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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 10, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the countdown to brexit — theresa may reveals plans to put britain's departure date in law. the prime minister wants parliament to commit to leaving the eu at 11pm on the 29th march 2019. in a newspaper interview mrs may warns pro—european conservatives she "will not tolerate" any attempts to block brexit. good morning. it's friday, the 10th of november. also this morning, a new approach to cervical cancer. a study suggests millions of women could soon need fewer smear tests throughout their lives. president trump arrives in vietnam on the latest stop of his tour of asia and a potential meeting with vladimir putin. in sport could a controversial penalty decision, have cost northern ireland a place
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at the world cup? they're 1—0 down to switzerland, after the first leg of their play—off in belfast. the pay gap between men and women is getting smaller, but could take 100 years to close completely. but why, and what's been done to tackle it? i'll be finding out. and, blasting his way into the history books. after 7:00 we'll be joined on the sofa by this record—breaking rocket man. and nick has the weather. good morning. a cloudy start for many of us today but there will be sunny spells on the way. some showers around, the heaviest in northern scotland. a few showers this weekend, some sunshine for nearly all of us by sunday. be aware this weekend, it is turning colder. i have all the weekend weather coming up in the next half—hour. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may has warned pro—european conservatives that she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process. in a sign of her intent, she's outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment that britain will leave the european union,
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11:00pm on 29th march 2019. 0ur political correspondent, emma vardy is in westminster for us. emma, what exactly does she want to do and why? we knew that this was the time we we re we knew that this was the time we were supposed to leave the european union, didn't we? yes, i think it is a strong message, to say that we will not go against the democratic will not go against the democratic will of the british people. i think putting the date and time into law is as much of a symbolic commitment as anything else. this is theresa may publicly underlining her commitment and hoping to protect herself from any criticism of any eurosceptic mps. in her article in the telegraph today, she says this. but in what is being seen as a
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controversial intervention by the man who actually wrote the article fit the intervention himself, lord kerr has come out publicly for the first time and is saying the brexit process could be reversed, and there is nothing to stop us changing our minds atany is nothing to stop us changing our minds at any stage. —— wrote the article 50 legislation in the first place. he isjust the he is just the latest prominent figure to add his voice to the calls for a possible rethink of brexit. gordon brown and tony blair have also made some of these arguments in the past. so will lord kerr's argument make any difference? it does add some legal weight to remain ats who want to say that there is
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some room for a rethink or a u—turn on brexit. —— remainers. at his intervention has also caused outrage. form at a prelude —— former tory leader iain duncan smith called a tad absurd and pointless statement. you do run the risk that intervening on brexit in this way is arrogant, hoping to go against the results, which the referendum originally delivered. emily, thank you. we'll be speaking to peter bowen and chuka umunna after 7:30 a.m.. a new study is recommending that women who have had the hpv vaccine only need to have three smear tests during the course of their life. the research funded by cancer research uk comes ahead of planned changes to the nhs cervical cancer screening programme due to come in 2019. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. cervical cancer is a dangerous disease. it is also one of the most preve nta ble disease. it is also one of the most preventable cancers. but there has been concern about a steady drop in
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the number of women going for screening in the past few years. currently, women aged 25 to 49 offered smear tests every three yea rs, offered smear tests every three years, and then every five years from the age of the 264. but almost a decade, girls aged 11 to 13 have deemed given a vaccine against the cancer—causing virus hpv. today's study published in the international journal of cancer says the vaccine reduces the risk of cancer by 70%, and women who have had it only need to undergo three smear test in their lives, instead of the normal 12, at the age of 30, 40 and 50 five. all cervical cancers are linked to hpv infection and having the vaccination dramatically reduces the chances of having the infection and also of having the infection and also of having cervical cancer. screening looks for early changes that could suggest cancer is developing, and simply put, having the vaccine into a less likely to see those changes and less likely to develop cancer, so and less likely to develop cancer, so you don't need screening quite so often. the study comes ahead of
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changes being planned to the screening programme in england for 2019. and similarlyjustin simpson and wales. —— similar adjustments in scotla nd and wales. —— similar adjustments in scotland and wales. this could mean fewer smear tests for all women, whether vaccinated or not. president trump has arrived in vietnam as he continues his tour of south east asia. he's due to speak at a trade conference attended by other world leaders shortly, where he'll emphasize the importance of america's relations in the region. there's also a suggestion that later he'll have a private meeting with russia's president putin. facebook‘s founding president has said he's worried about the effect the site is having on society. sean parker, who says he no longer uses social media, said the network was built on "exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology", and he was concerned about what it was "doing to children's brains". the unintended consequences of a network, when it grows to 1 the unintended consequences of a network, when it grows to1 billion 01’ network, when it grows to1 billion or2 network, when it grows to1 billion
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or 2 billion people, and it literally changes your relationship with society, with each other, you know, it probably interferes with or activity and weird ways. god only knows what it is doing to our children's brains. more than half of —— more than half of schools in england fail to offer computer science gcse, according to a new report by the uk's leading science academy. the royal society is calling for a tenfold increase in funding for computing education, which it says is patchy and fragile. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. what effect does a binary shifts left and a binary shift right how? ina left and a binary shift right how? in a classroom in saint organs, some running young computer scientist di deepin running young computer scientist di deep in debt gcse course. this school is in a minority. today's report says computer education is fragile and patchy, with too few pupils given the chance to enter the exam. what is more common the
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subject is eating largely avoided by girls. so what has made these stu d e nts girls. so what has made these students take it up? our future is very much based around computers and technology is becoming a big part of society. i knew that it would be useful to have, and i could get a job easily. maybe in other schools it might be viewed as slightly nerdy to do computer science, but i think it is quite respected at this school. the royal society's report says too many young people are missing out on vital digital skills. 54% of english schools do not offer computer science as a gcse. schools need three and half thousand more compute in teachers. only one in five computer science entrants are female. both the teachers in this class have degrees in computer science, which makes them unusual. the royal society wants a big increase in spending on training new teachers. the computing industry says digital skills are vital written‘s future. says digital skills are vital written's future. if we want to
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remaina written's future. if we want to remain a overlooked nation, a nature that —— nation that is innovative, but provides products and services to drive us forward in the 21st century, we need people with advanced digital skills, in all industries and all sectors. the department education says it wants to ensure the future workforce has the skills the uk needs. this report says that without more computing teachers, that won't happen. portia de rossi has accused the actor and producer steven seagal of sexual harassment. the arrested development star, who is married to the us talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her "how important it was to have chemistry off—screen" before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc that the actor had no comment. we will speak more about this after seven o'clock from hollywood. what do you get if you put matt smith's retro braces, tom baker's famous scarf, sylvester mccoy's grey coat
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and patrick troughton‘s high waisted trousers all together? jodie whitaker's new look has been unveiled, and doctor who fans have been quick to point out the references to the attire of previous time lords. i can't see her wearing a scarf. in the top, the stripes are alluded to. i remember those high waisted trousers well. but something i would hear, norma, at this time of day. no, i don't remember them, the high waisted trousers. sorry, don't mean to spoil the party. we will be speaking to rocket man later on. to spoil the party. we will be speaking to rocket man later onlj met him in a lift last night, bizarrely. was he going up? it was an odd merry lift. we were talking about fly boarding, with the jet powered boots. of course, he has
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gone one step further than that, much more amazing. can't wait to see him again. yes, he is coming in, but unfortunately he will not defining the rocket pack. it takes some time to set it all up. what have you got for us? well, northern ireland, football can bea well, northern ireland, football can be a very cool game. they are 1—0 down now, due to something that was not really their fault. a penalty given away when the ball clearly stuck cory evans' shoulder, not his hand. there have been a lot of tweets. conor murray, the friday night presenter, called it one of the worst referee decisions he has ever seen. the worst referee decisions he has ever seen. nonsensical. the worst referee decisions he has everseen. nonsensical. he says the worst referee decisions he has ever seen. nonsensical. he says they have the bottle that anger and challenge it in a —— challenge it in a positive way for sunday. northern ireland face an uphill struggle if they're to qualify for the world cup next year, after losing their play—off first leg 1—0 to switzerland last night. the swiss were awarded a controversial penalty after corry evans blocked a goal—bound shot. it seems with his shoulder,
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and not his arm. ricardo rodriguez then scored the only goal of the game. the second leg is in basel on sunday. scotland just missed out on the world cup playoffs, but were in friendly action last night. they lost 1—0 to the netherlands in aberdeen. former manchester united winger, memphis depay, with the goal. on day two of the crucial women's ashes test england have been bowled out for 280 in sydney. in reply the australians are yet to lose a wicket. we'll have the latest throughout the morning. britain's lizzy yarnold, won a bronze medal in the opening race of the new skeleton world cup season in lake placid, in the usa yesterday. the reigning olympic champion moved up from fifth after her first run, to finish third. i was speaking to the sliders team yesterday, saying that a lack of snow and cold temperatures, but they still got a good result. snow is tacky in the uk, in scotland now. it is going to get colder on the
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weekend. nickel fell us all about that. do you need me? always! ijust give the headlines, you give the detail and the accuracy. a very good summery of what is on the way this weekend. today, some of the showers on the recent rainfall picture, that is not just on the recent rainfall picture, that is notjust rain. some is snow, at the highest ground levels, in scotland. that cold air will move south over the uk over the next few days. a scattering of showers in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. thick cloud working south through england and wales. ah chee rain and drizzle, that won't last too long. you can see where most of the showers are this morning across the north and west of scotland. entry on the high hills. very strong winds, a bass restart today, with some sunny spells on the way for southee scotla nd spells on the way for southee scotland and into northern ireland. they will continue dotted about through northern england in two north—east wales, some drifting into the midlands. that area of thick
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cloud and patchy rain and drizzle will mark south. —— works out. it is sunny spells today, a brisk breeze adding a chill to things, more especially if you are out and about in northern scotland. a bit of risk and hail of the showers, elsewhere in scotland. northern ireland, drifting into northern england. perhaps north—east wales. many other places having a dry afternoon. that cold air is still do penetrate rocks —— across southern parts of england and wales. it will eventually get there by the time get to sunday. heading out this evening in northern ireland we expect some rain to come in. that might fringe into the south—west of scotland. it is england and wales that will see the bulk of that. the wind picking up towards the south—west of england with that as well. scotland will stay in the clear air. showers in northern and eastern scotland, a touch of frost in place here, as armistice day saturday begins. tomorrow, for many of us in
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scotland, northern england and northern ireland, we will see sunny spells. elsewhere in england and much of wales, there will still be a good deal of cloud. south wales, south—west england, off to the isle of wight and into hampshire as well. a dull, damp, but technically fairly mild day. elsewhere there will be virtually feeling, even if you see sunshine. as we go through saturday evening, that rain could turn heavier for evening, that rain could turn heavierfor a time in parts of evening, that rain could turn heavier for a time in parts of wales in southern england, clearing south on sunday. then it opens the door to the cold array of two flood south, reaching those parts which have been mild for the last few days across southern areas in particular. by sunday to pitches will be dipping. while many of us on sunday will have a dry day, we could still see showers in northern scotland and the irish sea. maybe into wales in south—west england. for many of us, pa rt south—west england. for many of us, part two of the weekend on sunday, we will get season sunshine, but have a look at pictures. well down into single figures, add on that window that will be a chilly day. that begs the question, do you
