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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 10, 2017 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2:00... as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law — a warning from the eu that we've got two weeks to clarify what we'll pay. no more trade abuse — president trump's message to china and others as he sets out his "america first" vision of global trade. we can no longer tolerate these chronic trade abuses and we will not tolerate them. and where to now? uber loses an appeal against a landmark ruling on the employment rights of its drivers. we also have all of the sport with damien. and in sydney things are quite tight? a must win match for england. under the floodlights in sydney. really atmospheric. a victory for australia means they will retain the ashes. but england have struck a psychological blow at the end of the second day with a weight eu late wicket which might
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swing things their way. and the weather with ben. remember the rain which cleared for bright autumn weather? this weekend we are going to do it all again. the details on the way. thanks, ben. also coming up — not the sistine chapel. but a council flat in hemel hempstead. no magnolia here. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. 11pm on friday the 29th of march 2019. that's the time and date theresa may wants britain to officially leave the eu. but we're now more than half way through the brexit process and even the most optimistic brexiteer can see that progress is painfully slow. today, another warning from the eu — clarify what you're going to pay in the next two weeks or talks will stall into next year. here's our political
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correspondent, emma va rdy. it's a one—way journey, says theresa may, as brexit talks enter a critical phase. next week, the eu withdrawal bill comes back to parliament. today, the prime minister sent a strong signal that the referendum decision cannot be reversed. theresa may wants to enshrine in law the exact date and time that britain will leave the european union. writing in the telegraph, she said, "let no one doubt our determination or question our resolve. brexit is happening." "we will not tolerate attempts from any quarter to use the process of amendments to this bill as a mechanism to try to block the democratic wishes of the british people." but we can still change our minds, says the man who wrote the key eu withdrawal clause. crossbench peer lord kerr has for some time argued that, despite triggering article 50, the uk could still legally reverse the process. i am keen that the public should
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know that sending the letter is not an irrevocable act. that the opportunity to change our mind is always there, if we want to take it. and it is clear to me that if we were to take that opportunity and we were to change our mind, we would be very welcome in brussels, that we had never left. the decision taken in 1975 by this country to join the common market has been reversed. from the moment the bbc declared the result of the referendum on the 23rd ofjune last year, today, at 1:49 precisely, we will be right at the halfway point. so now you can set your watch to brexit. and that ticking clock can't be ignored, because eu sources have told the uk it has just two weeks left to make progress on key withdrawal issues or risk further delays to any talk about future trade.
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the eu is united. the uk has to cough up more cash and they need to do that soon. the rights of eu citizens and the northern irish border are also yet to be resolved. but brexit secretary david davis said this can't be rushed. there's been a change in pace, i think. but, ultimately, this is about delivering results and will now depend on the content, not just the speed, of the negotiation. the eu's chief negotiator spoke today of working intensely. translation: in order to achieve our common objective, that is to organise an orderly withdrawal on the basis of an agreement, we will also work as intensely as is necessary in the weeks to come, in the run—up to the next european council meeting. if all goes as currently planned, we really will leave the eu at the 11th hour — "pm, march the 29th, 2019. theresa may's message is that there is no going back now.
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let's go to brussels. adam fleming is there. a change of pace, says david davis, but you still sense we are wading through treacle? what he really means, in his eyes, the eu getting a move on and moving to phase two, talks about trade, the future relationship and a transition deal. the british feel that with the prime minister's foreign speech, they have done enough to justify this as sufficient progress, and that the eu asking for too much. it was quite revealing, the press conference, that there were two big issueis conference, that there were two big issue is causing problems. the first one is the one we have been talking about all week, money. the eu does not want the uk to come with a figure written on a post—it note, shoved across the table to michel barnier. neither side wants an actual number, whether it is 50
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billion, 100 billion, 20 billion euros, whatever. they to go further in clarifying what the prime minister said in her foreign in clarifying what the prime minister said in herforeign speech when she said the uk would stick by its financial commitments made as a member. the eu, they think that is too generic and vague. they want david davis to say we will pay for this aspect of the budget, that programme, this loan guarantee and that pension pot for eu civil servants, rather than finalising a number. michel barnier confirmed, and it has been an open secret in brussels this week, that the eu side thinks that the uk has to do that in the next two weeks, for them to have enough time to trigger trade talks at the meeting of eu leadersjust before christmas on the 14th of december. that is the money. then there is northern ireland. there is broad agreement on protecting the good friday agreement and the peace process , good friday agreement and the peace process, but the tricky bit is the detail of how you do that and there isa detail of how you do that and there is a disagreement about that. we are 110w is a disagreement about that. we are now more than halfway through this whole process. if you were in a
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race, that would be the moment he started concentrating on the finish. we are still at the start? we are halfway, 51 minutes ago, according to my colleagues that have crunched the numbers! it is quite intriguing, the numbers! it is quite intriguing, the two stories are juxtaposed. you have the story at westminster about the legislation that will take the uk out of the eu, and whether there isa uk out of the eu, and whether there is a technicality about whether the date is definitively the 29th of march, 2019. that seems like it is an important debate, but it seems quite academic to the people here in the thick of the discussions, because they feel there is still quite a lot of progress to be made to reach the fabled sufficient progress to allow the trade talks to progress. when we come back to the issue of money, david davis was saying that the officials, the technocrats, they have kind of reach the end of the road of their discussions. there is no more the officials can do. it is now a political problem. you can summarise it like this, the eu sees the money, the so—called brexit bill, although
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everybody here hates the phrase, they see that as the uk settling obligations are made in the past. the uk would rather link that to the talks about the future trade deal and doesn't want to put money on the table until it knows what the eu is willing to offer in terms of a future relationship. the politicians are going to have to try to bridge the gap. another two minutesjust gone! thank you very much for that. let's to emma vardy. the clock is ticking? you are right. it is important, the pressure is getting piled on the uk to stump up more cash. it is so important, notjust for the cash. it is so important, notjust forthe uk, cash. it is so important, notjust for the uk, but also for the eu, to move for the uk, but also for the eu, to m ove o nto for the uk, but also for the eu, to move onto trade talks. as we keep hearing, the argument is that this benefits both sides. what we have seen today from theresa may is the aim to enshrine in law the exact date and time that we will leave the eu. that is notjust so we can do a
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bit of a countdown, it is really her putting a marker down to say that the government is determined to see this through. 0n the other hand, we have heard lord kerr saying there is room to put the breaks on. we have heard other people like tony blair and gordon brown saying we could still have a rethink. as for number 10, they are pretty scornful of that suggestion, saying that politically this is about delivering on the will of the people and there will not be a change of direction. thank you very much. president trump has vigorously defended his "america first" vision of international trade at a summit of the asia pacific economic co—operation group. speaking in the vietnamese city of danang, he said the us would no longer tolerate chronic trade abuses, and would in future insist on fair and equal treatment. jonathan head reports. fresh from a feel—good blast from beijing, president trump arrived in da nang, the base from where the us waged it war in vietnam's 50 years ago, with a much tougher message.
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apec is a free—trade forum, founded with strong american participation, just as the cold war ended. past presidents have used these summits to promote us values, like free trade and civil rights. but not this one. speaking to a hall full of east asia's business and diplomatic elite, mr trump at first showered them with flattery. but then changed tack with a litany of complaints, many directed at china, though he never named the culprits, of countries taking advantage of america, breaking the rules of free trade. we can no longer tolerate these chronic trade abuses. and we will not tolerate, despite years of broken promises, we were told that some day soon, everyone would behave fairly, and responsibly. people in america, and throughout the indo pacific region have waited for that day to come.
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but it never has. you can come to summit meetings like this, and asia holds plenty of them, and come away with the impression that not very much happened. but not this one — with his speech in da nang, donald trump has announced america's withdrawl from the leadership role it has played in asia since the second world war, a role that is profoundly shaped this region. after his speech was that of his recent host china. xi jinping's tone was softer, no threats or warnings here, but an invitation to asian countries tojoin a reforming china, and a none too subtle dig at the new american isolationism. translation: openness brings progress, while self seclusion leads one behind. we, the asia—pacific economies, know this too well from our own development experience. we should put in place a regional cooperation framework that ensures cooperation among equals,
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wide participation and shared benefits. mr trump's tough talk on trade will go down well with many americans, but here in asia, while some governments will welcome his no—nonsense approach to diplomacy, you can almost feel american influence shrinking, and china waiting to take up the mantle. jonathan head, bbc news, da nang. the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actress portia de rossi, who is married to the american talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her how important it was to have chemistry off—screen, before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc the actor had no comment. jon donnison‘s report contains some flash photography. steven seagal is used to playing the tough guy.
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now, he's the latest hollywood big name to be facing tough questions. portia de rossi, seen here on the right, with her wife ellen degeneres, accused the actor and director of sexual harassment. the arrested development star tweeted that at a final audition for a part in a steven seagalfilm, he talked about the importance of off—screen chemistry before unzipping his leather pants. ellen degeneres added her support for coming forward. mr seagal has been accused of inappropriate behaviour by several other women. his manager has told the bbc he has no comment to make. and there are more allegations, this time about one of america's best—known comedians, louis ck. the new york times is reporting five women have accused him of serious sexual misconduct.
