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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 9, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. theresa may considers who should replace priti patel, after one of the leading supporters of brexit resigned as international development secretary. lam i am alive in downing street, where for the second time in a week, theresa may is dealing with an unplanned departure from her cabinet. the first minister of wales is to issue a statement, following criticism of his handling of harassment allegations against carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. new figures reveal thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme. kevin spacey is to be edited out of a completed hollywood thriller, because of allegations of predatory sexual behaviour. also, donald trump urges china to act quickly on north korea. the president warns time is running out, but says china could fix the problems quickly and easily if they wanted.
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and up up and away... a british inventor sets the first world speed record for "flying a body—controlled jet engine power suit". good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may is under pressure to restore stability to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. ms patel was a prominent brexit supporter, and the prime minister
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is facing calls to replace her with someone who also backs leaving the eu. labour are demanding to know what the foreign office knew about priti patel‘s meetings with israeli politicians. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at downing street. pressure on the prime minister from all directions, can she emerge from this with a semblance of authority and a sense of stability in government? i would say that people inside downing street are not getting too excited about this. that point is that they have dealt with this, the resignation has happened, there is not much prospect of a widespread reshuffle, that is not what theresa may is planning. this is going to be more of a one in one out. the question is whether the
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balance of the cabinet when it comes to brexit is maintained, because priti patel was a very staunch brexiteers, she had a high profile role during yourfriend, brexiteers, she had a high profile role during your friend, there are some in the conservative party who say it does not have to necessarily be someone who campaigned to leave but someone who now embraces the idea brexit, but they are indeed yesterday about it. the easiest thing would be to replace priti patel with another woman on the brexit side of the argument, with ministerial experience, but we do not know when this announcement will come. this is what iain duncan smith himself a friend of priti patel had to say about what theresa may should do next. she will want to make sure the balance of cabinet remains the same. this is not a cabinet reshuffle. the differences, any cabinet reshuffle you can change the balance, change the focus, talk
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about where you want to put your emphasis on priorities, ie but in the post. this is simply someone we nt the post. this is simply someone went and someone has to go into post. my instinct is she will really not change the balance of that because otherwise that would necessitate a full reshuffle and thatis necessitate a full reshuffle and that is not a plan at the moment as i it. priti patel was forced to resign, raising questions of how you do things, you do notjust go to a foreign country and had a meeting without civil servants. also issues of lobbying, sometimes she was accompanied by someone from the conservative friends of israel, all these reasons she had to depart, but just because she has gone does not mean the questions stopped. labour are still putting on the pressure about who exactly she met when she was in israel. this is their deputy leader tom watson.
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i have written to theresa may to ask some detailed questions but principally i would like to know, did priti patel meet foreign office officials on her visit to israel and did the foreign office asked downing street not to publish the details of those meetings? because then i think the record can be set straight. no question this is a huge distraction for the prime minister on a day when we have those brexit talks happening again over in brussels, there are many other things theresa may would like to be getting on with rather than having to deal with ministers who have misbehaved. thank you, vicky. i'm joined now by the security minister ben wallace who is here to talk about the government's prevent programme to tackle radicalisation. but first i'm going to ask for his response to the latest resignation from the government. thank you for your time. how important do you think is for theresa may to replace priti patel with someone who has similar
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pro—brexit credentials? for all this talk of balance in the cabinet, it does an somewhat seem like she has been dictated to, told she sued replacer with someone who is similarly in favour brexit? the whole government is in favour of brexit. that is our manifesto, that is what we were elected to do. but there are degrees within that, on, mr wallace? of course, but when you join the cabinet, you sign up to collective cabinet responsibility. the position of the government is very clear, and the prime minister. we will deliver on the referendum result to leave the eu. anyone who goes into thatjob has to sign up to that. anyone who joins the government has two sign up to that. at the same time, what is really important for the prime minister is that they accept that and that the person is able to do the job of delivering on britain's foreign aid policies. that is the only two things that are a qualification,
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lots of my colleagues have that capability. they will do it much to newell. isn't -- they will do it extremely well. but that line was not stuck to buy priti patel, and that's why she left a post? you have a nswered that's why she left a post? you have answered your own question, if you cannot stick to policy you cannot be pa rt cannot stick to policy you cannot be part of government, that is the reality. anyone, abe remainer brexiteers can go into the cabinet as long as they sign up to the collective government ambition and view that we are here to deliver brexit as a result of the referendum that took place last year, there are no ifs or buts, they cannot decide they want to not deliver on it. the key is, are they with the programme as it is now and are they going to deliver a deal that is in britain's best interests? are there more
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questions to be answered in your opinion by downing street, about who knew what and when over priti patel‘s meetings with various israeli officials? tom watson is more inspector to zone than sherlock holmes on this. when the full details came to the attention of the prime minister, and it seemed priti patel‘s actions, as she has herself mentioned in her letter, did not seem mentioned in her letter, did not seem to align with the ministerial code or indeed the cabinet responsibility then she took the decision to resign. that is the answer, action has been taken, the government will get on and do the rest of its job which is delivering the manifesto and brexit. one report suggests today that european leaders are preparing for a scenario in which theresa may is not in her post any longer by the new year. you must accept that what has been happening
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here is difficult but other european leaders to get their heads around when it comes to these negotiations? i have spent a lot of time with european politicians over the years, andi european politicians over the years, and i think most british ministers whether labour or conservative often died european ministers to see you would not believe everything you read in the papers. the reality is that theresa may is fixated on delivering brexit, david davis, the brexit secretary, is still imposed on doing a very good job of getting those negotiations. the other m essa 9 es those negotiations. the other messages from europe are that the european commission has understood the forests beach and what we're trying to achieve which is getting towards opening talks on trade at the same time, and we to resolve the issues of outstanding money owed or not owed to the european commission. that has not changed. no matter what has been going on in the last few days, that will continue to be the strong agenda of this government to deliver that and the other stuff
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like prevent which is in my portfolio, as security minister, the issue of keeping people safe in my constituency and across the uk. let me come onto that. if we look at the figures, the great majority of people who have been referred to this programme are young, under 20, many under 15. is it your opinion that these concerns are being driven by use of social media and the internet, by these people in the younger age range? yeah, the current terrorist threat and the current use of the internet to groom people, whether for sexual exploitation or violent extremism, is going, and younger people live more of their life on the internet than other generations. that's why we see people being exploited through these means. they are therefore more younger, a younger generation. that is an area of concern and one reason
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why when we talk about prevent early on, making shall we included an education sector and teachers and lecturers, to make sure they understand that their wards, the people then after the very people being targeted by people like daesh the extreme right wing. it is the statutory duty to report concerns in councils and schools etc, do you think that is working? or is it swamping the system, swamping people who are working in prevent with too many cases to handle?” who are working in prevent with too many cases to handle? i think it is working. the figures we produced today are the first year, and the direction of travel of the provisional figures, direction of travel of the provisionalfigures, i'm trying direction of travel of the provisional figures, i'm trying to get that out as soon as possible, they show even more so prevent is being used more accurately and we are getting better quality referrals. i think what it is showing these figures, is first of all it's not as many as people think. if i put the 7600 odd prevent
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referral every year in perspective, there are 621,000 referrals of child safety every year, so it is just over 1%, of which half are younger people. it is not a mass programme, lots of young people are being abused online by groomers, whether terrorist groom as paedophiles or bodies, and we as the government and local authorities and police have to ensure we get ahead of those people and divert people away from violence. good news from the figures, over 350 people who were really on track to be violent extremists and terrorists etc have been diverted away from the course. that means we are safer as a result of that. the same time, about 2000 the 7000 people who have been
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referred were in receipt of other safeguarding things, so they may have started in the system is being exploited by turns out they were being sexually exploited and that meant social services and schools have enabled the step up and give them a support they need. it's just one of the lines of safeguarding, teachers and doctors already have a range of duties implied and implicit about protecting people that they come across. this isjust about protecting people that they come across. this is just one other line of that, about violent extremism, but at its heart is about safeguarding people from being exploited. thank you. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today. it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely to centre around the uk's financial obligations and the rights of british people living in the eu. damian grammaticus is in brussels for us. asi
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as ijust mentioned, to ben wallace a moment ago, one newspaper report today says one scenario eu leaders are preparing for is the idea of theresa may being out of office by the new year? that is quoting an unnamed european leader, seven the context of these discussions about to ta ke context of these discussions about to take place, it's not the most auspicious start? hello, yes, those comments came from a british newspaper today, an unnamed european leader quoted saying that. that is separate from what is happening here, that refers to european leaders across eu countries watching the political situation in the uk. they have been doing so very closely ever since the referendum. discussing amongst themselves the
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implications for barak said negotiations. they have seen the situation in the last week, and the situation in the last week, and the situation yesterday with the resignation of priti patel, and wondering themselves and what those invitations might be. those are discussions of a political level but eu leaders may be happening, may be seeking to think through the possible consequences. but they set aside —— set aside from what is happening here. one by eu institutions, the negotiations are into the sixth round today, and what is interesting in a way from these negotiations is the previous five negotiations, up to five days worth of talks, today we have a session amongst officials and tomorrow michel barnier and david davis meeting. so truncated, two days. much more limited sessions, which i
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think that the difficulties there are at the minute with the two sides their positions. thank you, damian. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may is considering who should replace the leading brexit supporter, priti patel, who resigned as international development secretary. the first minister of wales is to issue a statement, following criticism of his handling of harassment allegations against carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. new figures show that more than a quarter of people flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme, prevent, were under the age of 15. in sport, england's women suffered a late collapse on the first day of their one of ashes test against australia in sydney from 129—1, they closed on 235—7. australia will retain the ashes if they win this match. exeter ‘s henry slate starts for england against argentina on saturday, the first of their autumn
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internationals. owen farrell has been arrested. northern ireland prepare for the first leg of their world cup play—off against switzerland, their play at windsor park tonight before the second leg in basel on sunday. a full update in the next 15 minutes. reports from hollywood say kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before its release — following the recent allegations of sexual assault. spacey, who plastean paul getty in the thriller, "all the money in the world", will be replaced by the oscar—winning canadian actor, christopher plummer. the release of the film will still go ahead as planned on december the 22nd. we can speak now to the actress valentina violo, who stars in all the money in the world — alongside kevin spacey, mark wahlberg and michelle williams. thank you forjoining us. you met
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kevin spacey recently, in connection with the filming of the movie we we re with the filming of the movie we were just with the filming of the movie we werejust mentioning. how with the filming of the movie we were just mentioning. how did you find him, what did you make of him? idid not find him, what did you make of him? i did not shoot with him because i had no scenes with him, but i met him at the end of the shooting party. i thought he was very nice and kind and very human, he was enjoying himself, drinking, eating, speaking with people. all very fine. was this before the allegations emerged about his behaviour? yes, it does this summer. do you think then that it does this summer. do you think then thatitis does this summer. do you think then that it is the right decision that he should be edited out of the movie, and those scenes filmed again with a different actor?|j movie, and those scenes filmed again with a different actor? i don't know, i don't know if this is right. i think everything is going a bit crazy right now, so probably if they
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took this decision, it's good for the movie. you think it's the right decision, you think the producers and people putting up the money for this film, while they have the opportunity to do something about it and to edit him out and reshoot the scenes, that's the right way to go? i don't know, if they decided this way, it probably is. i think it's not, because i like kevin spacey as an actor, he's a legend to me. but if they took this decision, then probably it's right. it's an interesting question become because if you think of other work he's done that has a huge fan base my house of cards, how do you square watching an actor, whoever it is, with the knowledge of these allegations around their behaviour?”
