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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  November 9, 2017 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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very much in keeping you make of it? very much in keeping with the written statement that he's issued since carl with the written statement that he's issued since ca rl sa rgea nt with the written statement that he's issued since carl sargeant was found dead at his home in north—east wales on tuesday morning. as he said in the statement, he was my friend, we are all grieving, these are the darkest days for this institution, the welsh government, also the welsh assembly, but most of all for the family. it was interesting to note that he said look, there are answers that he said look, there are answers that need to be sought, that will come out during the inquest and if they don't come out during the inquest he will endeavour to make sure they are brought out into the open afterwards. he's not stepping down, he will continue. there is a process under way and he believes it has been undertaken properly. it's very sad and tragic to be institution, to the family, what has happened, but they have taken the steps and it's right and proper the
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process is gone through now. labour said the exact allegations of the nature of the details that carl sa rg ea nt nature of the details that carl sargeant and his family were looking for when not going to be forthcoming for when not going to be forthcoming for quite some time. under the rule book of the labour party, when allegations of a sexual nature are made, both parties need to provide written statements and then the accused received the exact nature of the allegations so that was going to come in time. there have been questions about the first minister's conduct in all of this, for example why the labour party initiated this independent inquiry last friday after he was sacked from the welsh government and the labour party initiated that, why then did carwyn jones on monday of this week to a round of interviews in which he spoke about those allegations. the
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family's solicitor had accused him of prejudicing the inquiry by giving those interviews. the welsh assembly said it's important the first minister answers to questions. he said there has been some inaccuracy in the media, that will come out as the process goes under way, but that they should let things take their course. it's been a tough time for the welsh government, the first minister and the family of course. he's been under a lot of pressure, many thought he would step down and it's been an easy ride for carwyn jones so far, this has been his greatest test, and from the statement he issued this afternoon he continues to serve as first minister and he once this process to be seen through properly now. many thanks for the latest and there will be more later on, we know. today at five...
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the second cabinet reshuffle in the space of a week, children as young as nine are among the thousands being referred to the government's anti—radicalisation programme. the actor kevin spacey will be edited out of a hollywood movie, due for release within weeks, following more allegations of sexual assault. welcome to bbc news 24.
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and on its 20th birthday, the bbc news channel looks back to news 24. we'll be talking to the man who launched it. it's 5.00pm. our main story is the limited cabinet reshuffle — the second in the space of a week forced on the prime minister. she's promoted penny mordaunt to the cabinet to become international development secretary replacing priti patel, who resigned last night after admitting a series of unauthorised meetings with senior israelis. penny mordaunt was a minister in the work and pensions department and, like priti patel, she had campaigned for brexit in last year's referendum and her appointment maintains the balance between leavers and remainers in the cabinet. 0ur political correspondent
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reports from westminster. another day, another new face in government. penny mordaunt propelled into the job of international development secretary after priti patel‘s fall from grace. a leave supporter, like her predecessor, with ministerial experience, penny mordaunt‘s appointment retains the delicate balance in theresa may's cabinet. i think it is a good appointment. penny is somebody who has a lot of experience. she's worked in an international department before as an armed forces minister. she's very capable and i've no doubt she will do an excellentjob. this clean—up forced on the prime minister after a chaotic week with two senior ministers forced to resign within days. now there's pressure on theresa may to get her government back on track. reporter: morning, mr davis. a bit early for that. how damaging is all this for the government? as the rest of her cab.net, like the brexit secretary and fresh faces like the new chief whip, try to get on with theirjobs.