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the bbc has contacted his managerfor comment. each day, it seems, hollywood is waking up to more revelations. it's just a very unsettling time. it's a good time in the fact that women now feel comfortable, or more comfortable, speaking out about what happened to them, and what was their experience. the list of stars accused is growing, and the more people who come forward with allegations, the more likely it is others will have the confidence to do so. this hollywood story could have some way to run. jon donnison, bbc news. the online taxi—hailing firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that gave its drivers employment rights. an earlier ruling had ordered uber to treat its drivers as workers rather than self—employed independent contractors, after two drivers argued that they were entitled to the minimum wage, sick pay and paid leave. uber challenged that ruling, and says it will pursue a further appeal. simon gompertz gave us this update from the tribunal. it isa
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it is a setback in uber‘s effort to try to maintain the way it operates in the uk, by using self—employed drivers. as you say, two them challenged that in an employment tribunal last year and they won against uber. uber appealed and now its appeal at the employment tribunal has been thrown out. this is significant for all firms that operate in what is called the gig economy. so, bicycle delivery riders, drivers, careers, all of them could be affected by the effort to try to stop individuals being treated at self—employed, rather than workers with workers' rights. in theory, uber could now be required to pay thousands of pounds to the drivers who have brought this challenging backpay, holiday and sick pay, if that is appropriate. anyone whojoins the
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sick pay, if that is appropriate. anyone who joins the claim could make those claims against uber. in practice, it looks as though uber is going to appeal again. this could go to the supreme court, which will be next year. as long as that process goes on, uber can carry on with its current practices. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law, a warning from the eu that we have two weeks to clarify what we will pay if the uk wants to talk trade. uber loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. president trump has defended his america first approached at an asia—pacific economic summit. and in sport, england's women's strike late on the second day of the ashes test, lifting hopes they could go on to victory in a must win match in sydney. northern ireland's players have landed in basel for the world cup play—off with switzerland, still reeling from the controversial defeat in belfast. and lewis
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hamilton clocked the fastest time in first practice for the brazilian grand prix. the world champion‘s team—mate valtteri bottas was second quickest. i will be back with more on those stories and 2:30pm. more now on our top story. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier says the uk has two weeks to explain how it intends to settle its bill for leaving if it wants to move on to trade talks next month. at a news conference in brussels following the latest round of talks, he said progress on the so—called divorce bill, citizens‘ rights and the irish border was "vital" for negotiations to progress to the next phase. joining me now from norwich is david campbell bannerman, conservative member of the european parliament for the east of england. thank you forjoining us. first of all, theresa may has given us a time and date, 11 o'clock on the evening of friday the 29th of march, 2019. that is yourjob done, is it? do you go off on gardening leave? myjob
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disappears at the same time. i am not sure what i will do next, but i am delighted that we are leaving the european union. how important is it that it is enshrined into law, as theresa may wishes? i think it is important. it sends a strong message of reassurance to brexiteers, to the great majority, 17.4 million, who voted for brexit. i'm delighted to see it. i think it is also a challenge to those that want to undermine our democracy, that have no respect for the largest ever vote we have had for anything in british history. and what do you make, in terms of the negotiations, i will use the analogy of wading through trea cle, use the analogy of wading through treacle, it implies some movement. there is some movement at least?” think there is a lot of progress, actually, in other areas like eu citizen areas. that seems to be progressing well. the real stumbling block is the ridiculous demand from the eu about money. we have legally
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challenged it. house of lords found we had no legal case to pay any money at all. surely we have a moral duty to honour any intentions on pensions, which many british people are going to benefit from? yes... well, i think for goodwill it is importantam well, i think for goodwill it is important am actually. the idea of paying until the end of the multi—annualfinancial paying until the end of the multi—annual financial framework, to 2020, is probably a goodwill gesture. we will continue to pay into agencies and programmes that we are still party to, like erasmus, the european space agency, should we wish to stay in that. that will continue. i think the idea of paying 60 billion or whatever the figure is, ithink 60 billion or whatever the figure is, i think that is nonsensical and it could cause the talks to fail if we are not careful. i will come onto that in a moment. what is a sensible figure from your point of view?m is always hard to break it down. as
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i say, there is an ongoing feed to be paid for these programmes and agencies, which is fairly small. you are talking hundreds of millions, not billions. 0ut are talking hundreds of millions, not billions. out of goodwill, i would live with the spending commitments to the end of 2020. so, nobody is disadvantaged by britain leaving the eu, the other nations are not disadvantaged. you might be talking about 20 billion. that is a ballpark that has been mentioned at the time of the foreign speech. i think i am uncomfortable to go much further than that, to be honest. i think the british people think, for heaven sake, they are not being reasonable. these are not actually justifiable demands and we will have problems. we are better off going to the world trade organisation rules, which most of the world trades on, including the united states, with the eu, india with the eu, china with the eu, so it is not that
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radical. we could compensate companies that are disadvantaged. radical. we could compensate companies that are disadvantagedm i was looking at this from the eu point of view, i would suggest that by pushing and pushing and saying you have still not come far enough in terms of that money, the british will eventually say, just pay them what they want, let's just get this done? well, that is their game. it is to separate into two phases, the trade talks being the second phase. you don't get your trade talks with what britain really wants, without paying out massive shed loads of cash. that is the game they are playing. i don't think we should fall for that. let's not forget, they need the british market. we have the second—largest importer in the world after america of goods and services. we have a huge deficit, £89 billion of goods. a lot of bmws, a lot of italian wine. you know, french produce as well, spanish produce. let's not forget that. also, they want access to the city of london, the largest financial
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centre in the world. it's notjust about as selling insurance to germany, it is about them borrowing huge amounts of cash on the london markets. finally, many people remember that you were deputy leader of ukip until 3010. i'm wondering, when you prowl around those corridors in brussels, strasbourg, what your european colleagues are making of this. is there a sense that they are now cold shouldering the british and theyjust want them to get on and get out? no, i mean, it is pretty friendly relations. generally, they understand what has happened. the british people have decided, what we must concentrate on is getting the best trade deal for all of us. that is the focus. that is really what is happening at the moment. it is good of you to join us. moment. it is good of you to join us. david campbell bannerman, thank you for your time. ceremonies are being held in belgium to mark the centenary of the end of one of the bloodiest battles of the first world war. 100 years ago today, canadian troops captured the ridge near the village of passchendaele
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from the german army. the campaign lasted for more than three months, and in that time, between 600,000 and 700,000 allied and german soldiers were killed or injured. robert hall reports from passchendaele. 0n the flat farmland outside lille, the thunder of the guns. on this day 100 years ago, canadian troops finally captured the belgian village of passchendaele after months of misery and slaughter. the battle, north of ypres, was part of a plan to capture high ground from german forces and reverse the course of the war in that part of belgium. but the attacks were slowed and thwarted by the coming of winter, which turned no man's land into a sea of mud. the man who has spent two years planning this tribute to half a million casualties was motivated in part by a loss within his own family. my grandfather was killed at hill 60
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in the battle of passchendaele. i have always had a feeling that he should be remembered. my cousins, several of them are here today. they are all now giving me the thumbs up, because we have now remembered him. every one of these 16 guns can be traced back to the battlefields of france and belgium. many of them have been restored, especially for today's ceremony. around them are gun crews, representing every nation that took part in the battle— britain, france, belgium, canada, new zealand, australia and ireland. all the soldiers are aware of the poignancy of what has gone before them. recent wars like iraq and afghanistan hit home, but it makes them even more interested in the history that came before that. being here is really important to them, and it means a lot. this weekend, britain and europe will remember those who lost their lives in conflict. but today, as the smoke cleared and the guns fell silent, thoughts were focused on one terrible autumn, and the men
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who never went home. robertsjoins me now. if there is one word that sums up the horror of the whole campaign, it is the word passchendaele? it is. that is why there was such a determination on behalf of the 200 strong team to make it happen. john, we heard you in the report saying how proud you we re in the report saying how proud you were to think about your family on a day like this. but you must have felt a real sense of achievement when you saw that absolute fire? absolutely, it was incredible. something that we have been doing for two under deliver crime half years. it was fantastic, mainly down to the gunners firing them. we are surrounded by this group, representing the ulster division. yes, we are representing the 36th
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division. we feel very proud and privileged to do so. it was extraordinary this morning with the smoke lowing across, the weather was pretty wintry, at least to start with. what was going to your minds? what must have felt like 100 years ago. especially the the smoke, and it was a privilege to be amongst this. have you been to the battlefield yourself? no, but we intend to go tomorrow. we are looking forward to that. why did you think it was important to joinjohn in what he was trying to do? he invited us over to the event and we felt that we would like to represent the 36th ulster division. that is why we are here today and we have thoroughly enjoyed it. you are the historian of the group, how many men did they lose? well, over a thousand men killed and wounded in action.
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the division was decimated. from the 1916, the somme, right up through all of the different battles that became known as passchendaele. the same ridge was another location where they fought with distinction, alongside the 16th irish division. for us to be here, representing the men that gave so much, it is just unbelievable to be able to do this. you summed up in a word on simon said in the studio, passchendaele sums up all of the suffering?m certainly does. firing the gun is, the cordite, the smell, the rain and mud underfoot, the horses brought
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in. you could see how much they had chewed up the ground. it was fantastic, just to be part of it and also letting your mind wander to what it would be like for those poor fellows. i know we are a lot older than they were, but just to get that feeling, the passion for what was actually going on at that particular time. thank you all so much for talking to me. congratulations. so many taking part in this. john as well, well done. i know it has been a terrific effort for you. goodness knows what you are going to do when you have recovered and gone back to work. my wife has been doing all the paperwork, the e—mails and everything to do with it. she came to me an hour ago and said, ok, what are we doing monday?” to me an hour ago and said, ok, what are we doing monday? i will leave that question hanging. like you so much. we are now looking ahead to a weekend of remembrance, remembering those that have fallen in conflict across the decades. now time for the weather forecast.
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ben is here. he needs to look at what the word forecast means, how old is that picture? it is from last weekend. there is a method in my madness. has nobody sent you one since then? our weather watchers send us loads of pictures, you know that. you might be thinking we have seen this before, last weekend it was a miserable start in the south, and it brightened up a little bit. and then we have a mixture of sunshine and showers, but it was cold. guess what? we are going to do it all over again. pretty much a carbon copy. we are going to see rain in the south at first this weekend and then some sunshine and showers. then it will feel cold. then you probably don't wa nt to feel cold. then you probably don't want to think about monday morning just yet. you're right! i'm going to make you think of it, because we are going to see a frost. it will be the
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third monday morning in a row that we have had a frosty start across the country. well, there we are! i love how excited you are. let's get the forecast. good afternoon. we have fine weather to come. crisp autumn weather. surely that is enough to make you enthusiastic? you will have to wait for it. we have an area of cloud hurtling from the atla ntic area of cloud hurtling from the atlantic and that will bring outbreaks of rain, particularly across southern and western areas to start the weekend. here is a current, recent weather watcher picture from staffordshire with blue skies. we had blustery showers into the north—west. that was the scene close to coleraine earlier. as we head through the rest of the afternoon there will be plenty of fine weather, spells of sunshine. still some showers blowing into northern and western areas. the temperatures are actually giving away as the afternoon goes on. 11 in the far south—west by the end of the afternoon, further north, aberdeen, maybe three or four degrees at the end of the afternoon. a chilly start to the weekend. it will turn cold
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across scotland, apologies for the jerky graphics. we will see rain pushing from england and wales and maybe we have rain in the system. we are going to see wet weather across southern areas during tonight. heavy rain and strong wind. a touch of frost across scotland, where we will also see wintry showers. into tomorrow, this area of rain is very relu cta nt to tomorrow, this area of rain is very reluctant to pull away to the south. we will see more in the way of sunshine developing and still a scattering of wintry showers in northern scotland. hopefully we can ta ke northern scotland. hopefully we can take you on a little tour for saturday afternoon. across scotland, plenty of sunshine, still some showers into the far north. six or 7 degrees are the temperatures for tomorrow afternoon. northern ireland should brighten up as the day goes on and then across northern england and east anglia, things will improve. sunny skies into the afternoon. look at this across the south of england and south wales. pretty miserable across saturday with outbreaks of rain, strong wind as well. still relatively mild. as we go through into the night, that
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rain continues across the south—west corner. it will turn pretty heavy for a time. and then as we head into remembrance sunday, the second half of the weekend, we will finally push the wet weather away to the south. look at the white lines and isobars. they go all the way up to the arctic. that shows where the air is coming from. cold air, which will be plunging its way southwards across the whole country on essentially. sunday will be a cold day. this is when even southern areas get a seedy crisp autumn weather with some sunshine. blustery wind, particularly close to the east coast, where we will see showers and temperature six or 10 degrees. it will be cold enough for showers across scotland to be wintry. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has warned that the uk has two weeks to clarify how it will settle the so—called "divorce bill" — if trade talks are to begin next month. theresa may says britain's departure