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prefer your weather at this time of year cloudy, damp and mild, or do you prefer it's sunny and chilly? that is your choice. i'm not offering to change things over the weekend, but that is what is coming up weekend, but that is what is coming up on sunday. let's take a look at today's papers. the front page of the times. foreign minister stoked stories about priti patel, so say allies or supporters of her. they've accused pro palestinian ministers, stoking stories about so—called secret meetings with israeli figures. the front page of the times has a picture of kevin spacey. the film is being reshot and edited as we reported yesterday, to take it out of the film. lead story is that david cameron claimed a £500 million investment deal, with which he may
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ta ke investment deal, with which he may take a job. the daily mail. britain's top police chief is quoting comments, saying teenage thugs should face harsher and more effective prison sentences. the sun has a special with gary lineker, saying, tax dodge on barbados villa, saying he sold a holiday home using an offshore firm which allowed him to avoid tax. gary lineker‘s spokesperson has denied any regularity. he himself tweeted and says he paid his tax thoroughly and says he paid his tax thoroughly and properly, however hard some people claim otherwise. carry on. i've found the front page. a bit of house work! sometimes they are here. i might have pinched it! do you want to pick up anywhere,
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mike? germany are in town to play a friendly and the page reflects that a lot of england players have withdrawn for various reasons. danny drinkwater has onlyjust come back into action. there is germany's player, saying germany wouldn't cry off like this. this is the first time they will use the video assistant refs. if the ball over the line? consult the referee! the video will have the final decision?m won't be the same! and this is incredible. you know we did that to snowdonia peter couple of weeks ago, how about a 50 foot wave? this is ridiculous. 0urthoughts how about a 50 foot wave? this is ridiculous. our thoughts go out to andrew cotton who broke his back. this is the huge wave off portugal which is renowned for the size of the waves. it is like several skyscrapers. we will be talking to
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him later. i was going to say. we will get an account of what that feels like. 0bviously will get an account of what that feels like. obviously a very scary situation. i've never surfed. it's a wonderful feeling. we are talking about equal pay, because today is equal pay day. it's been getting smaller, the average pay for men and women, the gap has been getting smaller, but it seems to have stalled at about ten or 11%. today marks the day where women would work the rest of the year for free and we reflect on how much less they would get paid. we are going to talk about that and why the narrowing of the gap has stalled. there are so many reasons why, if you look at the details, because it is illegal to pay men and women differently for the samejob, pay men and women differently for the same job, it looks at things like maternity leave, seniority and whether they are working full or part—time. whether they are working full or part-time. as the day changed
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lately? it is the 10th of november, the day on average where women would now be working for free. has that day got later? yes, because the gap has been getting smaller. so it used to be earlier in the year and has gradually been getting later in the year, for the rest of the year they would work for free. is there a prediction as to when it might be... hit december cause mac they will finally close the pay gap in 100 yea rs, finally close the pay gap in 100 years, so we finally close the pay gap in 100 years, so we will explain more about that later and wider gap still exists. and we were talking about christmas. a big weekend today because we will get a lot of the christmas adverts starting and we know every year all of the retailers put so much effort into it. john lewis offcourse will be the first up. they are spending £7 million on their advert. they spent 1
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up. they are spending £7 million on their advert. they spent1 million of the advert itself and 6 million will be spent on all of the marketing and everything that goes around it. is that more than ever before? it has steadied. i think they probably realised 7 million was a lot and probably enough. who is the main character? that's always the main character? that's always the joy. too many questions! a gassy monster, apparently. i'vejust read that this morning. apparently this morning —— monster lives under the bed... and is flatulent. we've just had the telegraph delivered. it just we've just had the telegraph delivered. itjust arrived, just in time. the front page talks offcourse about theresa may and the warning to pro european tory rebels. she will not tolerate any attempts to undermine brexit. we will of course be discussing that throughout the programme this morning. it was one of the bloodiest battles
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of the first world war. hundreds of thousands of young men were killed or wounded at the battle of the somme. as armistice day approaches, an artist has made it his mission to remember the fallen in a unique way. he's creating more than 72,000 figurines, one for each of the men whose bodies were never found. it was called the war to end all wa rs it was called the war to end all wars and when you see this physical representation of 19,240, the number of men killed onjust the representation of 19,240, the number of men killed on just the first day of men killed on just the first day of the battle of the somme, you understand how unimaginable any future wars would have been. but we know different. this is the artist rob hurd's tribute to those who lost their lives. it's so important that that number is physical iced in any way it can be. to understand that
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these aren't just numbers, way it can be. to understand that these aren'tjust numbers, these we re these aren'tjust numbers, these were men and they still are. the first shrouds were laid out in exeter and bristol last autumn. each figure deserves its moment in time. and for the past four years, rob has covered these figurines with plastic and flexiblejoints covered these figurines with plastic and flexible joints to allow a natural form and flexible joints to allow a naturalform in and flexible joints to allow a natural form in the tiny handstitched shrouds. he is working 12 hours a day, self—funded, and now has a new goal, 72,396, one for every man who died at the somme and whose bodies were never recovered. when you understand or you try to think what these men suffered, how they died, they didn't die easy, they died, they didn't die easy, they died, they didn't die easy, they died hard and i think, how can i say this is hard work when you are dealing with that? it gives me a great sense of perspective. when you think about all the lights that were
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lost, it brings it into focus. nor young's great uncle died on that first day. 19—year—old ronald was never found. my grandfather never spoke about it and when i spoke to my father he said it was a conversation in never had and i can only assume it was too tough to talk about. it's important that we remember these things, that these faces are notjust remember these things, that these faces are not just forgotten, what they did for us and for the future. and there's interest from a new generation 100 years on. these a—level students, the same age as some who fought in the great wall, are studying rob's work. —— great war. the shrouds from the somme will be laid out in london to mark the centenary be laid out in london to mark the ce nte nary of be laid out in london to mark the centenary of the first world war‘s and and today there is a public appealfor any and and today there is a public appeal for any family personal information about the 72,000. we
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hope that people will be inspired by the artwork, just as we were, to go out and find out more about these people, to put faces to those names, to put life back into the dead and that's why are really proud to be working with shrouds of the somme, to ask the nation to go and seek these stories and help us retell the story is for a new generation. rob has placed all the names of these boards. he is committed to creating a shroud for each man, one by one, to make hundreds, thousands, tens of thousands, lest we forget. worth saying as well, later our correspondent will be live in passchendaele, where they are commemorating 100 years with a number of events. our cameras will be there later. still to come this morning: here you have to look four or five
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ways before you can cross the street. it's quite a big difference. we'll meet the teenagers from the world's most remote island, the british territory of tristan da cuhna, which has a population ofjust 259 as they get to grips with city life and prepare to study in the uk. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the rac is calling on the government to make it easierfor drivers to check whether their vehicles could fall foul of new emissions rules in the capital. the motoring group says many car owners aren't clear how london's new toxicity charge works, and are also confused by the ultra low emission zones, which will be introduced in 2019. the department for transport says it's working with the dvla to make information available. the funeral‘s due to take place today of a london film maker, who was killed while working
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alongside kurdish forces. fighting so—called islamic state militants in syria. mehmet aksoy died when the military base in which he was stationed was attacked by is fighters in september. members of london's kurdish community will take part in his funeral procession through haringey later. three men have been convicted for their part in a violent brawl in south london that left a teenager with a freight did spine and a bleed on the brain. 17—year—old reker ahmed suffered life changing injuries when he was attacked in croydon in march this year. george walder, liam neylon and kurt killick were each convicted of two counts of violent disorder. part of an east london council estate is to go on display at the victoria & albert museum as a way of showcasing brutalist architecture. the three storey section includes two flats, exterior facades and interior staircases. it's been acquired from robin hood gardens in poplar, which is going to be demolished. the v&a describes it as a "significant example of the brutalist movement",
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which emerged in the ‘505. a roman temple, which has been painstakingly reconstructed beneath the ground in the heart of london, is opening to the public next week. the temple of mithras was first uncovered in the 19505, but was moved to make way for building work. it's now been reinstated at its original site beneath the new bloomberg headquarters near mansion house. archaeologists are used to taking things apart, not putting things back together, so it was a big challenge, but we are really fortu nate challenge, but we are really fortunate because the original excavation drawings were excellent and because there has been so much interest in this discovery. travel now. it's all looking good so far on the tube — no reported problems on any of those lines there. it's fairly quiet on the roads too actually. here's how it looks at the blackwall tunnel, no change there this morning. it's slow northbound from blackwall lane. and in notting hill, colville terrace is still closed
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for a police investigation between portobello road and colville road. over to the elizabeth rizzini now, with the weather. good morning. a much nicer day of weather today and we should all see some sunshine. but once again it's a damp, grey and drizzly start. milder than yesterday and we won't have to wait too long for the brightness to come through. a sunny afternoon for many of us and the wind will gradually ease. top temperatures 11— 12 celsius. if you are going out this evening it should be dry, a train through the early hours, some of it heavy and not clearing until saturday morning. then it turns colder the rest of the weekend. a chilly northerly wind and some sunshine. there's more from us in half an hour and of course more news travel and weather on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga. bye bye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. could your car be banned in certain cities when new pollution rules kick in? the rac says millions of drivers face confusion over the issue, we'll ask who is set to be affected by the roll—out of clean air zones.
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this is the moment a british surfer was wiped out riding a monster wave. his back was broken after being crushed by the 60—foot wave. he'lljoin us live from his hospital bed to share his story of survival. afamily affair. the actor, tobyjones, will be on the sofa to talk about being directed by his brother in the psychological thriller kaleidoscope, the story of a former convict challenged by the arrival of his controlling mother. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. theresa may has warned pro—eu conservatives she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process. in a sign of her intent she has outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment the uk will leave the european union. 11pm on the 29th of march, 2019. the man responsible for writing the article 50 withdrawal process, crossbench peer lord john kerr, says brexit could still be reversed. a new study
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is recommending that women who have had the hpv vaccine only need three smear had the hpv vaccine only need three smear tests in their lives, rather than the 12 hour currently offered. the vaccine has been given to girls aged 11—13 since 2008. the study, funded by cancer research uk comes ahead of proposed changes to the nhs was cervical screening programme, in q4 2019. all cervical cancer is linked to hbv infection, and having the vaccine dramatically reduces the chances of having an infection, and also having cervical cards. ashley hpv. screening looks for early chances but the cancer is developing, and having the vaccine is rather slack it have those changes are less likely to develop cancer, so you changes are less likely to develop cancer, so you do not need that screening is often. president trump has arrived in vietnam as he continues his tour of south—east asia. he's due to speak at a trade conference attended by other world leaders shortly, where he'll emphasize the importance of america's relations in the region. there's also a suggestion that later he'll have a private meeting with russia's president putin.
