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tv   HAR Dtalk  BBC News  November 10, 2017 2:30am-3:01am GMT

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from bbc news: donald trump has left beijing and is heading for vietnam and the annual apec summit. he and his chinese counterpart, xi jinping, are expected to outline competing visions of global trade. mr trump is expected to stress his "america first" doctrine, while president xi will call for global free trade. united nations officials are warning that yemen faces famine on a scale the world has not seen in decades. they are talking of millions of victims unless, they say, the saudi—led military coalition in yemen allows humanitarian aid deliveries to resume. all land, sea and air ports are closed. in zimbabwe, tension is rising over who will succeed robert mugabe as president. he is 93. one of the leading contenders, a former vice—president, has been sacked from the cabinet and forced to flee the country. mr mugabe's wife grace looks much closer to becoming president. it's just past half past two. now on bbc news, it's time for hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk. i am stephen
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sackur. authority is a priceless commodity in politics. it is not usually measured, but when they pry minister loses it, well, then governing becomes a perilous task. so it made be in britain today: theresa may has lost two cabinet ministers in a week, and her own tea m ministers in a week, and her own team is divided over brexit and seems unsure about its core message. my seems unsure about its core message. my guess today is the increasingly influential conservative mp and staunch brexiteer, jacob rees—mogg. can the tories get out of the hole they are and? —— they are in. jacob rees—mogg, welcome to hardtalk
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thank you very much. you are an increasingly important backbench member of a party. the government representing a party seems to be staggering between misfortune and disaster. why is this happening? well, first of all, i think there have inevitably been difficulties, and most of these come from failing to wina and most of these come from failing to win a majority in the election in june. but the events that have taken place over the last couple of weeks: the two ministerial resignations, these are things that happened to governments of all kinds. well, they are not governments of all kinds. well, they a re not really governments of all kinds. well, they are not really the sorts of things that regularly happen. we have priti patel who resigned, fairly asked to resign after the most extraordinary dramatic gasp in which he appeared to go completely freelance,
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diplomatically speaking, in his visit to israel. there are resignations this over decors. the best was peter mandelson, twice, essentially from the same government. this happens to governance with big majorities in small majority. it happens over bridges and ministerial code, and sex scandals. it happens in government, and it does not to the wea kness government, and it does not to the weakness or strength of the government. that is indicated by other factors. it does signal that this prime minister is seeing her authority draining away. priti patel, to continue with her case, it surely would not have felt able to undertake the diplomatic or freed —— diplomatic freelancing she did were it not for a lack of authority at the centre of government. it not for a lack of authority at the centre of governmentlj it not for a lack of authority at the centre of government. i think you are seeing things that do not exist. if you go back to lord mandelson. i would prefer to stick with current events. it is quite important because you need to get a
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perspective as to whether this resignation is something exceptionally unusual or something which happens to all governments. there are mum when lord mandelson resigned it was because he had accepted a loan from someone in another ministry, and did not declare, in breach of ministerial codes. this was embarrassing to tony blair at the time. but it was unimportant in the grand scheme of the tony blair government. ancient history, but i would rather continue discussing what is happening in your government today. it is not mine, it is her majesty's. the key to this is whether there is something unusual about the problems this gamut is facing, and whether they come, as you propose, from weakness, or if these are something that happens to governments not just of these are something that happens to governments notjust of recent decades, but over centuries. if you wa nt to decades, but over centuries. if you want to go back to the stonehouse affair... i would prefer to focus on
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whether this government can continue. we know that a significant batch bench mp these days called for theresa may to leave and called for a campaign to topple her. he got a significant number of mps to back m, significant number of mps to back in, but not enough. hold on. i don't think we found out who any of these cabinet ministers... no, i think that when names up bandied about, it is useful to know what those names — who those names belong to. i also think there is something, and you said it flatteringly about me, as well, but something about being influential and a backbencher. if you are influential, you another backbencher. let's get back to boris johnson. he misleadingly suggested that a british citizen who is currently being detained in prison in around, arrested last year, it is suggested that she was in iran train
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journalists. that is untrue. she was there on holiday. borisjohnson surely to go. personally that is not just exacerbated a humanitarian crisis for that family, but also a terrible dramatic gasp. boris johnson is giving evidence of an extensive period to the foreign affairs select committee. he made a mistake. i think you can... can you afford to miss the? is clarified it to make the position clear. i don't think you can expect ministers to resign every time they mispeak. you need continuity in government and you need to recognise that ministers will make mistakes. the question is the level of seriousness. and i don't think this meets the test of that sort of seriousness. your perspective is curly different to that of her family. they are
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appalled by what happened, not least because iranian media reports that this is proof that she was sent by the british government. this is proof that she was sent by the british governmentlj this is proof that she was sent by the british government. i have obvious is seen as reports. they've come out recently in relation to what the iranian government is doing. it is difficult that the mackerel -- it is —— it is difficult that the iranian government is handling this way. but they have unfairly and unjustly detained to me and prevented her from seeing her own children and family, and doing this on the bogus pretext of spying. we need to look at where the real fault is rather than in the mispeaking. eight column in the times here has suggested that
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borisjohnson has proved himself unfit for high office. —— a column. it isa unfit for high office. —— a column. it is a readable: —— is a readable column but is not infallible. this was written by a long critical of borisjohnson. he was written by a long critical of boris johnson. he used was written by a long critical of borisjohnson. he used to be one of the leading admirers. newspaper columns, which my father used to write for many years, have to ensure that they have something interesting to say, day after day, and to meet the deadline for the next day's news. they are not wholly read. michael fallon had to resign because of allegations of sexual impropriety. we have seen priti patel resign. on education, theresa may has chosen a simple one for one approach of a slob. is it not time for a bigger and more thorough reshuffle, to put some new energy and new blood into this government, which, friendly, too many people, is failing. —— approach of a swap.