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knowledge of these allegations around their behaviour? i wouldn't think about it, because i would just see the actor, not the person behind. i would see the work he does, the way he gets into the character, the way he is an actor, not the person he is. there is a responsibility go to think about those who are making the allegations, the alleged victims in these cases, isn't there? yeah. ok, thank you for your thoughts. an actress who has appeared with kevin spacey. a role which is due to be edited from an upcoming film, replacing him with the actor christopher plummer. let's get more reaction to this now. joining me is our correspondent tom burridge. is an interesting decision, perhaps not surprising, tell us more? the first thing to say is that the trailerfor first thing to say is that the trailer for all the first thing to say is that the trailerfor all the money first thing to say is that the trailer for all the money in the world is on youtube, you can watch the trailer and see kevin spacey is
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in the trailer. it's an incredible move to make. it has to be unprecedented. once might have been re—made, part we shopped, produced in the past, because someone died, but i can't think of any example of someone being withdrawn from serious allegations like this. you only have to watch the trailer to realise this isa high to watch the trailer to realise this is a high budget movie, big names, mark wahlberg and michelle williams, and of course kevin spacey. on wikipedia, you look at the cast list and already his name has been replaced by christopher plummer. the internet moves so quickly, he has already been raised from the movie which will be remade in part. as i said to valentinojust which will be remade in part. as i said to valentino just a moment ago, there is that window for the producers and the people behind the film to say, we want to make these changes. i don't know how big his parties in this movie? unclear. an
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interesting question, because if you think about a film of this nature, it must‘ve taken months to shoot. millions of dollars, maybe tens, may be higher, but a lot of money. the production values are high. therefore, how much of the film has to be remade, the trailer gives the impression he is a big part but not one of the two main roles. sony obviously have thought long and hard about this. they would not have reached the decision easily but i guess they want to avoid people ultimately boycotting the movie because some people might have taken a moral position and said, given the serious nature of the allegations against kevin spacey, why not go to the film. by making this move, we are all talking about the movie, i have seen the trailer and i'm quite intrigued to go watch it when it finally comes out. in a way i give the movie more publicity. it's interesting question, one of real balance for people in the entertainment business where someone
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they are working with stands accused of inappropriate behaviour, sexual harassment, and other allegations. what do they do with that? do they ta ke what do they do with that? do they take the position of the alleged victims, do they take the position of the average person who might want to watch a tv programme, a movie, irrespective of who is in it? the first thing to say is that the first allegation, remember, from anthony rapp, a fellow actor, there was a sexual advance by kevin spacey when he was 1a. anthony rapp. they did follow a n he was 1a. anthony rapp. they did follow an apology from kevin spacey, said he has at least admitted inappropriate behaviour relating to that allegation. he said if it happens. he did not remember it, you are right. the following allegations are right. the following allegations arejust are right. the following allegations are just allegations at this stage, kevin spacey has not commented. sony may have taken the approach of no smoke without fire. now they are not
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saying in any sense he is guilty relating to the more serious allegations, sickeningly this mother in massachusetts, the news yesterday, a very strong police press co nfe re nce . yesterday, a very strong police press conference. “— yesterday, a very strong police press conference. —— especially this mother in massachusetts. that has not been confirmed but quite serious allegations of sexual assault by kevin spacey. the widespread damage of the allegations at this point maybe means sony think they could not continue with him in the film. it is quite and credible —— an incredible full from grace. the welsh first minister is to meet labour assembly members to explain how he handled allegations of inappropriate behaviour against a minister who was laterfound dead. carl sargeant, who had been suspended by labour and sacked from carwynjones' cabinet, is believed to have taken his own life on tuesday. mrjones is due to make a statement following the meeting. let's speak to our correspondent tomos morgan who is in cardiff. good morning. let's reflect on what
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mr sargent ‘s family have been saying, a very strong message from them saying he had been denied natural justice, and expressing grave concern about how he had been treated in all this? yeah, they say carl sa rg ea nt treated in all this? yeah, they say carl sargeant was not made aware of specific details of the allegations against him, and therefore they felt he felt he did not have the appropriate knowledge to be able to defend himself will stop gas he was distressed, because of that, and it was affecting his mental well—being. they have called for an independent review into the process that took place, after his sacking last friday, and ca rwyn place, after his sacking last friday, and carwynjones the first minister has been facing criticism from within his own party. other
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party leaders in wales have called on him to resign. last night another strong message of criticism from former cabinet secretary, a former ally of ca rwyn former cabinet secretary, a former ally of carwynjones, leighton andrews, has said he was angry with the way the process had been dealt with. he said mrjones should not have made any interviews to the media on monday about the allegations, and that he believed, leighton andrews, that the first minister had not followed the due process by doing so. something the family have also said they were quite angry about as well. the red bulls of the allegations of improper behaviour in media and westminster, there have been allegations here. —— there have been allegations here. —— the red this is one of the biggest challenge is the first minister will have
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faced in his eight—year tenure as first minister here. the labour party have said that in line with the agreed procedure, the nature of the agreed procedure, the nature of the allegations were outlined to mr sargent as you mentioned earlier. however the families say the specific details were not outlined to them. later, he will meet with a labour assembly member here in cardiff bay today to discuss the events of the last week. business has been suspended in the assembly due to what has happened on tuesday. after he meets with the labour assembly members, ca rwyn after he meets with the labour assembly members, carwyn jones after he meets with the labour assembly members, carwynjones is due to release a statement. there is wide ranging speculation about what that may be, but it is unclear as to what that may be at this point in time. thank you. we will be following that story throughout the day. iranian state tv has said borisjohnson's recent remarks confirm a british—iranian dual
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national was spying in the country. the foreign secretary had been criticised for saying that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who has beenjailed in iran, had been training journalists there. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was detained at tehran airport in april 2016. she says her trip was so her three—year—old daughter could meet her grandparents. a british inventor has set the first world speed record for flying a body—controlled jet engine power suit. richard browning flew his suit across a lake in reading watched by adjudicators from guinness world records. here's how he got on. time you looks really good fun. let's get the weather now.
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we are not going to set any records today with the weather, fairly straightforward. quite a bit of cloud across england and wales, macleod is gradually clearing away. the best sunshine across scotland and northern ireland. one or two showers running into the far north. this is how it plays out for the rest of the day. cloud and rain moving south and east. it might linger in the far south—east during this afternoon. elsewhere, good spells of sunshine, a pleasant afternoon. just a view showers in the far north of scotland. temperatures 12 or 13. we will spread into england and wales, preventing frost but with clear skies across scotland temperatures could be close to freezing on friday morning. during friday, any cloud shooting away quickly. a rather brisk north—westerly wind taking macleod away. lots of sunshine, a
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view showers across england and scotla nd view showers across england and scotland into the afternoon. top temperatures about seven to 12 degrees. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. theresa may is considering who should replace the leading brexit supporter priti patel, who resigned as international development secretary last night. she stepped down over undeclared meetings with israeli officials over the summer. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, will issue a statement later, following criticism of his handling of harassment allegations against the sacked minister, carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. official figures have revealed that thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme, prevent. the actor kevin spacey is being edited out of a completed film after a string of sexual harassment allegations against him. his scenes in all the money in the world will be re—shot with another actor.