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in the end, priti patel had to go, out after admitting she'd failed to tell the prime minister about all her secret meetings with israeli politicians. in her resignation letter the now former international development secretary said... "my actions fell below the standards of transparency and openness that i've promoted and advocated. i offer a fulsome apology to you and the government." theresa may told miss patel... "when we met on monday i was glad to accept your apology, but now that further details have come to light, it's right that you have decided to resign." the cabinet had been carefully composed of brexiteers and remainers, men and women. this morning there was sympathy for some for the former secretary of state, but the focus now is on whether her replacement can bring stability back to theresa may's top team. leila nathoo, bbc news, westminster. 0ur political correspondent, vicki young, is in downing street. before we come on to the wider scene
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is, will this make any difference to the way that international development is run?|i the way that international development is run? i think that is unlikely. penny mordaunt, unlike many of her predecessors has experience in this field, but i think the real question about the international aid budget has always beenin international aid budget has always been in law of course 0.7% of the output of the british economy has to be spent on overseas aid and in some quarters that isn't popular. there is no suggestion that penny mordaunt is no suggestion that penny mordaunt is likely to try to change any of that in anyway. what priti patel was working on was trying to make it an efficient process, that money was going to the most deserving to the right places. i'm sure penny mordaunt will continue in that vain. let us look at the government itself. we have talked a lot about the balance within cabinet. what do you make of today? what has changed then well, i think in many ways what theresa may has done here is to keep
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this as limited ed as possible. in the broader spectrum, really, she's replaced like with like. she kept the gender balance in the cabinet, which theresa may feels strongly about. 0n which theresa may feels strongly about. on that crucial issue of course of brexit, that delicate balance between those on the leave and those on the remain side of the referendum campaign, it stays the same. i think that is important, certainly for many conservative mps who felt priti patel was a strong voice, voicing what they believe will feel they have that to a certain extent with penny mordaunt. theresa may with other ministers under investigation after accusations of bad behaviour, she will be hoping that this is the last cabinet reshuffle or move that is forced upon her because, don't forget, this is the second cabinet
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minister in one week that she has lost. she will want to look towards the brexit talks and in two weeks' timea the brexit talks and in two weeks' time a budget. thank you very much. while westminster is gripped by the events of the past 2a hours, the latest round of brexit negotiaitons is getting under way in brussels. it's the sixth time that uk and eu officials have come together to try to make some progress and, as ever, it's the financial settlement that is proving to be one of the main sticking points. the so—called divorce payment. the eu has warned that the talks can't move to the next phase without an agreement on money. the brexit secretary david davis and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier willjoin the negotiations tomorrow. 0ur correspondent, damian grammaticas, is in brussels. 0n the latest evidence or lack of it things are moving forward? huw, from what we can see, what we can tell, not moving very far at all. if you look at the facts, instead of a week
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of negotiations, as we've had on many of the weeks before, we've had a day today and then the michel barnier and david davis will turn up tomorrow. they have not been here today. they were taking part at the start of the negotiations in many of the previous rounds. all of that signals the fact that the two sides have very little at the minute around which they really feel they can focus their negotiations. they are talking about having technical talks today. that is different from the sort of big substantial points which are the things that are outstanding now. the technical talks can only get them so far. the big issues, money, and the eu want the uk to spell out what it will commit to in uk to spell out what it will commit toina uk to spell out what it will commit to in a financial settlement and issues on citizens rights as well. the legal guarantees and the like. the legal guarantees and the like. the dynamics of these talks, now that we know that tomorrow they will
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bejoined by mr barnier and david davis. to what extent is any momentum now down to these two individuals or are the teams around them the ones trying to settle this technical detail? huw, if you listen to what eu sources are say, they say that the difficulty, or the issue is not here. they view the issue as being a political one in the uk and that they feel that the reason the talks are not moving political decisions in the uk have not been made about how far to go, like the financial settlement, which is why progress isn't being made here. the eu signalling it needs or wants a nswe i’s eu signalling it needs or wants a nswers fairly eu signalling it needs or wants answers fairly quickly. it means two to three weeks, by the end of november, if this process is going to start to show positive signs in the eu's view, which would enable the eu's view, which would enable the leaders of eu countries, the 27
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other leaders to say at their nexting summit in december that they will roll the talks forward into the next phase. that is the transition, the outlines of a future deal. but that a phase and that decision won't happen unless we get movement here. the present signs are there has been nothing to shift things forward. thank you very much. that was the latest there in brussels. thousands of children and teenagers have been flagged up to the government's anti——terror programme in the past year according to the first official figures. the prevent programme aims to reduce the threat to the uk by stopping people being drawn into terrorism. in total more than 7,000 were referred — a quarter of them were under the age of 15.
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in one case a nine—year—old boy from london was helped by the prevent programme after he stood up in class and said he supported so—called islamic state. it turned out he had been watching their propaganda online. sima kotecha reports. preventing terror attacks is a top priority for the government, that is why it has something called channel, a programme designed to stop people being drawn into violent or extremist behaviour. the extreme right wing will use inler missed narratives... i try to work holistic way to understand the individual, to see how i can best help them, not only with an ideological risk or vulnerability but also understanding their particular personal circumstances so we can identify what the challenges are, what the susceptibilities are and improve that persons opportunity, potentially getting them into education, employment, these kind of areas. today's figures show over the last year
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more than 7,000 people were put forward for help after showing signs of extremism. more than 1,000 of them were assessed for inclusion in the programme. almost 400 then received specialist support, but 63 of them stopped cooperating. the programme is voluntary and those who were referred to it are under no obligation to engage. a lot of youngsters are being radicalised as well due to their vulnerability to drugs. a charity based in birmingham and partly funded by the home office reaches two men outside mosques. fake drugs are displayed on a stall. we want people to come here and talk to is about vulnerabilities they might have which might be radicalisation or homelessness or drug dependency and that is something we are trying to reach out to them to get help. channel hasn't been without its critics, there are some who argue it targets particular communities and create suspicion around them.