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which, friendly, too many people, is failing. -- approach of a swap. she has a wonderful and able cabinet and has a wonderful and able cabinet and has many people in the conservative party who came in in 2015... my question is if it is time to a bigger reshuffle? not necessarily. i think we have a good quality cabinet. we have stable and serious individuals in it that are doing important work. i don't think — as it happens, i don't think that a big reshuffle is the biggest sign of strength. ie don't want to talk about history again, but i go back to the night of the long knives. it was a sign that control was being lost. greater love has no man than someone lost. greater love has no man than someone who lays down his political life for his friend was what i think thorpe said. i think there is a lot of ability in the government. do you have paused to think about how the government looks when viewed, for
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example, from europe? because this is- example, from europe? because this is — the issue of the aid is the brexit negotiations. so it rather matters how perceptions are now of the british government in europe and across the european capitals. what do you think they are like? well, i think there is what they want to say and what they think, obviously. if you think the theresa may's got 10% more in the election we had them angela merkel got in hers, theresa may does not... look at the spanish government. would you rather be the prime minister of the uk all of spain at the moment? let me give you a different perspective... compared to continental governments, her majesty's government is quite stable. the head of the foreign office said that if you are in a european capital that it looks chaotic, confused, and drifting, when there are big issues around
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brexit. no clear line about the future relationship with the eu and a whole series of other crises as well. britain is simply not a real player. i think this is absurdly overstated. there is a clear idea for brexit, and that was enunciated by the prime minister in her speech to make speeches. there are parts of those that are not enthusiastic about... we have to talk about that. but it is a clear manifesto of a watch is looking for. she has been generous in her office to the european union. the government she leads is stronger in many, but not all, but many european governments. especially germany. the german government is very weak at the moment. it has not formed or agreed its coalition. you talk of european weakness. the 1.8 think that is clear is that the eu 27 art united
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when it comes to brexit negotiations. there will be no abolition of the talks to the next phase, and that is to talk about trade and the transitional arrangements, until, and this came out at a meeting of the twin seven ambassadors specifically talk about brexit, no move to that until they are happy with the cash that is going to be promised by britain to cover the costs of our departure. -- 27 ambassadors. the counter to that is that the financial framework is insolvent if we leave without a deal. that is what they are facing. you think hardball will work? yes. they are desperate for it pretty £7 billion. —— desperate for £27 billion. —— desperate for £27 billion. so you are saying great, no deal, walk away with out giving any money? i am saying is in theirjust to make a deal. their current budget is insolvent without a contribution.