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date will be enshrined in law. president trump has defended his "america first" approach at an asia—pacific economic summit. 0nline taxi—hailing firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that gave its drivers employment rights. the company says it will mount a further legal challenge. steven seagal is the latest hollywood actor to be accused of sexual harassment. now the sport with damian and england footballers in action? yes, a lwa ys england footballers in action? yes, always a big game when england play germany and eric dyer is captain. how northern ireland could have done with video technology. the other action of course down under, england's women, it is very tension
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in that game? yes a day/night match, england playing australia. and england's women struck a psychological blow with a late wicket in that one—off ashes test. 0ur correspondent andy swiss is in sydney. with two days remaining, the match remains poised. england began on 235—7, looking to push on towards something like 300. they didn't quite get there. all out for 280. australia batted beautifully before a clatter of wickets. marsh removing bolton for 28. the star for england was the 18—year—old spinner, sophie ecclestone, who took two wickets on her debut. at that point australia
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we re her debut. at that point australia were struggling. but a half century from their all—rounder elise perry swung the game towards australia before the crucial wicket of the captain. so the match ba bansed and if -- captain. so the match ba bansed and if —— balanced a if australia win, they will retain the ashes. it will bea they will retain the ashes. it will be a difficult pitch. it has been slow from bowl one. as the pitch breaks up and turns more, i think it will be difficult to score. the fact that we have got runs on the board and we will bat first in the second innings, puts us in a good position. world champion lewis hamilton edged out mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas in first practice ahead of the brazilian grand prix. hamilton was 0.127 seconds ahead of the finn, with ferrari's kimi raikkonen in third and red bull's max verstappen fourth quickest. british 19—year—old george russell, making his debut at a grand prix weekend was 12th quickest in his force india car in
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a controlled and impressive debut. northern ireland's players are flying to switzerland hoping to undo the damage caused by yesterday's controversial first leg world cup play—off defeat. cory evans says it was a disgrace to award a penalty against him that led to the swiss victory. northern ireland now face an uphill task to qualify after evans was harshly adjudged to have handled when the ball struck his shoulder. the referee awarded a penalty and ricardo rodriguez scored the only goal of the game from the spot. to make matters worse, evans is now suspended for sunday's second leg. even at the time, i thought the referee's guessed, because of the speed and the distance between the players... you know you have to be 100% sure in those situations and i could tell the referee's guessed in a situation where he shouldn't have. for a game of this magnitude for a referee to give a penalty in a
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situation like that, i think it is a disgrace. there will be a number of firsts at wembley when england face germany in a friendly tonight. eric dier will captain the side and both sets of players will wear poppies — the germans for the first time in their history — after fifa relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. it's also the first time video assistant referee technology's been used in an official match in the uk. already i have learned a lot from the week, when you have got the none qualification games that, is what you need from it. you want the learn things. said that when we went to germany and the game against france in the summer, we will take more from these games than any of the qualification games in terms of what we learn about players and the system and everything else. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. now the brexit talk s have ended in
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brussels. earlier there was a news conference on the talks. michel barnier said more work was needed on specific issues. on ireland, we will continue our dialogue on ireland and northern ireland. we have to ensure a common reading, the same reading of the conditions, consequences and implications of brexit and the good friday agreement and the common travel area. this should lead us to identify the technical and regulatory solutions to prevent a ha rd regulatory solutions to prevent a hard border, while preserving the integrity of the single market. as
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david and i told you last time, the unique situation in ireland requires specific solutions. translation: finally on the financial regulation, on the financial settlement, we need to work now over the next few weeks on an objective interpretation of undertakings entered into by prime minister may in florence. this is vital if we are to achieve sufficient progress in december. as isaid, sufficient progress in december. as i said, before, sufficient progress in december. as isaid, before, i repeat, that it sufficient progress in december. as i said, before, i repeat, that it is just a matter of settling accounts, as in any spacing. separation. the united kingdom decided to leave the union more than 500 days ago and it will be leaving on 29th march at
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midnight brussels time. now, in order to achieve our common objective, that is to organise an orderly withdrawal on the basis of an agreement, we will also work as intensely as is necessary in the weeks to xom in the run up to the next european council meeting. david davis said that a solution to the northern ireland border required the brexit talks move on to discuss the relationship with the eu after it leaves. on northern ireland, we will continue to have good technical discussions, we have drafted joint principles on the joint travel area. we continue to explore how best to preserve north/south co—operation and we are drafting joint commitments which will guide the solutions drawn up in the second phase. we have also had frank discussions about some of the big
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challenges around the border. we remain firmly committed to avoiding any physical infrastructure and we have be clear about that. these discussions will continue in the run up discussions will continue in the run up to the december council. but let's be under no illusion, we will only be able to conclude them finally in the context o' after future relationship. we respect the eu desire to preserve the customs union, that can't come at cost to constitutional integrity of the united kingdom. as i said, we recognise the need for specific solutions for the unique circumstances of northern ireland. but let me be clear, this cannot amount to creating a new border inside our united kingdom. in this process, we are committed to upholding the belfast or good friday agreement. we need to approach the challenging issues that arise in a
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spirit of pragmatic, creativity with political sensitivity. we owe that to the people of northern ireland and of ireland. that was david davis. women who have been given the human papillomavirus — or hpv vaccine — may only need three cervical screenings in their lifetime instead of 12. that's according to a new study. hpv is thought to cause nearly all cervical cancers and a vaccination against it has been offered to girls aged between 11 to 13 since 2008. a cancer research team in the uk says cutting the number of screenings for vaccinated women could save the nhs time and money. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has the details. cervical cancer is a dangerous disease, it's also one of the most preventable cancers, but there's been concern about a steady drop in the number of women going for screening in the past few years. mandy has had cervical cancer, and says she has never missed a smear test, and believes that saved her life.
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if i hadn't gone for my screening, it wasn'tjust me being manager matter, my consultant said it is an aggressive grade of cancer, you were lucky to catch it early, because otherwise we would be talking palliative care and not cure. but mandy's teenage daughters have both had a jab that protects against cervical cancer. almost a decade ago, girls aged 11 to 13 started to be vaccinated against the cancer—causing virus hpv. the vaccine reduces the risk of cervical cancer by 70%, according to today's study. it says women who have had it only need to undergo three smear tests during their lives, instead of the normal 12, at the age of 30, 40 and 50 five. all cervical cancers are linked to hpv infection, and having the vaccination reduces the chances of having the infection, and also of having cervical cancer. screening looks for early changes that could suggest
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cancer is developing. having the vaccine, you are less likely to have those changes and less likely to develop cancer, so you don't need screening as often. mandy is relieved her daughters have been vaccinated and they may need fewer smear tests. it's fantastic, and it takes the pressure away of having to think, every three years, i have got to do it. eventually, maybe not in my lifetime, but i think it will be eradicated by this new plan, so it's great. the study comes ahead of changes being made to the screening programme in england for 2019, and similar adjustments in scotland and wales. new, more advanced lab testing is expected to be introduced, which could mean fewer smear tests for women, whether vaccinated or not. the french president, emmanuel macron, is on an unscheduled visit to saudi arabia to discuss the escalating crisis between the kingdom and lebanon. his trip comes days after the lebanese prime minister resigned while in riyadh, saying he feared for his life. many in lebanon believe that saad hariri is effectively
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being held under house arrest and that lebanon is once again being dragged into a power struggle between saudi arabia and iran. richard galpin reports. this latest middle east crisis was sparked by the sudden resignation last week of lebanese prime minister saad hariri, wearing the dark suit. it was announced during a visit to saudi arabia, where he's still staying. mr hariri claimed his life was in danger in lebanon. but it seems to be part of a much bigger game between rival regional powers following the defeat of so—called islamic state in most of iraq and syria. iran now wields significant influence in both these countries, as well as in lebanon, where the shia organisation hezbollah, which is close to iran, is part of the coalition government. translation: the americans, the saudis and israelis are all trying to prevent hezbollah from maximising its gains from the wars in syria and iraq.
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hezbollah, and its allies, have achieved enormous success, but they're now facing huge pressure because of this. with tensions rising between shi'ite iran and saudi arabia, which is predominantly sunni emmanuel macron to fly out to the region yesterday to mediate, holding talks with saudi leaders. we've never been so close to the precipice. in many ways, the threat of regional war has never been this real, if you like, where it's a conflict that would involve a variety of different countries. already, saudi arabia, bahrain and kuwait have told their citizens living here to leave. because they don't want hezbollah to be part of lebanese government. first a look at the headlines
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on afternoon live: as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law, a warning from the eu that we've got two weeks to clarify what we'll pay if the uk wants to talk trade. the online taxi—hailing service uber loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. president trump has defended his "america first" approach at an asia—pacific economic summit. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the uk's industrial output grew at it is fastest pace so far according to figures from the office of national statistics. broadband and landline customers will now get money back from their providers when things go wrong,
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without having to claim it. this follows an 0fcom review which says customers are set for £142 million in payouts — around nine times the current level — benefiting millions who suffer poor service. taxi firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that its drivers should be classed as workers rather than self—employed. last year, a tribunal ruled that two drivers were staff and entitled to holiday pay, paid rest breaks and the minimum wage. the taxi hailing app has up to 40,000 drivers registered to it in london alone, where the company is fighting to retain its operating licence. extraordinary attack from a co—founder of facebook about the site. sean parker, a former president of facebook, says it is exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology and putting child ren's mental health at risk. he made a lot of money from
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facebook. quite damning for somebody pa rt facebook. quite damning for somebody part of brand. he says it is addictive? yes and vulnerable people may find it an obstacle. a lot of studies back this up, saying social media can lower your self—esteem. 0ne media can lower your self—esteem. one study said children's mental health, it is not good for people who are young and have problems with their body image. joining us now live from the new york stock exchange is samira hussain. how damaging is this? this is coming from someone who is actually, was one of the initial founders of
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facebook and as you said, made a lot of money from it. he has since walked away from facebook. 0n the one hand, i think it is interesting to just hear from an one hand, i think it is interesting tojust hearfrom an insider about the kind of efforts that went into creating facebook and just how much thought was put into how much of a person's time and how much of their energies they can focus. most interesting was the idea about user engagement, where you have the situation where you can like people's posts, it continuously gives people that engagement. in terms of damaging facebook‘s reputation, nothing he said was revolutionary. as you said, we have seen revolutionary. as you said, we have seen studies that are showing how damaging these social networking sites can be on children. is there more pressure on the likes of facebook to take more social responsibility? well from a business
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perspective, investors say this is good, because so many people are engaged, we are making more money. there may be a turning point at which you will see that they're going to want to put limits on facebook. now from a business perspective, many believe the onus is on the user themselves and not necessarily on facebook the company. thank you. we will leave it there, it looks like a busy day at the new york stock exchange. before you went on air, i saw you were struggling to get people out of the way? you were pushing people out of the way!” get people out of the way? you were pushing people out of the way! i am, thatis pushing people out of the way! i am, that is why i go to the gym regularly! i knew i had that is why i go to the gym regularly! i knew! had seen that is why i go to the gym regularly! i knew i had seen you before. thank you. on that bombshell... the markets. ofgem has
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said the cost of installing prepayment meters will be capped from general. and people won't have to pay up to £900 if they are forced to pay up to £900 if they are forced to have a prepayment meter installed. now markets. the ftse is in negative territory. we haven't got retail shares up there, but that is one reason why the ftse is down. thank you. more than half of schools in england fail to offer computer science at gcse, according to a new report by the uk's leading science academy. the royal society is calling for a ten—fold increase in funding for computing education, which it says is patchy and fragile. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. what effect does a binary shift left, and a binary shift right have? in a classroom in st albans, some budding young computer scientists are deep in their gcse course.
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but this school is in a minority. today's report says computing education is fragile and patchy, with too pupils given the chance to enter the exam. what's more, the subject is being largely avoided by girls. so what's made these students take it up? our future is very much based around computers, and technology is becoming a big part of society. it would be useful to have, and i could get a job out of it easily. maybe in other schools, it might be viewed as slightly nerdy to do computer science. but i think it's quite respected in this school. the royal society's report says too many young people are missing out on vital digital skills. 54% of english schools do not offer computer science as a gcse. schools need 3500 more computing teachers. only one in five computer science entrants are female. both teachers in this class have degrees in computer science, which makes them unusual.