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there are also questions about how effective it really is and how those who were put through the programme are later monitored. and there are serious concerns about what happens to those who refuse help. the good news from the figures today is that over 350 people who were really on track to be violent extremists and terrorists etc have been diverted away from that cause. -- course. that means we are safer as a result. the uk threat level remains at severe and that means the effectiveness of the government ‘s counterterrorism strategy is crucial. this is bbc news at five, the headlines: penny mordaunt has been appointed as the new international development secretary. she replaces priti patel who resigned last night over undeclared meetings with israeli officials. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, has defended his
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handling of the misconduct allegations against carl sargeant, the labour politician who's thought to have taken his own life. the actor kevin spacey is being edited out of a completed film after a string of sexual harassment allegations against him. his scenes in ‘all the money in the world' will be re—shot with another actor. hello will kick-off in belfast fast approaching. two—and—a—half hours away. northern ireland haven't been toa away. northern ireland haven't been to a world cup since 1986. they have a real chance to get one foot into russia 2018. michael o'neill's side face switzerland. they made it to the euros in france when they reached the knockout stage. if they get past the swiss over two legs it will be the first time they have qualified for back—to—back major tournaments. the second leg is in basel on sunday. the players have done fantastically so the players have done fantastically so far to get to this point. at the end of the day, you know, there are eight countries left in europe. we
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are the smallest one going into this situation. i see in the squad an opportunity that they don't want to waste, but equally, you know, i think that, you know, they've done everything so far. i anticipate they will do everything over the next two games to try and make it a reality. elsewhere today, england failed to capitalise on a good start with the bat on day one of their women's ashes test against australia they closed on 235—7 in the four—day match, the first women's day—night test. beaumont made 70 and knigh got 62. australia lead 4—2 in the multi format series. they will retain the arns ashes if they win this test. honours even at they win this test. honours even at the end of the day. it's been a really good competition between bat and ball. heather and myself are going nicely. we could have looked to kick on a little bit. australia
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fought back well in the last session under lights. the start of the rugby union autumn internationals. team news, eddiejones union autumn internationals. team news, eddie jones has union autumn internationals. team news, eddiejones has shaken things up. he has gone for a change in their opener against argentina at twickenham. slade starting at inside centre. farrell is being rested. leigh halfpenny is recalled at full—back. that is all the sport for 110w. full—back. that is all the sport for now. sportsday, 6. 6.30pm. see you then. thank you very much. see you later on. 20 years ago today, in november 1997,
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the bbc launched two brand new services — one was called news 24, a 24—hour television news service, we're now called the bbc news channel and the other was bbc news 0nline. it was a very different world, just 8 million people had access to the internet in the uk in 1997, today it's more than 60 million. nick higham reports on two decades of news on demand. hello and welcome for the first to bbc news 24. i'm gavin esler. and i'm sarah montague. november 9th, 1997, and bbc news 24 goes on air. for the first time bbc viewers didn't have to wait for the news at six or nine.
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it was available on tap. i was hoping it would just become something people would turn on when they wanted to know the news. why should we tell them when they had to sit down and watch the news? i thought it would be a true utility and therefore, once we'd started, it would never go off air. was that what happened? it went off air almost immediately because of technical difficulties! the computers didn't work. the pictures turning the black, the wrong picture coming up, us having to explain why it was happening. it took time, but they did overcome the technical problems. you may have heard that air france... jane hill, the only original presenter still on the channel, remembers the day it came of age, when an air france concorde crashed in paris, injuly 2000. that story was so big, it was the first time that we were simulcast, and the channel ran on bbc one or bbc two, because the controllers of those big national channels took the view this was such a big, unexpected story, the audience appetite wanted to watch that story unfold. we have some remarkable pictures coming in from new york, which we can go to now. since then, the channel has covered many major stories. some breaking news... reports are just coming in of an explosion at liverpool street station here in london.
