the toss, they chose to bat. it was australia's bowlers but got off to the best art. england losing the early wickets of lauren winfield, outfitjust four. australia on top in the early stages. then a century partnership between tammy beaumont and heather knight. tammy beaumont particularly impressive. you can see why she was england's player of the tournament at the world cup in the summer. beaumont was eventually out for 70. heather knight followed the 62. they've also lost natalie sciver 18. they've also lost natalie sciver i8. england with a bit of work to do. this is a much with so much riding on it. if australia wind, they will retain the ashes. so england need to post a big first innings total. they are currently 188—4. a quick update on the england men — their ashes series starts
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at the end of the month. they are in adelaide, on the second day of a four—day tour match. jake ball went over on his ankle and had to leave the field and is a doubt for the rest of the match. australia are 152—6, mi runs behind england. we've heard from eni aluko for the first time since she gave that devastating testimony about racism within the england camp. this was an interview she gave to the bbc. the fa came out of the dcms committee hearing very badly. they were looking at the circimstances around the england coach mark sampson's dismissal and how they handled it. he lost his job for his conduct at a previous job, but he was found to have used racially disciminatory language towards eniola aluko and another player. aluko was essentially ostracised and she feels very let down by some of her
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team—mates at the time. it's been very divisive and very adversarial, and i think the players have been dragged into that. but the players have their own mind and they should be able to say, actually, let me step back from this and see how this may benefit. if i have a problem, if they have a problem, they have a process that is going to protect them. aluko was an unused substitute last night for chelsea as they beat rosengard in the first leg of their last 16 champions league tie. it is the second consecutive thursday that the prime minister wa kes thursday that the prime minister wakes up needing to replace one of her cabinet ministers. this comes, as we've been hearing, after a series of unauthorised meetings with israeli officials and politicians.
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in a letter to theresa may issued after they met last night she says: so its left theresa may's government underfire from critics and commentators. and this is how the front pages view her predicament this morning — obviously with considerable speculation about what happens next. in a moment we'll be discussing where the prime minister goes from here. but first, our political expert james landale explains how exactly it went so badly wrong for priti patel. this story is all about a family holiday to israel by priti patel, the international development secretary, that went terribly wrong. a holiday where the lines between her public life
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and her private life became blurred. the correct way of doing business within government didn't happen, and had extraordinary consequences for the british government. so what happened was this. in august, priti patel went on holiday to israel. it was a 12, 13—day holiday. for around two days, priti patel decided to do a bit of work. and she had a very busy schedule packed in for her. no fewer than 12 separate engagements over those two days. now, the international development secretary, priti patel, has apologised after admitting meeting the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu. it is quite extraordinary that priti patel, a cabinet minister, met binyamin netanyahu, the head of the government for another country, secretly, without telling anybody. relationships between governments are incredibly fine—tuned, and meetings are calibrated and they‘ re prepared for, and ministers know
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what messages they want to get across and what they're going to receive. if you have a sort of rogue elephant storming through this process having secret meetings, then the potential for errors, for mixed messages, for the israeli government doing one thing and the british government doing another thing, or even the israeli government and another government minister deciding to do one thing to try and influence the british government. i mean, this is a really, really complicated place to be, and it's why, i think, that there were so many eyes raised when it emerged that priti patel had met binyamin netanyahu. let's talk to henry mance, political correspondent for the financial times, and ian birrell, a freelance journalist and former speech writer for david cameron. we may also bejoined byjo—anne
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nadler, who is stuck in traffic at the moment. the times reporting that an eu leader is reporting the british government will collapse by the end of the year. what do you think of that story? it sounds reasonable. from the other side of the channel, you're thinking, what is going on? one candidate member gone, being looked into for sexual harassment, another one gone here. this does not look like a government that will be around for long. 0ther symptoms have the former chancellor george osborne saying injune it would fall apart within a week. colin theresa may a dead woman walking, and she is still there. -- he was calling theresa may. how embarrassing is this for theresa may? very embarrassing. she looks weak. we have a foreign minister who
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may have inadvertently led to a longer jail may have inadvertently led to a longerjail sentence may have inadvertently led to a longer jail sentence for a british citizen in iran as well, and he is still in hisjob despite all the special still in hisjob despite all the special ops he has been engaged on to further his own ambitions. so we have a very weak prime minister, still very divided country and party, and i think it is very justified for european leaders to wonder whether this is a government they can do business with, particularly when it is hard to see how they can get any form of brexit through. it would be simple if britain offered more for the divorce bill, then things would start moving? yes, but she has a hard line who may not accept that. she has this terrible balancing act and she does not have the authority or power to get it through, and i think european leaders are just looking at this mess and saying, can they get anything through? it is also significant, we have had some german economists advising the government that they should give an
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extension... advising the german government? joest, to get an extension. we are coming up for a year after triggering article 50 and we still don't know the shape of the arrangement. the germans would not wa nt arrangement. the germans would not wantan arrangement. the germans would not want an extension to a deadline? there is a hard date, perhaps marks the 30th 2019, then she has done her job. she has fulfilled the role, and i think she is actually in a stronger position than perhaps she even realises. they have decided they are not going to try to get rid of her, not going to try a coup, they don't have enough rebellious mps in the conservative party. she is their best shot at making breaks that happened the way they want? yes, so why doesn't she sure that authority and sack people, rather than letting them resign. and it is clear policies on the things she ca res clear policies on the things she cares about, but instead we have this bit by bit approach, and she is making it all seem rather laborious. i think if you are a brexiter, you would say, yes, she is delivering
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the date, but making it look like really ha rd the date, but making it look like really hard work, not very tasty gruel that the country has to eat up. ian, it is such a the bridal time for the conservative party. are there parallels with previous administrations for you, not? the one that is being drawn is with the john major..., one that is being drawn is with the john major... , government one that is being drawn is with the john major..., government that had economic issues coming out of the european monetary system, then was beset by problems with a declining majority and a series of scandals afterjohn major's back to basics speech. that was the comparison and i wrote last week in the guardian that it i wrote last week in the guardian thatitis i wrote last week in the guardian that it is actual and much worse, and don't be fooled by thinking it is only that bad, it is much worse. not only other sex scandals more profound in what is happening the for in that it is about societal problems and how women are treated, but it goes much deeper in terms of economic issues, the chaos in the government, and you knowjohn major at least began with a majority, but theresa may has blundered away her
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majority. overshadowing everything is one big issue, brexit, and still we have not begun to resolve how we will get out of europe if indeed thatis will get out of europe if indeed that is to happen. what sort of trouble if any good priti patel make for theresa may on the backbenches? she spoke in her resignation letter about speaking up for a sovereign independent britain. yes, you mentioned the divorce bill, billions of pounds of taxpayers' money, and she's a big advocate for taxpayer money on the aid budget, so she could come around and say, i don't quite agree with this, and she has particular views on foreign policy. she could just be a nuisance. this was the woman commissioning work on her own department to see if money could be given to the israeli army, from british taxpayers? yes, it was a bit ofa from british taxpayers? yes, it was a bit of a paradox that, a bit strange. i think she could be very awkward and with a working majority of just 12 it is awkward and with a working majority ofjust 12 it is very problematic. but remember the polls are still
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neck and neck. the conservatives are not in complete freefall like they we re not in complete freefall like they were in the 1990s. if theresa may was overthrown and the new leader of the conservative party decided to have an election, there is every possibility the conservatives might actually wind a majority. possibility the conservatives might actually wind a majoritylj possibility the conservatives might actually wind a majority. i saw someone the other day saying if you wa nt someone the other day saying if you want to know how bad it is for the tories, just think, if ed miliband was the leader of the labour party the tories would be 15 points behind. and everything is about jeremy corbyn being leader of the labour party and then being terrified about handing power to our left government, bolstering their rags of power. priti patel, we should think, she was overpromoted, a very poor aid minister, and she does not have a huge amount of allies. unlike some of the keith brexiteers who are very key figures and respected on the backbenches —— unlike many of the key brexiteers. and asking viewers about theresa may this morning, how does she get a grip? the budget in a couple of