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time for the sport now. let's catch up time for the sport now. let's catch up with olly foster. england's women made a solid start in the one—off ashes test but australia, who will retain the ashes with a win in sydney, finished strongly on the first day. england won the toss and chose to bat in what is the first day—night ashes test. they lost lauren winfield cheaply but a century partnership bewteen captain heather knight who made 62 and tammy beaumont, with 70, put them in control. that put them to 129—1. england lost their momentum when they fell. knight was one of two wickets forjess jonassen. ellyse perry with a couple. including the prize wicket of sarah taylor, caught and bowled. england closed on 235—7.
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quick update on the england men, their ashes series starts at the end of the month. they are in adelaide. it is the second day of their four day tour match and jake ball went over badly on his ankle while bowling and is a doubt for the rest of the match. england have started the second innings against an australia 11th and they have a lead of 65. eni aluko says she feels let down by some of her england team—mates for not supporting her following her complaint against the former coach mark sampson. he was sacked because of his conduct in a previousjob, but the fa have apologised to her after an inquiry found that he had used racially discriminatory language towards her and another player. it's been very divisive and very adversarial, and i think the players have been dragged into that. but the players have their own mind and they should be able to say, actually, let me step back from this and see how this may benefit, if i have a problem... if they have a problem, they have a process that is going to protect them.
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it's a massive night for northern ireland in belfast. the first leg of their world cup play—off against switzerland. they haven't appeared in a world cup for 32 years. they were at the european championships last year in france, where they reached the knockout stage. if they get past switzerland over two legs, it will be the first time they have appeared at back—to—back major tournaments. the second leg is in basel on sunday. the players have done fantastically so far to get to this point. at the end of the day, there's eight countries left in europe and we're the smallest one going into this situation. i see in the squad an opportunity that they don't want to waste but equally, they have done everything so far and i anticipate they will do everything over the next two games to try and make it a reality. it is the start of the rugby union
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autumn internationals this weekend. exeter‘s henry slade will start at inside centre for england against argentina on saturday, with owen farrell and maro itoje rested. slade starts alongside jonathanjoseph in the midfield, while in the absence of itoje, george kruis partners courtney lawes at lock. head coach eddiejones says it's his side's "most important game this year". lewis hamilton says he won't let the controversy over his tax affairs "distract" him as he heads into the final two races of this season. hamilton of course wrapped up his fourth f1 title last weekend and is one of the high—profile figures whose tax situation came under scrutiny in the paradise papers. i've just i'vejust come from i've just come from this great period of time with my family and friends, that i have this huge wave of positive energy and nothing can really d e nt of positive energy and nothing can really dent that. so, yeah, i'm just carrying that, i'm solely focused on trying to win this race this weekend. we still have two races to
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go. i don't really have anything to add to the whole scenario that is happening. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. we will also hear from we will also hearfrom gareth southgate, the england coach, ahead of theirfriendly at southgate, the england coach, ahead of their friendly at wembley against germany tomorrow. it's the second consecutive thursday that the prime minister wakes preparing to replace one of her cabinet ministers. last week, she needed a new defence secretary. this week, she needs a new international development secretary. this comes after a series of unauthorised meetings priti patel had with israeli officials and politicians and not being straight about how many there were. in a letter to theresa may issued after they met last night, priti patel says: . the episode has left theresa may's government underfire from critics and commentators. and this is how some news
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organisations view her predicament this morning, obviously with considerable speculation about what happens next. in a moment, we'll be talking to a former senior diplomat and crossbench peer, lord ricketts. but first, our diplomatic correspondent james landale explains how it went so badly wrong for priti patel. this story is all about a family holiday to israel by priti patel, the international development secretary, that went terribly wrong. a holiday where the lines between her public life and her private life became blurred. the correct way of doing business within government didn't happen, and had extraordinary consequences for the british government. so what happened was this. in august, priti patel went on holiday to israel. it was a 12, 13—day holiday. for around two days, priti patel decide to do a bit of work. she had a very busy schedule packed in for her, no fewer than 12 separate
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engagements over those two days. now, the international development secretary, priti patel, has apologised after admitting meeting the israeli prime minister binyamin netanyahu. it is quite extraordinary that priti patel, a cabinet minister, met binyamin netanyahu, the head of the government for another country, secretly, without telling anybody. relationships between governments are incredibly fine—tuned, and meetings are calibrated and they‘ re prepared for, and ministers know what messages they want to get across and what they're going to receive. if you have a sort of rogue elephant storming through this process having secret meetings, then the potential for errors, the mixed messages, for the israeli government doing one thing and the british government doing another thing, or even the israeli government and another government minister deciding to do one thing to try and influence the british government. i mean, this is a really,
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really complicated place to be, and it's why, i think, that there were so many eyes raised when it emerged that priti patel had met binyamin netanyahu. i'm nowjoined by lord ricketts, former head of the diplomatic service. he is also a crossbencher in the house of lords. thank you for joining us. can you think of a scenario before where a senior minister has embarked on a course of action while telling so few people about it as the course of action priti patel followed? no, about it as the course of action priti patelfollowed? no, i can't think of any precedent for a minister organising a big programme like that in a country as sensitive as israel, including the prime minister, without telling the ambassador, the foreign office or the prime minister. so in your mind, was there any doubt she had to go? it was both that, which was clearly a mistake and really not compatible with collective responsibility but also the fact she did not come clean about it afterwards. i mean, the
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press release they put out was the most weaselly worded thing i think i've read for a long time and it only came out drip by drip so i think that met her position was impossible. would it have sent a stronger message if she had been sacked rather than allowed to resign? i don't think so, no, it was obvious after all that she couldn't carry on. and then boris johnson, the foreign secretary, we are reporting iranians state television today saying that the remarks he made about nazarenes gary ratcliffe confirmed to the iranian state's mind that the dual national was spying in the country. what do you make of that? it shows the precise words you use as foreign secretary are words you use as foreign secretary a re really words you use as foreign secretary are really important. borisjohnson clearly made a mistake in front of the select committee. he's apologised for that but the iranians have exploited that in a very cynical way but it shows that as foreign secretary, you've got to be precise in every word you use. is
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this situation so different from that of priti patel? should he be on his way out of his job as well?” don't think it is for me to decide who is foreign secretary but the foreign policy of the country needs a foreign secretary who projects authority and commands respect. a foreign secretary who projects authority and commands respectm is not his first gaffe, is it? it isn't and at the moment, boris johnson thomas rawls his talents, has not succeeded in convincing people he is a serious heavyweight foreign secretary with authority and thatis foreign secretary with authority and that is a real problem. what impact is that having on how britain is viewed in other parts of the welcome if you take his remarks in conjunction with what priti patel bid? looking back at the last few weeks, in european capitals of other way, it looks chaotic, confused and drifting, at a time when there are massive issues of brexit, no clear line from the cabinet about the future relationship with the eu, and also a whole series of major international crises and britain is not being a real player in that. is
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it going to be extremely difficult for the prime minister, do you think, to set britain on a course or at least project an image of stability of the back of this?” think she needs to take action now to show that there is a clear plan for the future, including what the shape and scope of our future relationship with the eu is going to be. will it be a close relationship ora be. will it be a close relationship or a more distant one? and we need to get a grip of the foreign policy and show that britain is a player in the world and is counting in the majorforeign policy the world and is counting in the major foreign policy crises which at the moment, brexit is sucking all the moment, brexit is sucking all the oxygen out of that. in your career as a diplomat, have you ever been more concerned about the image of britain abroad as you are right now? no, because i think throughout my career, we had a very clear foreign policy. we were a member of the european union and a close ally of the us. brexit has torpedoed that and we have not got a new shape for what britain's role in the world is going to be. everyone i meet abroad
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is saying, "where are you? we thought you were a stable country with a good, pragmatic sense of your own national interest. what has happened?" i think that is quite series. thank you forjoining us. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. if you report a crime, this is where your call is dealt with. the control room. it is the nerve centre of police operations. there are more than 8 million 999 calls every year, with millions of others on the non—emergency number, 101. the inspectorate of constabulary says that police are struggling to cope. it blames problems retaining control room staff
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and an overreliance on outdated technology. some requests for police to deal with crimes, including criminal damage and assault, go unanswered. in devon and cornwall, many callers hang up because they have to wait so long. the control rooms are right at the heart of what police forces do. the focus on getting that right is really important for chief constables, and we encourage them to continue with this. the report into police efficiency says the service is under significant stress. it says forces will spend 6% less on policing in the next three years and will lose more than 4,000 officers and staff from the police workforce. that is why many chief constables say they need extra resources to deal with the increased demand. mike cunningham says it would be a good thing for police to have more money, but he says the service needs to show the benefits extra funding will bring, and he says there is scope for forces to use their existing resources more efficiently. danny shaw, bbc news.
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in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. theresa may is considering who should replace the leading brexit supporter priti patel, who resigned as international development secretary. the first minister of wales is to issue a statement, following criticism of his handling of harassment allegations against carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. new figures show that more than a quarter of people flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme, prevent, were under the age of 15. in the business news... president trump and his chinese counterpart xi jinping have said they would work together to improve trade relations. in a departure from his recent rhetoric, the us president said he does "not blame china" for the trade deficit between the two countries. profits at sainsbury‘s fall 9% but sales rise.