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the royal society wants a big increase in spending on training new teachers. the computer industry says digital skills are vital for the uk's future. if we want to remain a developed nation, if we want to remain a nation that is innovative, that provides the products and services that are going to us forward in the 21st—century, then we need people with advanced digital skills. and that's true in all industries and in all sectors. the department for education says it wants to ensure that the future workforce has the skills the uk needs. but this report says, without more computing teachers, that just won't happen. rory cellan—jones, bbc new, st albans. i want to show you a tweet on an interview we have got coming up. from the bbc news press team. with it they have got a picture of me! but also with, how do you describe
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it? a subtitling system that seems to have got wrong, deoo scribing our guest as the current controller of bbc news, i will be diving into the double decade birthday of bbc news with somebody from, well the address is w1a. we will talk about the future of 24 hour news. that is all to come later. it is friday. here's a flat with a difference... it's taken nearly 40 years of painting, but diana keys has turned her council flat in hemel hempstead into her very own masterpiece. inspired by michelangelo's frescoes in the sistine chapel, she's decided to open her home and reveal what she's been working on. she paints using herfingers and you're wondering why, here is the
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answer. i've never seen the sistine chapel, but i wanted it to be a bit like that. if i haven't done anything in my life, which i haven't, because i have been in care and homes and everything, i like to think i've left behind a piece of love and the reason why i want it to be shown now is because i like to think some of it will live on even when i'm not here. you're watching afternoon live on bbc news. a p pa re ntly afternoon live on bbc news. apparently our director has an art degree, but that doesn't mean she is being fair. now the weather. this weekend we should see some bright, but cold weather. it will ta ke bright, but cold weather. it will take a while to cheer up. particularly in the south. this morning it started cloudy in the south, but brightened up in many southern areas with plenty of
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sunshine. but showers streaming in across the north—west. some hefty down pours, blown in on brisk wind. as we head through the late afternoon into the evening, the showers across northern ireland will be replaced by some heavy and persistent rain, that will spill into northern england, the midlands, wales and the south coast. further north, clear skies, some wintry showers in scotland, where temperatures will be close to freezing. milder in the south. tomorrow a struggle to brighten things up in the south. a lot of cloud across wales, the midlands, into east anglia and the south—east and rain continuing essentially all day long for south wales and the south west of england. further north, brighterer in scotland with some showers. just 5 or 6 degrees. northern ireland bright for most of afternoon. and a cracking afternoon
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for northern england. brightening up across east anglia. but for the south—east towards mid wales cloudy and for the south—west the rain keeps on coming and it will be windy. through daylight on saturday, most of rain will be light and patchy. but it will turn heavier again as we head through saturday night. further north, clearskies and wintry showers, because there is something colder on the way for all of us. we will lose the wet weather during the first part of remembrance sunday and thing in winds from the arctic. cold air sweeping across all parts of the british isles. with that still a lot of dry weather and decent sunshine. some showers in northern and eastern areas, the showers over high ground in scotland will be wintry. temperatures ofjust 6toio will be wintry. temperatures ofjust 6 to 10 degrees at best. for the weekend, some rain in the south, particularly at first and then a mixture of sunshine and showers, but for all of us eventually it will
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feel cold. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3:00. as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law — a warning from the eu that we've got two weeks to clarify what we'll pay. no more trade abuse — president trump's message to china and others as he sets out his "america first" vision of global trade. we can no longer tolerate these chronic trade abuses and we will not tolerate them. and where to now? uber loses an appeal against a landmark ruling on the employment rights of its drivers. we also have all of the sport with damien.
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wealth of their chances in the most as is billy mckay acid test. —— in the must win ashes test, they are 155-5. we the must win ashes test, they are 155—5. we should see some cold, crisp weather this weekend. some will have to be patient. some rain to get out of the way first. for the weekend weather prospects coming up. the bbc news channel may be 20 years old, what is the future of news? we will get the man who tells everyone to do better with less. hello everyone — this is afternoon live.
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11pm on friday the 29th of march 2019. that's the time and date theresa may wants britain to officially leave the eu. but we're now more than half way through the brexit process and even the most optimistic brexiteer can see that progress is painfully slow. today, another warning from the eu — clarify what you're going to pay in the next two weeks or talks will stall into next year. here's our political correspondent, emma va rdy. it's a one—way journey, says theresa may, as brexit talks enter a critical phase. next week, the eu withdrawal bill comes back to parliament. today, the prime minister sent a strong signal that the referendum decision cannot be reversed. theresa may wants to enshrine in law the exact date and time that britain will leave the european union. writing in the telegraph, she said, "let no—one doubt our determination or question our resolve. brexit is happening." "we will not tolerate attempts
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from any quarter to use the process of amendments to this bill as a mechanism to try to block the democratic wishes of the british people." but we can still change our minds, says the man who wrote the key eu withdrawal clause. crossbench peer lord kerr has for some time argued that, despite triggering article 50, the uk could still legally reverse the process. i am keen that the public should know that sending the letter is not an irrevocable act. that the opportunity to change our mind is always there, if we wanted to take it. and it is clear to me that if we were to take that opportunity and we were to change our mind, we would be very welcome in brussels, that we had never left. the decision taken in 1975 by this country to join the common market has been reversed.
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from the moment the bbc declared the result of the referendum on the 23rd ofjune last year, today, at 1:49 precisely, we will be right at the halfway point. so now you can set your watch to brexit. and that ticking clock can't be ignored, because eu sources have told the uk it has just two weeks left to make progress on key withdrawal issues or risk further delays to any talk about future trade. the eu is united. the uk has to cough up more cash and they need to do that soon. the rights of eu citizens and the northern irish border are also yet to be resolved. but brexit secretary david davis said this can't be rushed. there's been a change in pace, i think. but, ultimately, this is about delivering results and that will depend on the content, not just the speed, of the negotiation. the eu's chief negotiator spoke today of working intensely.
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translation: in order to achieve our common objective, that is to organise an orderly withdrawal on the basis of an agreement, we will also work as intensely as is necessary in the weeks to come, in the run—up to the next european council meeting. if all goes as currently planned, we really will leave the eu at the 11th hour — 11pm, march the 29th, 2019. theresa may's message is that there is no going back now. earlier i spoke to adam fleming in brussels, and asked him what david davis meant when he asked for a change of pace. what he really means, in his eyes, the eu getting a move on and moving to phase two, talks about trade, the future relationship and a transition deal. the british feel that with the prime minister's foreign speech, they have done enough to justify this as sufficient progress, and that the eu asking for too much.
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it was quite revealing, the press conference, that there were two big issues causing problems. the first one is the one we have been talking about all week, money. the eu does not want the uk to come with a figure written on a post—it note, shoved across the table to michel barnier. neither side wants an actual number, whether it is 50 billion, 100 billion, 20 billion euros, whatever. they to go further in clarifying what the prime minister said in her florence speech when she said the uk would stick by its financial commitments made as a member. the eu, they think that is too generic and vague. they want david davis to say we will pay for this aspect of the budget, that programme, this loan guarantee and that pension pot for eu civil servants, rather than finalising a number. michel barnier confirmed, and it has been an open secret in brussels this week, that the eu side thinks that the uk has to do that the next two weeks, for them to have enough time to trigger trade talks at the meeting of eu leaders just before
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christmas on the 14th of december. that is the money. then there is northern ireland. there is broad agreement on protecting the good friday agreement and the peace process, but the tricky bit is the detail of how you do that and there is a disagreement about that. iamjoined by i am joined by sam coates, deputy political editor of the times. how odd is it that theresa may has given ata time odd is it that theresa may has given at a time and date, and seeing that enshrined in law? theresa may wants to tell brexiteers that is going to happen. how better to do that then provide a symbolic time and date of that exit. march 29, 2019. i wonder whether we will ever get there. there is a 40% chance that we will not, because of the huge uncertainty in british politics. the move reflects the all—round uncertainty,
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not just politics, but reflects the all—round uncertainty, notjust politics, but brexit. so many unknowns, quite a few known unknowns. where we are today is in a bit of a holding pattern. in a plane above the fray. we know that britain has a bit more to offer in terms of money when we leave. we don't want to offer it out right after we get a commitment from the european union that they will give the green light for trade talks to begin. we're having a bit of a silly dance, while we wait for that piece of choreography to happen, which will happen around the december council next month. everybody is in a holding pattern this week. i was not terribly surprised that much progress was made. you are not arguing that the plane is at some stage not going to learn, or at some stage not going to learn, or at some stage we will fly off and it won't happen. there is an enormous amount of uncertainty in british politics. quite likely we leave the european
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union, overwhelmingly likely we leave at some point. all i'm saying is there are problems associated with having a very hard, full exit date. there are difficulties with the transition period the government says. trying to make it easy, a standstill. they are making it look very ha rd standstill. they are making it look very hard from where i am sitting. from where i'm sitting, the standstill transition, keeping it the same can sounds quite easy. at the same can sounds quite easy. at the same can sounds quite easy. at the same time the britain will have left the european union, not part of the european court ofjustice and the european court ofjustice and the agreements of the european union, that does not sound so easy from where i sit. the cabinet need to agree what kind of posts brexit the election ship we have been —— post—brexit relationship we have the european union going forward. whether it is domestic or european hurdles, the clock is ticking. michel barnier said we have essentially two weeks to get our house in order in terms of money.
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that will up the pressure, causing a view stomach knots today. does she have to do that with the cabinet, on the bill, boris johnson have to do that with the cabinet, on the bill, borisjohnson feel strongly about the amount of money we had the bay mcgivern he was part of the claim that we would return home £350 million a week. after brexit. lots of complications, nothing is certain. theresa may trying to put the stick about it this morning in the telegraph. it won't have anything to improve the mood towards in some parts of the conservative country, or standing in brussels. two size within the cabinet are happy theresa may are in charge of the moment, rather than someone charge of the moment, rather than someone else. a prime minister is better than no premise that. you look at the true files of the cabinet at the moment. losing two cabinet at the moment. losing two cabinet ministers in the last week and a bit. two more in trouble, damian green, being investigated by
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the cabinet office, for allegations he strongly denies. borisjohnson fending off allegations he may cause a british uranium woman to spend longer injail. the burning two weeks we have the most difficult budget in our lifetime. note money or majority in the commons, and a very difficult time for philip hammond to find billions of pounds for the bills already spent. this is not easy, a hard time, not sure how they will get through it. governments do get through it. there was a stench of death from john major's government from 1995, until 1997. look at the scale of the majority labour won at that point. so many spinning plates in the air, so many spinning plates in the air, so hard. predictions are a mug's game. we have learned that. president trump has vigorously defended his "america first" vision of international trade at a summit of the asia pacific economic co—operation group. speaking in the vietnamese city of danang, he said the us would no longer tolerate chronic trade
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abuses, and would in future insist on fair and equal treatment. jonathan head reports. fresh from a feel—good blast of bonhomie from beijing, president trump arrived in da nang, the base from where the us waged its war in vietnam's 50 years ago, with a much tougher message. apec is a free—trade forum, founded with strong american participation, just as the cold war ended. past presidents have used these summits to promote us values, like free trade and civil rights. but not this one. speaking to a hall full of east asia's business and diplomatic elite, mr trump at first showered them with flattery. but then changed tack with a litany of complaints, many directed at china, though he never named the culprits, of countries taking advantage of america, breaking the rules of free trade. we can no longer tolerate these chronic trade abuses. and we will not tolerate them.
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despite years of broken promises, we were told that some day soon, everyone would behave fairly, and responsibly. people in america, and throughout the indo—pacific region have waited for that day to come. but it never has. you can come to summit meetings like this, and asia holds plenty of them, and come away with the impression that not very much happened. but not this one — with his speech in da nang, donald trump has announced america's withdrawl from the leadership role it has played in asia since the second world war, a role that is profoundly shaped this region. after his speech was that of his recent host china. xi jinping's tone was softer, no threats or warnings here, but an invitation to asian countries tojoin a reforming china, and a none too subtle dig at the new american isolationism. translation: openness brings
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progress, while self seclusion leaves one behind. we, the asia—pacific economies, know this too well from our own development experience. we should put in place a regional cooperation framework that ensures consultation among equals, wide participation and shared benefits. mr trump's tough talk on trade will go down well with many americans, but here in asia, while some governments will welcome his no—nonsense approach to diplomacy, you can almost feel american influence shrinking, and china waiting to take up the mantle. jonathan head, bbc news, da nang. the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actress portia de rossi, who is married to the american talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet.