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weeks would be a good place to start but the problem is there is not a lot of money around. a lot of unravelling after a budget usually? you could see the last three have gone pretty poorly. when philip hammond tried to put up taxes on some workers, there was an outcry. i think they have to respond to the election, saying that we feel the nhs is greece, housing is not there for young people, too expensive for everyone, and those kinds of things about aspirations —— we feel that the nhs is squeezed. again i think they have to show they are about something beyond meandering through brexit. they have to show they have some ambition, things to say to the public on what they are concerned about, whether it is social care, and embarrassing thing to bring up for theresa may, whether it is housing, the health service, or perhaps they should look beyond that, to issues like drug reform something, where they can reach out
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to voters who are not necessarily engaged with politics. let's not forget the priti patel resignation probably does not impact people's lives a jot, but there are issues where they can reach out and grab people, but as of yet all we see is a government blundering from chaos to disaster the chaos the disaster, and that is not a good luck. thank you, ian birrell, and henry mance, thank you for coming on the programme. we can talk tojo—anne nadler later when she makes it in. some police control rooms in england and wales are struggling to cope with the number of calls theyr‘e getting — according to the official police watchdog. the report was carried out by her majesty's inspector of constabulary mike cunningham. we're more calls to 999 and 101 which means some calls don't get a response. that is not good. we are looking at how police use the money and staff that they have, how well
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they understand the demand for their services, and we found that overall police forces are performing pretty well in terms of efficiency, but in this area of control rooms where the calls coming, we found in some cases forces are struggling. and that is two areas, firstly the sheer volume of calls coming in and how they prioritise those, and secondly around staff who work in those control rooms, retaining them, giving them the skills they need to make an assessment of the calls, so a couple of issues are going on here that we are urging constables to have a closer look at. white the outcome of that, what they're complaining about, it often goes unresolved. that is not good? issues remain unresolved is clearly is not good and we have seen examples of where that happens. we absolutely accept police forces have to
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prioritise, they have to see which calls are important, which calls need a response, which ones don't. and, encouragingly, police forces now are doing that, not based on the type of crime reported, but on the needs of the person who is calling, so if my shed was broken in two in the middle of the night, i'm not a vulnerable person and might not expect the police to attend. if my neighbour who is elderly and lives on their own might have their shed broken in the middle of the night, it might terrify them, so they might expect reasonably for the police to attend and give them that reassurance, so there is much more sophisticated prioritising going on based on the needs of the person making the call. final thought, based on the needs of the person making the call. finalthought, how much stress our police forces under, and particularly over the next few yea rs and particularly over the next few years in terms of budget constraints ? years in terms of budget constraints? yes, we have said in this report police forces are under significant stress, and two things fall out of that. firstly, there is
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clearly less money around now than there was, and budgets have been affected, but secondly we are urging chief constables to think very differently about how they can provide services in the future, how they provide services to people who are vulnerable, who need the police. a lot of people do business now online. how do the police forces think about that in terms of how people communicate with them. lots of things are changing in policing, and police forces need to really embrace that change and step up. ok, thank you very much, thank you, mike cunning ham. —— cunningham. some tweets coming and about
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people's pets. this one, patch, kept happy when she was at her worst. and this is the most delicious dog. and linda says beazer two most gorgeous dogs, pixie is built westie and your kate cross. they are our world —— pixie is a westie and yorkie cross. still to come: prevent is the government's anti—radicalisation scheme.
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but is it working? we'll be asking people who work on the programme and a former far right extremist. and we have a special report on how virtual reality can help people tackle a range of phobias, as well as treating other mental health conditions. time for the latest news — here's annita. and theresa may is under pressure to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. ms patel was a prominent brexit supporter, and the prime minister is facing calls to replace her with someone who also backs leaving the eu. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who is believed to have taken his own life. the family of carl sargeant — who'd been accused of
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inappropriate touching — says he was denied naturaljustice because he wasn't given details of the allegations which led to his sacking. us president donald trump has urged chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. discussions on how to deal with north korea's threats to the region have dominated the agenda during mr trump's tour of asia. this morning he warned that "time is quickly running out" to deal with the north korean nuclear threat. reports from hollywood say kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before its release — following the recent allegations of sexual assault. spacey, who plastean paul getty in the thriller, "all the money in the world", will be replaced by the oscar—winning canadian actor, christopher plummer. the release will still go ahead as planned on december 22nd. scientists say skin injuries — such as cuts — heal quicker if they happen during the day. researchers found that people who suffered burns after 8pm took
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an average of 28 days to get better — compared with 17 for the daytime injuries. they think the human body clock is reason why. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now. these are our headlines this morning. england women are playing the one—off test against australia in their ashes series. they won the toss in sydney and chose to bat. heather knight and tammy beaumont scored half centuries. england are 206—4. eni aluko says she is disappointed by the lack of support she has had from england teamates. the fa has apologised to her after an inquiry found that the former coach mark sampson used racially dicriminatory language towards her. aluko was an unused substitute last night, as chelsea beat rosengard 3—0 in the champions‘ league. fran kirkby scored the pick of their goals in the first leg of their last 16 tie. and northern ireland are preparing for the first leg of their world cup play—off against switzerland.
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they play at winsdor park tonight before the second leg in basel on sunday. that's all your sport. we'll learn more this morning — very shortly — about how many people are being referred to the government's anti radicalisation programme — prevent. i've just i'vejust got i've just got the figures right now, and it is telling me that thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government to's anti—radicalisation programme. these are officialfiguresjust anti—radicalisation programme. these are official figures just in from the home office. the first detailed figures of prevent revealed that 2127 of those referred in 2015—16 we re 2127 of those referred in 2015—16 were under 15, including more than 500 girls. another 2000 were aged
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between 15—20. the first detailed home office analysis of prevent revealed 2000 of those referred in 2015-16 revealed 2000 of those referred in 2015—16 were under 15, including 500 girls. the scheme is part of the counter—terror strategy created by the labour government in 2003 to support those at risk ofjoining extremist groups including far—right and radical islamist groups. it tries to strengthen relationships between the police and other organisations, and requires senior community figures — from faith leaders to teachers to doctors — to report any suspicions. those in favour say it helps people who might be drawn into that radicalised world — but critics claim it creates distrust which can leave those who are at risk, even more isolated. let's now speak to two people who work at the more extreme end of the prevent strategy — known as channel. nigel bromage is a former far right extremist, and rashad ali is a counter—extremism specialist. both provide support to individuals who are seriously at risk of radicalisation.
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just over 2000 of those referred to prevent were under the age of 15 including more than 500 girls in 2015-16. those other referrals, they are considered to be a concern by front line staff. the number of people who go on to an engaged channel intervention is probably around a quarter of that. what do you think of that number of referrals ? you think of that number of referrals? i'm not sure to what extent is that picking up all the issues we are dealing with. we are talking about individuals who are expressing an interest towards extremist ideologies which have a tendency towards violence. those on the far right and islamist side. and to some extent what you are seeing is some who have concerns, which the majority of those concerns are laid at the initial stage by saying there
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is nothing here to be concerned about, and any small number of people who think when you break it down its not a large problem. but it is significant enough to understand why it's necessary to have some type ’: engagement ' why it's necessary to have some type ’: engagement for why it's necessary to have some type § engagement for them. thank of engagement for them. thank you for the context because it is important. how do you react the figures? for me it's about the more people that are reported, the more people that are reported, the more people we can engage with. you see these figures as a good thing, the fa ct these figures as a good thing, the fact that so many under 15 is being referred? obviously i'd like it to bea referred? obviously i'd like it to be a lot less than that but for me if there are people who need support, then i would rather be aware of them so we can get involved and try and support these people. you spent nearly 20 years as a far right extremist, including joining combat 18 who are openly racist and pro—nazi. you groomed tojoin such groups? very much so. ijoined the far right because i was anti—ira and
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anti—terrorist. it wasn't because i was racist. i had black and asian friends, i used to listen to reggae music. it evolved from there? it evolved from there. i was groomed through a slow process where they listened to my home concerns, my home issues... would you have described yourself as a vulnerable teenager? yes, at the time my mother was dying of cancer. the far right moved in, they took at a hospital, they bought the shopping when we needed it, it was a very gradual process. they are very good at what they do and we've got to try and counter that. is it fair to say the threat of radicalisation in this country is as much about far right extremism as islamist extremism?” wouldn't say it's as much but it is a growing problem. as more people get angry about various issues...