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london fire brigade has confirmed they are dealing with this serious fire in a tower block at latimer road, in west london. the british people have spoken and the answer is, we're out. the past 18 months have seen some of the biggest stories in the channel's history. details of a potentially serious incident coming to us from various news agencies of two people shot outside the westminster parliament. at least 50 people have died and more than 200 are injured after a gunman opens fire on a country music festival in las vegas. we're going to get to work immediately for the american people. and then the time a man called guy came for a job interview and inadvertently ended up on air. the bbc also launched
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news on the web. it was deliberately trying to appeal to a new, younger audience. the idea was that online would start to reintroduce young people to news because they were using computers and it was so successful that very soon it became difficult technically to keep up with the demand, because it was being pumped down victorian copper telephone lines, basically. these days, online and digital services sit at the heart of the bbc‘s newsroom. there has been a fundamental shift in the way that people get their news, often through social media like twitter and facebook. good afternoon. i'm simon mccoy. even so, the appetite for the new channel hasn't disappeared, the bbc still reaches 7 million people a week. a flavour of what has gone over the
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last 20 years. we will look back at two decades of 24—hour television news and talk to the man whose initiative it was topee hall, we will ask him what his memories are and how the service fits into today's news landscape. that is in the next hour or so. —— tony. the first minister of wales, ca rwyn tony. the first minister of wales, carwyn jones, has tony. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, has been defending his handling of the allegations of misconduct against carl sargeant, the labour politician, the former labour minister in wales, who is thought to have taken his own life earlier this week after being sacked from the welsh government last week. mrjones said he had no alternative to doing what he did and this he'd fold the rules by the book, he said. anotherformer labour minister leighton andrews
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has alleged that mr sargeant was a victim of a culture of bullying and spoke of a "toxic atmosphere" among ministers and officials in cardiff bay. mr sargeant‘s family say he was never given details of the allegations against him and couldn't defend himself. i'm speaking to you this evening at an awful time for everyone. i want to talk about carl and his family. we were all very shocked by what happened last week, there is great hurt, anger and bewilderment. carl was my friend. in all the years that i knew was my friend. in all the years that iknew him, was my friend. in all the years that i knew him, i never had a cross word with him. i never argued with him. for 14 years we worked together. he was a great chief whip and a minister who served his country with
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distinction. i'm sure we can all agree that it is difficult to conceive of what bernie and the family must be going through at the moment. there are a lot of inaccuracies in the press and many of you will have questions to ask about what happened last week. everybody is grieving and it's not appropriate for me to get into precise detail. these are matter for the future. things that will need to be properly disclosed through what should be a coroner's inquest. as they will, in all probability be an inquest, i and they will, in all probability be an inquest, iand my they will, in all probability be an inquest, i and my team will of course be co—operating fully with any questions that are raised there. the family deserve to have their questions answered and if that isn't possible through an inquest, then i will endeavour to make sure that
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happens through other means. there isa happens through other means. there is a legal process to go through. i'm obviously acting within that, but i welcome the scrutiny of my actions in the future and it's appropriate for that to be done independently i properly did all that i could to make sure that everything was being done by the back. i had no alternative but to ta ke back. i had no alternative but to take the action that i did, and i hope that people will understand that. but carl was a true force of a nyway that. but carl was a true force of anyway nature. he drove through more legislation than any other minister, not just through force of argument, but through sheer force of personality and persuasion. wales has lost a person of great warmth, ability and charisma. these are the
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darkest days that any of us can remember in this institution, but they are darkest of all for the family and we must respect their right to grieve in peace at this time. thank you. that was carwyn jones, the first minister of wales speaking in cardiff just jones, the first minister of wales speaking in cardiffjust a few moments ago. if there is more reaction to the first minister's statement we will bring it to you as soon as we statement we will bring it to you as soon as we have it. it's 5.27pm. iranian state tv has said borisjohnson's recent remarks confirm a british—iranian dual national was spying in the country. the foreign secretary had been criticised for saying that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe —
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who has beenjailed in iran — had been training journalists there. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was detained at tehran airport in april 2016. she says her trip was so her three year old daughter could meet her grandparents. a british inventor has flown into the record books in a jet suit he designed himself. richard browning wore the suit — powered by six gas turbine engines — to fly across a lake in reading. guinness world records logged his top speed as 32 miles an hour, making him the first ever holder of a newly—created world speed title for travel in a jet suit. final time for the weather with ben. thank you very much. chilly air to scotla nd thank you very much. chilly air to scotland tonight there will be wine showers and snow and perhaps ice over the highest ground. a band of cloud and rain moving through northern ireland and northern england and spots further south. temperatures overnight dipping across scotland particularly. mild to the south. there will be cloud in southern areas during the fist part of tomorrow with outbreaks of patchy
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rain. most of that should clear away quite quickly. it's a day of sunny spells for many. showers for some, particularly for western scotland, northern ireland down across north—west england. some of the showers wintry in the high ground. temperatures will struggle, 13 in the south—west. six in north—east scotland. friday night there will be outbreaks of rain spreading in from the west. it will take a while to get rid of that rain on saturday morning. it will hang around in the south—west. for most it will be a mixture of sunshine and showers. it will be turning colder. that's all the weather for now. don't be confused, because that was the moment the bbc news channel was born, exactly 20 years ago, at 5.30 on the ninth november 1997, it was news 24 in that first incarnation, and the look was rather different — there were lots of flags — and we're going to spend a few minutes now looking back over the past two decades of 24—hour television news, which launched with my colleagues gavin esler and sarah montague, and one or two other familiar faces, so let's take a look.