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she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her how important it was to have chemistry off—screen, before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc the actor had no comment. jon donnison's report contains some flash photography. steven seagal is used to playing the tough guy. now, he's the latest hollywood big name to be facing tough questions. portia de rossi, seen here on the right, with her wife ellen degeneres, accused the actor and director of sexual harassment. the arrested development star tweeted that at a final audition for a part in a steven seagalfilm, he talked about the importance of off—screen chemistry before unzipping his leather pants. ellen degeneres added her support for coming forward. mr seagal has been accused of inappropriate behaviour by several other women. his manager has told the bbc
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he has no comment to make. and there are more allegations, this time about one of america's best—known comedians, louis ck. the new york times is reporting five women have accused him of serious sexual misconduct. the bbc has contacted his managerfor comment. each day, it seems, hollywood is waking up to more revelations. it's just a very unsettling time. it's a good time in the fact that women now feel comfortable, or more comfortable, speaking out about what happened to them, and what was their experience. the list of stars accused is growing, and the more people who come forward with allegations, the more likely it is others will have the confidence to do so. this hollywood story could have some way to run. jon donnison, bbc news. let's get reaction from hollywood,
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anita bennett, from entertainment hollywood .com. because of the sheer volume of the allegations, everyone in the industry has been caught off—guard. it was a quietly kept secret, the whole casting couch thing. no one ever expected the sheer volume of allegations. director and hollywood mogul, producer, harvey weinstein, he had more than 60 women coming forward making allegations against him. it is the sheer volume, and it has happened so quickly. many british audiences will know steven seagal, less familiar with l0uis ck, who is the? very successful comedy writer,
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he got his own show called louis, he is known for his raunchy humour. he got his start as a writer for david letter man, chris rock. he had a movie is scheduled to come out next week. the film premiere was yesterday, as scheduled. as it came to light the new york times was publishing this bombshell story, they pulled the plug on the premier, now the release of the film is in doubt. the film is called i love you daddy. we have seen the industry is very quick to try and put these things behind them, rescuing salvage reputations when they can. the whole kevin spacey think of this was unprecedented. he has this movie, for the money in the world. a ridley scott film, judy, next month. they decided to remove kevin spacey from
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the film, cast christopher plummer, reshoot it in a matter of weeks. everyone is trying to distance themselves from these allegations. we are entering the time of year, up until march, where the awards become prominent. it is going to be really difficult tojudge, how prominent. it is going to be really difficult to judge, how the awards ta ke difficult to judge, how the awards take place. he goes, he wins. whether they should go ahead in the first place. these allegations have thrown hollywood into disarray. you have prominent, former 0scar winners, including gwyneth paltrow, patricia arquette. the big thing is the awards are held. and what are they going to say about this. good of you tojoin they going to say about this. good of you to join us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines:
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as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law, a warning from the eu that we have two weeks to clarify what we will pay if the uk wants to talk trade. president trump has defended his america first approached at an asia—pacific economic summit. uber loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. ina in a moment ceremonies held in belgium to commemorate one of the bloodiest battles in the first world war. england's women take late wickets lifting hopes they can go on to victory in the ashes. gareth southgate faces his biggest test is taking over as england manager, as an inexperienced england side take on germany at wembley with eric dier as captain. lewis hamilton clocked the fastest time in first practice at the brazilian grand prix. his
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team—mate valtteri bottas was second quickest. back with more rondo stories at half—past. the online taxi—hailing firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that gave its drivers employment rights. an earlier ruling had ordered uber to treat its drivers as workers rather than self—employed independent contractors, after two drivers argued that they were entitled to the minimum wage, sick pay and paid leave. uber challenged that ruling, and says it will pursue a further appeal. simon gompertz gave us this update from the tribunal. it isa it is a setback in uber‘s efforts to maintain the way operates in the uk by using self—employed drivers. maintain the way operates in the uk by using self-employed drivers. two them challenge that in an employment tribunal last week, winning against uber, uber appealed, now tribunal last week, winning against uber, uberappealed, now the tribunal last week, winning against uber, uber appealed, now the appeal at the employment tribunal has been thrown out. this is significant for all firms who operate in what is
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called the gig economy. bicycle delivery riders, drivers, careers. all of them could be affected by the effort to try and stop the individuals being treated self—employed, rather than workers with workers' rights. in theory uber could be required to pay thousands of pounds to the drivers who have brought this challenge, in back pay and holiday and sick pay. anyone who joins the claim could make those claims against uber. in practice it looks as if uber is going to appeal again. this could go to the supreme court next year. as long as the process goes on, uber can carry on with the current practices. the mother of a schoolboy who a naked picture of himself has won an
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appealfor the naked picture of himself has won an appeal for the police not naked picture of himself has won an appealfor the police not to hold the details. the northern ireland manager michael o'neill the northern ireland manager michael 0'neill says his side must channel the anger of a penalty decision when the anger of a penalty decision when the sides meet again in the second leg. billed as the biggest game for yea rs, leg. billed as the biggest game for years, they were drawing at the time of the controversial decision. in a memo to dermot the former premier league referee. shaqiry coming in. corry evans under way. they are saying hamble. are you kidding me? how can he give handball when he is that close? how can he give handball when he is that close ? giving how can he give handball when he is that close? giving him a yellow card as well. unbelievable. a yard away. he volleys it, hitting him on the shoulder. cannot believe that. let's speak to dermot gallagher. was it a penalty? not for me, simon. is there
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an element of doubt? there is no doubt in my mind. i don't think it isa doubt in my mind. i don't think it is a penalty. what i was going to explain, when you look at the criteria, he is too close, not moved his hand to the ball, arms not outstretched, not making himself bigger. debatable whether it hit him on the hand, looks like it hit him on the hand, looks like it hit him on the hand, looks like it hit him on the shoulder. not a penalty. do you think the referee saw it? here seen you think the referee saw it? here seen it, made an error ofjudgment. to balance things out. it is a terribly unfortunate decision for northern ireland. it will be a terribly ‘s gerry mccann fortunate decision for the referee, there will be ramifications. what sort? are you talking in future games in the crowd, or professionally? every referee is accountable, you referee at that level you under such scrutiny. you make a mistake of that magnitude, you do not get games at
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that level for a period of time. we saw it in bloemfontein, the goal for england that went over the line, the referee was removed from the world cup. it was his assistant‘s fault, but the whole team were removed. the referee may have gone home last night, got tv play out, watched it again. if you realise you have made again. if you realise you have made a mistake like that, how do you feel? absolutely gutted. you will beat yourself up over and over again. i'm notjoking. you will question yourself, how did i arrive at that decision, what went through my mind? you ask yourself so many questions. in the end, what you have to do, try to wash it away, go to somebody neutral, a support mechanism, and explain to him, and sit down, at the root cause and remedy. you overthink things after the match like that if you have made a mistake. unfortunate errorfor northern ireland. without doubt. for
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everybody involved in the world cup. does not show a good image. you know as well as i do video system refereeing is coming in at the england and germany game for the first time. is that an answer? will that be a help? certainly a step forward. i'm a dublin boy, we were subject to this eight years ago with thierry henry's handball. the famous one with maradona. they cannot keep going on. it has already come in, var, used in various leagues. tonight used by england for the first competitive match. we are moving forward. when that is brought into it has to be 100% correct. we are into it has to be 10096 correct. we are all human, that is the thing. we all make mistakes. what is the biggest howler you ever committed! how long have you got. tommy bowe
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one you do not have restful nights thinking about. it might sound strange, i that like jack nicholson in many ways, he doesn't remember any bad plots, i'm the same, i try to be positive. when i have not done particularly well, i would look at a gamei particularly well, i would look at a game i have refereed well, thinking thatis game i have refereed well, thinking that is how i can do it, focus on that, not the negatives. i'm wondering what the worst thing you heard shouted from the stands was?” could imagine there were a few worse last night. very good of you to join us. last night. very good of you to join us. dermot gallagher. ceremonies are being held in belgium to mark the centenary of the end of one of the bloodiest battles of the first world war. 100 years ago today, canadian troops captured the ridge near the village of passchendaele from the german army. the campaign lasted for more
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than three months, and in that time, between 600,000 and 700,000 allied and german soldiers were killed or injured. robert hall reports from passchendaele. 0n the flat farmland outside lille, the thunder of the guns. on this day 100 years ago, canadian troops finally captured the belgian village of passchendaele after months of misery and slaughter. the battle, north of ypres, was part of a plan to capture high ground from german forces and reverse the course of the war in that part of belgium. but the attacks were slowed and thwarted by the coming of winter, which turned no man's land into a sea of mud. the man who has spent two years planning this tribute to 500,000 casualties was motivated in part by a loss within his own family. my grandfather was killed at hill 60 in the battle of passchendaele. i have always had a feeling that he should be remembered. my cousins, several of them are here today.
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they are all now giving me the thumbs up, because we have now remembered him. every one of these 16 guns can be traced back to the battlefields of france and belgium. many of them have been restored, especially for today's ceremony. around them are gun crews, representing every nation that took part in the battle — britain, france, belgium, canada, new zealand, australia and ireland. all the soldiers are aware of the poignancy of what has gone before them. recent wars like iraq and afghanistan hit home, but it makes them even more interested in the history that came before that. being here is really important to them, and it means a lot. this weekend, britain and europe will remember those who lost their lives in conflict. but today, as the smoke cleared and the guns fell silent, thoughts were focused on one terrible autumn, and the men who never went home. time for a look at the weather.
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eventually this way kent all of us should see bright and cold weather. —— this weekend. it will take a while to perk up, because this rain swinging from the west is going to set in across england and wales tonight. northern ireland clearing up tonight. northern ireland clearing up by tonight. northern ireland clearing up by the end of the night. across scotland, clear skies, wintry showers, turning cold and frosty. tomorrow, we will see the cloud, outbreaks of rain, very slowly sinking southwards across england and wales. things brightening up, across the midlands and east anglia. brighterfor northern across the midlands and east anglia. brighter for northern england, ireland. and to be showers in the final. breezy day, cold in the north, six in aberdeen, 13 in plymouth with the outbreaks of rain. mild air swept away from the north
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on remembrance sunday. cold weather across the country. sunshine and showers across the north—east. highs of 6-10d. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has warned that the uk has two weeks to clarify how it will settle the so—called "divorce bill" — if trade talks are to begin next month. theresa may says britain's departure date from the eu will be enshrined in law and warns that she won't tolerate attempts to block the brexit process. president trump has defended his "america first" approach to trade
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at an asia—pacific economic summit. 0nline taxi—hailing firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that gave its drivers employment rights.the company says it will mount a further legal challenge. steven seagal is the latest hollywood actor to be accused of sexual harassment. in a moment, we'll be talking to a man who can allegedly tell everyone how to do more of better with less. sport now on afternoon live with damian johnson. i have been speaking to the referee about that howler. shouldn't happen in the england/germany game with new technology used for the first time? yes the first time in a big official match. gareth southgate may learn something about his troops, it is a
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big match with swraermy. -- germany. and england's women, they mayjust do it down under? yes, they feel they have edged the second day of they have edged the second day of the test. their hopes hang in the balance after a closely fought second day. england need a win to keep their hopes alive. but australia's elise perry has been causing problems as andy swiss reports. after australia's first day fight back, england set out in search of useful late order runs, but didn't find many as the hosts held their nerve. england were 280 all out with plenty of work to do. could their bowlers rise to the challenge? australia looked untroubled until bolton thrashed straight to shru bsole untroubled until bolton thrashed straight to shrubsole and suddenly england were on top as 18—year—old
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sophie ecclestone put australia in a spin with two wickets. when taylor snaffled a catch, australia were on 95-4. snaffled a catch, australia were on 95—4. they stabilised with a half century from elise perry, but england struck again. brunt trapping haynes to provide a boost to their hopes. it will be a difficult pitch, particularly in the second innings, it has been slow from ball one. if the pitch turns more, it will be difficult to score. the fact we have got runs on the board and we will bat first in the second innings, puts us in a good position. a second day in which the momentum ebbed and flowed. england can take confidence, but this match remains intriguingly poised. there will be a number of firsts at wembley,
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when an inexperienced england side face germany in a friendly tonight. with eric dier as captain and both sets of players wearing poppies — the germans for the first time in their history — after fifa relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. it's also the first time video assistant referee technology's been used in an official match in the uk. i have learned a lot from the week and when you have got the non—qualification games, that is what you need from it. you want the learn things. i said that when we went to germany and with the game with france in the summer, we will ta ke with france in the summer, we will take more from these games than any of the qualification games in terms of the qualification games in terms of what we learn about players and the system and everything else. wales play their first game since failing to make the world cup play—offs last month. and it's a tough one, against france in paris. manager chris coleman hasn't decided whether he will stay in charge beyond the end of his current contract. but, he's not going to let that affect how he and his team prepare.