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like what? what would attract you to combat 18 now? people who have been upset about things like the manchester bomb attack. the far right wasted no time, they tried to manipulate that. thankfully the people of manchester sent them packing. there was no room for extremism at that time. but the far right try and manipulate issues and concerns right try and manipulate issues and concerns that people have. your official title is a channel intervention provider, what does that mean in practical terms? give us an that mean in practical terms? give us an insight into how you engage with radicalised individuals and tried to the radical them. there are a number of people who are expressing understandable sentiments which is anger towards what is happening in the world they see around them. some of them have personal, negative experiences. some of them may well have a world view which tells there is a global war against muslims and therefore they
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are fighting at the edge of that war. many of these young people or slightly older people will be taken on board by extremist groups. some of them will try to go and join isis, some of them returned from conflicts, some of them may have been arrested for minor offences. those individuals, it's easier to engage with them so that they can understand their anger is normal but also understand how they are being manipulated by these ideas and by these groups. and then allow them a means by which they can reconcile with themselves. do you talk to them? one of the ways obviously is to be able to get them to talk and explain their perspective, and getting them to reflect on what they are thinking about. 0ften getting them to reflect on what they are thinking about. often they have are thinking about. often they have a certain set of assumptions which are quite dangerous. getting them to realise their political worldview is quite immature but also that that emotions are in conflict with their
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religious sensibilities. as you know, some people feel it unfairly targets muslims, this programme. here are some students we spoke to last year. there is a real sense of fear and suspicion, and questioning of where the academic freedoms come so on campuses we've got people self censoring in classrooms. we've got, you know, students worried about what websites they can go on, students worried about what they can study, cutting things out of their dissertations because they're scared. and it's really curtailing the freedom of someone who wants to come to university and wants to study things, and that's the whole point, right? there have been occasions where i have been sort of afraid to put my head above the parapet and sort of give my opinions on certain things at the risk of sort of being treated as an outcast. 0r treated as you know someone that may be suspected of being at risk of radicalisation. you know, i mean, when i've been searching for certain things, some of my friends have been saying to me, be careful.
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use incognito, because if the university wonders what you're doing, then that puts you in a very precarious, vulnerable position where your freedoms may be curtailed, and, you know, basically be like the thought police. do you think there's a sense of paranoia, oversensitivity, on this issue? i don't think there is a paranoia, oversensitivity, because i personally know of people who have been referred to prevent over a simple aspect of they were in a debate based on theology and religion, and this was organised by the sixth form debating society. and because they had their own religious beliefs, which i personally believe i share similar practices of islam to them, and for them to be referred to the prevent officer, and then get searched, the whole house, his computer, his phones, everything. i don't think there is oversensitivity. i should be cautious, because this
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has happened to my friend. so it could happen to me. the students i met at brunel were all familiar with this man's story and used it as an example of why they were on edge with the prevent strategy on campus. mohammed is 33. until last year, he was studying a mast at staffordshire university in terrorism. he was reading this book on terrorism studies in the campus library, part of the course reading list, when he was questioned by a member of staff. do you support isis? do you dislike homosexuality? do you think that the three girls who left bethnal green in order tojoin isis, what you think of this? and the questions became progressively intrusive. i was reading this very page of the book, which is about the definition. the staff never was concerned after the conversation, and under the prevent duty wanted to flag it up. security on campus were asked for mohammed's details. once he found out what was going on, he launched his own complaint against the university, hired a lawyer. do you think that there was anything
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that you said that gave the member of staff reason for concern, and rightly so she went and investigated further? no, there was no i think or i believe, it was surely so—and—so said or it's been said or narrated in such—a—such a work. so i followed the academic code to the exact level. but unfortunately that did me no favours. mohammed's studies were put on hold while the university launched an investigation. they apologised, but he's decided not to go back. is that an example of the strategy working or not working?” is that an example of the strategy working or not working? i don't think any of those are examples of the strategy at all. the first incident weather girl is complaining about somebody being searched and their property being looked at has nothing to do with prevent. it's an investigation that has taken place which is a different part of the
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counterterrorism strategy, so obviously there's been some kind of terrorism connection there. i don't know the details but that's got nothing to do with prevent. the second case with the individual, we can't comment on the details, but has nothing to do with a prevent prefer —— prevent referral. i don't think it's to do with the referral process or prevention. i think a lot of the time some of the issues that are raised genuine issues but a lot of the time they come into a political context, where people have a view regarding what prevent is or are part of the ideological battle. whether it's on the hard left or the islamist wright, who see prevent as being curtailing their ideological belief system. i've got a comment from the national police chief's council, their lead for prevent. this is what he says about the figures. these figures out this
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morning demonstrate trust and support in prevent is growing. each of the 7631 referrals for someone trying to guide a person they had concerns about a way from harm and towards the help they may have needed. that's his very positive spin on these figures. you can see that some might say, hang on, this is people overreacting. the thing is, the more people that are aware, prevent is simply about protecting honourable adults and children. that is the baseline. we've got to deal with that. the more reports there is for me, the more people it's being helped. thank you very much for coming on the programme. still to come, more reaction to priti patel‘s resignation and what theresa may needs to do to get a grip of the situation. virtual reality is capturing the imaginations of gamers everywhere. it transports players into worlds that are so immersive they seem almost real. but its potential goes far beyond computer games. psychologists and computer scientists are testing to see whether the technology could be used to treat mental health
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conditions.they believe that because the virtual scenarios are so realistic, they could be used to train and heal our minds. with mental health services under so much pressure, could virtual therapy be the solution? we sent our reporter jean mackenzie to test it out. for some, a phobia of heights can be an almost paralysing experience. simply standing too close to an edge can create intense fear. floor ten. this is a virtual reality simulator, designed not only to induce a fear of heights, but also to help conquer it. the view from here is amazing, isn't it? so i'm now right up at the top of the building, and i can see the roofjust above me. and it is very high up. how's your anxiety now? i still feel 0k. quite high up to be
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this close to the edge with very little barrier. but 0k. what i'd like you to do is pick eight apples. to reach them, use the platform. you push the lever forwards, and it will take you out. let's give it a go. ok, i'm moving forward. very good. right, that's one. i need to get eight, right? yeah. where shall i put them? oh, you can throw it. 0h, 0k. that's fun. this one's quite far away. i've got to lean quite far over to get this one. i don't think i'd normally do this in real life. i would not have leant that far forward if this was for real. i can tell you that. take the headphones off. so that was quite challenging in some areas. now, i'm not scared of heights myself, but you do get a sense of feeling like you are in this space that is recreated quite well, and the sense of movement, as well. in the lift, you feel like you're moving up.
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you feel like you're moving out. and they contribute to making you feel a little bit uneasy, a little bit uncertain on your feet. but what will it evoked in someone with a real phobia? this is liz. and her fear of heights was starting to take over her life. great. let's get started. if i had to be in a situation where i was confronted with a height, i would feel very, very tense. um... sort of jumpy. and certain height situations made me feel not just that i might fall over the edge, but that i actually might voluntarily go over the edge, which is a really, really unnerving feeling. i didn't trust myself with heights any more. i felt anxious as to how i might react. you're doing marvellously. would you like to try the next floor up? yes. even though you're... you know it's not a real world,
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you do feel the symptoms of fear that you would do, but you're braver because you know that you're safe. liz has completed this course, and to her amazement, it's had a powerful effect. how did this feel, liz, when you were doing it for the first time? oh, i was very nervous. um... my hands were sweating on a few of the occasions, which is not normalfor me. and i felt very jumpy, at any sort of sound change. i mean, i could do it, but i didn't feel very stable. but now i feel hugely more confident. i thought that it had perhaps changed, but i wasn't really sure to what extent until i tried it, so after that session, i did go out and put myself into some positions where you are sort of facing heights, and i was really, really surprised at how differently i felt about it. so exposure therapy is when a person is exposed
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to the situation that they're fearful of, that they might be avoiding. dr nihara krause is a clinical psychologist who's been treating mental health problems for more than 20 years. exposure therapy is something that is seen as helping people learn to manage their automatic fear response, their physiological response, and become desensitised to that response. it doesn't fill threatening, and so i don't feel anxious. and ifeel comfortable with it. would you actually go as far as to say you feel comfortable? yes, i would. which is quite remarkable, really. there's something beautiful about vr in the fact that people know it's not real and they can try things that they've not done before, not done for a long time, yet mind and body does behave as if it's in the real world. and what they're basically doing, like liz, is learning a new memory,
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in her instance about safety around heights, and that memory of safety is replacing and helping diminish the fear memory that she had. one in four of us will have some sort of mental health problem this year. and with the number of people seeking treatment rising, a new approach could be needed. specific phobias are one thing, but what about anxiety or depression? these are more complex conditions, more nuanced. can a machine ever really replace a human when it comes to treating these? mel slater certainly hopes so. his latest programme simulates a therapist's office, and uses a popular psychological technique called body swapping. so this is a kind of virtual self—help therapy, where you can talk to yourself as if you were a friend, because we know we are better at solving friends' problems
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than we are our own problems. so it gives you a way to get a better perspective on your issues. this is emily, who has severe social anxiety. i have this constant voice in my head telling me that i'm not good enough, and people will sort of notice and judge me for that. daily interactions, like ordering a coffee or taking a book out of the library, i get really hot and quite flushed and flustered. my breathing gets quicker. and then you're just suddenly, everything spills over. can this treatment help? to begin, emily must explain her problem to a virtual therapist. i experience a lot of anxiety at university, especially social anxiety, which affects me in lectures. now she swaps chairs in the virtual reality, and gets to hear her avatar relay her problem. i experience a lot of anxiety at university, especially social anxiety, which affects me in lectures. and going out, sporting events.