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hello, you are watching bbc news 24. i'm chris eakin. welcome for the first time to bbc news 24. we are live now to ben brown. this is a hardline stance by america, is likely to be agreed with by the un? hugh edwards is with me now, how serious is this split for the tories? potentially very serious, i don't know what william hagueis serious, i don't know what william hague is playing at, in that he appears to be delivery antagonising appears to be delivery antagonising a lot of their traditional friends
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in the world of business. what is the conservative party if not firmly allied with business? he wants to be seen allied with business? he wants to be seen to be tough and links at the end of the baby takes a tough line against the single currency it's going to be seen to be principled and perhaps, more importantly, it will be a vote winner. if you really going to call the lemmings, which is what the press reporting? unless the executes a very quick u—turn over night, the word lemmings will be in the speech but he will use it carefully to suggest those who are walking towards a single currency without really considering the big issues he wants to consider perhaps our walking like lemmings. if he tries that in the conference will tomorrow and does not whether that carefully it will go down like a lead balloon. you are watching bbc news 24. you are watching bbc news 24. the new, round—the—clock tv news channel. bbc news 24. bringing you
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the whole picture. the whole time. this is the now o'clock news, from the bbc... can't quite believe we said the now o'clock news! well, that was 20 years ago today, the launch of news 24 as it was then. and the man whose initiative it was, was the bbc‘s director of news at that time, tony hall, who's now in overall charge of the bbc as director—general, this was his message in 1997. you may not thank me for this... there is an audience demand for news when they want it, not when we the broadcasters tell them to want it, and we're trying to use all our existing resources to give our licence fee payers better benefit in that way. and lord hall, the bbc director—general, is with me. nothing has changed. a lot has
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changed! 0h nothing has changed. a lot has changed! oh dear. it seems a very long time ago now. you were there, gavin was there, sarah. it seems amazing to say it now, but actually, 20 years ago, the notion of being their 24 hours a day, seven days a week was, well, this is pushing boundaries, will there be an appetite for it? will we be repeated lots of years? now you take it for granted that on and find out what's been happening, major stories, you find out. at that point, the issue was, how you feel 24 hours a day, seven was, how you feel 24 hours a day, seven days a week with news? that was the question. at the same time as news 24, bbc news, we also had bbc news online. again, i remember people saying, what on earth is this all about? the world wide web, online? who will use that? now you realise what the teams have done, starting with you and everybody, have actually made this absolutely pa rt have actually made this absolutely part of the war and weft of our
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lives. you cannot live without bbc news in the way we now talk about it, or indeed bbc news online. it has added to google ‘s use, frankly, the bbc. how much of a battle was it to convince colleagues was worth it? a really big battle, both externally and internally. people were saying, you are diverting resources, or money, or activity from what was then the nine 0'clock news. into this new thing which no one will watch. it was a huge battle, but my belief then is my belief now, that had we not done that, we would not be giving our audiences the services that they want in the way they want. i sent it back then, with slightly different coloured hair and glasses, but that message is the same one now. we have to be there when our audiences want to turn to us and i'm delighted to say that why people come to bbc news. looking back at
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major milestones, thinking about when the channel really into people's lives, the concorde crash in paris, july 2000, one of the first big events. then the channel was being broadcast is well on bbc one and bbc two because they recognise the value of it. how important was that? when those... look, the early days, we were experimenting, trying new things, no jackets and stuff like that. people did brilliantly but no doubt about it, when a large major story happens people suddenly say, i can now turn to bbc news 24, as it was then, and the channel controllers on one and two saying we will now use you and your attention to the fact we can have running news on these things, that was very important. you think of this huge stories that you have covered. you have covered since then, from 9/11, 77, etc. you cannot imaginea then, from 9/11, 77, etc. you cannot imagine a universe now without being able to turn on and see the news, as it happens, from the people you trust. the big debate around the
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range of services, and what we are offering people in terms of what they can do on radio, tv, online and they can do on radio, tv, online and the range they can pick from. what's your sense the range they can pick from. what's your sense of where a traditional television news channel fits into that mix? well, i think we all consume news when we want it on our mobile phones, ipad, all that. you have to be left for that, though services we are providing. a news channel is there with people watching to see what's going to happen next, something is happening, don't know where that person is, x, y, zeke, there's a really important role than that. it's brilliant that the bbc news channel is recognised by channel of the year, that's by its peers, brilliant. iwould by channel of the year, that's by its peers, brilliant. i would say this not because you are sitting there but also there is still the need for the crafted bulletin, the moment when, in all the noise, and the stuff going on in the day, you sit back and say, all right, now we
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will have those pieces that make sense will have those pieces that make sense of the day, or, i think we importantly, the pieces where you are standing back and saying, 0k, you know what, you need to know about this, or that. the ability of our first—rate correspondence and reporters to shake something that either is getting to grips with the day ina either is getting to grips with the day in a way you have not thought about before, or is taking something com pletely about before, or is taking something completely off agenda, and one of the huge strengths of the bbc would you see the huge strengths of the bbc would you see on the huge strengths of the bbc would you see on this channel and online and ten and six and 1pm, and in radio of course, is the ability to use the network of excellent people we have run the world around the country to give people a range of news that i don't believe they can get anywhere else. that is so precious about the bbc. and i take you back to 2013, when this building was opened by her majesty the queen? this was a good news channel moment. look at this... it's a view we share with our