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i wouldn't dare take my foot off the gas, because they deserve everything they have got and they have always given me everything they have got. it is business as usual for me. i don't see it as an end of anything. even so, the players we have got, the group of players we have got, these boys are going to go on, with me, without out me and i believe they will achieve. world champion lewis hamilton edged out mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas in first practice ahead of the brazilian grand prix. hamilton was 0.127 seconds ahead of the finn, with ferrari's kimi raikkonen in third and red bull's max verstappen fourth quickest. british 19—year—old george russell, making his debut at a grand prix weekend was 12th quickest in his force india car in a controlled and impressive debut. 0lympianjess varnish is suing uk sport and british cycling. a source close to the sprinter told bbc sport her legal action is based on claims she suffered sex discrimination, so—called detriment for whistleblowing, victimisation and unfair dismissal.
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varnish was dropped from british cycling's elite programme last year and former technical director shane sutton was found to have used sexist language towards her. sutton resigned but was later cleared of eight of the nine allegations. british cycling's confirmed that talks with varnish about a possible resolution are on—going. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. the french president, emmanuel macron, is on an unscheduled visit to saudi arabia to discuss the escalating crisis between the kingdom and lebanon. his trip comes days after the lebanese prime minister resigned while in riyadh, saying he feared for his life. many in lebanon believe that saad hariri is effectively being held under house arrest and that lebanon is once again being dragged into a power struggle between saudi arabia and iran. richard galpin reports. this latest middle east crisis was sparked by the sudden resignation last week of lebanese prime
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minister saad hariri, wearing the dark suit. it was announced during a visit to saudi arabia, where he's still staying. mr hariri claimed his life was in danger in lebanon. but it seems to be part of a much bigger game between rival regional powers following the defeat of so—called islamic state in most of iraq and syria. iran now wields significant influence in both these countries, as well as in lebanon, where the shia organisation hezbollah, which is close to iran, is part of the coalition government. translation: the americans, the saudis and israelis are all trying to prevent hezbollah from maximising its gains from the wars in syria and iraq. hezbollah, and its allies, have achieved enormous success, but they're now facing huge pressure because of this. with tensions rising between shi'ite iran and saudi arabia, which is predominantly sunni,
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emmanuel macron flew out to the region yesterday to mediate, holding talks with saudi leaders. we've never been so close to the precipice. in many ways, the threat of regional war has never been this real, if you like, where it's a conflict that would involve a variety of different countries. already, saudi arabia, bahrain and kuwait have told their citizens living here to leave. because they don't want hezbollah to be part of lebanese government. this seems to be an attempt to pressurise the these government to exclude the shi'ite organisation hezbollah from its ranks, and therefore reduce iran's influence in the country. richard galpin, bbc news. women who have been given the human papillomavirus — or hpv vaccine — may only need three cervical screenings in their lifetime
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instead of 12. that's according to a new study. hpv is thought to cause nearly all cervical cancers and a vaccination against it has been offered to girls aged between 11 to 13 since 2008. a cancer research team in the uk says cutting the number of screenings for vaccinated women could save the nhs time and money. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has the details. cervical cancer is a dangerous disease, it's also one of the most preventable cancers, but there's been concern about a steady drop in the number of women going for screening in the past few years. mandy parker has had cervical cancer, and says she has never missed a smear test, and believes that saved her life. if i hadn't gone for my screening, it wasn'tjust me being melodramatic my consultant said it is an aggressive grade of cancer, you were lucky to catch it early, because otherwise we would be talking palliative care and not cure. but mandy's teenage daughters have
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both had a jab that protects against cervical cancer. almost a decade ago, girls aged 11 to 13 started to be vaccinated against the cancer—causing virus hpv. the vaccine reduces the risk of cervical cancer by 70%, according to today's study. it says women who have had it only need to undergo three smear tests during their lives, instead of the normal 12, at the age of 30, 40 and 50 five. all cervical cancers are linked to hpv infection, and having the vaccination reduces the chances of having the infection, and also of having cervical cancer. screening looks for early changes that could suggest cancer is developing. having the vaccine, you are less likely to have those changes and less likely to develop cancer, so you don't need screening as often. mandy is relieved her daughters have been vaccinated and they may need fewer smear tests. it's fantastic, and it takes the pressure away of having to think, every three years, i have got to do it. eventually, maybe not
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in my lifetime, but i think it will be eradicated by this new plan, so it's great. the study comes ahead of changes being made to the screening programme in england for 2019, and similar adjustments in scotland and wales. new, more advanced lab testing is expected to be introduced, which could mean fewer smear tests for women, whether vaccinated or not. the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law, a warning from the eu that we've got two weeks to clarify what we'll pay if the uk wants to talk trade. president trump has defended his "america first" approach at an asia—pacific economic summit. the online taxi—hailing service uber loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. here's your business headlines on afternoon live.
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the uk's industrial output grew at its fastest pace so far this year in september. that's according to official figures from the office for national statistics. separate data showed the uk's trade deficit in goods and services narrowed by more than expected in september. broadband and landline customers will now get money back from their providers when things go wrong, without having to claim it. this follows an 0fcom review which says customers are set for £142 million in payouts — around nine times the current level — benefiting millions who suffer poor service. a gap in pay will take 100 years to close. that is according to a new report. now shopping and high street
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retailers have had a tough time in 0ctober. retailers have had a tough time in october. 5.296 down in sales, the worst single month since last april. there are a couple of reasons for this, it was an unusually warm 0ctober this, it was an unusually warm october and people putting off buying their winter clothes, so maybe delaying it to november or december and you have the christmas period and people saving for that and wage growth has not been great, inflation has been high, about 3%, so inflation has been high, about 3%, so that's taken its toll. that will worry retailers before christmas? yes, we often see discounting happen towards the end of november, we are seeing it earlier this year and that has something to do with it. joining us now is sophie michael, head of retail and wholesale, at the business consultancy firm bdo. these sales are considerably down for october, how much of that is to do with online retailers? well, we
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have seen an increase in online, but the increase in online is expected as we see the shift from store to online. but it wouldn't have made up the fall we have seen on the high street. so are you thinking this is because of disposable income, the hit we have had to disposable income, because of higher inflation and we're seeing more stagnant wage growth? i think that is right. 0ctober itself has been hit by a number of factors, which has combined to create that hit. so we have seen inflation is beginning to hurt in terms of the weekly shop and disposable income, wage growth, is being outstripped by inflation. that is reducing disposable income. and consumer confidence i was down, because of the noise and the noise that we had about the interest rate rise, which did materialise. so that
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doesn't have that combination doesn't have that combination doesn't have that combination doesn't have a good outcome for consumer spending. doesn't have a good outcome for consumerspending. since doesn't have a good outcome for consumer spending. since the financial crisis, walking down the high street f you go into any clothing retailer, you will find sales happen more through the year. is that how retailers are expected to react to this? well, it is true that we have got a savvy consumer that we have got a savvy consumer that wants a discount. but it is important, because retailers need to protect their margins and they have had squeezes through increased cost, but they look at how they discount their goods and they will be looking at that, promotional activity is important when they have disposable income is on the down. so they will be looking at promotional activity and at that engagement with the consumer and offing a difference ya pted consumer and offing a difference
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yapted product —— differentiated product. we have seen shares battered today as well. thank you. thank you for that. more than half of schools in england fail to offer computer science at gcse, according to a new report by the uk's leading science academy. the royal society is calling for a ten—fold increase in funding for computing education, which it says is patchy and fragile. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. what effect does a binary shift left, and a binary shift right have? in a classroom in st albans, some budding young computer scientists are deep in their gcse course. but this school is in a minority. today's report says computing education is fragile and patchy, with too few pupils given the chance to enter the exam. what's more, the subject is being largely avoided by girls. so what's made these students take it up? our future is very much based around computers, and technology is becoming a big
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part of society. it would be useful to have, and i could get a job out of it easily. maybe in other schools, it might be viewed as slightly nerdy to do computer science. but i think it's quite respected in this school. the royal society's report says too many young people are missing out on vital digital skills. 54% of english schools do not offer computer science as a gcse. schools need 3,500 more computing teachers. only one in five computer science entrants are female. both teachers in this class have degrees in computer science, which makes them unusual. the royal society wants a big increase in spending on training new teachers. the computer industry says digital skills are vital for the uk's future. if we want to remain a developed nation, if we want to remain a nation that is innovative, that provides the products and services that are going to us forward in the 21st—century, then we need people
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with advanced digital skills. and that's true in all industries and in all sectors. the department for education says it wants to ensure that the future workforce has the skills the uk needs. but this report says, without more computing teachers, that just won't happen. rory cellan—jones, bbc new, st albans. so, it's been a big week in the world of 24—hour news. talk of a sell—off of cnn as part of a deal between at&t and time warner. there's also the suggestion that the future of sky news could be in doubt as part of the negotiations over a proposed fox takeover of sky. here at the bbc, we've been marking 20 years since the start of the bbc news channel — or news 24 as it was. so what is the future of broadcasting and should everyone be doing more of better with less? what we need is to talk to an expert and i mean a serious expert, someone who really knows how it all works. i think we can hearfrom one now, so that's all good then. 0k, let me explain how this works.
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ifi 0k, let me explain how this works. if i can, sorry i'm just agreeing with you. there is no such things as lunchtime news. it is one avalanche of bleep happening in real time. very good. yes, exactly, yes. well to help with that we can talk in more detail to the man in that video — controller of news and current affairs, neil reid. mr reid welcome to w1a — i mean bbc news. a momentous week, who would have thought we would still be here after 20 years. i did, because news doesn't stop. it will keep on going forever and people walking down the street doing something is necessarily news. there might be boring news or interesting news, you feed it to the news and you decide which news you're going to put into which news you're going to put into which slot. the content is always there, it is the form we have put in and my god we have had trouble with form over the years, lit‘s face it.