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the supermarket said the drop in profits was due to price cutting, wage cost inflation and the consolidation of argos. luxury goods retailer burberry is planning to close some stores and stop selling in outlets that are not sufficiently upmarket. the new strategy was announced along with its half—year results, which showed like—for—like sales up 4% and a 24% rise in operating profits to £127 million. now let's kick off with those latest numbers from the uk's second largest supermarket chain, sainsbury‘s. it's reported a 9% fall in half—year profits. but the decline was not as bad as many had expected and sales rose, leading chief executive mike coupe said he was "very pleased with progress". nonetheless, profits came in at £251 million in the 28 weeks to the 23rd of september, while like—for—like sales
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excluding fuel went up by 1.6%. earlier, we spoke to the sainsbury‘s chief executive about how challenging the market is right now. it's a tough market but the numbers have beaten the consensus, the market forecasts out there and we are pleased. we've got good momentum in the business and we are serving more customers than ever but as you say, the nature of our customers' shopping habits are changing and thatis shopping habits are changing and that is reflected in the business as well so we've seen good growth in the convenience business, up 8%, good growth in online groceries and with the acquisition of argos, we have a new channel to market with a wonderful service called fast track which enables us to get a lot of nonfood products to customers within four hours so we are very pleased with progress. joining us now is molly johnson—jones, seniorfood and grocery analyst at globaldata retail. thank you forjoining us. we were
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just hearing from the boss, saying how tough the market is right now, trying to adjust to consumers' changing shopping habits. what do you make of sainsbury‘s numbers today, how have they been reacting? it's unfortunate for sainsbury‘s today because it is a very difficult market at the moment but the last quarter, all of the other grosses have posted higher like—for—like and sales growth so naturally people have been disappointed. the fall in profits according to the supermarket is down to price cutting and wage cost inflation and of course the big consolidation of argos. it's difficult because everyone has to invest in prices at the moment because they can't blast —— pass all of the inflation on we're thing without giving market share to discounters but sainsbury‘s have maybe been investing a bit too heavily competitive test go and asda, who passed on a little bit more. “ asda, who passed on a little bit more. -- compared to tesco and asda. what do we make of the takeover of argos and gabi that at last year has
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gone, a huge deal costing around £11; gone, a huge deal costing around £1.11 billion? gone, a huge deal costing around £11» billion? i gone, a huge deal costing around £1.10 billion? i think gone, a huge deal costing around £11» billion? i think it's been a good move for sainsbury‘s, driven football in stores, so having argos in sainsbury‘s generates 1—2% of extra sales growth and the reason we have seen a fall in profits for this half is because in the first for the, argos is naturally loss—making, they make all their money in the second half of the year, over christmas. how is sainsbury's shaping up compared with the online and other main supermarket competitors? i think sainsbury's has managed to differentiate itself in terms of innovation, their product innovation is fantastic and hopefully it is. they are playing the long game and not sacrificing by cutting prices and doing loads of promotions but they are trying to integrate themselves as a slightly upmarket supermarket that adapts to the consumer. trying to adapt to the ever—changing retell market. thank you forjoining us. regional airline flybe has reported a 47% drop in adjusted pre—tax profit to £81; million. the firm blamed a "previously
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announced one—off onerous it contract provision and the impact of higher aircraft maintenance costs". that's definitely management—speak. earlier, we were spoke to aviation consultant john strickland. we asked him what this means. well, they've invested in new it systems to make their booking process is more relevant to the space in the market they operate in. they had some costs on maintenance on the aircraft or try to improve reliability of operation. many bloopers —— many viewers will know it is an important regional character in uk, it's not so big in london but it came akinde drain the —— ninny and it's important to cities like southampton, manchester, birmingham and up in scotland and they are not competing with the likes of rya nair they are not competing with the likes of ryanair and easyjet, more with surface travel and rail. they've had a new management team earlier in the and they are trying
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to make progress and some ways, an big challenges from the past. it is seven days since the bank of england raised rates by 0.25%, to 0.5% and lots of savers out there are getting in touch to ask when, if at all, the banks will pass on the rise to you. if you are looking for those kind of answers, why not head to our website? we have got a special report on that sadly for you. let's look to see what the markets are up to. a slight dip in the ftse 100 so far in the session and the drop in burberry, weigh on the uk's top share index on thursday, it is stuck below a five—month high, that plunge in burberry is the big move on the index, of course, the true retailer plummeting some 10.4% earlier in the session although it has recovered somewhat. on track
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still for its biggest one—day loss since september 2012 after announcing its new strategy and giving a first half update, also profits at sainsbury's, as i was saying, falling 9% but sales rising and the share price down as a result but sterling inching up on thursday ever so slightly on the expectation ofa ever so slightly on the expectation of a gradual rate rise. that's all the business news. exactly 20 years ago today, the bbc news channel went on air for the first time, as news 24. since then it's covered major events and disasters including the air france concorde crash in paris, the death -- 911 —— 911 macro and more recently the g re nfell tower —— 911 macro and more recently the grenfell tower five. we are now the most watched news channel in the uk and this year became the rts channel of the year. nick higham reports. hello and welcome for the first onto bbc news 24. i'm gavin esler. maggie lieu i'm sarah montague. november
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nine, 1997 and bbc news 24 goes on air. the first time, bbc viewers did not have to wait for the news at six or nine. it was available on tap.” was hoping it would just become something people would turn on when they wanted to know the news. why should we tell them when they had to sit down and watch the news? i thought it would be a truly utility but therefore, once we'd started from it would never go off air. was that what happened ? from it would never go off air. was that what happened? it went off air almost immediately because of technical difficulties! the computers didn't work. the technology failing us, pictures cutting, going to black, freezing, the wrong pictures coming up, us as presenters having to explain what was going on, why it was going on, apologising a lot. it took time but they did overcome the technical problems. you may have heard that efron is... jane hill, the only original presenter still on the channel, remembers the day it came
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of age when an air france concorde crashed in paris injuly 2000. of age when an air france concorde crashed in paris in july 2000. that story was so big, it was the first time we were put, we were simulcast, and the channel ran on bbc one bbc two because the controllers of the big national channels took the view this was such a big, unexpected story, the audience appetite wanted to watch that story unfold. we have some remarkable pictures coming in from new york which we can go to now. since then, the channel has covered many major stories. is breaking news, reports coming in of an explosion at liverpool street station here in london. the london fire brigade has confirmed they are dealing with this serious fire in a tower block at latimer road in west london. the british people have spoken and the answer is, we are out. indeed, the past 18 months has seen some of the biggest noise in the channel's history. details of a potentially serious incident coming to us from various
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news agencies two people shot outside the westminster parliament. at least 50 people have died and more than 200 or injured after a gunman opens fire on a country music festival in las vegas. we are going to get to work immediately for the american people. and sometimes, things go wrong, like that sign a man called guy, who had gone for a job interview, was mistaken for a technology expert called guy and put on set. he bravely tried to answer the question anyway. good morning. were you surprised by this verdict today? i'm very surprised to see this verdict, to come on me. 20 yea rs this verdict, to come on me. 20 years ago, the bbc also launched news on the web. it started modestly but soon grew rapidly, deliberately trying to appeal to a new, younger audience. the idea was that online would start to reintroduce young people to news because they were using computers and it was so successful that very soon, it became
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difficult technically to keep up with the demand cars it was being pumped down victorian copper telephone lines, basically! these days, online and digital services that at the heart of the bbc newsroom. there's been a fundamental shift in the way people get their news, often through social media like twitter and facebook. hello, everyone, this is often in life, i'm simon mccoy. even so, the appetite for tv news channels has not disappeared. the bbc still reaches 7 million people per week. nick higham, bbc news. and there will be full coverage of the bbc news channel at 20 from 5.30 later this afternoon here on bbc news. we will relive some of the moments when the news channel first went on air20 years when the news channel first went on air 20 years ago. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather... hello, a cloudy scott today across many parts of england and wales, with a bit of rain and drizzle around. but further north, we have had some sunshine and this is just
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one scene across scotland at the moment, some blue sky there. thank you to our weather watcher. you can see for the rest of scotland and northern ireland and increasingly the far north of england from the satellite, some sunshine. elsewhere, cloudy skies and as i mentioned, a few spots of rain. that rain and the cloud will continue to move its way further south and east, so increasing amount of sunshine across england and wales and certainly for scotland, we will keep sunshine into the afternoon. just a few showers coming into the far north and quite breezy conditions, temperatures about 7—10dc. dry and sunny for much of northern ireland, through northern england, the midlands, wales and increasingly south—western parts of england, too. you will notice in the south—east of england, still a few spots of rain around kent and it will stay quite loudly in the south—eastern corner well into this evening. this evening and tonight, we will see more cloud and rain spreading from northern ireland, eventually into england and
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wales. claire squires across scotla nd wales. claire squires across scotland may allow temperatures to drop close to freezing. could be a bit of patchy frost but for many of us, with cloudy skies and a bit of rain, acting like a blanket, preventing the temperatures falling too far. during friday, the cloud and rain moves southwards fairly quickly and then for many of us in the afternoon, a dry and fine afternoon really with some sunshine, afternoon really with some sunshine, a few showers across northern england and across scotland, into the afternoon. quite chilly, temperatures 7—9dc, 12 degrees in the south. as we go through friday night, we have got a little area of low pressure which will move from west to east across the uk and it will give a spell of quite heavy rainfora time will give a spell of quite heavy rain for a time as we go into the early hours of saturday morning. behind it, some cold air, just a pocket of cold air, which conveniently is coming towards us for the weekend so both saturday and sunday, it will feel quite chilly. this is saturday, any rain will
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clear, maybe a few showers around western and eastern coasts but you will notice that with a brisk northerly wind it will feel quite chilly at times with temperatures 7-13 chilly at times with temperatures 7—13 degrees and four remembrance sunday, a dry day, good spells of sunshine and again the odd shower but feeling on the chilly side. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. theresa may considers who should replace priti patel as international development secretary — but can she keep the cabinet balanced over brexit? iam i am live in downing street, where for the second time in a week, theresa may is dealing with the fallout from an unplanned cabinets departure. the first minister of wales is to issue a statement, following criticism of his handling of harassment allegations against carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. new figures reveal thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme. kevin spacey is to be edited out