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facebook‘s founding president has said he's worried about the effect the site is having on society. sean parker, who says he no longer uses social media, said the network was built on "exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology", and he was concerned about what it was "doing to children's brains". the unintended consequences of a network, when it grows to 1 billion or 2 billion people, and it literally changes your relationship with society, with each other, you know, it probably interferes with our activity in weird ways. god only knows what it is doing to our children's brains. 0r or the more than half of england's secondary schools could not offer gcse computer science in 2015—16, according to the uk's leading
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computer science academy. the royal society convert tenfold increase in the spending on computer education over the next five years. the department for education says it has pledged £5 million to specialist teacher training since 2012, and that computer science gcse entries continue to rise more quickly than any other subject. the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actor portia de rossi, who is married to the us talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her "how important it was to have chemistry off—screen" before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc that the actor had no comment. those are the main story this morning. mike has this what for us. good morning. lots of nations have them, those moments in time you look back on for generations, with a sense of injustice. the republic of ireland had thierry henry using his
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hands to score in france, they missed out. frank lampard, his goal being under the line against germany in 2010. maradona. of course, the hand of god. northern ireland, they can still get through. it is only the end of the first leg. so we want to soothe their frustration. they feel hard done by after a controversial penalty against them. it is only the first leg, they have another chance against switzerland on sunday evening. have northern ireland's chances of a first world cup appearance in 32 years been ruined by a terrible refereeing decision? michael 0'neill‘s side face an uphill struggle if they're to qualify for russia next year after losing their play—off first leg 1—0 to switzerland last night. stoke forward, shaqiri's second half volley was blocked by corry evans and the referee pointed to the spot, even though he appeared to have been hit on the shoulder as he took evasive action. ricardo rodriguez then score the only goal of the game. the second leg is in basle on sunday. it is staggering in this day and age
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when the stakes are so high at this level of the game that something like that, it is obviously a game changer, but dwelling on it isn't going to help us. whether it is the worst, whatever it is, whatever label you want to put on it is irrelevant. the most important thing is that we use it in the right way and overcome it. we channel it into the game on sunday night. lots of people on social media were reaching for what the laws of the game say about handball. first thing they say is that the contact has to be deliberate. how do referees decide if it is deliberate? well it's only a handball if the hand moves towards the ball. the referee must also consider the distance between the opponent and the ball to assess if the handball was unavoidable or not and the laws also say the position of the hand does not necessarily mean that there is an infringement, you have to take all of these factors into consideration. and so of course that is the debate
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about where the arm and the hand and, and where the shoulder begins. that will be going on into the weekend. in the other world cup play—off croatia beat greece in zagreb. this gift from the greeks let andrej kramaric in to make it 4—1 just after half—time. that's how it finished. the second leg is in athens on sunday. scotland were also in action last night. they lost their friendly 1—0 to the netherlands in aberdeen. former manchester united winger memphis depay scored just before the break. the scottish fa have confirmed that interim boss malky mackay is not in the running to become permenant manager. wales face the french in paris, while for england, tottenham midfielder eric dier wolf caps and his team for the first time as they face world champions germany in an international friendly at wembley. both sets of players will wear poppies, the germans for the first time in their history,
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after fifa relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. tonight's match will also mark the first time video assistant referee technology has been used at wembley. so the players, to be playing in front of a full house, twice, at wembley, against top teams, those are the games you live for. and we are the games you live for. and we are going to learn a hell of a lot about everything. i have learned an enormous amount already this week from the process. so i think, i am just looking forward to the games and seeing how the lights go. —— lads. manchester city thrashed lillestrom 5—0 in the first leg of their women's champions league last sixteen tie in norway. demi stokes and isobel christiansen put city 2—0 up before the interval. then claire emslie and a brace from jane ross completed the rout as city maintained their 100% record in the competition. day two of the one—off women's ashes
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test match between australia and england in sydney. a crucial match, a winfor england in sydney. a crucial match, a win for australia will see them go 8-2 a win for australia will see them go 8—2 up in this multiformat series. that is enough to lead —— to see them regain the urn. england were bowled out in their first innings this morning. marsh was the last wicket to fall. tea is being taken, and in reply, australia are going well, but they have just lost their first wicket. as many as out. —— bev mooney is out. britain's lizzy yarnold won a bronze medal in the opening race of the new skeleton world cup season in lake placid, in the usa yesterday. the reigning olympic champion, who's looking to defend her title next february in south korea, moved up from fifth after her first run to finish third. yarnold came just ahead of fellow brit laura deas, who finish fifth. so we are all the way now to the winter olympics. no rest for the
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sliders. and how northern ireland could have done without that video system rather technology last night. i know people say that it interrupts the game, but northern ireland fans wouldn't have minded it, if the penalty was given. yes, we will talk more about that through the morning. thank you, might. by march next year, councils across the uk are expected to publish plans to improve air quality in their area. it's thought many of them may consider restricting the number of cars entering certain zones — or even charging drivers. one of the things you might need to know is what's known as your euro standard, basically a way of finding out how clean your car is. but the rac says many drivers are going to be left thoroughly confused. we asked people in manchester if they knew about the plans. no, not really. you mean... what do you mean by that? can you repeat the question? do you know what your car's euro emissions category is? never heard of it. why should you have to pay to drive
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around? why should you have to pay to drive around ? you why should you have to pay to drive around? you pay tax and insurance already anyway. i wouldn't be happy. not really, no! to be honest, i was behind a black cab today and i had to put up my windows because the fumes that were coming from it were discussing. —— are disgusting. fumes that were coming from it were discussing. -- are disgusting. what difference would it make? do you know? even if you could know what it is giving, you would still use your car. an interesting point. rac chief engineer david bisleyjoins us. the lady there in manchester said, what difference would it make? you still have to drive your car, regardless of knowing this euro standard, which obviously not many people have heard of either. no. clearly we need colin rea. pollution from nitrogen dioxide causes a substantial number of premature deaths each year. so it is right that we tackle the worst areas of poorair right that we tackle the worst areas of poor air quality. and it makes sense to use the emissions standard
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associated with a vehicle in order to determine whether that a vehicle should be discouraged from driving into an area. the problem, of course, is that just into an area. the problem, of course, is thatjust in this —— just as in your interviews, most people in the research we did, 38% of people, they had never heard of the euro standard. two thirds of people had no idea what a euro standard their vehicle complied with. we might say that is something for the future, but actually, in london, now, we have already got key charge. in18 now, we have already got key charge. in 18 months, we will have further charges introduced. those are based on the euro emissions standard. people are buying cars now and they wa nt to people are buying cars now and they want to know what standard that vehicle complies with. so if somebody is sitting at home listening to what you are seeing right now and thinking, i don't know what mine is either, and by all accou nts what mine is either, and by all accounts that is a lot of people,
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well, what do you do? how do you find out this information? the only way you can be confident at the moment is to ask your manufacturer, the deal, about the vehicle concerned. these standards change over a period. so, for example, when the recent euro six standard came m, the recent euro six standard came in, vehicle started to come onto the road in september 2014, but it was up road in september 2014, but it was up to two years before all of the vehicles you bought were to the new standard. i am going to be confused. like a lot of people, i don't drive a new car. supposing you drive a seven—year—old car, you are saying, what, you drive anderson, you phone up what, you drive anderson, you phone upa nissan what, you drive anderson, you phone up a nissan dealership and say, i've got a seven—year—old whatever, and they are going to be able to tell you over the phone, and you can take that as gospel? they may, or they may not. there is a government website run by the vehicle certification agency, and if you know a lot of detail about the
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vehicle, then there is the ability to look up... notjust your registration? no, that is exactly what we think you need. you need a simple look up system. dvla already have a very user—friendly system which you can plug a registration number in two, and it will give you the basic information about their vehicle. now, all we need to do is, effectively, add a line to that. that will require work, obviously, by dvla to do that. what they are very good at these sorts of systems. is there any indication that could happen? there is discussion about it. i think government have recognised the need, the point is, there is an urgency about this. people are buying vehicles today which in 18 months time they will wa nt to which in 18 months time they will want to drive into central london. there are other cities consulting. scotla nd there are other cities consulting. scotland is consulting on schemes in four cities at the moment. scotland is consulting on schemes in four cities at the moment. people want to know whether the
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vehicles they fly today, especially use vehicles, will comply with the releva nt use vehicles, will comply with the relevant standards. very interesting. david bisley, thank you. chief engineer with the rac. it is coming up to 6:45 a.m.. the main stories: theresa may said written's departure date from the eu is to be enshrined in law and she will not tolerate any attempt to block the process. women have been —— who have been vaccinated against cervical cancer may only need three smear cervical cancer may only need three smear tests in their lifetime, according to a new study. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. let's go straight into the weekend detail. a bit of rain around across parts of wales and southern england through the week. clearing early on sunday and for sunday most of us have sun and showers. no rain in the south on saturday. this is the main thing for
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the weekend. turning colder. single figure temperatures by sunday. some sunshine to compensate, but a brisk northerly wind. it is still friday, so northerly wind. it is still friday, so let's get some detail for what is happening this morning. lots of showers across northern and western parts of scotland at the moment and strong winds as well. hail and thunder possible and some snow on the higher hills above 300 metres. some of those showers into northern ireland and northern england. a large part of northern england has cloud and drizzle. that's clearing southwards and won't be long before the sun comes out morning. many of us will get some pleasant sunshine today. showers continue in northern and western scotland. southeast scotla nd and western scotland. southeast scotland has plenty of sunshine. sunny spells northern ireland. showers running in north—west england, maybe the odd one in the wales and some into the midlands. a range of temperatures for friday. double figures across parts of wales
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and southern england, but already chilly across scotland and tonight where the windfall flight we will have a touch of frost in places. a ba few icy patches. you will notice for northern ireland there will be rain moving in this evening and that will push across much of england and wales as the night goes on, keeping the temperature up here. it's really just in scotland in the clear spells asa just in scotland in the clear spells as a touch of frost. sunshine to start tomorrow. that sunshine develops into northern england and the east midlands. you will see we keep a lot of cloud in southern parts of wales and england and still outbreaks of rain in south wales, south—west england and maybe towards hampshire and! south—west england and maybe towards hampshire and i love of —— isle of wight throughout saturday. maybe 13— 14. 6-7 in wight throughout saturday. maybe 13— 14. 6—7 in scotland, with sunshine. through saturday evening and night the rain may turn heavierfor a time
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in south wales and southern england. when that clears on sunday, this colder air comes right through southwards across the uk on a stronger wind. part two of the weekend on sunday will feel colder for all of us in the stronger wind, but any will be dry, with sunshine. some showers in the north sea, irish sea coast, some for wales and the south—west. some sunshine, a chilly. at least there's sunshine. that always makes it better. of course! 0ut that always makes it better. of course! out of the wind, there is sunshine. it would feel too bad. thanks very much. there's still a gap between the average pay for men and women and it could take 100 years to close it completely. ben has more. todayis today is equal payday, we will explain and what it means. it's illegalfor men and women doing the same work to be paid differently. but if you look at average pay for everyone, men still do far better than women.
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women still, on average, earn 10% less than men. that gap has got smaller, but only by a little bit. it shrank byjust 0.4% over the last five years. according to campaign group the fawcett society it could take over 100 years to close the gap completely. jemima 0lchawski is head of policy and insight at the fawcett society. good morning. why are we still talking about this in this day and age, that there is still a gap between what men and women get paid? the pay gap is an indicator of many ways women are excluded from or disadvantaged in our economy. that includes things like having a divided labour market, the women tend to cluster in jobs that are lowest paid, while men dominate the highest—paid jobs. men dominate the highest—paid jobs. men dominate seniorjobs and there are in the six ftse100 executives that
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are women, at 80% of care workers, some of the lowest paid people in our economy, our women. and discrimination is still an issue. even though it still illegal we see cases still where women are paid less for work of equal value. and we also see consistently that women have more care and responsibility, making it difficult for them to do some of your more desk space, lord hoursjobs and some of your more desk space, lord hours jobs and they tend to get stuck in lower quality part—time work, which is often part—time paid. —— long hours. work, which is often part—time paid. -- long hours. we said today is equal pay day. explain that for some people who might not know what that is. after today women are effectively not getting paid between now and the end of the year, relative to men, because of the difference. we are calling on people to use this moment to recognise that no one should be working day for free, let alone two months, and to make the gap less. so we would like the government to challenge employers and require them to make
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jobs flex will by default. if you are an employer we are saying become are an employer we are saying become a real living wage employer, because 60% of people who are less than the living wage are women and as individuals there are things you can do. —— as individuals. there are things like talking about pay with your colleagues. pay gap reporting staff this year. we seen a number of initiatives that try to make it more transparent. the bbc hasjust initiatives that try to make it more transparent. the bbc has just gone through it and other organisations are doing similar things. how helpful is that? i guess it makes a difference, but we are still talking about 100 years to close this gap. transparency is important because if we don't know what the problem is we can't solve it. but you need to be beyond the headline figures to understand the nuances and of course knowledge on its own isn't enough. we have no better pay gap for decades, but you need action to address it. you need more flex will working, more support for fathers that they can support their partners. —— flexible working. and
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we need to change the balance of who does whatjobs. we need to change the balance of who does what jobs. is it really comparable? there are so many different factors that determine how much people get paid. how long they've been there, maybe their experience, can you really compared like—for—like? experience, can you really compared like-for-like? i think it the questions you have to ask is why do those comparisons mean that consistently women come out worse? women in similar roles still owed less. for example, there has been research looking at managers with similar levels of responsibility and there is a pay gap there. women are less likely to get a bonus and when they do that bonus is smaller. so although people are different as individuals, it consistently women who are getting disadvantaged and valued less. really interesting as a subject and still staggering that it will take 100 years to close that 93p- will take 100 years to close that gap. thanks for explaining some of that. i will be back after seven. thanks very much. sometimes what you need for a story
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isa sometimes what you need for a story is a globe. i think we can introduce one now. we are bringing it down... very calmly and gently. give it some space. the reason it is here today, we want to introduce you to the world's most remote inhabited island, with a population of just 259 remote inhabited island, with a population ofjust 259 people. and it's so small you'd struggle to pick it out on the globe. it has just one school, one hospital, one policeman and only nine different family surnames. now, three students have left the british territory and its relative tranquillity for the hustle and bustle of the uk in order to study for their a—levels. brea kfast‘s graham satchell has been to meet them. jade, janice and rhianna are long
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way from home and slightly overawed about the experience of being in london. it's very big. so many people! is that where they keep the crown jewels, all people! is that where they keep the crownjewels, all used people! is that where they keep the crown jewels, all used to? coming from somewhere where there is little people to somewhere like this, it's a big difference. we don't have very much traffic on the island and here you have to look like four or five ways before you can cross a street and stuff. it's like, yeah, quite a big difference, really. the girls are in england to study for their a levels, but home is the british territory of tristan da cuhna. halfway between south africa and south america, it's a tiny volcanic island in the south atlantic ocean. from the see the volcano dominates
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everything. there'sjust from the see the volcano dominates everything. there's just one village on the eyelid. the total population, 259, almost all are descended from the original settlers 200 years ago. fishing and farming. it is a very simple lifestyle. you live how your a ncestors simple lifestyle. you live how your ancestors did basically. nothing has the market —— erratically. ancestors did basically. nothing has the market -- erratically. everyone is very close. it's a small community. everybody helps each other. i think we are all equal and we are all treated equally as well. tristan da cuhna is the most remote inhabited island on earth. there is no airport, a boat comes once every two months and it's a seven—day sale to cape town. even though our island is so isolated, as individuals you are never alone, whereas in london is not isolated, but as an individual because you don't know anybody you sometimes feel isolated. but on tristan it impossible for you
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to feel alone. so this is the original co— partnership that was signed by the original settlers, including ian glass. he was your great—grandfather? including ian glass. he was your great-grandfather? yes the girls have come here to see an extraordinary document. it is now 200 years to the day since it was signed. written by their great, great, great grandfather, it describes how the community will live, how everyone will be equal with no one assuming superiority. it is the first time the girls have seen is the first time the girls have seen the document, the first time they've heard of it. 200 years we have followed that document without even knowing we were following it, which is pretty incredible. 1961 and a catastrophe that threatened the island's existence. volcano erupted. the entire population of the eyelid was evacuated to england. the
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british government thought the islanders would stay but as soon as they could they all went home. islanders would stay but as soon as they could they all went homelj think you will always be brought at tomb tristan in some way. i think it's a great place to raise a family. and you know everyone. when i settle down i'll definitely go home. i had never heard of it. never. they say the only complication they haveis they say the only complication they have is a boat every two months. that's the only way to get on or off. what they are really happy with it and make a really valid point about cities, feeling isolated in a city, it was people are too busy to say hello. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the funeral is due to take base
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today the london filmmaker who was killed alongside kurdish forces fighting so—called islamic state militants in syria. mehmet aksoy died when the military base in which he was stationed was attacked by is fighters in september. members of london's kurdish community will take part in his funeral procession through haringey later. his sister described him as a family man who was committed to the battle forjustice. three men have been convicted for their part in a violent brawl in south london that left a teenager with a fractured spine and a bleed on the brain. 17—year—old reker ahmed suffered life changing injuries when he was attacked in croydon in march this year. george walder, liam neylon and kurt killick were each convicted of two counts of violent disorder. george walder, liam neylon and kurt killick were each convicted of two counts of violent disorder. a roman temple, which has been painstakingly reconstructed beneath the ground in the heart of london, is opening to the public next week. the temple of mithras was first uncovered in the 19505, but was moved to make way for building work.