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this is a powerful card. of course they say they want the money upfront. because once we have paid the money, they don't have to give us the money, they don't have to give us very much. so this is important. you are saying it may not be right to call you influential, but is a must not go beyond the 27 billion euros that she has promised. -- 30 billion euros. that is generous. —— 20 billion euros. not only do some countries get less in the long—term, but they get less in april 2000 19. suddenly expenditure needs to stop or more money needs to be raised. somebody's bluff will be called. —— 2019. you said could be europe, but it could be theresa may's government, who could find there could be a no deal
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wrecks it because the europeans won't give ground on wanting more than 20 billion. they wta brexit is a good want the united kingdom. it frees us from the protectionist customs union that makes prices for british consumers higher and basically protects inefficient continental european industries. they wto exit saves us a lot of money. it takes is a long way to meet ina money. it takes is a long way to meet in a commitment that was... the wto brexit you are talking about is a fantasy. do you know how many countries the uk trades with at the moment on wto rules? 57% of our trade. 24 countries. 57% of our trade. 24 countries. 57% of our trade is not with eu countries. but most of our most important trading partners in the eu bloc. no, you mistake the deals. most of those deals arejoint
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mistake the deals. most of those deals are joint competent steels that we have agreed to individually as well. most of those deals, the counter parties have indicated that they are to continue this. you aren't reading what i am reading. many details on trade and legal issues say the idea we can revert to wto rules is pure fantasy. it is straightforward. i was speaking to the singaporean high commissionerfor speaking to the singaporean high commissioner for example. they are ready to do so because it is a multi—party agreement. those trends —— tra nsferrals are multi—party agreement. those trends —— transferrals are simple. multi—party agreement. those trends -- transferrals are simple. it depends who you talk to. it depends who you talk to. recently you talked to the head of the cbi. she says her
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members are deeply alarmed. 60% of companies expect they must have contingency plans for a crashing out no deal brexit by the end of next march unless there is a breakthrough before that. cbi gets money from the eu. it is the eu funded cbi. what about individual chief executives? well... this person says a few months ago the uk government said we would be certain to have a deal. he says if we have to decide some future investment, of course, the key point is going to be the competitiveness of this country in the future. you talked about the cbi. they wanted us to join the future. you talked about the cbi. they wanted us tojoin estonia. they were wrong. they wanted us to join the euro to be they were wrong.
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the cbi is hopeless. if i may say so... the cbi is hopeless. if i may say so... the cbi is the most consistently wrong body in the country. they are listening to what their members are saying, the distances of written. this quote is from the editor. —— the businesses of britain. —— toyota. they no longer have the confidence to stay in britain and say investment decisions will be made accordingly. what are toyota worried? they will no this is how it works. why do you think they are worried? why is it that if people are so worried about investing that in 2016 the uk received its largest ever fdi and a high share of all eu fdi coming into
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the european union? we should watch what businesses are doing and how much they are investing, not what it pr machines are saying. you don't agree with the key points of theresa may's position on how she once the negotiations to go. she wants a two—year transition, and during it, we will accept all of the rules of the eu, including the european court ofjustice, like the printable freedom of movement, while we negotiate the long—term deal. —— principle of. they should have no involvement after we have left. we have not left the eu if they are involved. can you imagine voting against that? let me finish. if those two things apply it is not a
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transition, it is remaining in the eu foran transition, it is remaining in the eu for an extra two years. i think that would not meet the conditions of the vote injune last that would not meet the conditions of the vote in june last year. that is an interesting characterisation. iam asking is an interesting characterisation. i am asking you, would that be a dealbreaker and would i am asking you, would that be a dealbrea ker and would you i am asking you, would that be a dealbreaker and would you as a tory mp dealbreaker and would you as a tory m p vote dealbreaker and would you as a tory mp vote against that deal? the ecg isa mp vote against that deal? the ecg is a dealbreaker. we must not remain under their jurisdiction. is a dealbreaker. we must not remain under theirjurisdiction. if you and like—minded colleagues voted against it... if that is what she wants she will win a vote in the house of commons no matter what i think. you don't know what labour will do. they will not vote down a vote including the ecg. talking about the tory party. we have had nick balls, a close confidant of david cameron and minister in the cameron parliament, he says all talk of austerity has to
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end. it is over as far as he is concerned. you are an mp who has consistently supported for example all the cuts to the welfare budget, the benefit system, do you feel the tories need to develop a message that austerity is over?|j tories need to develop a message that austerity is over? i think that nick balls is one of the most important thinkers in the tory party and always worth listening to. his point is that the debt as a percentage of gdp was over 20% in 2010 and now it is under 3% and does not require emergency measures. but we still need to live within our means. it is a question of whether money should be spent, how it should be spent, and what the parity is. but most of the work of austerity has been done. as for welfare changes, most of my support was because i think they will deliver welfare better. universal credit is