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now it's herjob as the therapist to counsel herself. have you thought of using any methods to try to calm yourself down? focusing on your breathing, trying to find the cause of your anxiety and managing your thoughts? and she's now back in her own body, ready to hear that advice. have you thought of using any methods to try to calm yourself down? focusing on your breathing, trying to find the cause of your anxiety and managing your thoughts? i think it's quite difficult when you are experiencing a moment of heightened anxiety to remember necessarily some of the techniques that you've been taught. i think knowing that it was me maybe made it less helpful, because it was still kind of my voice. but it is, i guess, reassuring, like a bit of a self mantra, so something that you were saying to somebody else could
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actually be useful and you could take it on board. body swapping is something that can be used again as a tool that accompanies your treatment. however, it assumes that a person has first of all got the ability to put themselves in someone else's position, which isn't always very easy for people. the second assumption is that people have the verbal ability to be able to express something objectively, which again for some people isn't very easy. so i would have concerns about somebody doing it on their own. so we know there's a crisis of mental health in the uk and other countries. we know that people often have to wait a long time for appointments where issues that are fairly mild over time can become much, much worse. and maybe this can be a stopgap before they see the real therapist. so it's very early days. we don't really know yet. but these are the kind of ideas that we are investigating right now. and you've had conventional
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talking therapy. how does this compare? can it compare? um... i think it's difficult to compare it, because there's somebody physically in front of you who's trained to offer advice. whereas if you're talking to yourself, you know, i'm not a trained mental health professional. i don't know maybe the best techniques that you could use. i'm really excited. i think we can make a fun, interactive and effective treatment for people that will change how mental health problems are dealt with. some people i think are nervous, perhaps worried about therapists being replaced, but we don't see it like that. we think vr can aid therapists, but more importantly, aid so many more people getting the psychological advice that they need. if we going to radically increase the provision of psychological treatments, then we're going to need technologies like vr. this therapy will now be trialled on 100 people.
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the aim is to get it into clinics and even people's homes. my son asked me, i'd like to go and do go ape. he has mentioned it before. i have managed to move the conversation on, and we've not done it. i wouldn't even have really liked to see him doing it. but i thought, 0k, i've done this course. i'm going to try it. we did it. and it was amazing. you're crossing sort of bridges where there's great gaps in the steps, or walking across a sort of tightrope walk, and i was able to look down. it's liberating. i feel it's given me a lot of confidence as well, actually, because part of this reason to do this course as well as conquer my fear was i feel like it's good to show my son that a fear that you already have, or something that you're frightened of, you can get over it if you really put your mind to it. and thank you for your e—mails on
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how your pets have transformed your lights. christine collected her yorkshire terrier rosti —— transformed your lives. she was rescued by the rspca along with a0 other yorkies and was kept in kennels just for breeding. as you can imagine she was traumatised and traumatised when i took her home and forced. when i brought her home i was at a very low ebb, feeling life had no purpose for me, but rosti and i bonded from the first moment and we have been inseparable since. —— rusty. i tell everyone she is a rescue dog who actually rescued me. christine from the isle of wight, thank you. let's get the latest weather update with carol. turning colder, especially this
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weekend. at the moment it is chilly for summer us, but then for others. 14 for summer us, but then for others. 1a celsius in yorkshire at the moment, 12 in cardiff and further south into london, the temperature no picking up, at eight. we have this weather front which is cascading southwards taking the cloud and rain with it as it does so and behind it allowing the sunshine already in the north to spread that bit further south. through the course of this morning you can see the patchy rain and drizzle they are, the sunshine coming out behind it, in the north midlands into wales and south—west england, but we do have a rash of showers coming in on a blustery wind across the north of scotland. into the afternoon, we still have the remnants of that front across the isle of wight, southern counties, kent, essex, parts of east anglia as well and this is midlands. moving north, back into the sunny skies. a pleasant day. the same across most of
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scotla nd day. the same across most of scotland with the exception of the north and the north—west where we hang on to all those showers. for northern ireland for most of the day you will have a fine day with some sunshine, and later we will see the cloud build in the west and for wales when we lose this morning's load the sun will come out. in south wales and south—west england as well, in the sunshine, 13 or 1a celsius. through this evening and overnight, there goes the front, taking the rain with it, clear skies following behind. you can also see a new system coming in from the west, introducing thicker cloud, breezy conditions and some rain. north of that, it will be a cold night, widespread frost in scotland, and we will also still have those showers, wintry on the hills, and that holds true tomorrow. tomorrow will again bea true tomorrow. tomorrow will again be a blustery day. but tomorrow the weather front sinking south will clear more readily from southern counties and the channel islands
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that we are expecting today, and there will be a lot of sunshine around and those showers, then later we have more rain across northern ireland and into south—west england. into saturday, armistice day, varane will pull away from the south and then we're looking at today operates bells, sunshine and showers but it will feel much cooler —— the rain will feel much cooler —— the rain will pull away. standing around outside it will feel cold. showers in the north, the west and east, but in between a fair bit of sunshine. cheers, carol. hello, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. another headache for theresa may as she loses her second senior minister in a week. so as priti patel resigns, what's next for the government? we've got a very weak prime minister, are still divided country and party, and i think it is very justified for european leaders to
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wonder whether this is a government they can do business with. more reaction in the next half—hour. thousands of children and teenagers have been referred to the government's prevent anti—terror scheme due to fears they were being drawn into radicalisation, including more than 500 girls. if there are people who need support i'd rather we were aware of them. we'll talk to some of those behind the schemes to stop radicalisation in schools. and fewer of us are owning pets apparently, but we'll be talking to a group of animal lovers who say owning a pet has changed their lives. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. theresa may is under pressure to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week.
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the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. ms patel was a prominent brexit supporter, and the prime minister is facing calls to replace her with someone who also backs leaving the eu. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under significant stress because of budget cuts although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the governance anti—terrorist scheme. that included more than 500 girls. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today.
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it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely to centre around the uk's financial obligations and the rights of british people living in the eu. us president donald trump has urged chinese leader xi jinping to work very hard on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. discussions on how to deal with north korea's threats to the region have dominated the agenda during mr trump's asian tour. this morning he warned that "time is quickly running out" to deal with the north korean nuclear threat. the united states is committed to the complete and permanent denuclearisation of north korea. china can fix this problem quickly and i'm calling on china and your
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great president to hopefully work on it very hard. i know one thing about your president, if he works on it hard, it will happen. there's no doubt about it. reports from hollywood say kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before its release following the recent allegations of sexual assault. spacey, who plastean paul getty in the thriller, all the money in the world" will be replaced by the oscar—winning canadian actor, christopher plummer. the release will still go ahead as planned on december the 22nd. scientists say skin injuries such as cuts heal quicker if they happen during the day. researchers found that people who suffered burns after 8pm took an average of 28 days to get better compared with 17 for the daytime injuries. they think the human body clock is reason why. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 10.30. allen
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alle n wa nts allen wants to say, i've been a supporter of the conservative party for more than 15 years but like so many other supporters i'm so disillusioned with the infighting and disarray. it is a failure of this government to listen to and act on the concerns of the public. if you have advice for theresa may, let me know. send me an e—mail, tweet, etc. here's some sport now. the one—off test in the women's ashes series is under way in sydney. england won the toss and chose to bat. england cannot afford to lose this or australia will retain the ashes. it's actually the first day—night ashes test. england lost lauren winfield cheaply, but a century partenrshiup bewteen captain heather knight who made 62 and tammy beaumont, 70, put them in control. england lost their momentum when they fell, knight was one of two wickets forjess jonassen. england have lost a couple more in
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the last hour. sarah taylor caught and bowled. sharp fielding their from belize perry. —— elysse perry. quick update on the england men, their ashes series starts at the end of the month. they are in adelaide for the second day of a four day tour match. jake ball went over on his ankle and had to leave the field and is a doubt for the rest of the match. australia are 198—7, 95 runs behind england. eni aluko say she feels let down by some of her team—mates are not supporting herfollowing some of her team—mates are not supporting her following her accusations against mark sampson. the fa have apologised to her often an enquiry found he had used
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racially discriminatory language towards her and another player. it's been very divisive and very adversarial and i think the players have been dragged into that. but the players have their own mind and they should be able to say, actually, let me step back from this and see how this may benefit. if i have a problem, if they have a problem, they have a process that is going to protect them. aluko was an unused substitute last night for chelsea, as they beat rosengard in the first leg of their last 16 champions‘ league tie. they won 3—0, so will be odds—on to reach the quarterfinals. fran kirkby scored the pick of their goals. a massive night for northern ireland in belfast. the first leg of their play—off match against switzerland. they haven't appeared in a world cup for 32 years, and they haven't appeared in back—to—back major tournaments ever, but following last year's appearance at euro 2016,
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where they reached the last 16, they now have the chance to qualify for russia next year. the first leg is in belfast this evening, before the second leg in basel on sunday. a massive few days from northern ireland. the players have done fantastically so far to get to this point. at the end of the day, there's eight countries left in europe and we're the smallest one going into this situation. i see in the squad an opportunity that they don't want to waste but equally, they have done everything so far and anticipated they will do everything over the next two games to try and make it a reality. commentary on that match on radio 5 live this evening. follow it across the bbc sport website as well. in syd ney the bbc sport website as well. in sydney england creeping up to 227—6 in that must not lose test. the prime minister is facing a tricky political balancing act, as she decides who should replace brexit supporter priti patel in her top team. ms patel resigned as international