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it's now been reinstated at its original site beneath the new bloomberg headquarters near mansion house. archaeologists are used to taking things apart, not putting things back together, so it was a big challenge, but we were really fortunate because the original excavation drawings were excellent and because there had been so much interest in this discovery in 1954. travel now. it's all looking good so far on the tube — no reported problems on any of those lines there. it's fairly quiet on the roads too. here's how it looks at the blackwall tunnel — no change there this morning. it's slow northbound from blackwall lane. and in notting hill, colville terrace is still closed for a police investigation between portobello road and colville road. over to the elizabeth rizzini now, with the weather. good morning. a much nicer day of weather today and we should all see some sunshine, especially this afternoon.
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but once again it's a damp, grey and drizzly start. milder than yesterday and we won't have to wait too long for that brightness and sunshine to come through. that lasts into the afternoon. a breezy start. and the wind will gradually ease. highs of 11—12 celsius. if you are going out this even he should be dry but there will be rain coming in from the west through the early hours. some of this could be quite heavy. temperatures dropping off at first and then rising into tomorrow morning. a fairly mild start today, but it will be wet. the rain hanging around for much of the morning and then gradually clearing into saturday afternoon and then it will start to feel cold. temperatures around 30 degrees on saturday afternoon, but it will get colder and it will be chilly on sunday, with a brisk northerly wind, a frost to stop the new working
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week. there's more from us in half an hour and of course more news travel and weather on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the countdown to brexit — theresa may reveals plans to put britain's departure date in law. the prime minister wants parliament to commit to leaving the eu at 11:00pm on the 29th march 2019. in a newspaper interview, mrs may warns pro—european conservatives she "will not tolerate" any attempts to block brexit. good morning. it's friday, the 10th of november. also this morning, a new approach to cervical cancer. a study suggests millions of women could soon need fewer smear tests throughout their lives. president trump arrives in vietnam on the latest stop of his tour of asia and a potential meeting
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with vladimir putin. in sport, could a controversial penalty decision have cost northern ireland a place in the world cup, as they go 1—0 down to switzerland after the first leg of their play—off in belfast? good morning. they're essential for work, and for life, so just why aren't more children being taught computer skills at school? i'll be finding out. and blasting his way into the history books. after seven o'clock we will bejoined history books. after seven o'clock we will be joined on the sofa by the record—breaking rocket man. and nick has the weather. good morning. a damp start for many this morning, but sunshine is on the way. for most of us, at some stage, we will see sunshine over the weekend as well. the main story this weekend, it will be turning colder from the north, especially by sunday, in a brisk northerly wind. all your forecasts for today the
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weekend coming up the next half—hour. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may has warned pro—eu conservatives that she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process. in a sign of her intent, she's outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment that britain will leave the european union, 11pm on 29th march 2019. 0ur political correspondent emma vardy is in westminster for us. emma, what exactly does she want to do and why? we did know the date, didn't we? what is the significance of making this into law? this is really the prime minister under —— underlining her commitment to brexit. her message is not to go against the democratic will of the british people. her putting this saturday is no coincidence. it comes ahead of the eu withdrawal bill, due to be scrutinised by mps in parliament next week. have a listen to what theresa may had to sail this in her article the telegraph today. —— had
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to say on this. but in what is being seen as a controversial intervention by the man who actually drafted that key eu withdrawal clause himself, lord kirk, what he is accusing theresa may today is misleading voters, saying that in fact we could still change our minds at any stage. lord coejoins a number of prominent voices, like gordon brown and tony blair, who have added their own arguments to this. —— lord kerr. they say we could leave the door open to a rethink of brexit,
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possibly a referendum again on brexit. will this intervention make any difference? 0n the one hand, he isa any difference? 0n the one hand, he is a credible voice. he will help with those remain arguments, saying that there is still time to change our minds. —— remainer. those on the leg side say that it is an absurd and pointless statement, trying to backslide on the will of the british people. we'll speak to the conservative mp peter bone and labour's chuka umunna about this just after 7:30. a new study is recommending a major change in the way women are screened for cervical cancer. it suggests those who've been vaccinated against the hpv virus need only have three smear tests during their life, rather than the 12 currently offered. 0ur healthhcorrespondent sophie hutchinson reports. cervical cancer is a dangerous disease and it is also one of the most preventable cancers, but there's been concern about a steady drop in the number of women going for screening in the past few years.
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currently women aged 25 to 49 are offered smear tests every four years and then every five years from the age of 50 to 64, but for almost a decade girls aged 11 to 13 have been given a vaccine against the cancer—causing virus hpv. today's study published in the internationaljournal of cancer is the vaccine reduces the chance of cancer by 70% and women who have had it only need to undergo three smear tests during their lives, instead of the normal 12, at the age of 30, 40 and 55. all cervical cancers are linked to hpv infection and having the vaccination dramatically reduces the chances of having the infection and also having cervical cancer. screening looks for early changes that could suggest cancer is developing and quite simply having the vaccine means you are less likely to have those changes and less likely to develop cancer, so you don't need screening quite so often. the study comes ahead of changes to the screening programme
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in england for 2019 and similar adjustment in scotland and wales. new, more advanced lab testing is expected to be introduced, which could mean fewer smear tests for all women, whether vaccinated or not. and after eight o'clock will be joined i representative from cancer research uk, and a woman diagnosed with cervical cancer. president trump has arrived in vietnam, as he continues his tour of south—east asia. in the past hour, he's been giving a speech at a trade conference attended by regional political leaders. let's get the latest from our correspondent, aleem maqbool who's in vietnam for us this morning. donald trump very clear with his message again. yes, good morning. it is not often that the apec summit is headline news, but donald trump is here, so it is. it has been a really interesting trip to asia. there was a lot of criticism of donald trump
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while he was in beijing, as he was yesterday. i saw him give a speech and there was very little criticism of china rattled. —— at all. he said china had taken advantage of the us in the past, but he didn't blame china, he blames previous american presidents. he has come here and he has levelled much mocked this is at china and has said that america will not be taken advantage of any more. what he hasn't come here with, or across to asia with, is what other american presidents have tried to do. they have said, look, we want societies to change, we want human rights abuses to stop, we want you to adopt american values. he doesn't appear to care about any of those things. what he is about is a deal for america. some of those who would have wa nted for america. some of those who would have wanted him to perhaps be more critical of what is going on in this region would be disappointed, but the supporters of his back home will certainly be very happy with what they have heard here, that america first message they have become used
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to. thank you. facebook's founding president says he is worried about the effect the site is having on society. john parker, who says he no longer uses social media, says the network is built on exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology and he is concerned about what it is doing to children's reigns. —— brains. the unintended consequences of a network, when it grows to 1 billion or 2 billion people, and it literally changes your relationship with society, with each other, you know, it probably interferes with our activity in weird ways. god only knows what it is doing to our children's brains. actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actor, portia de rossi, made the allegation in a tweet. she says that
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during a film audition, mr seagal told her how important it was to have chemistry of screen before underpin his trousers. his manager told the bbc the actor had no comment. what do you get if you put together these old doctor who outfits? you mash them up, and you get this. well, once they are mashed up, they are going to form a new outfit for doctor who. that isjodie whittaker. 0bviously doctor who. that isjodie whittaker. obviously we can show you at the moment. it is an amalgamation of those outfits. she has long grey coat, the staff of the stripes, the high waisted trousers. —— scarf with the stripes. if you want to see that, you can check our website. the
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13th doctor boards the tardis next year. coming up a little bit later on axis, we'll be speaking to the record—setting man. he set a world record—setting man. he set a world record for flying the firstjet powered the suit. yesterday, the first minister of wales carwyn jones defended his handling of the misconduct allegations against a labour minister who is believed to have taken his own life. he said he had no choice but to sack carl sergeant who died on tuesday. we are all very shocked by what happened last week. there is great hurt. banga. —— anger. and bewilderment. carl was my friend. in all the years i knew him, i never had a cross word with him, never argued with him. in 14 years, i did all that i could to make sure
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everything was being done by the book. i had an alternative to take the action that i did. and i hope that people will understand that. wales has lost a person of great warmth, ability and charisma. joining us now from our cardiff newsroom is leighton andrews who was a member of welsh government and is a friend of the sargeant family. thank you very much for your time this morning. first of all, i know you are close to carl sergeant‘s family. have you had a chance to speak to them, or get any response from them, since carwynjones spoke yesterday? i have spoken to a member of the family but i am not the family spokesperson and i think if they have anything to say they will say that formally through their solicitor in due course. say that formally through their solicitor in due courselj appreciate that and understand the sensitivities involved. what did you, then, as a friend and someone who is clearly closely linked to what has happened, what did you make of what was said yesterday? well,
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let me start by saying, i was pleased that the first minister went on record, on camera, to praise the achievements of carl sergeant as a minister. it was important that he did that, and i know the first minister himself will have been traumatised by what has happened. the truth is that without carl sergeant, carwyn the truth is that without carl sergeant, ca rwyn jones the truth is that without carl sergeant, carwynjones would not be first minister. he played a very important role in carwynjones' leadership election in 2009, particularly mobilising trade unions and members of parliament in support of:, and and members of parliament in support of: , and that and members of parliament in support of:, and that needs to be part of this context. —— support of carwyn. the difficulty is that in north wales, in carl sergea nt‘s the difficulty is that in north wales, in carl sergeant‘s own constituency, the town of connors quay where he grew up and still lived, yesterday's statement will be seen as lived, yesterday's statement will be seen as too little, too late. the family had previously made the point that adding to carl sergeant‘s
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stress in this circumstance was the fa ct stress in this circumstance was the fact that the allegations, the information, was not put to him, that nobody was told what the allegations were. what is your understanding of how that contributed to what happened? well, it is true that even on tuesday morning, carl was unaware of the full details of the allegations. it is also true, of course, that it was known the process would go well into january of next year. so there was going to be no short conclusion to this. it was going to be hell for him and his family for quite some time. i am not sure how much you are either happy or care to share with us about, speaking to carl sergeant, how do you spoken to him during this interim period at all? did you have
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any contact? i had some contact with him,i any contact? i had some contact with him, ididn't any contact? i had some contact with him, i didn't speak with him, but i have spoken with a number of friends who had been speaking to him regularly over that weekend. yes, i have had some contact with him. i know from the people who had more contact with him that he was severely troubled by the process they were going through. i don't think that was eased by the remarks that were made by the first minister on monday. when he expanded on the allegations. i think there is a strong feeling that having handed the process over to the labour party, people should not then have been further commenting on it. there is no question that in the minds of ca rl‘s is no question that in the minds of carl's friends, those comments from the first minister on monday intensified the pressure on carl. ca rwyn
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intensified the pressure on carl. carwyn jones yesterday said everything was done by the book, but people have an opinion as to whether that's the case. the party and those individuals are having to balance up what they had to do by the book, if you accept that phrase, alongside their duty of care to carl sargeant himself. how do you think they have judged that? well there was no duty of care, judged that? well there was no duty of ca re, let's judged that? well there was no duty of care, let's be clear about that. there was no duty of care to carl sa rg ea nt there was no duty of care to carl sargeant in this process. i've heard things said, that he was offered support and so on. well, there was no support, that's got to be put on the record. in respect of doing things by the book, if you do things by the book, if you have an enquiry like this in a company or in local government or a third sector organisations, then your enquiry is conducted behind closed doors. you don't have a situation where... which we had in this instance, where the first minister is doing
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television interviews elaborating on the allegations. thank you very much for your time this morning and sharing your thoughts with us. that was a friend of carl sargeant sharing some of his thoughts and some of the thoughts of the family as well. let's find out what's happening with the weather ahead of the weekend. let's find out what's happening with the weather ahead of the weekend. it is getting chilly. it is. there will be some sunshine around, but that's not the whole story. there will be some rain for some of us, especially on saturday. south wales and southern england will see it gone by early sunday. you may catch a shower on sunday, but for all of us it will be a much colder date, especially in the north with the wind. there will be some sunshine around. let's get to the detail of what's happening this morning. lots of showers pushing
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into northern and western scotland. moving through quickly. a strong and gusty wind. hail and thunder possible and snow above 300 metres. that's how cold it is in scotland. a couple of showers to northern ireland and northern england. for the rest of england and wales it is quite cloudy right now. patchy rain and drizzle missing south will stop that clears southwards and we get some sunshine developing. plenty of their skies today, with sunny spells. the wind easing through the day. staying breezy. still showers in northern and western scotland. maybe some for the north—east of wales and the midlands. many places having a dry afternoon, with a range of temperatures. still double figures for many. northern england and scotland, into single figures. tonight will stay chilly in scotland. clear skies and a few showers. an area of free this evening into northern ireland, so be
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aware of that. some of that could be heavy, with the breeze picking up. of course that keeps that average app. in the northern scotland there could be a touch of frost. sunny spells throughout in scotland, with the odd shower tomorrow for armistice day. brightening up and northern england into the east midlands. to the south of that we keep the cloud and even through saturday afternoon still some outbreaks of rain in south wales and parts of southern england, especially into the south—west. double—figure temperatures. a range of temperatures. 0n double—figure temperatures. a range of temperatures. on saturday the rain turns heavierfor a time, affecting parts of south wales and southern england, but by the time we get the sunday morning it looks like that will clear quickly southwards and then on sunday the blue takes over a cross and then on sunday the blue takes over across the uk. although the arrows a long way north of the uk as well. that's where the air is coming from. although there will be quite a bit of sunshine around, we catch a
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few showers on the north —— north sea coast. for many it will be a dry and sunny second half to the weekend, but your eyes will no doubt be drawn to these temperatures. single figures. add on the wind and it will feel colder still. again, the sunshine for many of us on sunday. we've got sunshine, we're happy. thanks. so the pay gap between men and women is a hot topic at the moment and has been for some time. todayis moment and has been for some time. today is quite a significant day? yes, it marks equal pay day and a mark that point in the year by which women will basically be working for free for the rest of the year because of that gap, because they are paid less than men, they essentially work the rest of the yearfor essentially work the rest of the year for free. it's a significant time for people to talk about it. good morning. we are looking at this because the new research suggests it would be 100 years because before the pay gap closes. —— years before.