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you go to meetings and make decisions, it is men like you, women like you in offices who make the decision. it is a long, hard slog. there is a lot of meetings with a lot of meetings talking a lot of... and i have to deal with that and shovel that particular stuff and make a decision about what we do. hopefully i get my way, but the director of governance may tell us that panorama is now going to twitter. i mean, what do you do? you throw your hands up in the air. somebody says evan davis wants to do strictly. i heard you could do a bit of soft shoe shuffling too. i have to structure news so it is a serious component of the bbc and not something akin to a bake—off. component of the bbc and not something akin to a bake-off. what is it about the channel, it has evolved over time, how have you, how do you see it progressing and the next 20 years panning out? not in a
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dissimilar fashion next 20 years panning out? not in a dissimilarfashion to next 20 years panning out? not in a dissimilar fashion to the first 20 yea rs. dissimilar fashion to the first 20 years. you know, an interesting, challenging slog i think is the word i would use. at the end of the day i'm the wizard of oz, i have the big curtain controlling this crap and i can come out and say to the world, this guys are fantastic, but somebody behind the scenes is paddling to keep it all going and i reckon i will be growing more paddles over the next 20 years to keep this place afloat. you're in charge of who does what, which reportish does what. including yourself. yes, how do you make that decision? it is not who is good at what, it is who is less bad at things. i have a scale from one to ten and! things. i have a scale from one to ten and i have never used a ten, nine or eight. i think huw edwards got a nine or eight. i think huw edwards gota7 nine or eight. i think huw edwards got a 7 once. because he got rid of
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the guy who did his hairfor the last 16 years. he got a 7 for that. there are many decisions i have to make on who will make the worst cock up make on who will make the worst cock up and leave them i out of the equation. this week, a survey said bbc news is still the most trusted source of news, you must take great pride in that? have you seen the other lot? ameen at the end of the —— i mean at the end of the day there is not much competition. sky, lovely channel, could be going down the pan. they get a lot of viewers and we get gies as m so —— twice as many. so we are doing something right. myjob many. so we are doing something right. my job is many. so we are doing something right. myjob is to keep my nose to the grind stone and keep you guys in check and make something that is a trusted voice across the day, talking to the nation in a structured, formulaic way that allows people to take a deep breath and go, that is what happening today. rather than jabbing at an ipad. in terms of those decision
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that you make in those meetings you must have made some howlers, what is the worst decision you have made. this is in the top ten, but let's have a think. the worst decisions? certainly when we decided, well the powers that be suggested, they could co nflate powers that be suggested, they could conflate news and weather, so you would say it is cloudy outside. you can go to window and say it is cloudy or raining. thomas could disagree. but there was a decision at one point, because costs were going up that new and weather could co nflate. going up that new and weather could conflate. fiona bruce's eyebrows went up so much. sophie raworth threw a glass of water over my face. i have one catch phrase, that is
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bollards, or a world that begins with b and ends with s. and i said, we are not having that. it won't happen. fortunately you present news in your unflappable charming way, the other guys present the weather in their unflappable, charming erroneous way and. . . in their unflappable, charming erroneous way and... even's happy. but that was something i had to dig my heels on. what is the best, the bit you're proudest of that we do? i'm quite proud that we have kicked the subtitling into shape. we had a lot of trouble with that. we have pa rt lot of trouble with that. we have part of bbc rolling thunder programme. basically to make this entire building run without anybody doing anything. you could not be here and you would still be here technically. the captions we had trouble with vladimir putin being called puking. and we have haven't had a problem for the last... well,
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actually, it was the last ten weeks untiljust actually, it was the last ten weeks until just before i actually, it was the last ten weeks untiljust before i came on and in fact... they had presented by sign on mccoy. i don't know if that is a portent of things to come. but i'm proud that we managed to nail that and you know people that need to watch the news as well as listen to it can do so in peace and harmony. how do you keep your temper in those meetings? i don't. let's be frank, you have heard things come out of my mouth you wouldn't hear from a liverpool docker. i'm not proud of saying that, there are people in this building who are complete...” think we will have to leave it there slam! thank you. very good to talk to you. of course. neil reid — thank you very much. and i should say thank you to the actor david westhead too who had just a small hand in this. the recent series of w1a is still available on the bbc iplayer. very strong.
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now the weather, ben rich, who will probably be doing the news at some stage. good afternoon, eventually this weekend, just about all of us should see some bright but cold weather. it will take a while to cheer up, particularly across the south and this morning it started cloudy in the south and it brightened up in london and the south—east. but some showers streaming in across the north—west. some hefty down pours, blown in on a brisk north—westerly wind. that was the seen in coleraine earlier. tonight the showers across northern ireland will be replaced by some heavy and persistent rain that will spill into northern england, the midlands, wales and down to the south coast as well. further north, clear skies and some wintry showers in scotland where temperatures will be close to freezing. further south
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mild at 10 degrees in the south west. tomorrow, it is a struggle to brighten up in the south. a lot of cloud lingering and the midlands and east anglia and rain continuing all day long for south wales and the south west of england. to the north, brighter in scotland. some showers blowing in. five or six degrees. northern ireland mostly dry and bright for the afternoon. and it looks like a cracking afternoon for northern england. brightening up in east anglia, but for the south—east up east anglia, but for the south—east up to mid wales, cloudy and for south wales and south west england, the rain keeps coming. most of rain light and patchy, but it will turn heaviestier on saturday. there is something colder on the way and we will lose the wet weather on the first part of remembrance sunday and
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bring the winds in from the arctic. cold air sweeping south across all parts of british isles. with that there will be a lot of dry weather and decent spells of sunshine. some showers particularly in northern and eastern areas. the showers in high ground in scotland will be wintry. with temperatures ofjust 6 to 10 degrees at best. so for if weekend, some rain in the south. then a mixture of sunshine and showers. but for all of us eventually it will feel cold. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4:00. as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law — a warning from the eu that we've got two weeks to clarify what we'll pay. if the uk wants to talk trade. no more trade abuse — president trump's message to china and others as he sets out his "america first"
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vision of global trade. we can no longer tolerate these chronic trade abuses and we will not tolerate them. and where to now? uber loses an appeal against a landmark ruling on the employment rights of its drivers. we also have all of the sport with damien. all about the ashes with england's men on the way to winning their warm up men on the way to winning their warm up game, and england's women with the upper hand in their test in the ashes. remember last weekend, some rain in the south, crisp autumn sunshine, a frosty sunday night. essentially we will do it all over again. the full forecast later on. also, coming up, not the sistine chapel, but a councilflat also, coming up, not the sistine chapel, but a council flat in also, coming up, not the sistine chapel, but a councilflat in hemel hempstead. you will not find magnolia on the walls here. hello everyone —
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this is afternoon live. 11pm on friday the 29th of march 2019. that's the time and date theresa may wants britain to officially leave the eu. but we're now more than half way through the brexit process and even the most optimistic brexiteer can see that progress is painfully slow. today, another warning from the eu — clarify what you're going to pay in the next two weeks or talks will stall into next year. here's our political correspondent, emma va rdy. it's a one—way journey, says theresa may, as brexit talks enter a critical phase. next week, the eu withdrawal bill comes back to parliament. today, the prime minister sent a strong signal that the referendum decision cannot be reversed. theresa may wants to enshrine in law the exact date and time that britain will leave the european union. writing in the telegraph, she said, "let no—one doubt our determination or question our resolve.
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brexit is happening." "we will not tolerate attempts from any quarter to use the process of amendments to this bill as a mechanism to try to block the democratic wishes of the british people." but we can still change our minds, says the man who wrote the key eu withdrawal clause. crossbench peer lord kerr has for some time argued that, despite triggering article 50, the uk could still legally reverse the process. i am keen that the public should know that sending the letter is not an irrevocable act. that the opportunity to change our mind is always there, if we wanted to take it. and it is clear to me that if we were to take that opportunity and we were to change our mind, we would be very welcome in brussels, that we had never left. the decision taken in 1975 by this country to join the common market has been reversed. from the moment the bbc declared
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the result of the referendum on the 23rd ofjune last year, today, at 1:49 precisely, we will be right at the halfway point. so now you can set your watch to brexit. and that ticking clock can't be ignored, because eu sources have told the uk it has just two weeks left to make progress on key withdrawal issues or risk further delays to any talk about future trade. the eu is united. the uk has to cough up more cash and they need to do that soon. the rights of eu citizens and the northern irish border are also yet to be resolved. but brexit secretary david davis said this can't be rushed. there's been a change in pace, i think.
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but, ultimately, this is about delivering results and that will depend on the content, not just the speed, of the negotiation. the eu's chief negotiator spoke today of working intensely. translation: in order to achieve our common objective, that is to organise an orderly withdrawal on the basis of an agreement, we will also work as intensely as is necessary in the weeks to come, in the run—up to the next european council meeting. if all goes as currently planned, we really will leave the eu at the 11th hour — 11pm, march the 29th, 2019. theresa may's message is that there is no going back now. theresa may trying to make it clear to the brexiteers, she is going for this. absolutely, a marker put down by theresa may to show the government is determined to see this through. that is much as anything else. what this means is the day and
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time will be put on the front of the eu withdrawal bill. that bill is being scrutinised in parliament next week. it is a huge piece of legislation. a big piece of legislation. a big piece of legislation we need to lump all of the eu law into british law so the day after that we leave the eu there is not a legal black hole. there has been cross—party agreement that the date and time has to be enshrined in law so it is made very clear exactly when we are leaving. that is the message from theresa may, all about delivering on the will of the people, hoping to silence any critics who believe she may be in danger of backsliding into brexit. we heard the comments from lord kerr camino the legislation inside out, because he wrote it. he said despite the fact we sent the article 50 letter, there will still be room, right up until the point we leave,
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we could decide to put the brakes on and change our mind. that has gone down badly with people, saying it is an outrage and absurd to make this kind of intervention. others will see him as a very credible voice, boosting the remaining arguments. number ten are scornful about his intervention, saying politically there is no way the government is going to change direction on this. crisp pages in belfast. it is the border issue, clearly one of the things dragging these talks down at the moment. the border issue is certainly a big brain teaser in the brexit negotiations. the european commission has written a paper linked over the last 24 hours from the same one of the ways you could preserve the border as it is now pretty much invisible with no border checks, with northern ireland, and the uk as a whole, keep the rules of
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being in the european customs union and single market. that reflects the irish government's thinking on this. at lunchtime in the channel islands, they said it had been the irish government's point of view for a long time that the only way of avoiding hardboard in ireland would be for the uk or ireland to follow the rules of the customs union and the rules of the customs union and the single market. that did not mean they had to stay in the single market and customs union. the british government have made it quite clear they are prepared to look at special circumstances around northern ireland, they recognise it is in somewhat of a unique position. david davis and james brokenshire said they would not contemplate doing anything meaning they would be an internal border within the uk. that seems to rule out the possibility of northern ireland having one set of customs rules to enable the border to remain soft, and the rest of the uk having a
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different set of customs rules. cutting off northern ireland from the rest of the uk in trade terms. chris, we will talk about this again. for now, thank you. president trump has vigorously defended his "america first" vision of international trade at a summit of the asia pacific economic co—operation group. speaking in the vietnamese city of danang, he said the us would no longer tolerate chronic trade abuses, and would in future insist on fair and equal treatment. jonathan head reports. fresh from a feel—good blast of bonhomie from beijing, president trump arrived in da nang, the base from where the us waged its war in vietnam's 50 years ago, with a much tougher message. apec is a free—trade forum, founded with strong american participation, just as the cold war ended. past presidents have used these summits to promote us values, like free trade and civil rights. but not this one. speaking to a hall full of east asia's business and diplomatic elite, mr trump at first showered them with flattery. but then changed tack with a litany of complaints,
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many directed at china, though he never named the culprits, of countries taking advantage of america, breaking the rules of free trade. we can no longer tolerate these chronic trade abuses. and we will not tolerate them. despite years of broken promises, we were told that some day soon, everyone would behave fairly, and responsibly. people in america, and throughout the indo—pacific region have waited for that day to come. but it never has. you can come to summit meetings like this, and asia holds plenty of them, and come away with the impression that not very much happened. but not this one — with his speech in da nang, donald trump has announced america's withdrawl from the leadership role it has played in asia since the second world war,
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a role that is profoundly shaped this region. after his speech was that of his recent host china. xi jinping's tone was softer, no threats or warnings here, but an invitation to asian countries tojoin a reforming china, and a none too subtle dig at the new american isolationism. translation: openness brings progress, while self seclusion leaves one behind. we, the asia—pacific economies, know this too well from our own development experience. we should put in place a regional cooperation framework that ensures consultation among equals, wide participation and shared benefits. mr trump's tough talk on trade will go down well with many americans, but here in asia, while some governments will welcome his no—nonsense approach to diplomacy, you can almost feel american influence shrinking, and china waiting to take up the mantle. jonathan head, bbc news, da nang. the actor and producer steven seagal
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is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actress portia de rossi, who is married to the american talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her how important it was to have chemistry off—screen, before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc the actor had no comment. jon donnison's report contains some flash photography. steven seagal is used to playing the tough guy. now, he's the latest hollywood big name to be facing tough questions. portia de rossi, seen here on the right, with her wife ellen degeneres, accused the actor and director of sexual harassment. the arrested development star tweeted that at a final audition for a part in a steven seagalfilm, he talked about the importance of off—screen chemistry before unzipping his leather pants. ellen degeneres added her support for coming forward. mr seagal has been accused
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of inappropriate behaviour by several other women. his manager has told the bbc he has no comment to make. and there are more allegations, this time about one of america's best—known comedians, louis ck. the new york times is reporting five women have accused him of serious sexual misconduct. the bbc has contacted his managerfor comment. each day, it seems, hollywood is waking up to more revelations. it's just a very unsettling time. it's a good time in the fact that women now feel comfortable, or more comfortable, speaking out about what happened to them, and what was their experience. the list of stars accused is growing, and the more people
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who come forward with allegations, the more likely it is others will have the confidence to do so. this hollywood story could have some way to run. jon donnison, bbc news. the online taxi—hailing firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that gave its drivers employment rights. an earlier ruling had ordered uber to treat its drivers as workers rather than self—employed independent contractors, after two drivers argued that they were entitled to the minimum wage, sick pay and paid leave. uber challenged that ruling, and says it will pursue a further appeal. simon gompertz gave us this update from the tribunal. it is a setback in uber‘s effort to try to maintain the way it operates in the uk, by using self—employed drivers. as you say, two them challenged that in an employment tribunal last year and they won against uber. uber appealed and now its appeal at the employment tribunal has been thrown out.