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of a completed hollywood thriller, because of allegations of predatory sexual behaviour. also, donald trump urges china to act quickly on north korea. the president warns time is running out, but says china could fix the problems quickly and easily if they wanted. and up up and away... a british inventor sets the first world speed record for "flying a body—controlled jet engine power suit". good afternoon, it's the 9th of november. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may is under pressure to restore stability
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to the government after the second resignation from her cabinet in a week. the international development secretary, priti patel, stepped down last night after more questions were raised about her unauthorised meetings with israeli politicians. ms patel was a prominent brexit supporter, and the prime minister is facing calls to replace her with someone who also backs leaving the eu. labour are demanding to know what the foreign office knew about priti patel‘s meetings with israeli politicians. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at downing street. i understand we may hear news of two priti patel‘s replacement is within the next hour. that question keenly watched, because there was much talk of how this might affect the balance in cabinet. that's because priti patel was a very prominent brexit
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campaigner, during the referendum. when these decisions are made about brexit, there is a division between those who think we should have a pretty close relationship, close ties with the eu even after we have left in those who think we need a much looser arrangement. it is delicately balanced. it's interesting people like jacob rees—mogg, a prominent brexiteer, though they said someone needs to be enthusiastic about brexit, he says it does not necessarily have to be someone who campaign in a referendum on that side. that certainly would limit the options. i am told the new replacement will be announced lunchtime esch, which has some flexibility in it, i think we can say. iain duncan smith, a close friend of priti patel has been speaking this morning about how he thinks theresa may should handle the vacancy. she will want to make sure the balance of cabinet remains the same. this is not a cabinet reshuffle. the difference is, any cabinet reshuffle you can change the balance, change the focus, talk about where you want to put
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your emphasis and priorities, by who you put in the post. this is simply someone went, and someone has to go into post. my instinct is she will really not change the balance of that because otherwise that would necessitate a full reshuffle and that is not a plan at the moment as i see it. priti patel was forced to leave government because of undisclosed meetings she had had with israeli officials, and the israeli prime minister, she did not tell anyone in advance she was going to be doing this, it was not done in the proper way. there were no civil servants there and they raise the whole issue of transparency, lobbying, the kind of transparency, lobbying, the kind of influence which may be put on a cabinet minister if there was no one there to hear what they are talking about behind closed doors. she may have gone, but the questions have not. the deputy leader of labour,
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tom watson, has written to the prime minister. he says he has been told this priti patel met officials from the british consulate general in jerusalem. that shows the foreign office must have known she was there, he says, and they may well know what she was up to. he has a series of questions he wants the government to answer. i have written to theresa may to ask some detailed questions but principally i would like to know, did priti patel meet foreign office officials on her visit to israel and did the foreign office ask downing street not to publish the details of those meetings? because then i think the record can be set straight. we will find out pretty soon you the replacement will be for mr patel, this was not a reshuffle theresa may wa nted this was not a reshuffle theresa may wanted to carry out, there does not seem to be any suggestion she will doa seem to be any suggestion she will do a full—scale cabinet reshuffle —— miss patel. it's much likely to be
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pretty limited, we will know quite soon. thank you very much. security minister ben wallace was here earlier to talk about the government's prevent programme to tackle radicalisation. but first i asked for his response to the latest resignation from the government. and whether the prime minister will favour calls from some conservative mps for priti patel to be replaced by another mp who voted for brexit. when you join the cabinet, you sign up to collective cabinet responsibility. the position of the government is very clear, and the prime minister. we will deliver on the referendum result to leave the eu. anyone who goes into thatjob has to sign up to that. anyone who joins the government has to sign up to that. at the same time, what is really important for the prime minister is that they accept that and that the person is able to do the job of delivering on britain's foreign aid policies. that is the only two things that are a qualification, lots of my colleagues have that capability. they will do it extremely well. but that line was not stuck
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to by priti patel, and that's why she left her post? you have answered your own question, if you cannot stick to policy you cannot be part of government, that is the reality. anyone, whether remainer or brexiteers can go into the cabinet as long as they sign up to the collective government ambition and view that we are here to deliver brexit as a result of the referendum that took place last year, there are no ifs or buts, they cannot decide they want to not deliver on it. the key is, are they with the programme as it is now and are they going to deliver a deal that is in britain's best interests? are there more questions to be answered, in your opinion, by downing street, about who knew what and when over priti patel‘s meetings with
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various israeli officials? tom watson is more inspector cluseau than sherlock holmes on this. when the full details came to the attention of the prime minister, and it seemed priti patel‘s actions, as she has herself mentioned in her letter, did not seem to align with the ministerial code or indeed the cabinet responsibility then she took the decision to resign. that is the answer, action has been taken, the government will get on and do the rest of its job which is delivering the manifesto and brexit. one report suggests today that european leaders are preparing for a scenario in which theresa may is not in her post any longer by the new year. you must accept that what has been happening here is difficult for other european leaders to get their heads around
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when it comes to these negotiations? i have spent a lot of time with european politicians over the years, and i think most british ministers whether labour or conservative often guide european ministers to say you would not believe everything you read in the papers. the reality is that theresa may is fixated on delivering brexit, david davis, the brexit secretary, is still in post and doing a very good job of getting those negotiations. the other messages from europe are that the european commission has understood the forests beach and what we're trying to achieve which is getting towards opening talks on trade at the same time, and we to resolve the issues of outstanding money owed or not owed to the european commission. that has not changed. no matter what has been going on in the last few days, that will continue to be the strong agenda of this government to deliver that and the other stuff like prevent which is in my portfolio, as security minister, the issue
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of keeping people safe in my constituency and across the uk. let me come onto that. if we look at the figures, the great majority of people who have been referred to this programme are young, under 20, many under 15. is it your opinion that these concerns are being driven by use of social media and the internet, by these people in the younger age range? yeah, the current terrorist threat and the current use of the internet to groom people, whether for sexual exploitation or violent extremism, is growing, and younger people live more of their life on the internet than other generations. that's why we see people being exploited through these means. they are therefore more younger, a younger generation. that is an area of concern and one reason why when we talked about prevent early on, making sure we included an
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education sector and teachers and lecturers, to make sure they understand that their wards, the people then after the very people being targeted by people like daesh the extreme right wing. it is the statutory duty to report concerns in councils and schools etc, do you think that is working? or is it swamping the system, swamping people who are working in prevent with too many cases to handle? i think it is working. the figures we produced today are the first year, and the direction of travel of the provisional figures, i'm trying to get that out as soon as possible, they show even more so prevent is being used more accurately and we are getting better quality referrals. i think what it is showing, these figures, is first of all it's not as many as people think. if i put the 7600 odd prevent referral every year in perspective, there are 621,000 referrals of child safety every year, so it is just over 1%, of which half are younger people.
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it is not a mass programme, lots of young people are being abused online by groomers, whether terrorist groomer or paedophiles or bullies, and we as the government and local authorities and police have to ensure we get ahead of those people and divert people away from violence. the good news from the figures, over 350 people who were really on track to be violent extremists and terrorists etc have been diverted away from the course. that means we are safer as a result of that. at the same time, about 2000 the 7000 people who have been of the 7000 people who have been referred were in receipt of other safeguarding things, so they may have started in the system as being exploited but it turns out they were
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being sexually exploited and that meant social services and schools have been able to step up and give them a support they need. it's just one of the lines of safeguarding, teachers and doctors already have a range of duties implied and implicit about protecting people that they come across. this is just one other line of that, about violent extremism, but at its heart is about safeguarding people from being exploited. british officials will travel to brussels for further brexit talks today. it's the first set of negotiations since eu leaders agreed to begin preparing for discussions about the future relationship with britain. the brexit secretary, david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the talks tomorrow, which are likely of british people living in the eu. damian grammaticus was in brussels for us. those comments came from a british
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newspaper today, an unnamed european leader quoted saying that. that is separate from what is happening here, that refers to european leaders across eu countries watching the political situation in the uk. they have been doing so very closely ever since the referendum. discussing amongst themselves the implications for brexit negotiations. they have seen the situation in the last week, and the situation yesterday with the resignation of priti patel, and wondering themselves and what those invitations might be. those are discussions of a political level but eu leaders may be happening, may be seeking to think through the possible consequences. but they sit aside from what is happening here.
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the negotiations are into the sixth round today, and what is interesting in a way from these negotiations is the previous five negotiations, up to five days worth of talks, today we have a session amongst officials and tomorrow michel barnier and david davis meeting. so truncated, two days. much more limited sessions, which i think that the difficulties there much more limited sessions, which i think hints at the difficulties there are at the minute with the two sides reconciling their positions. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may is considering who should replace the leading brexit supporter, priti patel, who resigned as international development secretary. the first minister of wales is to issue a statement, following criticism of his handling of harassment allegations against carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. new figures show one in six people placed on the uk government's intensive de—radicalisation scheme refuse to cooperate. let's get a sport update.