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development secretary last night over unauthorised meetings with senior israeli figures, and her departure has fuelled opposition accusations that the government is in chaos, and mrs may is getting weaker by the day. let's speak to our political correspondent eleanor garnier, who is at downing street. how serious is this? put it like this, victoria. theresa may hasjust lost two cabinet ministers in a week. her deputy in all but name damian green is facing allegations and an investigation. allegations he strenuously denies, but an investigation over those. her foreign secretary borisjohnson is facing calls to be sacked or resign over what many say was an extremely serious diplomatic gaffe. then she's got the battle with brussels and the brexit negotiations. added together it doesn't make for a comfortable background in which to do a
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reshuffle. they aren't easy at the best of times but now theresa may has priti patel, an ardent brexiteer campaigner, potentially pretty angry on the backbenches, and she has got to find someone to replace her. the question is, thus theresa may put someone in who has the right skills and experience and choose them based on those circumstances, or does she tried to maintain the extremely carefully balanced perspective there is in cabinet over brexit? she carefully balanced those who campaignfor carefully balanced those who campaign for brexit and those who campaign for brexit and those who campaignfor remain campaign for brexit and those who campaign for remain and does she find someone to replace priti patel who is a brexiteer? that is the challenge theresa may faces and of course the challenge to look like she now has a steady hand, but she can get control of the situation over what many say has been an extremely chaotic week. we expect the appointment sometime today, but that in itself won't necessarily be
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straightforward. just last week when michael fallon had to go, he was replaced by a key ally of theresa may gavin williamson. there was a lot of criticism and howls of anger from some in the conservative party about his meteoric rise from chief whip to secretary of state for defence. certainly theresa may is not out of the woods. let's speak tojo—anne nadler, a political commentator and former conservative party staffer. how can mrs may get a grip of things? in the short term she needs to report somebody to replace priti patel who has experience and who knows something about international development. she did come a cropper last week with this extraordinary appointment of gavin williamson to defence secretary, someone who had no ministerial experience and who as far as we know doesn't have any particular expertise in defence. that was a mistake it would appear but certainly she took a lot of
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criticism for that. now, as she is deliberating over who should take over from priti patel, deliberating over who should take overfrom priti patel, ithink deliberating over who should take overfrom priti patel, i think she needs to concentrate on the best person for thejob. needs to concentrate on the best person for the job. rather than whether they are a brexiteer or a remainer? yasser. can you think of some names? the obvious person would be alistair burt is extremely well respected, who has a long experience of working in this kind of field. but he is very much a remainer. even as somebody who voted brexit i think it's important she focuses on the job and getting the right person into place. you'll have seen some of the headlines today on news websites on the front of the papers suggesting the government could colla pse suggesting the government could collapse in the short term, are those over the top or is there a realistic fear? there is a bit of a feeding frenzy at the moment. i worked for the conservative party during quite a lot of the major
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government and there were issues, crises that happened week on week almost. and yet that government served a—5 years and was only deposed at a general election in 1997, the first rumblings that things were wrong were very soon afterjohn major was elected back in 1992. whilst i don't think this is a great prognosis, the reality is that this could carry on for some time. the thinking seems to be from those in the conservative party who voted for brexit that theresa may is their best shot at getting the kind of brexit they want, which is why there has been no move to depose her. is that accurate? that is accurate. there is also the other issue which is there is no obvious person to replace theresa may. she is a sort of composite figure. she's served some purposes for the people who voted to leave, some for those who
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voted to leave, some for those who voted remain. both sides are probably concerned that whoever ta kes probably concerned that whoever takes over might have a stronger view in either camp. she somehow manages to straddle both. but the reality is that mrs may didn't go through an election process, she emerged a couple of years ago as the leader, and i think most people will feel that probably hasn't been to her advantage or to the advantage of the party. in looking to replace the party would have to go through a lengthy selection process and hardly a position to do that at the moment. she is being held in place by external forces. thank you. labour's deputy leader tom watson told me he believes the full truth about priti patel‘s meetings and exactly who she met in israel is yet to emerge. he suspects some in the foreign office did know about the meetings in israel. on one level
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this story is minister does something bad, ministerforced to resign. but i think there are more questions that need answering today. i was told that priti patel had meetings with foreign office officials from eastjerusalem in the consulate, or from the consulate there. that suggests to me that there. that suggests to me that there was knowledge of her visit that hasn't been admitted by the foreign office downing street. also, i was told that the foreign office has downing street —— asked downing street to remove details of the meeting. if that was the case i honestly think priti patel deserves some recognition that her argument that there was knowledge of the visit, that the foreign office understood it, and be prime minister in some way felt she had to sack her only because the revelations were made public not because... the
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significance of what you're saying if it's true, are you saying number 10 is saying one thing to journalists and the rest of the world, when knowing something else privately? that could be the case and that's why i've written to theresa may to ask some detailed questions. principally i would like to know, did priti patel meet foreign office officials on her visit to israel and to the foreign 0ffice asked downing street not to publish the details of those meetings? then i think the record can be set straight. if those meetings did happen in east jerusalem and if number ten did do as you say, what will be the result of that? it will show you the public report from number ten is not accurate and it further shows there is some attempt to withhold knowledge of priti patel‘s actions. we are very concerned about that because obviously if priti patel bid meet foreign office officials from
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the consulate in eastjerusalem, it shows there was knowledge at the foreign office —— if priti patel did meet. and it shows they have not been accurate about their knowledge of her conduct when she was out there. the times are reporting that brussels, and eu leader, is preparing for the british government to collapse by the end of the year. do you think that is realistic or over the top? i have been in politics for 30 odd years, an mp for 16 years, and i have never seen a wea ker 16 years, and i have never seen a weaker administration. i have also been a minister at the tail end of a labour government. it does seem to me there is very little trust between very senior people at the heart of government, and this government is therefore not off caused by events, so i think it is possible that a random event could bring the government down. that would mean a general election and potentially you and jeremy corbyn taking over the running of the country. are you ready for that, are you ready with brexit, which has
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been overshadowed in recent weeks because of various events? yes, but obviously if there is a general election it will be down to voters to decide... sure, which is why potentially you could find yourself running the country. elections can change governments, yes, and kick a government out of office. all i can say is our brexit negotiating team is led by keir starmer who has been very effective both at outlining the big picture, but he can also do detail. he will put a negotiating tea m detail. he will put a negotiating team in place and make sure we try to getan team in place and make sure we try to get an outcome from those negotiations that benefits british workers. we've been very clear that we wa nt workers. we've been very clear that we want a workers' first brexit and that requires us to get tariff free access to the single market, so i think it would be a very different negotiation. it would still be one that removes us from the european union and respect the views of the people in the referendum. would labour be minded to ask for an extension to this deadline of march
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2019 in order to be able to achieve what you've just described there are? look, if you want to know the detail about negotiating strategy cani detail about negotiating strategy can i suggest you talk to keir starmer? i would love to, can i suggest you talk to keir starmer? iwould love to, but can i suggest you talk to keir starmer? i would love to, but do you think that would be a idea? we would have to take over the negotiations, when they take place, and we would have to take a realistic view of whether we can get a negotiated settle m e nt whether we can get a negotiated settlement in time. i'm not going to say yes or no on that, but all i can say yes or no on that, but all i can say to you is from opposition we have made our negotiating strategy very clear, our priorities, and that that would obviously be our priority in government but, is the government going to feel? who knows. what i am asking today is for the government to be very clear about the circumstances of the meetings behind priti patel‘s visit in israel. circumstances of the meetings behind priti patel's visit in israel.” wa nt to priti patel's visit in israel.” want to ask you about your colleague, the labour leader in the welsh assembler, carwynjones, who sacked his cabinet member and friend
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carl sa rg ea nt sacked his cabinet member and friend carl sargeant who it is believed took his own life earlier this week over claims of inappropriate behaviour. why was he sacked instead of being suspended? well, victoria, carl was a friend of mine, and all i can say to you on that is that many of us are still in grief and we are still in shock at his loss, so i'm not sure about the details of who said what, when and why, and i'm not sure it's appropriate for me to comment on that now. all i would say to you is that if there are lessons to you is that if there are lessons to be learned about how we apply our procedures, we will learn them. ca rwyn procedures, we will learn them. carwyn is speaking to assembly members today, and i think i should leave it there at this difficult time for everyone. i want to ask you finally about grenfell, residents and survivors of grenfell. 0n finally about grenfell, residents and survivors of grenfell. on this programme we regularly report on how they are getting on. what are you asking for today? we think that five months on from grenfell the
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government needs to make its pledge to people who live in flats, high—rise apartments, that they will be made safe. 0nly high—rise apartments, that they will be made safe. only one in 50 flats has sprinkler systems, and yet we know from previous reports in the fires in flats that 99% of fires are extinguished when sprinklers are present, so we are saying to the government, make a financial pledge to retrofit every tower block in britain to make sure that we can look to those grenfell survivors and say to them, no one else will have to put up with what you have put up with, the fear and the misery, and we are asking the government to make a budget pledge today and my colleaguejohn healey a budget pledge today and my colleague john healey is a budget pledge today and my colleaguejohn healey is leading on this, we are determined to make sure that it will be the number one negotiating position when it comes to the finance bill later in month. tom watson, labour's deputy leader. a couple of e—mails from you. paul