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audience every day, but today, a unique moment with a very special one guest. there is something quite surreal about this, actually... i think the staff will rather pleased that day. i had the privilege, and it was a privilege when i came back to the bbc, steering her around the new broadcasting house. what was wonderful was her amusement and interest. the way that suddenly, we we re interest. the way that suddenly, we were walking through canyons of people, who are all taking pictures of her, cheering her, ithink people, who are all taking pictures of her, cheering her, i think it was one of those moments of, we are in this building, and the queen is here, and actually, let's be proud of what we do and what we have achieved. she absolutely loved it, and as everybody says about the
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queen, she has all sorts of peadar timmins questions about what was going on, but it was a wonderfully warm celebration. —— she has all sorts of pertinent questions. lastly, the kind of audience that will develop in future. when i talk to school audiences, most of them clearly are accessing news, as we all know, in different ways, on facebook, social media, might be bbc news that other news as well. are we ina news that other news as well. are we in a position where we will have to have quite a radical look at the way we try to target a young audience in future, or do you think the mix is broadly right? i think we have two keep our eye very clearly on where the next generation are consuming news. and make sure they have the choice. of coming to an news organisation that they can trust, andi organisation that they can trust, and i think, i would say this is important 20 years ago, it is even more important now, because social media and the kind of environment we
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are in, the tendency is for your news to come from a narrower and narrower perspective, and maybe a perspective which is confirming or affirming your views, and not giving you what we all believe in, which is actually a wet and range of opinion and a breadth and range of journalism as well. we are doing things in these areas, which i think are things in these areas, which i think a re really things in these areas, which i think are really good. we have to make sure we can keep the pressure to get to those new audiences, reinventing what we do for that new audience. tony, it's been great to talk to you on this 20th anniversary. we should say to everybody, happy birthday and well done. for 20 years, well done. there is an army behind the scenes, who do an amazing job. i'm now able to do something i've always wanted to do something i've always wanted to do something i've always wanted to do which is clicked my fingers, ina to do which is clicked my fingers, in a polite way, so we can get rid of our 20—year—old branding, and come back to today... thank you very much. what power! i love it. lord
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hall, thank you very much. let's go on with some of the days of the news. president trump says he blames the huge jell—o the news. president trump says he blames the hugejell—o trade deficit on other previous presidents, meeting with president sian jumping in his tourof meeting with president sian jumping in his tour of asia. his comments are being seen as an important win for beijing, as our correspondent john sudworth reports. forget military brinkmanship or trade wars, for this state visit china is trying different strategy. a charm offensive. and the us seems smitten. our meeting last night was absolutely terrific. our dinner was beyond that. our relationship has already proven to be a great one. my feeling towards you is an incredibly warm one — as we said, there is great chemistry.
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in place of mr trump's old china bashing, there was admiration for the way it has exploited the huge trade imbalance. right now, unfortunately, it is a very one—sided and unfairone, but, but, i don't blame china. after all, who can blame a country for being able to take advantage of another country for the benefit of its citizens? i give china great credit. watching this bromance back home, trump's core supporters might wonder what happened to the promises to be tough on china? critics will say that with a bit of wheeling and dealing on business and the pomp and ceremony of a state visit, the chinese have flattered him into submission.
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the two presidents watched as the us and chinese companies signed an number of trade deals. but on issues of substance, market access, copyright theft and state subsidies, china is offering little except warm words. translation: president trump's visit has been successful and historic. we now have the blueprints for the future us—china relationship. then mr trump had one more gift for his hosts. journalists' questions were waved away. us presidents used to stand up for press freedom in china. not this one. john sudworth, bbc news beijing. the actor kevin spacey is to be edited out of a completed hollywood film, six weeks before its release, following allegations
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of sexual assault. he'll be replaced in the thriller ‘all the money in the world' by the canadian actor, christopher plummer. sony pictures says the scenes containing kevin spacey will be reshot, and the film will be released next month as planned. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. a powerful true story with a cast including almost unrecognisable double oscar winner kevin spacey asjohn paul getty. how much would you pay to release your grandson? nothing. but recent allegations made against kevin spacey looked set to kill off the box office and academy awards hopes of the story of the famous 1973 kidnapping of billionaire john paul getty‘s grandson. it's led to an unprecedented decision to reshoot all of kevin spacey‘s scenes with a new actor, christopher plummer. actress valentina violo who appears in the movie says it must have been a complex, difficult decision. i think everything is going a little bit crazy right now, so probably,
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if they took this decision, it is good for the movie. it underlines the studio's determination not to let accusations aimed at one man damage a film with more than 800 performers, writers and crew have worked on for many months. the film's award—winning director sir ridley scott now has a monumental task: to reshoot the scenes in question and then to seamlessly edit them into the already finished film. at the same time, he is turning what could have been fatally bad publicity into perhaps the opposite. you could say he's profiting very quickly on this negative publicity, turning the story around in classic hollywood is spin fashion, turning this into a publicity machine for this movie which, to be honest, i have never heard of until now. now it has this amazing hollywood story of rising from the ashes of the awful spacey story, which has its victims. there have now been multiple allegations