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how is the cricket going? england's women made a solid start in the one—off ashes test but australia, who will retain the ashes with a win in sydney, finished strongly on the first day. england won the toss and chose to bat in what is the first day—night ashes test. they lost lauren winfield cheaply but a century partnership bewteen captain heather knight who made 62 and tammy beaumont, with 70, put them in control. that put them to 129—1. england lost their momentum when they fell. knight was one of two wickets forjess jonassen. england have lost a couple more wickets, ellyse perry with a couple. including the prize wicket of sarah taylor, caught and bowled. england closed on 235—7. even at the end of the day, it's
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been a really good competition between bat and ball. heather and myself going nicely, we could have looked to kick on vets, but australia full—back well in the last session. it's a massive night for northern ireland in belfast. the first leg of their world cup play—off against switzerland. they haven't appeared in a world cup for 32 years. they were at the european championships last year in france, where they reached the knockout stage. if they get past switzerland over two legs, it will be the first time they have appeared at back—to—back major tournaments. the second leg is in basel on sunday. the players have done fantastically so far to get to this point. at the end of the day, there's eight countries left in europe and we're the smallest one going into this situation. i see in the squad an opportunity that they don't want to waste but equally, they have done everything so far and i anticipate they will do everything over the next two games to try and make it a reality. england face germany at wembley
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in afreindly tomorrow and brazil next week but gareth southgate has had to contend with some at wembley. the england manager has lost harry kane, harry winks, dele alli, raheem sterling and jordan henderson amongst others to injury. having been a player, i'm not a manager that would suggest we all players out till daybreak. i don't ta ke players out till daybreak. i don't take risks, it is their livelihood. if we were in a cup final or critical game, maybe we would have a really open conversation. but i think, as a manager, you have a duty of care to your players. to make sure things are done correctly. it is the start of the rugby union autumn internationals this weekend. exeter‘s henry slade will start at inside centre for england against argentina on saturday, with owen farrell and maro itoje rested. slade starts alongside jonathanjoseph in the midfield, while in the absence of itoje, george kruis partners
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courtney lawes at lock. head coach eddiejones says it's his side's "most important game this year". that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. iranian state tv has said borisjohnson's recent remarks confirm a british—iranian dual national was spying in the country. the foreign secretary had been criticised for saying that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who has beenjailed in iran, had been training journalists there. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was detained at tehran airport in april 2016. she says her trip was so her three—year—old daughter could meet her grandparents. i'm joined by our diplomatic correspondent caroline hawley. so, iranians the tv basically using
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borisjohnson' so, iranians the tv basically using boris johnson' remarks so, iranians the tv basically using borisjohnson' remarks as proof of some sort of plot by the british government? —— iranian state tv. some sort of plot by the british government? -- iranian state tv. the remarks he made on tuesday, under pressure to apologise, have done nothing to apologise elements of the iranian regime to continue to seize on his remarks and exploit them to the detriment of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who to my understanding had been to iran several times with her daughter gabriella before she was arrested in april last year. the foreign secretary said that the uk government had no doubt she was on holiday at the time, that he accepted his remarks could have been clearer, but still we have iranian state television, which is in the hand of hardliners, that's an important point to make, saying the foreign secretary had unwittingly
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confirmed the words of iranian sources. that's how they put it. you will remember the foreign office put out a statement on tuesday saying the iranian foreign minister had said that boris johnson' the iranian foreign minister had said that borisjohnson' comments had not had an impact on the case, but it is certainly clear that elements within the raid djim are continuing to use his comments against this british iranian mother. —— within the regime. against this british iranian mother. -- within the regime. and arrays in and iranian news industry has described her as one of the secret managers of bbc persia? the situation in iran is very complex. the justice system, if we can call it that, is secretive. the way the iranian government operates is very opaque. we have moderates and hardliners, and nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe caught in the middle. the foreign minister of ron
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saying he hoped to secure her release on humanitarian grounds, but then hardline elements saying she was a spy, we thought that all along, she was notjust innocently visiting to allow her parents to meet her daughter, gabriella. what is borisjohnson meet her daughter, gabriella. what is boris johnson doing meet her daughter, gabriella. what is borisjohnson doing about this currently to try to sort out the situation? i have spoken to the foreign office to find out when that visit he said he would make in the next few weeks would happen. they say they hope it will happen before christmas, borisjohnson needs of these vertigo. he has also said he will meet richard ratcliffe, the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, something the family have wanted the see the past 19 months. but it's only happening now? the foreign office says the meeting will happen before the foreign secretary travels to iran but we do not have a date. thank you. reports from hollywood say
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kevin spacey is to be edited out of a new film six weeks before its release — following the recent allegations of sexual assault. spacey, who plastean paul getty in the thriller, "all the money in the world", will be replaced by the oscar—winning canadian actor, christopher plummer. the release of the film will still go ahead as planned earlier i spoke to the actress valentina violo, who stars in all the money in the world. she told me the decision was right to remove spacey from the film. like kevin spacey as an actor, he's a legend to me. but if they took this decision, then probably it's right. it's an interesting question become because if you think of other
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work he's done that has a huge fan base my house of cards, how do you square watching an actor, whoever it is, with the knowledge of these allegations around their behaviour? i wouldn't think about it, because i would just see the actor, not the person behind. i would see the work he does, the way he gets into the character, the way he is an actor, not the person he is. i met him at the end of the shooting party. i thought he was very nice and kind and very human, he was enjoying himself, drinking, eating, speaking with people. all very fine. joining me now is the film critic jason solomons. did sony have any choice other than to do this? they have a very small window to re—film the scenes? the film industry never ceases to amaze me, they could have cancelled it. movies cost so much to
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make and so much to recoup that it is obviously a financial disaster if they completely mix their movie. this was coming on december 22 in the us, prime time, in the uk later injanuary, the us, prime time, in the uk later in january, january four, still scheduled to so. if they can com plete scheduled to so. if they can complete this with a new actor, that will be an extraordinary feat of technical wizardry. the moral thing about it is there's obviously an place in the awards season. i do not think this film will now be an awards contender, so publicity campaigns will have been kicking into action, here's another publicity campaign, a limitation campaign where the film will now get publicity probably before they wa nted publicity probably before they wanted it to all the wrong reasons. one feels sorry for christopher plummer having to come into this without, that double—edged sword, i'm fascinated to see this movie. it will be extraordinary. if we look at netflix and its reaction, vis—a—vis
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house of cards, you can see how the industry, with this string of allegations and these allegations continuing to grow, in number, the industry is looking at kevin spacey and saying, a star, but we can't work with him, it's not comfortable for us to work with him. you know, stars stars because they come with iconography in connections and talent, they bring audiences to your film, that's why they get paid big money because kevin spacey in your movie, great, oscarwinner, loads of fans, that will sell your movie. now it's the opposite, it is toxic, can't have him anywhere near the movie, on the poster, even associated with it. obviously with this, he will be forever associated with this movie. one of his great performances, and he set a lot of store by this performance, it will be expunged. hollywood is doing this now, it used to be you could
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separate the man and the behaviour from the art, let's say, from the work. now that is no longer possible, we have seen that with harvey weinstein how peaceful have recently said, let's remove him, expansion from history. i think people are uncomfortable, they don't know what to do in terms of that, pr people, spacey ‘s publicists gave up. damage limitation people, spin doctors, kicked in, studios used to know what to do with their properties. now we see a near panic, a moral panic of some sort. people do not quite know what to do.” guess they don't know the answer to the question as whether audiences will still want to watch tv programmes films with kevin spacey them. you mentioned harvey weinstein as well, do you think this really is as well, do you think this really is a watershed moment for the industry? it's clearly a huge panic. things are falling, it feels like the fall of the roman empire, old technologies being mustered, ridley scott who directed this film has
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done this before. oliver reed died while they were making gladiator, a ridley scott film russell crowe who went on to win oscars, they digitise the rest of his performance in. this happens usually when actors die. it's almost a hollywood turning their back on kevin spacey. he is dead to them, from the allegations of the scandal, none of them proved yet or particularly work through. the instant mode the world is in now, with netflix and how quickly you can turn things around, normally films take years. are they going to make a new film of a new star in six weeks and still have it ready? things are changing rapidly and reactions are changing rapidly as well, to what has been a century—old artform, it is changing as we see it in response to events outside of that bubble. it's a fascinating time. hollywood is entering into territory it has no control over and this is panicking even the highest echelons of the studio, like sony. very interesting to get your
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thoughts, thank you. the welsh first minister is to meet labour assembly members to explain how he handled allegations of inappropriate behaviour against a minister who was laterfound dead. carl sargeant, who had been suspended by labour and sacked from carwynjones' cabinet, is believed to have taken his own life on tuesday. mrjones is due to make a statement following the meeting. let's speak to our correspondent tomos morgan who is in cardiff. do we know any more about how the rest of the day will unfold, with regards to what mrjones is going to be saying and doing? as you mentioned, he will be coming to cardiff bay, to the assembly, to discuss the events of the last week with fellow labour assembly members. it is understood, while there are claims that some of those assembly members are angry with the way that mr sargent was dealt with, with regards to the allegations against
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him, there is anger in the constituency from where he is from. in north wales, and alan and deeside, the family also understandably are angry with the process that took place and have called for an independent review. he is facing concerns from within his own party about the way he dealt with this situation. one former assembly member, a former ally of ca rwyn assembly member, a former ally of carwyn jones, assembly member, a former ally of carwynjones, a former assembly member, a former ally of carwyn jones, a former cabinet minister, leighton andrews, said yesterday that he was angry and also was not happy with the fact that ca rwyn was not happy with the fact that carwyn jones had was not happy with the fact that carwynjones had been conducting media interviews on the situation, the monday before, it is understood carl sa rg ea nt the monday before, it is understood carl sargeant took his life. as you mentioned, he will be coming down here later, carwynjones, to speak to labour assembly members to