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says i am a labour supporter and even i wish mrs would take a tough line and get a grip when it comes to the running of our country. be the boss, he says. katie says mrs should retire now and retire to a tax haven. still to come: we'll be talking about why the number of pet owners in the uk is declining. a small decline, but at the cry nevertheless, and that was obviously an excuse for you to send in pictures of your own pets. here is one. this little monkey has changed my life for the better. my dog harvey makes me laugh every day. kuyt years, chilling out. and this one. a turkish angora i rescued almost a year ago. it has taught me almost a year ago. it has taught me a lot because i have had to learn how to communicate with him in different ways and learn perseverance. and this one, yes, i'm
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dog mad and i have five of my own. clea r, dog mad and i have five of my own. clear, you dog mad and i have five of my own. clea r, you let dog mad and i have five of my own. clear, you let them go on the bed! is at the bed? the sofa? —— claire. she runs a small dog rescue centre in dorset. no, no, that is my dog! that is gracie, and obviously i am abusing my position as television presenter to show my own dog. but she is cute, come on! if you want to get in touch to send an e—mail. you can send us a get in touch to send an e—mail. you can send us a message on get in touch to send an e—mail. you can send us a message on twitter, or you can use what's up or message us on facebook. —— whatsapp. thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme, prevent, according to official figures released this morning. 2127 of those referred to the scheme in 2015—16 were under 15, including more than 500 girls. another 2000 more were reported
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for potential intervention over extremism concerns were aged between 15 and 20. prevent aims to reduce the threat to the uk by stopping people being drawn into terrorism. it has sometimes been controversial, as you know. let's now talk to the west midlands regional prevent lead for further and higher education hifsa haroon—iqbal. head of islamic studies at the counter—extremism organisation quilliam, usama hasan. and labour mp naz shah, who is a member of the home affairs select committee. welcome to. firstly, reaction to the figures. naz shah, why don't you give a reaction to your figure —— these figures? i am quite alarmed at these figures? i am quite alarmed at these figures? i am quite alarmed at these figures and it reinforces a lot of my concerns around prevent, especially when you look at the details of the figures, talking about those with vulnerabilities but it does not give us the details. more than 75% were referred with no
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further action, so what that tells me is we have a real issue, and certainly the teachers who told us in the first select committee, they need the right support to implement the prevent duties, so this reinforces my concerns and raises more, really. you mean because teachers, faith leaders, doctors, however, seniorfigures in the community, are ferrying kids and they shouldn't be? because they don't really know what they are supposed to be doing. —— they are repairing kits. 75% of supposed to be doing. —— they are repairing kits. 7596 of the referrals —— they are referring kids. looking at the muslim community, and if you look at the islamic referrals, it is really worrying. if you have referred a child, a young person, and it turns out that it is nothing they are doing is wrong, it really is worrying for me and is very alarming. jane foley, how do you
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respond to these figures? they are shocking. —— usama hasan, how do you respond to these figures? a quarter of these figures are actually far right referrals. yes, we reflect that... hundreds of muslims work for project back and i know hundreds of muslim mums and dads who are grateful for prevent, who called prevent to stop their children joining isis in syria, for example. but the 75%, it actually shows there isa high but the 75%, it actually shows there is a high bar, so referrals go to a local channel, and only serious cases are actually taken on as cases, so 75% are weeded out. what is happening here is there is a new duty on schools, and a lot of teachers are worried if they miss somebody they could lose theirjob for missing a potential terrorist, so in the initial one or two years i think it is to be expected that
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there will be a lot of false referrals, if you like. what effect will that have? if you were 16, i was 16, and we were referred knowing we had done nothing but because the teacher wasn't quite sure, or perhaps had suspicions that were inaccurate, it would have a real impact on you, wouldn't it? it could do depending on the individual circumstances. i'm quite shocked by the figures. because you think they are high. but there is also of me, yes, they are high, but also i think i need to see more of them. on why people were referred, and they may not necessarily have gone on to be referred for further interventions but they may have needed support in other areas. for me the important factor is we need to understand that prevent is very much about safeguarding, very much about trying to stop people from getting involved in things that could potentially end up in things that could potentially end up with them supporting terrorism, or committing terrorist atrocities themselves. naz shah, do you accept
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that, safeguarding of young people issue? if it took the safeguarding approach it would be very effective, but it doesn't. what it does, and i absolutely disagree with doctor usama ‘s take absolutely disagree with doctor usama ‘stake on whether it is toxic or not, because talk to the vast majority, and i have a very large muslim large muslim constituency, muslim large muslim constituency, muslim community within that, telling me very loudly and clearly, and in bradford and must admit we don't have the kind of narrative around prevent which is nationally amongst the muslim community, simply because we work with the community, and this top—down approach, and we have heard in the select committee academics and teachers coming to us and saying they just academics and teachers coming to us and saying theyjust don't have the right training to implement their prevent duty, they don't feel confident enough, and these figures, actually with foresight, if you have the confidence to talk to a young person to address their issues, and when we talk about these young people who have no further action, who are stopped from being exploited
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or being radicalised, then what happens if they have mental health issues? if we took a real safeguarding approach i would be very confident we would be addressing issues of alienation, of poverty. when young people are vulnerable they are vulnerable for reasons, and those reasons are what we need to be addressing. those reasons of poverty, disenfranchisement except, and that is not what we are getting here so it is not a safeguarding approach being taken by the government. i would like it to be but i am not convinced it is. usama hasan, what is the difference between the far right extremists and islamist extremists try to groom and radicalise young people? actually they are very similar, the two approaches, they are like mirror images of each other, based on false grievances, victim narrative, protecting your own tribe and accusing the others, the other side, orjews or anybody else, of trying to wake you up, so you get people
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who are basically —— trying to wipe you out, sold one side saying people are trying to target muslims and islam, and others saying people are out to target the white race, and it is the radicalise is saying we need to team up and get violent, for example. so that is why you see children reflecting that, sometimes, in their essays and comets in class. again, the 75% no further action is actually the right approach because all you need in cases is for the teacher to talk to the young person, ina gentle teacher to talk to the young person, in a gentle way, and if needed speak to the parents as well, a channel referral of prevent is an absolute la st referral of prevent is an absolute last resort. sol referral of prevent is an absolute last resort. so i would encourage teachers to use their common sense, and deal with this like safeguarding. a durham academic study showed recently that despite criticisms the vast majority of school heads and managers were quite happy with how prevent was working and they were using it on the safeguarding. what about the influence of monsanto ads on their children? what about
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the influence of what kids can see on you tube? —— the influence of mums and dads. we need to try and stop people getting involved in this type of activity. it's notjust the work of government or prevent strategies. this needs to be a community approach. young people, older people are being radicalised through all sorts of means. it may be happening in their homes but i think there's a lot that's going on on social media, on the internet. we know for example that from 2010 to the present day, 300,000 items of terrorist related material has been taken down from the inter—net. that includes websites, social media. there is a real need for us to get on top of the agenda. it is very much about safeguarding, in the same way we look at trying to protect young people from being involved in gang culture, from child sexual exploitation. this is anotherform
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of grooming and that creaming is taking place in all sorts of settings. it's important the work we do recognise that. the figures today, when you analyse them a bit more, show that 63 people withdrew from the scheme, from channel the more extreme end of the prevent strategy. explain, prevent, channel. prevent is the government strategy that tries to stop people becoming involved in something that could radicalise them and take them down the avenue of supporting or committing a terrorist offence. if someone is deemed to be at risk, they would then be referred to channel. 63 people withdrew from channel. 63 people withdrew from channel because they didn't want to cooperate. what will happen to those people? brew channel is voluntary, it is not criminal, it is pre—criminal if you like. it is not criminal, it is pre-criminal if you like. hundreds
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of people, thousands actually have been through channel and have benefited from that. they are grateful for that, especially young people who with good mentoring have been encouraged to seek education, employment and have a fulfilling career. this is by people who could have become muslim extremists, far right extremists or far left extremists. we had a conviction of a far left extremist recently for example. a lot of people have benefited from this. the approaches and perfect of course, there are always mistakes in any sensitive issue like this. we have to take stock of these figures and analyse them carefully and see how we can improve things stop. as well as the work done by intervention providers we also have some fantastic projects that take place within local communities that
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are run by the communities themselves who can also support these individuals. thank you. time for the latest news — here's annita. the bbc news headlines. theresa may is under pressure to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. ms patel was a prominent brexit supporter, and the prime minister is facing calls to replace her with someone who also backs leaving the eu. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today. it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely to centre around the uk's financial obligations and the rights of british people living in the eu. thousands of children and teenagers
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have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme, according to new figures released this morning. the first detailed home office analysis of prevent reveals that over 2000 of those referred to the scheme in 2015—16 were under the age of 15, and included more than 500 girls. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. us president donald trump has urged chinese leader xi jinping to "work very hard" on persuading north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. discussions on how to deal with north korea's threats to the region have dominated the agenda during mr trump's tour of asia. this morning he warned that "time is quickly running out" to deal with the north korean nuclear threat.