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men are consistently being paid more than women, despite high profile campaign to eradicate the gap. it has been getting smaller but progress has stalled in recent yea rs. progress has stalled in recent years. campaigners say businesses need to be more transparent about what it pays all of its staff. elsewhere, should uber drivers be classed as staff rather than self—employed? classed as staff rather than self—employed ? there will a classed as staff rather than self—employed? there will a —— will bea self—employed? there will a —— will be a ruling against the previous verdict, saying they should be considered star. that means we should get the national minimum wage. thejudgement should get the national minimum wage. the judgement could should get the national minimum wage. thejudgement could be referred to the supreme court, and they will need to develop all sorts of regulations. that will apply to all sorts of other businesses, like deliveroo. i will try not to be a bridge but it is that time of year. many of the big retailers will reveal the festive tv ads this weekend. they are all competing for
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our cash this christmas. that's the john lewis ad. it's an industry worth about 6 billion pounds. they will try to boost sales and profits. john lewis's advert will air tonight for the first time. they spent £1 million on the advert and will spend another £6 millionjust million on the advert and will spend another £6 million just to million on the advert and will spend another £6 millionjust to promote it. boots, house of fraser, waitrose and asda will all unveil their christmas ads later as well. get used to seeing this guy, called moz. was there any news about the noise as he makes? yes. mike was discussing this earlier with us. i do want to spoil it was it will be on tv for the first time tonight, but let's say moz is a little bit flatulent. 0k. that's all we need. thanks very much! there are more allegations of sexual harassment coming out of hollywood this morning. portia de rossi has
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accused steven seagal of one thing his trousers during a film audition. we can now talk to an entertainment journalist, whojoins us we can now talk to an entertainment journalist, who joins us from los angeles. thanks very much for joining us and good to see you again. what exactly has happened here? today portia de rossi tweeted about an experience she had in an audition with stevenson gaal, where he said something about, well, chemistry is important between actors and then unzipped his pants —— stevenson gaal. he said he fled from the room and immediately called her agent. but years ago, jenny mccarthy said that he insisted she undress in an audition and said, i know that there is no nudity in this film. but he said, yes, but there needs to be off—camera nudity. she didn't do it, she didn't get undressed, but she felt sorry for a
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lot of the other women who might have. now another woman has come out and said she was called to do some line readings with kevin spacey at a hotel and was told a female aged would be there and she wasn't. she said steven seagal insisted on showing her his gun and that really frightened her, but she left the room and said she had never seen a gun before. however, this story of steven seagal at one time was just a gigantic international —— he was an international action star and this has been eclipsed by all of this highly successful people. kevin spacey today, louis ck, harvey weinstein and so you've got a climate here where everyone is going, what's next? who is next? it
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seems the reporters are really asking for very tiny, ugly and very gross detail. we must make clear that the bbc has asked steven seagal‘s agent for comment and we have been told no comment will be made or no comment has been given yet. what is the mood like in hollywood? you yet. what is the mood like in hollywood ? you are yet. what is the mood like in hollywood? you are following what people are talking about. are we now infor people are talking about. are we now in for revelation or allegation after allegations now, as it appears people feel more free to call out bad behaviour? well, they feel more free to call out bad behaviour and certainly the me too movement has got people saying, we've been harassed, here is my story. i think there is fear that we are rushing to judgement. ifear that the there is fear that we are rushing to judgement. i fear that the stories have been buried in the past and
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some of the bad actors still won't be exposed. i think people are depressed and repulsed by the stories, because they are not romantic, they are not sexy, for the most pa rt romantic, they are not sexy, for the most part they are abusive and an seemly and not consensual and it really is one kind of ugly details story after another. i think one of the reasons people are coming forward is because they are kind of ashamed that they didn't come out sooner, where it could have helped someone sooner, where it could have helped someone and stopped a bad actor from... you know, a pervert, from, you know, abusing other people. so i think they are brave. harvey weinstein and kevin spacey, they wa nt weinstein and kevin spacey, they want them killed. i know i am exaggerating, but there is this high sense of anger and this is a time of
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year sought before the oscars and before the holidays, when everyone is talking about movies, and you can't talk about movies right now u nless can't talk about movies right now unless you talk about the actors and the recasting and the changes that have been made by these scandalous and very ugly revelations. very passionate about what's been going on. always good to talk to you. thanks very much. we are going to be talking to the inventor dubbed the real—life iron man. we saw these pictures yesterday. the world record, the fastest speed in a body controlled jet engine power suit. he will be hit with us later, with the suit, but not flying. whether coming out of his hands as well, the force, orjust his feet? the force? charlie... i don't know. all of the equipment will be in the studio.
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we can asking them. the case. —— 0k. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the funeral is due to take base today the london filmmaker who was killed alongside kurdish forces fighting so—called islamic state militants in syria. mehmet aksoy died when the military base in which he was stationed was attacked by is fighters in september. members of london's kurdish community will take part in his funeral procession through haringey later. three men have been convicted for their part in a violent brawl in south london that left a teenager with a fractured spine and a bleed on the brain. 17—year—old reker ahmed suffered life changing injuries when he was attacked in croydon in march this year. george walder, liam neylon and kurt killick were each convicted of two counts of violent disorder. a roman temple, which has been painstakingly reconstructed beneath
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the ground in the heart of london, is opening to the public next week. the temple of mithra5 was first uncovered in the 19505, but was moved to make way for building work. it's now been reinstated at its original site beneath the new bloomberg headquarters near mansion house. hi5torian5 say it provides a fascinating glimpse of an ancient past. archaeologists are used to taking things apart, not putting things back together, so it was a big challenge, but we were really fortunate because the original excavation drawings were excellent and because there had been so much interest in this discovery in 1954. travel now. it's all looking good so far on the tube. no reported problems on any of those lines there. it's fairly quiet on the roads too. this is how it looks on the a13. traffic building heading out of dagenham. and the a214 is partly blocked. there are delays in both
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directions. over to the elizabeth rizzini now, with the weather. good morning. we are all in for a much nicer day of weather and we should see 5un5hine at some point, especially this afternoon. but once again it's a damp, grey and drizzly start. milder than yesterday and we won't have to wait too long for that brightness and 5un5hine to come through. that should happen through the middle part of the morning and lasting into the afternoon. quite breezy start and north—westerly wind5, but it will begin to ease and avoid too unpleasant or this time of yearin avoid too unpleasant or this time of year in the sunshine. highs of 11 or 12. more high cloud a5 year in the sunshine. highs of 11 or 12. more high cloud as we head towards the end of the day. about 20 past four. if you are going out this evening it should be dry but there will be rain coming in from the west through the early hours. some of this could be quite heavy. temperatures dropping off at first and then rising into tomorrow morning.
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a fairly mild start to the day, but it will be wet. the rain hanging around for much of the morning and then gradually clearing through saturday afternoon and then it will start to feel colder. temperatures around 13 degrees on saturday afternoon, but it will get colder and it will be chilly on sunday, with a brisk northerly wind, a frost to start the new working week. there's more from us in half an hour and of course more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual addre55. bye bye. hello, welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a5ummary of a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. there5a may has warned pro—eu conservatives 5he will not tolerate any attempt to block the brexit proce55. will not tolerate any attempt to block the brexit process. she has outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment the uk will leave the exact moment the uk will leave the european union. 11pm on march 29, 2019. the man responsible for britain's withdrawal proce55, lord
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kerr, says brexit could still be reversed. yesterday the first minister of wale5, ca rwyn yesterday the first minister of wale5, carwynjones, defended his handling of misconduct allegations against a welsh labour minister believed to have taken his own life. he said he acted by the book and had no alternative but to remove carl sargent from his post. leighton andrew5, a former minister and the welsh government and a friend of carl sargent 5aid welsh government and a friend of carl sargent said people do not believe he was treated fairly. a new study is recommending women who have had the hpv vaccine only need to have three 5mear test5 had the hpv vaccine only need to have three 5mear tests during their lives rather than the 12 they are currently offered. the vaccine has been given to girls aged 11— 13 since 2008. a study funded by cancer research uk comes ahead of those changes to the nhs surgical —— cervical cancer screening programme due to come in in 2019. actor and producer steven seagal i5 the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment.
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actre55 portia de rossi made the allegation in a tweet. she said during an audition, steven seagal told her how important it is to have chemistry offscreen, before unzipping a5 trousers. the act of‘5 agent said he has no comment. what do you get if you take matt smith's retro brace5, the 5tripy scarf, to hire waisted trousers, altogether? —— the high—waisted trousers. it all mergers nicely to form a new out for the doctor, jodie whittaker, whose new look has been unveiled. doctor who fans have in quick to point out the references to the attire of previous time lord5. you can see that new look when the 13th doctor boards the tardis next year. mixed reaction to that from our viewers. what do you think? i
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philipp petz5chner look5 our viewers. what do you think? i philipp petz5chner looks fantastic. i love high—waisted trousers. me too. ye5, i love high—waisted trousers. me too. yes, you are the nearly every day. posy on twitter says no on the pa nt5, day. posy on twitter says no on the pant5, everything day. posy on twitter says no on the pa nt5, everything else, day. posy on twitter says no on the pant5, everything else, yes. kim on twitter says to belay, absolutely everything is awesome. mike, we have a picture. tell us the tale of that moment in time. northern ireland fans are saying it is one of the worst refereeing decisions of all time. some countries have suffered them over the years and they stay with you for generations to come. northern ireland still have a second chance, this play—off to reach the world cup isa this play—off to reach the world cup is a two leg affair, they have a second leg in basel on sunday. they lost 1—0 second leg in basel on sunday. they lost1—0 in second leg in basel on sunday. they lost 1—0 in belfast last night because of this penalty awarded, when really, the ball struck corry evans' shoulder. there is a whole debate about when the shoulder nz where the arm begins. he didn't mean it, he was tried to get out of the
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way. northern ireland fans are being called to channel that anger. have northern ireland's chance5 of a first world cup appearance in 32 years been ruined by a terrible refereeing deci5ion? michael 0'neill‘5 side face an uphill struggle if they're to qualify for russia next year after losing their play—off first leg 1—0 to switzerland last night. stoke forward, shaqiri'5 second half volley was blocked by corry evan5 and the referee pointed to the spot, even though he appeared to have been hit on the shoulder, as he took evasive action. ricardo rodriguez then scored the only goal of the game. the second leg is in basle on sunday. it is staggering in this day and age when the stakes are so high at this level of the game that something like that, it's obviously a gamechanger, but dwelling on it isn't going to help us. whether it is the worst, whatever it is, whatever label you want to put on it is irrelevant. the most important thing is that we use it in the right way and overcome it. we channel it into the game on sunday night. scotland were also in action last night.