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discuss the issue. business in the assembly has been suspended. this week, due to what has happened. as you mentioned, mrjones will release a statement later. there is wide speculation on what might be in that statement. we have no details at the moment, of what may be in it. thank you for that. asummary of a summary of the headlines in a merit but first, the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. we've been on quite a journey with the weather this week, some wet weather, some sunny weather, some relatively mild weather, some relatively mild weather and as we head towards the weekend, the focus will be on rather cold weather. for most of us, today's relatively mild, disappointingly cloudy across parts of the south. we will see the cloud struggling to break up across southern areas, particularly in the south—east, where there will be spots of rain. furthermore, sunshine and heavy showers blowing into
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northern scotland on a fairly brisk wind. this evening and overnight, dry and clear in the south for a time but cloud and rain will splash in from the north—west and then the skies clear again across northern half of the country with showers, wintry showers overly high ground of scotla nd wintry showers overly high ground of scotland and over the highest level routes, there should delete macro could be icy stretches tomorrow morning. tomorrow, the process of clearing the cloud from the south should happen more quickly than today, with a fair amount of sunshine, still some showers in the north and north—west, clouding over with rain into the far west later in the day and as we head into the weekend, rain to clear away first, then a mixture of sunshine and showers and it will feel quite a lot colder. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. theresa may is considering who should replace the leading brexit supporter priti patel, who resigned as international development secretary last night. she stepped down over undeclared meetings with israeli officials. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, will issue a statement later, following criticism
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of his handling of harassment allegations against the sacked minister, carl sargeant, who is believed to have killed himself. official figures have revealed that thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme, prevent. the actor kevin spacey is being edited out of a completed film after a string of sexual harassment allegations against him. his scenes in all the money in the world will be re—shot with another actor. it's the second consecutive thursday that the prime minister is preparing to replace one of her cabinet ministers. last week, she needed a new defence secretary. this week, she needs a new international development secretary. this comes after a series of unauthorised meetings priti patel had with israeli officials and politicians and not being straight about how many there were. in a letter to theresa may issued after they met last
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night, priti patel says: . the episode has left theresa may's government underfire from critics and commentators. and this is how some news organisations view her predicament this morning, obviously with considerable speculation about what happens next. this report comes from our diplomatic correspondent james landale, who explains how it went so badly wrong for priti patel. this story is all about a family holiday to israel by priti patel, the international development secretary, that went terribly wrong. a holiday where the lines between her public life and her private life became blurred. the correct way of doing business within government didn't happen, and had extraordinary consequences
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for the british government. so what happened was this. in august, priti patel went on holiday to israel. it was a 12, 13—day holiday. for around two days, priti patel decided to do a bit of work. she had a very busy schedule packed in for her, no fewer than 12 separate engagements over those two days. now, the international development secretary, priti patel, has apologised after admitting meeting the israeli prime minister binyamin netanyahu. it is quite extraordinary that priti patel, a cabinet minister, met binyamin netanyahu, the head of the government for another country, secretly, without telling anybody. relationships between governments are incredibly fine—tuned, and meetings are calibrated and they‘ re prepared for, and ministers know what messages they want to get across and what they're going to receive. if you have a sort of rogue elephant storming through this process having secret meetings, then the potential for errors,
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for mixed messages, for the israeli government doing one thing and the british government doing another thing, or even the israeli government and another government minister deciding to do one thing to try and influence the british government. i mean, this is a really, really complicated place to be, and it's why, i think, that there were so many eyes raised when it emerged that priti patel had met binyamin netanyahu. james landale, there. joining me now is the executive director of the british foreign policy group, tom cargill. thank you forjoining us. what is your view when we look at priti patel and her actions and boris johnson and his remarks and how they are being viewed in iran must remark what is your view in totality of how british foreign policy looks at the moment? i think it is a domestic as much as an international challenge.
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there's clearly a lack of common understanding at the very highest level sometimes about what the international position of the uk is. if that is being communicated so poorly sometimes between colleagues, you have to be concerned about the broader communication for all of the rest of us in the uk about where is the uk going and what is it international position? do you sink in respect of priti patel and what she did that the government needs to have a clearer strategy that takes into account all aspects of international activity when a minister goes and has meetings with some are although many would argue it was pretty clear before priti patel had her meetings? sure, we are publishing a report tomorrow that says the problem goes far deeper than that, this is notjust about government. so many parts of the uk now have really important international dimensions to their work, whether they are devolved administrations, businesses, charities, there's many aspects to
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this now in this increasingly networked age and unless there is much more of a national conversation about the international position and profile, things could go very wrong, very quickly, particularly as we leave the eu. on that point, how important is it, even more important, to have that coherent and comprehensive strategy as the uk prepares for brexit? it is absolutely critical, as you have said in the pieces earlier and as lord ricketts said, the eyes of the world a re lord ricketts said, the eyes of the world are upon us right now, there isa world are upon us right now, there is a real concern about the position of the uk, domestically and internationally. ourargument of the uk, domestically and internationally. our argument is actually the uk has huge numbers of assets, a lot of reason to be confident about the future but we have to start aligning the assets more coherently and talking much more coherently and talking much more publicly about where the uk is going and how we are going to get public support for that, and what kind of priorities we will set between development interests and broader diplomatic interests. where
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are these tensions and, might is going to come? the former head of the diplomatic service, lord ricketts told me earlier that he's never been more worried than he is now about how britain is viewed abroad and with regard to boris johnson, he said he needed to step up johnson, he said he needed to step up and demonstrate a much clearer grip on the brief of being foreign secretary. you of course know about the latest developments with iran saying that borisjohnson's remarks we re saying that borisjohnson's remarks were an unintended explanation, proof of some sort of a british plot in iran. should borisjohnson really be in thejob? orange micro well, for me, i think the thing we should not get away from is that it is iran is holding this woman. holding this woman prisonerfor is holding this woman. holding this woman prisoner for no apparent reason for as can tell. iran has got form in harassing journalists and theirfamilies form in harassing journalists and their families elsewhere. i completely, i think borisjohnson has accepted he has made a mistake. it certainly speaks to a need for us to be more coordinated and careful
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about our international strategy but i don't think we should forget that the fault lies with iran as much as anyone. do you think it is going to be tougher to work for the release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe as a result of this? surely it must be?” don't know is the honest answer. it certainly does not help. but iran has to be the one to decide what kind of message it wants to be sending out to the world about its support or otherwise human rights. we were just chatting briefly before we started this interview and you said in the world of foreign policy, sometimes it can take a very long time to build up a position but it can go very wrong, very time to build up a position but it can go very wrong, very quickly, so clearly these policies, these positions, these relationships that have built up with other countries, these are things to be nurtured and handled very carefully? absolutely
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and the frustration and the opportunities, the uk has an incredible track record of doing this, and it would be an absolute... we are at a real inflection point in our history and it would be a tragedy if we threw so much of that away right at the point when we need all of those assets the most. thank you forjoining us. tom cargill, the executive director of the british foreign policy group. let's cross live now to downing street for the latest news on the appointment of priti patel‘s replacement in the cabinet. when we see someone walking up the street as we did this day last week when the replacement for michael fallon was announced, we will be back their live to bring you news of who the new minister will be. it is all very quiet in downing street at the moment, though but we're expecting it to change quite soon. after talks in beijing,
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president trump and his chinese counterpart xi jinping have said they would work together to solve the crisis over north korea's nuclear weapons. president trump said he hoped china would act faster and more effectively, saying it was uniquely placed to "solve this problem easily". the presidents also pledged to improve trade relations. let's listen to a bit of what each leader had to say. we discussed our mutual commitment to the complete denuclearisation of north korea. we agreed not to replicate failed approaches of the past and there were many. we agreed on the need to fully implement all un security council resolutions on north korea and to increase economic pressure until north korea abandons its reckless and dangerous path. all
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responsible nations mustjoin together to stop arming and financing and even trading with the murderous north korean regime. translation: in agreement by our businesses, during this visit, the two sides signed over $250 billion of commercial deals and two way investment agreements. according to china's timetable and road map for opening up, china has announced a numberof opening up, china has announced a number of steps to promote market access. this speaks volumes of the broad space for further economic and trade cooperation between the two countries which will deliver great benefits to the two peoples. we agreed to expand, exchange and dialogue between the two militaries at various levels. thousands of children and teenagers
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have been flagged up to the government's anti—terror programme, prevent, according to official figures released this morning. more than 2,000 of those referred to the scheme in 2015/16 were under the age of 15, including more than 500 girls. another 2,000 more reported for potential intervention were aged between 15 and 20. only a small percentage of referrals were deemed suitable to receive sufficient support. prevent aims to reduce the threat to the uk by stopping people being drawn into terrorism. but it has sometimes been controversial. with me now is our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani. for the viewers, first of all, let's look ina for the viewers, first of all, let's look in a bit more detail at what prevent is, reminders of how and when it was set up. a lot of people don't understand how it works really and there's a lot of controversy around it. the simplest way of describing it is it is similar to social services intervention, at the most controversial and you could suggest it is some kind of spying