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that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now. england's women had a late collapse in the first of their one—off ashes test against australia in sydney. they closed on 235—7. australia will retain the ashes if they win that match. eni aluko says she is disappointed by the lack of support she has had from england teamates. the fa apologised to her after an inquiry found that the former coach mark sampson used racially dicriminatory language towards her. aluko was an unused substitute last night as chelsea beat rosengard 3—0 in the champions league. fran kirkby scored the pick of their goals in the first leg of their last 16 tie. and northern ireland are preparing for the first leg of their world cup play—off against switzerland. they play at winsdor park tonight before the second leg in basel on sunday. that's all your sport. i'll be back with more on bbc news
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after 11am. liam albert died injuly 2009 after the stolen car he was driving crashed during a police pursuit. his family demanded to know exactly why he died and when the independent police complaints commission investigated, they raised concerns over the behaviour of some of the officers including the destruction of photo evidence and a failure to put a tape in the dash cam. what followed was years of delay before the officers were finally called to a gross misconduct hearing last month. however, the hearing was thrown out because the length of time that had passed meant a fair hearing was "not possible". liam's parents have received an apology but say they're "hurt and frustrated" that they'll never get answers. talking to us now for the first time is liam's mother, sharla john, liam's father, delroy albert, and their solicitor, andre clovis from tuckers solicitors. thank you very much for talking to
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us. you have been waiting a number of years to find out the circumstances of this accident and you still don't have the answers. explain what that is like to use. disappointing, angry, disillusioned a little bit by the ipc c. if you've never had any dealings with the ipc cor never had any dealings with the ipc c or the police, you believe that they will do an independent enquiry and the truth will come out. u nfortu nately and the truth will come out. unfortunately that hasn't happened. what has it been like for you? the same. frustrating, i'm disappointed as well at the outcome. we just want to know the truth and the answers for our son. it's been very frustrating and disappointing for us. tell us about your son. liam...
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he was very loving, very, very loving. he had a passion for cars from when he was very young. not necessarily driving. any family member could come to the house and he would offer to wash, clean the car, that was from a very, very young age. he thought of others always, and he wore his heart on his sleeve at all times. he wasn't a bad tempered child. yes, he would do some things at 17 and 16 that you should not have been doing. we don't condone anything that happened. however, he would not go out of his way to hurt anyone at all. how do you deal with hearing the news that your son has been killed in an accident driving a stolen car after accident driving a stolen car after
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a police pursuit? at the time, the car wasn't reported stolen. the fact is the police should have called it off a mile and a half before the accident happened. which is sad to know the fact that these officers didn't go buy the book. lessons should be learnt and they still haven't. after this ipcc, three police officers faced gross misconduct hearings for things like failing to seek authority from the control room for the pursuit. providing an inconsistent account of what happened. failing to hand over a mobile phone. deleted photos at the scene. when you knew there was a hearing coming, did you think finally we'll get the truth? yes.
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0ne finally we'll get the truth? yes. one of the officers was allowed to retire before the hearing, and then the hearing came. what happened? certainly my recollection of how we found out was that it was six months after he had retired, and it was in the process of normal communications with the ipcc. they had discovered that this officer had been allowed to retire by the metropolitan police and we had no inkling. we were told by that point it was too late to go back and bring that offers into the misconduct proceedings. eventually the hearing was set for last month, but? it proceeded in the sense that there were submissions made by the office rs there were submissions made by the officers that their prosecution for misconduct shouldn't proceed from the basis that there had been a delay. what was interesting about the delay was we first found out
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about some of the things that had gone wrong almost a year after the collision. when they were disclosed to us, the family immediately made complaints. the next working day, complaints. the next working day, complaints went in. what would normally happen is the officers would be notified. it appears the metropolitan police force who had conduct of this for the first three years didn't notify them. if that situation is correct. when the ipcc took over the investigation they still didn't notify them. more than that, the metropolitan police service at various stages actively delayed the investigation from starting. first by arguing that there had to be the inquest first, and then by seeking a discontinuance from the requirement to investigate the complaint. when that failed,
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seeking a discontinuance. we then had to go to the high court to challenge that decision to get proceedings reinvestigated. the outcome is that the hearing didn't go ahead because they said too much time had passed and so the officers couldn't get a fair hearing. the met police say our thoughts and sympathies remain with liam's family for their tragic loss. it is crucially important for public confidence that officers are held to account and the sad death of liam has been investigated twice through a managed and then independent ipcc enquiry and fully scrutinised. it's also important officers are treated fairly and in the exceptional circumstances this case the panel determined that could not happen. the ipcc sake, we'd very much regret our part in any delay and want to apologise to the family for the frustration and upset this has caused as well as to the officers involved. how do you rationalise
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now, finally, the fact you won't get the answers you're looking for, and you have two adjust to that? we have to grieve now. it's been eight yea rs, to grieve now. it's been eight years, eight years of fighting for him. eight years for me personally of keeping him alive in some way. now it's come to an end, not the result we wanted, but the end is the scary part for me because now i have to grieve for my son. basically accept the decision that's been made. there's nowhere we can go after this. a brief point that you wa nt to after this. a brief point that you want to make about police pursuits, particularly high—speed police pursuits. they seem to be on the increase, particularly in urban areas. in 1999 for instance, sheena mcdonald the news presenter was
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knocked over and seriously injured. in that year there were nine, sorry six deaths. that spiked and dipped since then. but in 2016, there were 13 deaths. in the first four months of this year, there were 28 deaths. there are 28 families like this. you believe that requires some scrutiny? what is worse than that is that the macro 25% of those people wholly unconnected to the pursuit. people going about their lawful business. we need to think about whether these pursuits are a proportionate way to resolve whatever the issue is the police are confronted with. thank you. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, is due to make a statement later today amid criticism of the way he handled
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misconduct allegations against a welsh cabinet member, who's believed to have killed himself. the family of carl sargeant says he was denied justice because he wasn't given details of the claims before he was sacked. 0ur wales correspondent tomos morgan is in cardiff for us this morning. do you know what carwyn jones do you know what carwynjones is likely to see later? -- see later. what we do know is that carwynjones will come here to the senedd to discuss with other labour assembly members, and he will then issue a statement. this is undoubtedly one of the biggest challenges the first minister has faced during his eight year tenure as first minister of wales. there has been criticism from within his own party about the way that the first minister has handled
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the process of the allegations of improper conduct against carl sargeant, and other parties in wales have called on him to resign. the family of carl sargeant want an independent review into the process that took place, and just last night some more scathing criticism from former cabinet secretary, and a former cabinet secretary, and a former close ally of carwynjones, leighton andrews, who said he was very angry with the way the situation had been dealt with, and angry with the fact that carwyn jones had been conducting interviews on the tv and radio on the monday, before carl sargeant, on the tv and radio on the monday, before carl sargea nt, it on the tv and radio on the monday, before carl sargeant, it is understood, took his life. the family, as you just mentioned there, have released some of the details of the information that was in their lawyer's statement to the labour
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party. they have said that carl was accused of unwanted attention and inappropriate groping are touching, but that he was deprived of natural justice. he wanted to know more details of the allegations against him, and he was distressed at not being able to defend himself because he didn't have those full details, they say, and his mental well—being had been affected, they said. the labour party have said that in line with agreed procedure, the nature of the allegations were explained to carl sargeant, and as i see later today carwyn jones who will carl sargeant, and as i see later today carwynjones who will come here to the senedd to discuss the situation with labour ams. business has been suspended this week in light of what has happened and labour's carwyn light of what has happened and labour's ca rwyn jones light of what has happened and labour's carwynjones will release a statement but at the moment we do not know what will be in that statement. tomos reporting live from
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cardiff, many thanks. we're a nation of animal lovers, with millions of us across the country owning pets. aside from the care they provide, they can also help people deal with loneliness, disability and teach important lessons to children. but new research today shows the number of us owning pets is declining. let's talk to teresa jones, who got her dogs after her children left home. she's disabled and spends a lot of time at home, so felt she was in need of the company. and those are her two dogs. who is a? roscoe and karma. -- who are these two. he has been in a car for ages so he is a bit excited. thank you for coming in. jo botting bought two cats to give her children responsibility and teach them different experiences. alec and connor are here as well. hello.