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they lost their friendly 1—0 to the netherlands in aberdeen. former manchester united winger memphis depay scored ju5t before the break. the scottish fa have confirmed that interim boss malky mackay is not in the running to become permenant manager. wale5 face the french in paris, while for england, tottenham midfielder eric dier wolf caps and his team for the first time as they face world champions germany in an international friendly at wembley. —— eric dier will captain his team. both sets of players will wear poppies, the germans for the first time in their history, after fifa relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. tonight's match will also mark the first time video a55istant referee technology has been used at wembley. so the players, to be playing in front of a full house, twice, at wembley, against top teams, tho5e are the games you live for. and we are going to learn a hell of a lot about everything. i have learned an enormous amount already this week
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from the process. so i think, i am just looking forward to the games and seeing how the lads go. so, i wonder how much they would have liked having the video review system in northern ireland last night. as you know, i durdin much about this, but my theory is, why do they train the players? in the natural in5tinct, when the ball is shot at you protect yourself. if they didn't do that, and theyjust at macca get out of the way? no, to stand absolutely 5till at macca get out of the way? no, to stand absolutely still in the position you are in. the naturalistic i5 position you are in. the naturalistic is to turn, then you get into trouble because your arms are moving. but his arms were down. i don't think you can blame corry eva n5. i don't think you can blame corry evans. i'm not blaming him, but why was it going to get out of the way? he didn't have much choice, it was in5tinct, it was so near to him. that is my point. trained and psychologically... you know it is going to hurt, but take it for the team. well, we can continue this later, can we? it is a fair point. that he was trained to get out of
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the way and it struck him on the shoulder. end of story. it should have been given. a must which match for england's women's cricket team in sydney. it would see them go 8—2 up in the multiformat 5erie5 would see them go 8—2 up in the multiformat series of this a5he5 5erie5. that would see them regain the urn. england's first innings came toa the urn. england's first innings came to a close at 280 this morning. au5tralia came to a close at 280 this morning. australia were doing well in reply but england have made inroads. beth mooney became sofia poulsen's first victim. the australian zhuhao li 78 43. if they are short a video referee tonight, you could be at wembley, giving your decisions. referee tonight, you could be at wembley, giving your decisionslj know wembley, giving your decisions.” know you think my idea is nonsense, i know you do. all you are doing is telling people to stand still on the pitch. can you imagine the game you would see? like statues! have you had your breakfast yet? honestly, no. hold onto your tummy. this is a new meaning to taking your car for
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no. hold onto your tummy. this is a new meaning to taking your carfor a spin. it are letting dancelike mood5. 0n tomorrow's programme, 5ee what happens when a joint three time5 world champion a5 what happens when a joint three time5 world champion as he gears up for the world final in south africa next week was up 70 miles an hour, you spin your next week was up 70 miles an hour, you 5pin your way next week was up 70 miles an hour, you spin your way around a series of ob5ta cle5. you spin your way around a series of obstacles. very good, mike. don't try that at home, by the way. it would be illegal to try that in the car park. thank you. the exact date and time of brexit could be fixed in law as there5a may warns tory rebels that the process of leaving the european union will not be sabotaged. the prime minister says membership of the eu will end at 11pm on 29th of march 2019, but the man responisble for writing the article 50 withdrawl process, cross bench peer lord john kerr, says brexit could still be reveresed. labourmp chuka umunna and conservative mp peter bone join us now from westminster. thank you to speaking to as this
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morning. shall we begin with a plan from the prime minister to put the brexit exit date into law? fantastic. this is a really big, important step. there were items about whether that date would be extended, and now another day has gone by, another day closer to coming out of this dreadful european union protection racket. ok, that is clear. chuka umunna? this protection racket which has helped protect your view is‘ rights at work, their rights as a consumer, and the natural environment. this isn't news. we know this was the trajectory the government wanted to put us on. they always said they wa nted put us on. they always said they wanted us to leave on the 29th of march. 0bviously wanted us to leave on the 29th of march. obviously you have this very important intervention from somebody who has served our country with distinction as one of the senior diplomats abroad. he makes the point that there is nothing inevitable about this process. clearly it is a lot more complex than people envisaged. every day, every week, new facts are emerging, that people
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could not possibly be expected to know at the time of the referendum, like that there will be a whopping big divorce bill, like, for example, we are not going to be able to trade on the same terms out of the eu as we do inside the eu. and of course there are real practical issues. the conservative brexit minister who recently stepped down, lord bridges, said he didn't believe that practically, in the timeframe, this 29th of march, 2019 timeframe, practically, we will not be able to get a transition arrangement in place, the divorce bill settled, and the final trade deal arrangement finalised. so we may need more time to actually be able to do that. lord kerr has said, ok, we have got the freedom and flexibility to make choices down the line if we want to. peter bone, can you respond to that, in the sense that lord kerr said brexit can be reversed? there is now speculation, in the papers today, that theresa may is ready to increase the brexit divorce bill,
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the £20 billion brexit divorce bill, and that by setting this day today, putting this in law, planning to put this in law, this is theresa may trying to assert authority in the face of really difficult challenges in persuading her own party to back her on this? i don't think i agree with much of that. the conservative party is pretty much united giant what the prime minister is doing on brexit. —— united behind. more united than the labour party is, trying to fudge it and get us to not come out of the eu. so i don't agree with that. i don't agree that we should have a massive divorce bill. i don't see why that has been agreed. i don't see that that will ta ke agreed. i don't see that that will take place. we might have an implementation period, but that will be after march 29, when we come out. so we are on course. the prime minister is doing the right thing. she is implementing what the british people want. people like the other do not like the referendum result and they want to change it. that is
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fine, they can say that, at... actually, in fairness, peter bone ignores the fact i voted to invoke article 50. saying that anybody who raises objections to the way the prime minister is carrying out this processjust prime minister is carrying out this process just wants to do something different than the will of the people... do you want to stay in the eu? i wish we were. you do want to stay in the eu? i wish we were. there you are, that answers your question. we obviously had a referendum. if i didn't accept the result i wouldn't have voted to invoke article 50. this divorce bill is the big thing. you have heard peter talking about it, he doesn't seem peter talking about it, he doesn't seem to accept that there will be a divorce bill. itell you seem to accept that there will be a divorce bill. i tell you why this matters. it matters because if there isa matters. it matters because if there is a big divorce bill, they will not be that extra £350 million extra per week going to the nhs, which was caught on the leave campaign. the director of the vote to leave campaign said without that pledge —— pledged they would not have won the referendum. obviously there is a big divorce bill toupee, you will not be
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output that extra money into the nhs. peter talks about an implementation phase, a point to ta ke implementation phase, a point to take as from the point where we are out to where we are in. you have to know where you are going. obviously if you do not know what the final deal is, what your final trading arrangements are going to be, how on earth do you know what you are transitioning to, or what you are actually going to be fermenting? again, this is why, at the end of this process, we may actually need —— need more time practically to get this right for the british people. peter bone, do you think we would be able to leave the eu without paying able to leave the eu without paying a divorce bill, just to clear that 7 a divorce bill, just to clear that up? that is quite clear. the government has said there is no legal obligation whatsoever to pay the eu anything. there were a few reasons why the british people voted to leave the eu. one was to control immigration into this country. another big bomb was not to give billions of pounds every year to the eu. another reason was to make our own laws in our own country. as far asiam own laws in our own country. as far as i am concerned that is what the government is trying to implement.
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the only way there would be any payment to the eu is if there was an agreement, and as to three mac says, you need to know what an agreement will look like. no sign of that. my view is that we need to come out of the eu whether there is a deal or not. we can then spend £14 billion a year on supporting the nhs and other public services. i think that is the way it will pan out in the future, i don't think the eu has any interest in doing a deal with the uk whatsoever. i'm not sure i agree with that. let's be clear what consequences are leaving without a deal. we would not have finalised a customs arrangements, so you speak to the port of dover, they will tell you there are going to be miles and miles of cues coming out of dover. we could end up with trade tariffs, up we could end up with trade tariffs, up to 40% of agricultural produce, 1296 up to 40% of agricultural produce, 12% on clothes, 10% on our cars, never mind not having agreement on security arrangements. that is very complacent stuff. we would the extremely damaged, in a very practical way. i think it would be
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awful. peter bone, chuka umunna, thank you forjoining us on brea kfast thank you forjoining us on breakfast this morning. let's have a look at the weather. it will be even colder by the time we get to sunday. already called in scotland. wet as well. there could —— plenty of showers into the north and west and on strong winds. some of them have hail and thunder and they are wintry on the tops of the hills above about 300 metres. for england and wales there's patchy rain sinking southwards. sunshine on the way. some sunny spells in between the showers. very windy to begin the day. wind easing a little bit this afternoon. blustery across the uk and showers pushing into north—west england and northern ireland. where you are starting a
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day later, cloud, a bit of drizzle, just enough to dampen the ground, that will clear southwards quite quickly and then we will have sunshine. sunshine wise we are doing pretty well away from the north and west of scotland. more of these showers moving on. a lot of sunshine in south—east scotland, away from any showers in northern ireland. showers continuing in north—west england. a range of temperatures for the day. the chill stakeholding scotland, northern ireland and northern england, at double figures elsewhere. this afternoon there could be sunny spells which won't feel bad. this even in northern ireland you go to see a spell of rain. across england and wales overnight as well. some of that could be heavy. a touch of frost in scotland, especially in the north. still a couple of showers around that could produce icy patches. not as strong as they have been.