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which is one of the accusations so in practice what happens is that under a legal duty, somebody like a teacher who has concerns about the mindset of a student, for instance, who may be saying something which sounds like they are supporting terrorism in the classroom or perhaps some other setting or police have picked up from the community, that individual‘s case will be referred to a local panel which involves education experts, psychologists and so forth and they will look at what this person has been saying or doing and try to work out whether this person is getting drawn into terrorism. at that point, similartoa drawn into terrorism. at that point, similar to a social services intervention where somebody needs safeguarding, to use the jargon, a decision will be taken about whether they can support the individual, such as through educational men touring. a good example will be, there have been cases where there have been young people in schools who are having a troubled time at home because of divorce or something like that, they start acting up at school, they are saying things which sounds violent, and it turned out they are nothing to do with terrorism or extremism but it is what is happening in light is coming
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up what is happening in light is coming up through this process and prevent tries to weed the people they need to be terribly concerned with. said this is the first eat other analysis by the home office of prevent and just take us through these statistics. the headline figure we already knew, we knew there were about 7500 referrals in the year to april 2016 and we think this year's figures will be a lot higher but we are still waiting for them. what is interesting is where the referrals are coming from, more than half the people referred under the age of 20, education has provided the largest number of tip—off to the prevent system which probably stands to reason because teachers now have a duty to alert authorities to what is going on. quite a few coming up through the community and friends and family, about 10% of the referrals. the vast majority involved is alarmist, jihadist ideology, about 10% are far right, -- is ideology, about 10% are far right, —— is islamist, jihadist ideology. but the buzz majority of cases
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dismissed ta banelli stage but the buzz majority of cases dismissed tabanelli stage all the individual needs help like psychological support or educational men touring or some other complicating factor. 1000 of the cases are referred on to channel, the government's deradicalisation scheme for people who are showing concerning mindset where the government is concerned about what they will do. of those, only 400 went into the most intensive scheme at the end of the day where they we re at the end of the day where they were sat down with a mental who really challenge the way they were thinking. the government said today, it is the first time we have heard this figure, that three quarters of the cases in 2016 were a success, they managed to get people out the other end, in a better state than they entered and they are therefore no longer a threat to themselves and others. but a quarter... 63 people who were put through the scheme withdrew their cooperation and walked away for whatever reason and thatis walked away for whatever reason and that is the mystery, what happened to them? are they still a danger? we've pressed the government for more clarity on this but i don't think it will come at the moment because in those kind of cases, you
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are looking at the ball right on the edge of getting involved in terrorism. but interesting to follow up. thank you forjoining us. police forces in england and wales are struggling to meet demand, due to a surge in the number of calls from members of the public. a survey by the policing watchdog says the service is under "significa nt stress" because of budget cuts, although it says forces could help by making further efficiencies. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. if you report a crime, this is where your call is dealt with. the control room. it is the nerve centre of police operations. there are more than 8 million 999 calls every year, with millions of others on the non—emergency number, 101. the inspectorate of constabulary says that police are struggling to cope. it blames problems retaining control room staff and an overreliance on outdated technology. some requests for police to deal with crimes, including criminal damage and assault, go unanswered. in devon and cornwall, many callers hang up because they have to wait so long. the control rooms are right at
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the heart of what police forces do. the focus on getting that right is really important for chief constables, and we encourage them to continue with this. the report into police efficiency says the service is under significant stress. it says forces will spend 6% less on policing in the next three years and will lose more than 4,000 officers and staff from the police workforce. that is why many chief constables say they need extra resources to deal with the increased demand. mike cunningham says it would be a good thing for police to have more money, but he says the service needs to show the benefits extra funding will bring, and he says there is scope for forces to use their existing resources more efficiently. danny shaw, bbc news. news coming into us from our europe correspondent who is reporting that the european union's chief brexit
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negotiator, michel barnier, has said it is high time to clarify the essential principles of an exit deal with the uk. he tweeted this remark as eu negotiators meet for round six of the talks in brussels with michel barnier and david davis due tojoin the discussions tomorrow. you may remember that eu leaders have said they need to see progress in the negotiations in the next few weeks, if they are to give the go—ahead at the upcoming summit in decemberfor the upcoming summit in decemberfor the next phase of brexit negotiations to go ahead so time is very short, which michel barnier is reminding everybody off. exactly 20 years ago today, the bbc news channel went on airfor the first time, as news 24. since then it's covered major events including the air france concorde crash.
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we are now the most watched news channel in the uk and this year became the rts news channel of the year. nick higham reports. hello and welcome for the first onto bbc news 24. i'm gavin esler. i'm sarah montague. november 9th, 1997 and bbc news 24 goes on air. for the first time bbc viewers did not have to wait for the news at six or nine. it was available on tap. i was hoping it would just become something people would turn on when they wanted to know the news. why should we tell them when they had to sit i thought it would be a true utility and therefore, once we'd started, it would never go off air. was that what happened? it went off air almost immediately because of technical difficulties! the computers didn't work. the technology failing us, pictures cutting, going to black, freezing, the wrong pictures coming up, us as presenters having to explain what was going on, why it was going on,
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apologising a lot. it took time but they did overcome the technical problems. you may have heard that air france... jane hill, the only original presenter still on the channel, remembers the day it came of age, when an air france concorde crashed in paris injuly 2000. that story was so big, it was the first time we were put, we were simulcast, and the channel ran on bbc one or bbc two because the controllers of the big national channels took the view this was such a big, unexpected story, the audience appetite wanted to watch that story unfold. we have some remarkable pictures coming in from new york which we can go to now. since then, the channel has covered many major stories. some breaking news, reports coming in of an explosion at liverpool street station here in london. the london fire brigade has confirmed they are dealing with this serious fire in a tower block at latimer road in west london. the british people have spoken and the answer is, we are out.
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indeed, the past 18 months has seen some of the biggest news in the channel's history. details of a potentially serious incident coming to us from various news agencies of two people shot outside the westminster parliament. at least 50 people have died and more than 200 are injured after a gunman opens fire on a country music festival in las vegas. we are going to get to work immediately for the american people. and sometimes, things go wrong, like that time a man called guy, who had gone for a job interview, was mistaken for a technology expert called guy and put on set. he bravely tried to answer the question anyway. good morning. were you surprised by this verdict today? i'm very surprised to see this verdict, to come to me. 20 years ago, the bbc also launched news on the web. it started modestly but soon grew rapidly, deliberately trying to appeal
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to a new, younger audience. the idea was that online would start to reintroduce young people to news, because they were using computers and it was so successful that very soon, it became difficult technically to keep up with the demand, because it was being pumped down victorian copper telephone lines, basically! these days, online and digital services are at the heart of the bbc newsroom. there's been a fundamental shift in the way people get their news, often through social media like twitter and facebook. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. even so, the appetite for tv news channels has not disappeared. the bbc still reaches 7 million people per week. nick higham, bbc news. and at 5:30pm, we will be reliving some of the moments where the news channel first went on air 20 years
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ago. join us for that. in a moment the news at one. first the weather. good afternoon. we've had plenty of twists and turns in the weather journey this week. we've had some rain, sunshine, fog, mild weather and the final destination of the journey, certainly as we head into the weekend, is we will see some cold air plunging southwards, right across the country. that cold air is already flirting with parts of scotland, quite chilly feel but bright for our weather watchers in aberdeenshire. further south in devon, quite a lot of cloud around, certainly for the start of the day, which has been quite reluctant to clear but the last of it well as we finish the afternoon and as we head into the evening, some clear spells for a time into the evening, some clear spells fora time in into the evening, some clear spells for a time in the south—east with the odd patch of fog and then more cloud on the north—west and then the skies clear out again and we will see some showers into north of scotland, wintry showers over high ground and over some of the
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high—level routes, there could be some icy stretches to take us into tomorrow morning. this is how we start friday, with a lot of cloud and patchy rain across the south of england. it will look and feel quite similarto england. it will look and feel quite similar to how it was this morning but come further north into wales, the midlands, things should brighten up the midlands, things should brighten up quite smartly with some spells of sunshine, decent start to the data in northern england, just the odd shower into north—west england and the northern ireland and scotland, spells of sunshine but plentiful showers, ridiculously in the northern half of scotland, wintry over high ground and quite windy as well. the cloud in the south should clear away quite quickly during tomorrow and for many, a lot of brightness around and some spells of sunshine, still some showers across the northern half of the country, thenit the northern half of the country, then it clouds over from the west later. holding onto some mild air in the south, 14 in the channel islands but just six the south, 14 in the channel islands butjust six in aberdeen, cold air starting to make its presence felt. this wriggling weather front will bring rain across central and
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southern areas at the start of the weekend but the main story is the cold air, the white lines, the isobars coming all from the north, the north—westerly wind filtering that cold air southwards across the country and bringing some showers into northern and western coastal areas particularly. still mild in the south and cold in the north and for sunday, remembrance sunday, a northerly wind bringing cold air all the way southwards and also at this stage, some showers down the east coast but for many, it will be largely dry with spells of sunshine. a mixture of sunshine and showers to ta ke a mixture of sunshine and showers to take this into the weekend with a colder feel. another reshuffle is underway in westminster as the prime minister considers who to bring in to replace priti patel as international development secretary. she was forced to resign yesterday after a series of unsanctioned meetings with israeli politicians over the summer. her successor is expected to be named within the hour. we'll have the latest from westminster. also this lunchtime: a woman has been arrested on suspicion of neglect in connection with an investigation into sussex healthcare. more than 2000 children under 15
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were referred to the government's anti—terrorism programme, prevent, in just a year according to new figures. the father of a man who died after his ex girlfriend allegedly threw acid at him breaks down in court as he describes his son's injuries. edited out after a string of assault allegations — kevin spacey is being replaced in a hollywood film
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