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made against kevin spacey, while the studio, production team and sir ridley scott are confident that all the money in the world will still be released in december as planned, with the accused actor no longer appearing insomuch as a single frame. lizo mzimba, bbc news. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: penny mordaunt has been appointed as the new international development secretary. she replaces priti patel who resigned last night over undeclared meetings with israeli officials. the first minister of wales, carwynjones, has defended his handling of misconduct allegations against carl sargeant, the labour politician who's thought to have taken his own life. the actor kevin spacey is being edited out of a completed film after a string of sexual harassment allegations against him. his scenes in "all the money in the world" will be re—shot with another actor. a woman has been arrested by sussex police as part
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of an investigation into the deaths of 12 people in care homes run by a private company. she's being questioned on suspicion of neglect and fraud. our social affairs correspondent alison holt is here. give us a little more context. we have just had a brief statement from sussex police today, in that they save the woman who lives in west sussex has been arrested and is currently in custody. this is part ofan currently in custody. this is part of an ongoing investigation into nine care homes run by private company called sussex health care. that company provides support for older people, some with dementia, and the younger adults with a physical or learning difficulties, seve re physical or learning difficulties, severe disabilities. that is mainly in the horsham area of west sussex. the investigation, which started in may when the police were alerted to
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concerns, focuses on allegations of a lack of care and safeguarding of 43 residents since april 20 15. 12 of those residents have since died. as the company said anything today? they have put out a short statement in which it says it continues to cooperate fully with the police and cou nty cooperate fully with the police and county council, to support the current investigation. on their website, they stress they are a company with 30 years experience, they describe themselves as being a respected provider and they may have supported more than 30,000 people over supported more than 30,000 people over that period of time. the new international development secretary — penny mordaunt — who has replaced priti patel — has been speaking in the past few minutes. let's hear what she had to say. are you joining a cabinet in chaos? i'm delighted to have been appointed
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by the prime minister tojoin i'm delighted to have been appointed by the prime minister to join the department of international done on. i'm looking forward to working with the team head to build a safer, more secure and prosperous world for us all. really giving the british public pride in what we do. it's my first day here, i am delighted to be here. i've already met some of the staff and they are doing a terrific job building a more safe, more secure and prosperous world for us all. i want to continue doing that, but also to give the british public confidence and pride in what we're doing. thank you. penny mordaunt there, she's speaking a short while ago. the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall have paid their respects to india's war dead, as their tour of the country comes to an end. the royal couple observed a minute's silence, and laid a wreath at india gate, the national war memorial. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell is in delhi, a warning that his report contains flash photography. through the dense smog of delhi, the motorcade of the man who will be king.
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charles will be 70 next year. no heir to the british throne has waited as long to achieve his destiny. at india gate, charles laid a wreath in memory of those from the indian subcontinent who lost their lives in the two world wars. last post. in three days' time, on remembrance sunday in london, charles will lay his mother's wreath at the cenotaph. for the first time the queen will watch the ceremony from a balcony. it will be the most visible public sign so far of the transition — the moves which are gradually gathering momentum, preparing the way for a change of reign. are there other people you are employing? that moment may yet be years away. when it does come charles knows his campaigning will have to stop, but for now he shows no sign of curbing his interventions on the environment, for example, or his efforts to assist young people. in delhi he met entrepreneurs, helped by an offshoot of his prince's trust. it's on visits such as this,
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where charles is now the senior substitute for the queen, and where he's delivering subtle messages on behalf of the british government, that his enhanced king in waiting status is most apparent. in india the central message has been about the commonwealth. it's important to post—brexit britain and it's important to charles because he wants to follow his mother as its head. the commonwealth, built as it is on a firm foundation of shared associations and values, offers us an unparalleled means to build bridges between our countries. a visit which began with a story about a disputed shareholding has gone on to underline charles' role on the international stage and his increasing proximity to the british throne. nicholas witchell, bbc news, delhi. time for a look at the weather with ben rich. a little earlier than planned,
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because we are going to do something afterwards to do with our 20th birthday. so, the weather, then a chat about all things whether after that. i will stick with the easy bit, the weather for the next few days. it will turn colderfor weather for the next few days. it will turn colder for many as we head towards the weekend, some of that cold weather already sinking in a across scotland. perhaps even icy surfaces across higher levels. a band of rain sinking south with clear skies behind, temperatures not dropping too far but it will turn chilly across parts of scotland, temperatures around freezing. tomorrow cloud and patchy rain in the south first thing, that should clear way and it's looking like a decent day. styles of sunshine around, still some showers blowing into the north and north—west. quite a range in temperatures. 14 of the
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channel islands, just five then shetland. through friday, things cloud over from the west. outbreaks of rain splashed through. we will have to get rid of this for the first part of the weekend, in many areas it will clear with some rain hanging on in the south—west. for most, the weekend forecast brings a mix of sunshine and showers and a colder feel. i was mix of sunshine and showers and a colderfeel. i was not mix of sunshine and showers and a colder feel. i was not here 20 years ago but i think you have someone with you who was... that was a touch smug! a jest. but yes, helen is with me. a big expert in the field of weather. we will chat in a moment, because weather has been a massive part of the service we provide. again, you are not going to thank me for this. let's go back 20 years and look at this clip... these guys have brightened up quite nicely above the sky here in london.