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tomorrow for armistice day cloudy start for many. in the afternoon still outbreaks of rain in wales and affecting southern england. northern england, northern ireland and scotland, sunny spells. still showers in the north of scotland. still a range of temperatures. chilly in sunshine. saturday evening the rain turns heavy for a time in south wales and southern england, but by the time we get to sunday that rain will have cleared. the blue will then be pushing south across the uk. arctic air. by sunday across the uk. arctic air. by sunday a strong northerly wind will be across us. so we will feel the chill. but on the plus side on sunday there will be a lot of sunshine. in fact a lot of dry weather around inland. a few showers to the north sea coast and irish sea coast, especially at the start of the day in wales in south—west england. elsewhere where you've got the sunshine single figures on sunday and a stronger north—westerly
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winds to contend with. a widespread frost on sunday night. that the latest forecast. i think we will be wearing scarves a lot more now. gloves, scarves and thick coats on sunday, but at least there will be sunshine. and sunglasses! thanks. we are talking about computer science at gcse, which you talk, naga? yes, and we also established the computer at your school... it was big and a bit further back. just one. good morning. yes. computer sciences are taught as part of the national curriculum, but according to the royal society the training on offer to older children is patchy across the country. it says that's because of a shortage of teachers with the right skills. it wants more schools to be like this one in. fundamentally we have to get more
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teachers to overcome the shortage is that we've got with the specialist knowledge and abilities in order to deliver effectively what so important. pairing —— preparing young people for jobs important. pairing —— preparing young people forjobs that exist today. computer science offers so many skills beyond just programming or the traditional view, so things like rob on solving, logical thinking, still —— skills they would use all through life. professor steve furber is a fellow of the royal society. he wrote the report, which was funded by microsoft and google. he was also one the inventor of the iconic bbc micro. thanks for coming in. we will talk about the micro in a minute. this report suggests that despite all of this demand for computer skills at all of thejobs this demand for computer skills at all of the jobs created with those in mind, therejust isn't the right training? estate of computer science
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teaching is fragile and patchy. so some schools are doing extremely well, but half the schools in the country aren't even offering computer science at gcse, so it is very variable. clearly schools have got to get it right and work out what skills they need to give the students, but we know that the future of the workplace will be it, programming, robotics, artificial intelligence. why is there such a problem getting the right teachers? the problem is that the curriculum went through a fairly significant change from the old curriculum and the new one contains some fairly challenging content and the teachers haven't received enough support to be able to teach that content thoroughly. so what would you like to see change? how do we get more teachers in schools? ginger lee it ta kes teachers in schools? ginger lee it takes time to train them. we would like to see more teachers being recruited in this area. the
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government has failed to reach the target. but also we need to offer much better and wider training to the teachers already in place. how do you inspire young people to get involved? you do you inspire young people to get involved ? you were do you inspire young people to get involved? you were one of the principal designers of this. it is showing its age, it is fair to say. but that's got a whole generation of young people interested in computing. what's the next thing? how do you do it now? there are many initiatives to try and attract interest in computing. people know about rasberry pie. there are a lot of effective school clubs, where it pupils are playing with robots and these are very good for pupils, they can engage in that kind of thing,
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but they aren't available widely enough. really good to see you. thanks for coming in. i should just say we've had a statement from the department for education, which has told us it wants to ensure that the workforce or the future workforce has the skills that they need to drive future productivity and the economy of the country. they say they've made computing a compulsory pa rt they've made computing a compulsory part of the national curriculum. as you've heard a shortage of teachers with the right skills could prove to bea with the right skills could prove to be a problem. you are up—to—date. thanks very much. maybe we should explain straightaway, this is part of the record winning jet engine suit. you may have seen record winning jet engine suit. you may have seen some record winning jet engine suit. you may have seen some of the images. let's introduce richard brownin, the man inside the suit. —— browning. lets remind people what you did. this is 32 mph. the record. this is the preparation. just talk
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us through it. so this was last tuesday. this was really... rather than trying to break the record, this was establishing a record because this is unsurprisingly a new type of flight. we did a flight over reding. we actually clocked a decent time by them and this journey has been all about learning from failure. we weren't afraid to make safe alias constantly, as you can see from a lot of the footage. motto in life, really. it has to be safe and sensible and that was pretty benign. one of the lovely things about you being on his idea to say the charlie, i told you so! because you mocked me earlier i was looking at the suit... you did! this is the arm thing, that the technical term, andi arm thing, that the technical term, and i said the force or the thrust comes out of here, and you said, no, no. but it does, this is really
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heavy. you are pretty much right. those things on the side of your arm, they arejet those things on the side of your arm, they are jet engines. what does it feel like when it goes off? how quickly do you go up in the air? within a couple of seconds. so they build up? and rather thanjust stand there and decrease the power, you stand there, hold your arms out to increase the power, and to go up you point them down gradually. your brain isa point them down gradually. your brain is a really good balancing edging anyway. to stand on one foot is amazing, really. this is heavy. how much does this way? it's about five kilograms. it puts out 44 kg of thrust. about 320 horsepower. i've got a bad track record of operating things. you won't send it going off in the studio. who else has had a go? we had our first customer from japan. he commissioned his own suit and we trained him for three days
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and we trained him for three days and he got quite good within a few days. there is a sprinkling of people, but most of it has been me, because i like to feel the result of the different changes we are co nsta ntly the different changes we are constantly making and also if you fall constantly making and also if you fa ll over constantly making and also if you fall over from constantly making and also if you fall overfrom a constantly making and also if you fall over from a few feet and happy that's me at the moment rather than someone else i havejust that's me at the moment rather than someone else i have just recruited. are you allowed to tell me how much one of the suit sells for? the copy of the first version, which we are doing any more, was $260,000. a copy of the one you saw there is about $450,000. and you are making these? it's not the primary activity, but a select few people have said they would quite like to own their own. either any regulations around a suit like this? we've had chats with the various authorities. we want to be on the front foot with that. it might not come as a surprise, there aren't many rules around human flying suits. we are less than 150 kilos aeroplane level, so that helps. can we get a close-up? the red button on the front, what's
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that? that's the throttle. the problem is, i can't get my... i can't get my hand... you probably need to take yourjacket off. can you see that? i can't get my hand through the gap. it is very finely tuned to the right size. that's your hand? it's actually the fit the japanese customer and i have to fit my hand quite quite tightly. japanese customer and i have to fit my hand quite quite tightlym japanese customer and i have to fit my hand quite quite tightly. if i put in my hand we will have to get the fire brigade to release it. it's fantastic. thank you so much for bringing it in. the thrust is proven correct. we'll be talking to you later as well. if any of you have questions about how it works or what you will be doing next, get in touch. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the funeral is due to take base today the london filmmaker who was killed alongside kurdish forces
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fighting so—called islamic state militants in syria. mehmet aksoy died when the military base in which he was stationed was attacked by is fighters in september. members of london's kurdish community will take part in his funeral procession through haringey later. the rac is calling on the government to make it easierfor drivers to check whether their vehicles could fall foul of new emissions rules in the capital. the motoring group says many car owners aren't clear how london's new toxicity charge works, and are also confused by the ultra low emission zones, which will be introduced in 2019. the department for transport says it's working with the dvla to make information available. a roman temple, which has been painstakingly reconstructed beneath the ground in the heart of london, is opening to the public next week. the temple of mithras was first uncovered in the 19505, but was moved to make way for building work. it's now been reinstated at its original site beneath the new bloomberg headquarters near mansion house.
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historians say it provides a fascinating glimpse of an ancient past. archaeologists are used to taking things apart, not putting things back together, so it was a big challenge, but we were really fortunate because the original excavation drawings were excellent and because there had been so much interest in this discovery in 1954. travel now. the victoria line has minor delays between victoria and brixton because ofa between victoria and brixton because of a faulty train. a vehicle has broken down on the north circular. delays back to the m11 and it is down to one lane west bound. at newbury park there are westbound delays on the a12, eastern avenue. over to the elizabeth rizzini now, with the weather. good morning. we are all in for a much nicer day of weather and we should see sunshine at some point, especially this afternoon. but once again it's a damp, grey and drizzly start. milder than yesterday
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and we won't have to wait too long for that brightness and sunshine to come through. that should happen through the middle part of the morning and lasting into the afternoon. quite a breezy start and north—westerly winds, but it will begin to ease and not too unpleasant or this time of year in the sunshine. highs of 11 or 12. more high cloud as we head towards the end of the day. sunset at about 4:20. if you're going out this evening it should be dry but there will be rain coming in from the west through the early hours. some of this could be quite heavy. temperatures dropping off at first and then rising into tomorrow morning. a fairly mild start to the day, but it will be wet. the rain hanging around for much of the morning and then gradually clearing through saturday afternoon and then it will start to feel colder. temperatures around 13 degrees on saturday afternoon, but it will get colder and it will be chilly on sunday, with a brisk northerly wind, a frost to start the new working week.
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we are back in half an hour. more on our website. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. theresa may reveals plans to put britain's brexit departure date in law. she wants britain to commit to leaving the eu at 11pm on the 29th of march 200019. ina of march 200019. in a interview, mrs may warns pro—eu conservative she will not tolerate any attempt to block brexit. good morning, it's friday 10th november. also coming up this morning... a new approach to cervical cancer, as studies suggest millions of women could soon need fewer smear tests
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throughout their lives. the hollywood star steven seagal is accused of sexual harassment by the actor portia de rossi. a penalty for a surprise attack the ball could the northern ireland failed to make next year's world cup. —— fourie supposed handball. the pay gap between men and women is getting smaller, but could take 100 years to close completely. but why? and what's been done to tackle it? i'll be finding out. a british surfer was tackling this 50 foot wave earlier this week when he spectacularly wiped out, he broke his back, we will speak to him from his back, we will speak to him from his hospital bed as he begins his recovery. and nick has the weather. we are starting cloudy today, the sun will come out, but showers will continue in northern and western scotland, a bit of snow in the hills and, infact, colderairwillspread right across the uk through the
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weekend. all the weekend weather coming up. thanks, nick. good morning. theresa may has warned pro—eu conservatives that she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process. in a sign of her intent, she's outlined plans to set out in law the exact moment that britain will leave the european union — 11pm on 29th march, 2019. in an interview with the telegraph newspaper she said... "let no—one doubt our determination or question our resolve, brexit is happening. we will not tolerate attempts from any quarter to use the process of amendments to this bill as a mechanism to try to block the democratic wishes of the british people." earlier respected the conservative mp peter bone and labour's chuka umunna. the prime minister is doing the right thing, implementing what the right thing, implementing what the british people want. people like chuka don't accept the referendum result and want to change it, they can say that, but we will do what the british people want an theresa may is doing it. in fairness, peter ignores the fact i voted to invoke article 50 so saying anybody raises
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objections to the way the prime minister is carrying out his process just wants to do something different against the will of the people is nonsense. you understand the eu, yes or no? i wish we were, but we obviously had a referendum and if i did not accept the result of the referendum i would not have voted to invoke article 50. our political correspondent adam fleming is in brussels for us. theresa may is making a political statement and enshrining that date in law, some people possibly confused because we thought we knew that already. meanwhile, as they say, in brussels, what is happening? yes, well spotted, charlie. all the stuff happening in the uk about the withdrawal date being fixed to march 2019, i imagine some people in brussels will look at that with amusement because under eu law that is when the uk leaves the eu unless there are political things happening here to extend the article 50
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process or something really dramatic happens which means it does not happens which means it does not happen at all. so that is all quite theoretical because the focus in brussels today is the sixth round of brexit negotiations. david davis, brexit secretary, got here last night, he will sit down first thing this morning with his opposite number, the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier, and they will talk about the three big issues they have been talking about throughout this process in the preceding five rounds, the right of eu nationals living in the uk and british people who live on the rest of the continent after brexit, what rights do they have, how are they guaranteed ? ? nospace? rights do they have, how are they guaranteed ?? nospace? the issue of money, how do you calculate the uktheobligations as it leaves the eu, a big sticking point because the
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eu, a big sticking point because the eu wants the a member, ben david davies at his press conference with michel barnier in a couple of hours will stick to his line that the uk will stick to his line that the uk will only talk about money when the talks about —— when there are talks about a future trade deal, which the eu does not want to do that. then there is the talk about the northern irish border, the principles there, eve ryo ne irish border, the principles there, everyone agrees, but there is a lot to talk about. what his being said here is consolidation, which i think is brussels code for, don't expect too much. adam fleming, speaking to us from brussels this morning. yesterday, the first minister of wales carwyn jones defended his handling of the misconduct allegations against a welsh labour minister who is believed to have taken his own life. he said he had acted by the book and had no alternative but to remove carl sargeant from his post. leighton andrews, a former member of the welsh government and a friend of mr sargeant, said people didn't believe he'd been treated fairly. there was no duty of care to call sergeant in this process. i have heard things said that he was offered support and so on, there was no support, that has simply got to
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be put on the record. in respect of doing things by the book, if you do things by the book, if you have an inquiry like this in a company or in local government, or in the third sector organisation, then the inquiry is conducted behind closed doors. you don't have the situation we had in this instance, where the first minister is doing television interviews elaborating on the allegations, that is not buy the bookin allegations, that is not buy the book in my view. the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actor portia de rossi, married to the host and generous, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition, stevenson told her how important it was to have chemistry of screen before unzipping his trousers. mr cigar‘s manager told the told the bbc the actor had no comment. earlier, a show business journalist told of how news of the latest
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allegations had been received in hollywood. i think people are depressed and repulsed by these stories because they are not romantic, they are not sexy, they are, for the most part, abusive and unseemly and not consensual. it is really one kind of ugly details story after another. facebook's founding president has said he's worried about the effect the site is having on society. sean parker, who says he no longer uses social media, said the network was built on "exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology", and he was concerned about what it was "doing to children's brains". the unintended consequences of a network, when it grows to1 billion or 2 billion people, and it literally changes your relationship with society, with each other, you know, it probably interferes with our activity in weird ways. god only knows what it's doing