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not a money—saving scheme, it is to help it will get back into work and to look at them as individuals rather than to categorise them as welfare depend on people and to let them live the life they can lead. it is the transformation of welfare thatis is the transformation of welfare that is important. your voice matters. you are very conservative ona number of matters. you are very conservative on a number of issues. you are an observant catholic. on abortion, you have been honest and clear the regard abortion as immoral. it is against your belief. and you will a lwa ys against your belief. and you will always campaign to curtail it wherever you can. against the wishes, it is clear, of a big majority of the british people. there are a variety of polls. there a lwa ys there are a variety of polls. there always are. i think the key point here is where do you think life begins. if you think it is conception, then, you have to protect it, you have a duty to
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protect it, you have a duty to protect it. and even when a woman wa nts protect it. and even when a woman wants an abortion after rape, you say that is wrong? i think a light has been created and is taking that life does not put right the grave wrong that has already taken place. —— life. we can argue about polls, but roughly 70% of british people do not agree with you that abortion is wrong, and they believe people who wa nt wrong, and they believe people who want abortion should be able to have them. that is 24 weeks in the pregnancy according to current laws stopping my question is this, if you are ambitious to play a role, perhaps not leader, but influential, is it possible to hold the thoughts you do on gay marriage and abortion, out of touch with the country, is it possible to play a leadership role with your views? umm, well, i think this doesn't actually matter, that myjob is to represent the people of
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north east somerset. i set out what i believe and they decide whether to vote to have me. they agree with brexit and it will have a more immediate effect than my views on abortion and other moral issues. including euthanasia, the most important of my views. but political life is about standing up for what you believe in and not trying to climb the greasy pole. that is a secondary task. we want leaders who are honest about their beliefs, but what about representation? i am thinking of tim farron who quit the job saying because he is a devout christian and does not believe in 93v christian and does not believe in gay marriage, for example, he said he found himself completely torn
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between living as a faithful christian and serving as a political leader. he found it impossible.” christian and serving as a political leader. he found it impossible. iam not putting myself forward as a political leader, as you know. we live in a country with people being entitled to religious beliefs and we have freedom of religion in this country. inevitably, people will not a lwa ys country. inevitably, people will not always agree with me, or even new. many people don't agree with theresa may. get a leader has to emerge. —— yet. many people have confidence in the leader. it would be absurd if religious belief occluded people from... do you feel you are in tune with your own country? it depends on what subject. there are some things ifindi what subject. there are some things ifind i am what subject. there are some things i find i am in close agreement with what the majority of my fellow countrymen think, and others were we are not in touch. —— where. if you
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ta ke are not in touch. —— where. if you take the sun and mail as british opinion, iam take the sun and mail as british opinion, i am quite in touch. we have to leave it there. thank you so much. thank you. hi there. our weather's turning a little bit colder, and if you're up over the mountains of scotland, it will be cold enough for a bit of snow later on today. the cold front is behind these weather fronts, loitering in the south of the country. the colder conditions there across scotland. there will be snow in the showers, above 300 metres elevation. it won't get down to low levels, it's just staying
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in the mountains. but a sign that the air‘s turned colder. across the south, we start with a cloudy note, and some patchy rain. nothing particularly heavy, mind you. behind the rain, which is the dregs of a weak weather front, most of us will start on a bright and sunny note. bright and sunny it may be, but there will also be showers affecting northern and western areas, driven in by some strong and blustery north—westerly winds that will add a certain windchill. through the rest of the day, those showers will continue to be driven in by those strong winds. but the early—morning cloud, clearing from southern england pretty quickly and then the sunshine comes out. temperatures will be a little down on what we had on thursday. a range of temperatures from about 12 degrees or so in the south to a cooler six or seven degrees. so a little bit below normal for the time of year across the northern half of the country. taking us through friday night, we'll see an area of rain work in for a time in northern ireland before spilling its way in across england and wales. the rain could be heavy at times. to the north of this, we've still got the cold air with us in scotland.
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probably some pockets of frost in sheltered areas and some icy surfaces to contend with as well, to take us into saturday morning. for the weekend, some rain in the south, but that will clear readily and then it will turn colder. a mixture of sunshine and showers were many areas. it clears from southern wales. probably reluctant to clear away from south—west england, where it could be dull and damp for most of the day. sunny spells further north. again, showers across north—western areas, still driven in by blustery winds. we still have a range of temperatures, relatively mild in the south, colder further north. heading into sunday, this band of rain will eventually pull away from southern counties of england and then we'll start to see colder air moving down from polar regions, getting in across a good part of the country. so temperatures will be dropping away for the second half of the weekend. weatherwise, on remembrance sunday, again we've got showers across northern and western areas, but many of us will see some sunshine. it will feel colder in the blustery winds. look at these temperatures — around six or seven degrees in the northern half of the uk. that's your weather.
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welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in north america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. our top stories: farewell to beijing — donald trump leaves china and heads to vietnam — for the opening of the apec summit. yemen faces the worst famine the world has seen in decades. that's the warning from the united nations. power play in zimbabwe — a leading contender to replace robert mugabe is sacked and forced to flee the country. thousands of british children under the age of fifteen are identified under the government's counter—terrorism programme. president trump is due to arrive in vietnam shortly for a summit
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meeting of the 21—member asia pacific economic cooperation
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