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i think it will be a fairly dry and bright day across much of the country, that cloud is fairly thin, i think it will continue to let them break up two seasons some sunny intervals in many places. already showers going through the morning in the south—west, some in wales and parts of west wales, also a batch of showers in the north—east. not forgetting the remnants of yesterday's drizzle across eastern parts of england. it's going to be rotten way across eastern coast for the first part of the morning into the first part of the morning into the afternoon as well. brightening up the afternoon as well. brightening up by the afternoon as well. brightening up by the afternoon that drizzle breaking into more showery weather... you really have not changed. my voice has definitely dropped! that was my first national broadcast, very first. what's your memory of it? not much, iwas very first. what's your memory of it? not much, i was too frightened. don't i sound a little scared? it was an amazing opportunity, given to me when bill giles came over to cardiff, i was working on bbc wales
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today there. he gave me the opportunity to be part of this launched team for 24 hours news channel, the me that was fantastic, starting in a region and moving nationally was fantastic. i think the overriding one you can see their comedy feeling was definitely nervous. comedy feeling was definitely nervous. we all have that. when you realise people's need on a daily basis, on an hourly basis for when nears, you then realised straightaway how important weather would be in this new provision. sport and business and all the rest as well, but it was absolutely crucial. we probably doubled or even travelled our output of whether, we would involve service in those days and live at times the mass was not really changed, a bit of bbc one and two, some radio 4, and radio five of course, but the coverage or things like severe weather warnings, the ability to not have to wait to see the1pm, ability to not have to wait to see the 1pm, 6pm ability to not have to wait to see the1pm, 6pm 10pm, ability to not have to wait to see the 1pm, 6pm 10pm, the ability to not have to wait to see the 1pm, 6pm10pm, the people who we re the 1pm, 6pm10pm, the people who were travelling and whatever they
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are doing in their lives, the need for weather 20 47 was just incredible. and of course we doubled our team almost overnight. we are seeing some of your colleagues just now. how would you explain to viewers about how things have changed in terms of the way you can present and explain what weather is doing? the main change is the advancement in accuracy, and the availability of more technology. the resolution now is far better, we can see resolution now is far better, we can see far more detail give you the actual weather, and the computer models that forecast weather. that has increased three, four fold models that forecast weather. that has increased three, fourfold in the last 20 years. what we obviously say within the bbc is we are forecasters, we are better divorce seven, forecasters, we are better divorce seven, we forecasters, we are better divorce seven, we will correct it all the time. it's lovely to see that garish orange map, i can't believe that! we wa nted orange map, i can't believe that! we wanted to be unique. the amount of time it took to render those graphics, to make them orange after
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they came from, because we would all use the same graphics it's quite amazing. look to the side, the screen you are looking at, just to see screen you are looking at, just to see what you are pointing out, is what? at that time, was it the side or where? we were opposite the presenters, the news presenters, we had monitors either side to the left and right, primarily you are looking towards the left, i cannot quite remember. i think you could actually see a remember. i think you could actually see a faint outline of the graphics as well on the screen behind you. very similar in that way to how we have it, obviously the plasma screens are far superior now to 20 yea rs screens are far superior now to 20 years ago. look about, that was rain! that's how we showed the rain, believe it or not. very quick, very honest upfront commission about maybe what was the worst incident you in terms of being a presenter? there would be the odd wondering camera, and! there would be the odd wondering camera, and i think my graphics stuck once and they did five minutes on scottish football weather forecast. something to do with
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static shoes and the machine crashing. helen, as ever, lovely to talk to you. i'm cute and happy birthday to all of us again. to bbc news at six now, but we will do it with a bit of mr alger. just enjoy what's coming up, and goodbye for now. “— what's coming up, and goodbye for now. —— a bit of i'm looking forward to working with the team here, to continue building a safer, more the team here, to continue building a safer, more secure the team here, to continue building a safer, more secure and more prosperous world for us all, really giving the british public pride in what we do. but with the government still under pressure on multiple fronts, tories are hoping theresa may can get her ministers back on track. another challenge for theresa may — crunch talks on brexit are under way... also tonight... preventing extremism — more than 2000 children under 15 have been referred to the official anti—terror scheme. "i acted by the book" — the welsh first minister defends his sacking of a politician who was later found dead.
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