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to our children's brains. what do you get if you put matt smith's retro braces, we are talking dr who, tom baker's 5tripy scarf, sylvester mccoy's coat and patrick's high waisted trousers and mash them 7 high waisted trousers and mash them d high waisted trousers and mash them up? and there you go, with a sound effect, it would seem it all merges together to form the new outfit for the doctor, jodie whittaker‘s new look unveiled. doctor who fans have been quick to point out the references to the attire of previous time lords. and it works, it looks great. you can see the new look when the 13th doctor boards the tardis next year. we will have all the weather for you, i was going to the travel news, we are not going to do that, but the weather and the sport with mike coming up later on. for years, women have been told about the importance of having
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regular smear tests. now, new recommendations and changes to screening techniques could mean fewer check—ups for women in england. currently, those aged between 25 and 64 are screened for cervical cancer 12 times in their life. a study of the hpv vaccine given to girls aged between 11 to 13 indicates they need only have three tests. let's get more detail on this from fiona osgun, from cancer research uk and laura flaherty, who was diagnosed with cervical cancer more than a year ago. good morning to you both. fiona, what is the study actually saying has changed ? what is the study actually saying has changed? it is failing to make ratings. we already know we are going to be changing the cervical screening test that we use, so what will happen to a woman going to cervical screening will be the same but what happens to the samples will change from 2019 in england, so rather than what we do at the moment, which is test for abnormalities in the cells, we are going to look for the hpv virus
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first, which is a much better, more accurate way of picking up up who might be at risk of cancer. alongside that we will see the first cohort of women who were vaccinated against hpv coming into the screening programme, and because of that they are much less likely to get the virus in the first place, so we need to check for it less often, which means we can offer fewer screens. laura, you had a rather special moment on wednesday this week, is that right? it was actually before then, i only put it on this week. ok, explain your situation, what happened ? week. ok, explain your situation, what happened? you were diagnosed, how far back i'll be going?” what happened? you were diagnosed, how far back i'll be going? i was diagnosed in june 2016, how far back i'll be going? i was diagnosed injune 2016, i had my screening quite a time before then, itjust takes screening quite a time before then, it just takes that long to get to the final diagnosis, so i had attended my regular smear, it was really, really important, this is why we stress to women how important
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it is to go, because if i had not attended the story could be so different. the moment i was referencing is that this week you discovered you are clear?” referencing is that this week you discovered you are clear? i am 12 months all clear, yes. i had a letter this week, surrey, which is a massive milestone so, yes, a real massive milestone so, yes, a real massive leap forward in my story. this is you seeing that confirmation there, as very special moment. very emotional moment, it was fabulous. the owner, most women expected to have 12 tests in their lifetime, smear have 12 tests in their lifetime, smear tests in their lifetime, and this would drop to three. would the period between them having the tests changed? yes, what the paper has shown is that those three tests could be offered at ages 30, 40 and 55, quite different to what we are currently doing which is every five yea rs currently doing which is every five years for women under 50 and every five years beyond that. if you look at the statistics we have been
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given, the hpv vaccine is successful and protect against 70% of cervical cancer so there is still 30% left, the concern many will be thinking is, i don't want to slip through the cracks, why can't ijust have the test a nyway cracks, why can't ijust have the test anyway because three in ten is still a significant chance? yes, you are right, the vaccine is very effective and protect against the most common virus linked to cervical cancer, about 70% of the ones we know are linked to cancer in the uk, and that is why we are still having those three screens because the vaccine is excellent and offers great protection but it is not 100% protection which is why we still need to screen those women, but much less often. is there anyone who is perhaps more vulnerable or is there any evidence to say the hpv vaccine isn't going to be as effective with you all you are in a high risk category, is an aspect is there anyone who should be aware of that? this is just anyone who should be aware of that? this isjust one anyone who should be aware of that? this is just one study so what we
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need to do is put that together with other research, and part of it will be figuring out exactly that, something else to work out, like a test when people need to go for screening, have they remembered to be vaccinated, did they get all of the doses, did it work, to make sure we are not missing any one out and thatis we are not missing any one out and that is why we need to do more research before we make the changes. lawro, your experience was, as i understand it, you delayed a smear test, didn't you? i did, iwas meant to go before christmas, but as any man with young children, i was very busy, felt other things were important, the lead up to christmas, absolutely, so i only put it off for absolutely, so i only put it off for a few weeks, so i went in the february. obviously now everything i thought was imported prior to that, i would have gone straightaway, i would have run to the clinic, which i think women should be doing, as soon as you get the letter, go. it is not worth it, it is not. what is
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interesting with your case if you had had a smear test three years before, which is what i was trying to say, this can happen so quickly? what is important to point out is i am not vaccinated so it is going to be completely different, it is a whole different ball game. i don't think people should be nervous about progression in understanding cancer and the fact that we are moving forward and it is a treatable cancer, i would urge anybody who has any questions to go to the website, it isa any questions to go to the website, it is a minefield of information especially for young girls who have not been vaccinated and want to know more about it. i think we have talked about this earlier, but the take—up of the vaccination, has that been high amongst younger people?m has been incredibly high, about 90% of schoolgirls who were offered the vaccine take it up, which is great because we know it is so effective at preventing hpv infections, it is great to see and we have to take
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that into account with changing intervals in cervical screening to make sure that the women offered less screening are the ones who have been vaccinated. fiona, thank you very much. laura, you will have a good christmas now!” very much. laura, you will have a good christmas now! i will have a fantastic christmas this year. best of luck to you and your family. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... theresa may says britain's departure date from the eu is to be enshrined in law. she has worn she will not tolerate any attempt to block the process. we have been hearing, women who have been vaccinated against cervical cancer might only need three smear tests in their lifetime after a new study. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. straight to weather watcher picture this morning, from braintree in essex. a lot of cloud around and you might even see drizzle in the next hour before things improve this
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morning and you see some sunshine. the weekend isn't sunny all the way. there will be rain, especially saturday and saturday night in parts of south wales and southern england. elsewhere, sun and some showers, not everybody will catch on, but it will turn colderfor all the everybody will catch on, but it will turn colder for all the fuss this weekend, particularly sunday when a cold arctic air coming our way. the details of the weekend, we will start this morning. this is the picture at nine o'clock. if you are damp and drizzly across england and wales, it will clear away quickly this morning and we will see sunshine coming through. it is a blustery day, the wind getting stronger the further north you become. showers around pushing into north—west england and some in northern ireland and north and west scotland. loads of showers coming in ona scotland. loads of showers coming in on a strong wind to start the day. wintry in the hills, above 300 metres. elsewhere, hail and
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wintry in the hills, above 300 metres. elsewhere, hailand thunder is possible. in south—east scotland you will hold onto a lot of sunshine ona mainly you will hold onto a lot of sunshine on a mainly dry day. good spells in northern ireland and across england and wales in the afternoon. notice this feeding of showers, maybe one or two drifting into the midlands. mild air across southern england and south wales. single figures in scotland, northern ireland and northern england. out and about in northern ireland tonight, you will see some rain. overnight across england and wales, a spell of rain, some of it heavy. scotland is staying mainly dry with clear skies, some icy patches as temperatures dipped away in the north, but it will stay mild elsewhere, especially the further south you are, with the rain. quite windy to the south—west of the uk. tomorrow, it does not wa nt to of the uk. tomorrow, it does not want to clear away. even into tomorrow, armistice day, some outbreaks of rain in south wales and south—west england. sunny spells in
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northern ireland, still some showers in northern scotland and still chilly despite the sunshine. but mild without the cloud and the rain. in the south, the crowd gets heavier on saturday evening, and some rain. by on saturday evening, and some rain. by the time we get to remembrance sunday, that has cleared away, meaning the cold air will spread to us all on sunday with quite a strong northerly wind. the arctic air will have a bite to it. but the emphasis will be on sunshine. you might catch a shower in northern scotland, the north sea coasts, wales, the south—west. inland, a lot of sunshine. it might that be much for the temperature. just about all of us on remembrance sunday will be in single figures and sunday night will see a widespread frost. next week will see a widespread frost. next week. that'll start to turn milder once again. the graphic you had before this, the
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uk was slotted in a blue bit between the orange bits. why is that, and when will be yellow bit come to us? when is that getting here? we are in the blue because if you follow the wind arrows, this is the arctic air. look how far north it's coming down from across the uk. we can colour the airto from across the uk. we can colour the air to indicate the temperature. this milder air will start to move on from the west next week. we'll change from the northerly and change toa change from the northerly and change to a westerly that. to feed in. more of us next week we'll get back to double figures. you don't have to wait too long before this comes back. thanks, neck. we are talking about the pay gap between men and women. it has been getting smaller between
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what men and women get paid, but it has stalled in recent years. we are looking at that now in new statistics this morning. new figures say it could be 100 years before the pay gap between men and women finally closes. new figures show that men are still consitently being paid more than their female colleagues, despite high profile campaigns to eradicate it. the gap has been getting smaller, but progress has stalled in recent years. campaigners say business needs to be more transparent about what it pays its staff. should uber drivers be classed as staff, rather than self—employed? a ruling is expected later in the ride sharing app's appeal against a previous verdict that said it should class its workers as staff, and offer them holiday pay, rest breaks and the national minimum wage. today's judgement could be referred to supreme court — because the ruling could determine the rules for lots of other workers in the so—called ‘gig economy‘ such as deliveroo and it's that time of year again.
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many of the big retailers will unveil their festive tv ads this weekend — all vying for our cash this christmas. together they'll spend a massive £6 billion to try to boost sales and profits. john lewis' advert will air on tv for the first time tonight. they've spent £1 milion on the ad and another £6 million in promoting it. boots, house of fraser, waitrose and asda are all unveiling theirs later too. get used to seeing that guy, and he is called moz, that big grinchy style monster. for any professional surfer — the bigger the wave the better, and that's what andrew cotton was hoping for when he was surfing on his board off a beach in portugal. things didn't go to plan and he was wiped—out by a 60 foot
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atlantic wave and broke his back. thankfully, he has survived to tell the tale. we can speak to him from his hospital bed. good morning to you, andrew. good morning, how are you? i'm ok, the question is, how are you? i'm all right. i'm living the horizontal dream at the minute. it's all right! are you holding your phone because you're in your hospital bed. can you explain what situation you are in. i'm lying down and have been given a selfie stick. i'm managing to speak to you through the selfie stick. it's good to. talked us through and maybe we can see some images while you speak about some of the waves involved. talk through the moment. looking at this as somebody who doesn't surf, everybody is thinking,
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thatis doesn't surf, everybody is thinking, that is so terrifying. talk us through what's happening. that is so terrifying. talk us through what's happeningm that is so terrifying. talk us through what's happening. it was one of the best sessions, one of the best waves we've had in some time. we got out there early, about eight o'clock. i had already caught two or three waves. so had my partners. and it was my turn again. the wave came, and it seemed like it could have been the dream wave. basically the lines i drew on it, it was going to be the best wave of my life. we are seeing the slow motion image, and it looks like you are falling off a cliff, in front of the wave. that was the moment of impact, was it? as i fully committed to the wave, the plan was to go inside the barrel. the split—second as i thought i was
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going to pull into the barrel, i realised the wave wasn't going to do what i planned. it's the bbc! the nurse is here chatting to me! it's all right, two minutes! if you need some urgent medical care, please stop the interview because there are more important things! it's all right, she's just asking if i want it's all right, she's just asking if iwanta it's all right, she's just asking if i want a cup of tea. i'm fine. i don't need a cup of tea.” i want a cup of tea. i'm fine. i don't need a cup of tea. i think you do. you landed in the water, and at that point you realised immediately that point you realised immediately that you were in a bad way, presumably. it's the biggest impact i'd ever had in the water. i knew i was in trouble instantly. but i was lucky, the team i was working with we re lucky, the team i was working with were quick to rescue me. the guys at the beach were amazing. they looked
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after my back and put me in spinal recovery. i was quickly in the hospital. so you are a professional surfer, this is not casual. you have specialist equipment with you to try to help in these situations. yeah, this is myjob. we treat safety very seriously. i have a lot of specialist equipment. flotation devices. i use a vest called the up vest. its c02 canisters that if i am in trouble under water it will pull me to the top. we don't take it lightly, and it's part of thejob, i suppose. you mentioned the nurse offering you a cup of tea. what's the prognosis, how are you and how soon the prognosis, how are you and how soon will you be able to surf again? i have broken the l2 in my lower
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back, but it is stable and i will not need an operation, which is great. i'm being super positive. i'm hoping to be serving big waves again within a couple of months. have you got your cup of tea yet, has it arrived? i don't think so, it was a language breakdown. communications. good to see you smiling. sugar in your tea, and good to see you smiling. sugar in yourtea, andi good to see you smiling. sugar in your tea, and i think you good to see you smiling. sugar in yourtea, and i think you can good to see you smiling. sugar in your tea, and i think you can have some biscuits as well. treat yourself. cheers! what a lovely man! rave. unusual circumstance to do the interview on the selfie stick. we wish him a good recovery. we will have the scene in lille in belgium shortly, in lille in france, on the border close to belgium. and we will
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be remembering passchendaele shortly. good morning. after early cloud and patchy rain sinking south first thing, goodson sunshine across england and wales, the odd isolated chamakh creeping into the north west england later this afternoon. scattered showers for northern ireland and scotland, most of those in the north and west of scotland where they could be heavy with the odd rumble of thunder, a bit of hail mixed in and over the hills we could even see a touch of snow, temperatures struggling into the mid single figures with a brisk north—westerly breeze. for northern ireland, after a bright weather across
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england and wales, temperatures reaching a maximum of around 12 celsius with a brisk north—westerly breeze. as we move through this evening and overnight, outbreaks of rain spreading east from northern ireland into scotland and wales, further north with clearer skies the temperatures will fall away, one or two showers in the north so we could see a couple of patches of ice and some frost to start the day tomorrow. a fairly chilly start on saturday, we will see the cool conditions begin to spread southwards as we move through the weekend, so something a bit cooler to come, but a chilly start of the day on saturday, plenty of brightness, one old who showers for the far
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north of scotland. after a cloudy start for northern ireland and england, it will brighten up with sunny spells later into the afternoon. fairly cloudy for much of england and wales, the rain becoming confined to the south of wales and southwest as we move through the day, milder in the cloud but cooler in the north. a chilly start to the day on sunday, good spells of sunshine, the risk of seeing the odd isolated shower, particularly on the coast and the part of wales and the south—west. wehrlein cool with a brisk north—westerly breeze. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and alice baxter. president trump renews his pledge to rebalance american trade but warns he'll be selective about the deals he does. live from london, that's our top story on friday, 10th november. a511 countries try to get one of world's biggest free trade deals back on track without the united states, president trump says he will do bilateral deals. we'll be live to the apec summit
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in vietnam for the latest. also in the programme... japan's third biggest steel—maker blames a lack of control for the scandal which led car and plane makers worldwide to check

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