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nathalie ingham is battersea cats and dogs home's canine behaviorist and training manager, and thinks there are many benefits to owning a pet. what a fantastic job!. what a fantasticjob!. also wilma is here. yes, little jack russell and chihuahua cross. that is mad breeding! 0h, chihuahua cross. that is mad breeding! oh, my gosh! 0k, chihuahua cross. that is mad breeding! oh, my gosh! ok, so karma and roscoe, how have they changed your life, teresa? tremendously. i ama your life, teresa? tremendously. i am a little bit agoraphobic as well, soi am a little bit agoraphobic as well, so i find it difficult to get out. without them, i don't go out at all. ido without them, i don't go out at all. i do most of my shopping and things at all. i do have blue cross who walk them for me, because there are times when i really can't go, but there are times when i can. why get two dogs, teresa ? there are times when i can. why get two dogs, teresa? they handle! yes,
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i had one, karma, then obviously i had quite a few hospital appointments and things so i was worried about leaving her at home on her own because she is quite sensitive thing. you are a big s ofty , sensitive thing. you are a big softy, are due, teresa? so you got rascal. yes, he is a handful but definitely keeps entertained. alex, connor, how are you, and, jo, how are you? tell me about your decision to get cats. the boys have always loved animals and then getting a pet seemed like a progression, because when we got the cats four years ago they were seven and nine which seemed a good age for them to learn about responsibility and looking after an animal, but also just the companionship a cat can bring, it is really valuable for them. what are your cats called? my cat is jack. mine is clara. one each. is there any rivalry? well, we share them so
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it is not like one has one cat and one has the other. we like to share them. but secretly, alex, do you think clara is better thanjack? them. but secretly, alex, do you think clara is better than jack? no. konta? no, i think think clara is better than jack? no. konta? no, ithink they think clara is better than jack? no. konta? no, i think they are both lovely. if you come home from school and you have had a bad day, they will chew you up, come and find you —— connor? they will always, comfort you and give your affection. people animals don't believe that, they don't believe that domestic pets can actually work out what kind of mood you're in, what sort of day you have had. nathalie, can you tell them the truth? the absolutely can. dogs and cats are both very perceptive about everything that goes on around them, and we developed a strong bonds with our animals as owners, your mood, they can be thinking something is not quite right and that is
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unsettling for you and them, so quite often they will seek out more attention in those situations. which is what —— which is what rascal has been doing? absolutely. sorry, should not have mentioned his name. he is settling down a bit now, but wondering what the heck is going on. not his normal routine. how come wilma is so chilled? she came into us wilma is so chilled? she came into us is astray, she had been wondering. so she has obviously seen a lot of different things. today is quite a big day for her, all very unusual, so she is building a bond with me, sticking with me a bit more further reassurance, because it is all a bit new and different, and further reassurance, because it is alla bit new and different, and i think the thing we see especially with rescue animals going into their new homes, having come into rescue environments, going in to build that new bond with that one on, or multiple owners, whatever the case may be, going into that new family, they do create a lasting bond with those people and think it makes a
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massive bond for them as animals. some come into us the absolutely no fault of their own, very happy dogs and cats, and others perhaps have gone through some hard times, but they still never fail to build that bond and trust people again, regardless of what has happened to them. and! regardless of what has happened to them. and i think as much as they need us, they definitely help us as well, in many ways. yes. so the figures out today show that millions and millions and millions of us in britain still have a domestic pet, but the number of uk households with a fish, dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, a fish, dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, a cat, it is declining, but only a little bit. why do you think that might be? certainly we see a lot of dogs and cats coming in because owners are moving house. they are in rented accommodation and it is harderand harderto find accommodation that will allow pets. a lot of older people who have had dogs or cats all of their life, they
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might be going into, you know, retirement properties, going into different places, different accommodation, and they can't take their pets with them, or going into hospital and can't take their animals with them, so a lot come into us because of this problem with housing and accommodation, which is really ha rd housing and accommodation, which is really hard because those people love their animals a lot, and it is ha rd love their animals a lot, and it is hard on them. did you go for cats because you prefer cats over dogs because you prefer cats over dogs because you prefer cats over dogs because you are out of the house all day and it just because you are out of the house all day and itjust didn't seem fair? we love dogs. i think the boys would have loved that but, yes, clearly they need much more companionship and attention and we are simply not there enough. do you feed and change there enough. do you feed and change the water and do all that stuff? yes. well, yes. well, yes? mm. much of the time, unless we are out... or on holiday or something like that, karma would really love to come home
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with you, alex. —— gaelic. karma would really love to come home with you, alex. -- gaelic. they sent everything, if someone is a bit anxious, give them a cuddle. when i am on the house on my own they sent everything, if someone is a bit anxious, give them a cuddle. the cats are not that interested but they will be there to greet and they do love them very much. some photographs and feedback from you around the country. andrea said we adopted our rag doll from essex after she was made homeless. she fills our lives with so much happiness and wakes us up every morning by licking ourfaces. tom, blue, aged six, simply the best of dogs. siobhan has e—mailed in her two boys, levi the cocker spaniel and flash the guinea pig. i suffer with fibro and these two really help
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each day. another one, beautiful picture of my pet, king george. hang on... that was a snake! i've just realised. he is almost a0 years old. we have moved on from the snake now, but he was a0 years old. goodness me. this picture is from tricia, this is my support dog tokai. she is my best friend, my carer, and my reason to keep going, as i have ms and diabetes. that is the thing. if you are patient, if you have a condition, then a pet... 0bviously pets need walking, dogs need walking, so it is not an easy life, you have a responsibility there. yes, we have a number of dogs that go over to chelsea pensioners' hospital every month and the joy they bring to those people, they ta ke they bring to those people, they take them for a little walks, we have dogs we have re—homed to help people with disabilities, to become
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almost like assistance dogs, to get trained up to carry out specific tasks to help, and it is amazing how wonderful they are. tasks to help, and it is amazing how wonderfulthey are. ok, thanks tasks to help, and it is amazing how wonderful they are. ok, thanks to all of you, especially wilma and karma, who loves you, alec, and the rascal. i appreciate all of your time. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. back tomorrow at nine o'clock. good morning. a pretty cloudy start across england and wales but things will improve for the afternoon. some sunshine breaking through. we already have that sunshine across scotla nd already have that sunshine across scotland and northern ireland. you can see from the latest satellite images those cloudy skies across england and wales are becoming less cloudy into the afternoon. rain and drizzle across southern and eastern areas will tend to clear away, but it will stay quite cloudy in the south—east corner. elsewhere, as you
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can see, sunshine this afternoon. maximum temperatures up to about 10-12 maximum temperatures up to about 10—12 degrees. tonight further cloud spreading through ireland, northern wales, and there will be frost here in scotland for the first part of friday morning. again on friday, a rather brisk north—westerly winds chasing away the cloud after frosty first thing. one or two showers across northern england and through the day. a little chilly with that brisk wind and maximum temperature about eight to 12 celsius. that is it for me. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. theresa may considers who should
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replace priti patel, after one of the leading supporters of brexit resigned as international development secretary. iam i am alive in downing street, where for the second time in a week, theresa may is dealing with an unplanned departure from her cabinet. the first minister of wales is to issue a statement, following criticism of his handling of harassment allegations against carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. new figures reveal thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme. kevin spacey is to be edited out of a completed hollywood thriller, because of allegations of predatory sexual behaviour.

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