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this is significant for all firms that operate in what is called the gig economy. so, bicycle delivery riders, drivers, couriers, all of them could be affected by the effort to try to stop individuals being treated at self—employed, rather than workers with workers' rights. in theory, uber could now be required to pay thousands of pounds to the drivers who have brought this challenging backpay, holiday and sick pay, if that is appropriate. anyone who joins the claim could make those claims against uber. in practice, it looks as though uber is going to appeal again. this could go to the supreme court, which will be next year. as long as that process goes on, uber can carry
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on with its current practices. the mother of a schoolboy who sent a naked photo of himself to go as won a judicial review over the police force refusing to delete the records. the boy aged 14 at the time was not arrested or prosecuted by greater manchester police. his mother said she is concerned police could release information to potential employers when he is older. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law, a warning from the eu that you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time we have two weeks to clarify what we will pay if the uk wants to talk trade. president trump has defended his america first approached at an asia—pacific economic summit. uber loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. ina in a moment the opportunity for women to have three cervical screening is in their lifetime instead of 12. england women have the edge midway through their must win ashes test in sydney. australia
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177-5, win ashes test in sydney. australia 177—5, trailing by 103 runs. england's and men on the verge of winning their second warm up game in adelaide. gareth southgate faces his biggest test since taking over as england manager, fielding an inexperienced side against germany tonight in wembley, eric dier is captain. lewis hamilton clocked the fastest time in first practice in brazil, valtteri bottas was second fastest in his mercedes. more now on our top story. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier says the uk has two weeks to explain how it intends to settle its bill for leaving if it wants to move on to trade talks next month. at a news conference in brussels following the latest round of talks, he said progress on the so—called divorce bill, citizens‘ rights and the irish border was "vital" for negotiations to progress to the next phase. joining me is richard corbett,,
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labourmp. joining me is richard corbett,, labour mp. where are we with the progress of brexit? pretty deadlocks, issues that should have been sorted out in the first phase show no signs of being sorted out now. theresa may was the enshrined the time and date in uk law that we leave, is that a good move? that seems to me to be a bit bonkers, to put in law that whatever happens, whatever the circumstances, we are leaving on that date. seems to tie your own hands. what if the negotiations, having been delayed, at that point are not concluded, looking as if they are nearly concluded, and you need a little more time? you have tied your hands, not able to do that. seems silly. just a gesture to appease the hardline right—wing just a gesture to appease the ha rdline right—wing brexiteers just a gesture to appease the hardline right—wing brexiteers in her party, it seems to me. how can you negotiate when there is not a deadline of sorts. everybody on both
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sides, not playing games, but they are feeling their way, seeking compromise. without the deadline, it could go on forever. there is a deadline for the 29th of march. there is a procedure, if need be to extend the deadline. it needs unanimous agreement. there is a high threshold to do it, you need to do it unilaterally. to that completely, enshrining it in law that you could never agree to change the deadline, seems to me to be tying your own hands. what if britain wants to extend it at that point, but the government cannot do that, it has legislated to prevent it, even asking to do that. do you believe brexit will go through? more likely than not. but there are more and more doubts about it. as we move on in this exercise, it is turning out to be confusing, chaotic, and above all costly. most people who voted
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league did not want brexit at any cost. —— voted leave. they were insured it would save money, not cost money. it would all go to the nhs. it is becoming clearer this is turning out to be a rather costly exercise, i don't mean the divorce bill, i mean the economic cost of bricks it. those people are entitled to say, wait a minute, that was not what i was promised, not what i was told, not what i voted for. would you regard yourself as a remonaer or a sceptic brexiteer. i would say i am more like those people i do described. that is not the same as being moaning about something that was one on a pack of lies. we have
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seen now was one on a pack of lies. we have seen now people who voted to leave are having their doubts intrusively. do you agree with chuck pertamina, there should be a rethink. —— do you agree with chuka umunna.” there should be a rethink. —— do you agree with chuka umunna. i don't usually agree with david davis. i do agree with one thing he said. he said a democracy that cannot change its mind ceases to be a democracy. i think that is true for any democracy. we have the right if we so democracy. we have the right if we so choose, if their are new circumstances, more information than we had before. if this is a shift in public opinion, surely you cannot deny the right of britain to reconsider, if that is warranted. richard corbett, thank you for joining us. you can let us know about the stories we're covering here at
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afternoon lie. —— afternoon live. women who have been given the human papillomavirus — or hpv vaccine — may only need three cervical screenings in their lifetime instead of 12 — thats according to a new study. hpv is thought to cause nearly all cervical cancers and a vaccination against it has been offered to girls aged between 11 to 13 since 2008. a cancer research team in the uk says cutting the number of screenings for vaccinated women could save the nhs time and money our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has the details. cervical cancer is a dangerous disease, it's also one of the most preventable cancers, but there's been concern about a steady drop in the number of women going for screening in the past few years. this lady has had cervical cancer, and says she has never missed a smear test, and believes that saved her life. if i hadn't gone for my screening, it wasn'tjust me being manager matter, my consultant said it is an aggressive grade of cancer,
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you were lucky to catch it early, because otherwise we would be talking palliative care and not cure. but mandy's teenage daughters have both had a jab that protects against cervical cancer. almost a decade ago, girls aged 11 to 13 started to be vaccinated against the cancer—causing virus hpv. the vaccine reduces the risk of cervical cancer by 70%, according to today's study. it says women who have had it only need to undergo three smear tests during their lives, instead of the normal 12, at the age of 30, 40 and 50 five. all cervical cancers are linked to hpv infection, and having the vaccination reduces the chances of having the infection, and also of having cervical cancer. screening blixt the early changes that could suggest cancer is developing. having the vaccine, you are less likely to have those changes and less likely to develop cancer, so you don't need screening as often. mandy is relieved her daughters have been vaccinated and they may
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need fewer smear tests. it's fantastic, and it takes the pressure away of having to think, every three years, i have got to do it. eventually, maybe not in my lifetime, but i think it will be eradicated by this new plan, so it's great. the study comes ahead of changes being made to the screening programme in england in 2019, and similar adjustments in scotland and wales. new, more advanced lab testing is expected to be introduced, which could mean fewer smear tests for women, whether vaccinated or not. ceremonies are being held in belgium to mark the centenary of the end of one of the bloodiest battles of the first world war. 100 years ago today, canadian troops captured the ridge near the village of passchendaele from the german army. the campaign lasted for more than three months, and in that time, between 600,000 and 700,000 allied and german soldiers were killed or injured. robert hall reports
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from passchendaele. on the flat farmland outside lille, the thunder of the guns. on this day 100 years ago, canadian troops finally captured the belgian village of passchendaele after months of misery and slaughter. the battle, north of ypres, was part of a plan to capture high ground from german forces and reverse the course of the war in that part of belgium. but the attacks were slowed and thwarted by the coming of winter, which turned no man's land into a sea of mud. the man who has spent two years planning this tribute to 500,000 casualties was motivated in part by a loss within his own family. my grandfather was killed at hill 60 in the battle of passchendaele. i have always had a feeling that he should be remembered. my cousins, several of them are here today. they are all now giving me the thumbs up, because we have now remembered him. every one of these 16 guns can be
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traced back to the battlefields of france and belgium. many of them have been restored, especially for today's ceremony. around them are gun crews, representing every nation that took part in the battle — britain, france, belgium, canada, new zealand, australia and ireland. all the soldiers are aware of the poignancy of what has gone before them. recent wars like iraq and afghanistan hit home, but it makes them even more interested in the history that came before that. being here is really important to them, and it means a lot. this weekend, britain and europe will remember those who lost their lives in conflict. but today, as the smoke cleared and the guns fell silent, thoughts were focused on one terrible autumn, and the men who never went home. time for a look at the weather.
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another guess the photograph competition. if anyone was watching earlier, you did not enjoy the throwback to last weekend. looking at the definition of forecasts, i was looking ahead. this is now. in the midlands, in staffordshire. lovely blue skies. patchy cloud. we will get some more scenes like that this weekend. rain to get out of the way first. i will now throw us back to next weekend —— last weekend, for anyone paying attention, they were no we have had rain in the south over the last few weekends, exactly what we will have this weekend. then a mixture of sunshine and showers, then feeling colder. do you know
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what happens next? you press the button, we will find out. we get a frosty monday morning. you like those statistics. in the month of november, across the uk, we get five air frosts november, across the uk, we get five airfrosts in november, across the uk, we get five air frosts in the november, across the uk, we get five airfrosts in the month, temperatures down to freezing. already two on monday morning. the last two have been frosty. the long—range forecast suggests the next following monday morning maybe frosty. are you forecasting a white christmas? i will leave someone else to do that. i have the week after next week. not surprised, give us a forecast. good afternoon. not a bad day today. here comes trouble. we have this allowed working in from the atlantic. that will bring the rainfor the atlantic. that will bring the rain for some of us, as we start off the vijender stop the rain setting in quite quickly across northern ireland. as we head through the night, the rain was sinking across england and wales. some of it will
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be quite heavy, a different sort of weather across scotland, clear spells, wintry showers, temperatures here dipping away. a touch of frost here dipping away. a touch of frost here madadi freezing, further south, we will have milder rain. ten in the south—west. tomorrow, a family disappointing start across the southern half of the country. outbreaks of rain reluctant to clear away across the south, across the south west and wales, as we head on through the afternoon. further north, something brighter than the spells of sunshine, crisp autumn weather in place. wintry showers in the north and scotland. northern ireland brightening up the day goes on. for northern england, lovely day, spells sunshine. hopeful it will brighten up across east anglia, could take a while to do so. across the south—east, the south midlands, wales and the south west, it will stay cloudy. across the far south—west, outbreaks of rain through the afternoon. in cardiff,
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for the wales against australia rugby union international, rain, quite cloudy. for england: brighter skies. as we head on through saturday night, the rain keeps on coming across the south—western corner. the loan in on a brisk westerly wind. further north, a touch of frost. a sign of what is to come for the second half of the weekend. following the white lines all the way to the north, in fact if we could see right to the top of the globe, the white lines go all the way to the arctic. cold air coming from the arctic, right across the british isles, heading into remembrance sunday. chilly old day, quite windy, particularly close of the east coast. the loss of sunshine around, some showers, even the high ground, up to scotland, fairly low levels. wintry, high temperatures and just 6—10d. pretty chilly weekend to come. at least we will see some crisp sunshine. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has warned that the uk has two weeks to clarify how it will settle the so—called "divorce bill" — if trade talks are to begin next month. theresa may says britain's departure date from the eu will be enshrined in law and warns that she won't tolerate attempts to block the brexit process. president trump has defended his "america first" approach to trade at an asia—pacific economic summit. online taxi—hailing firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that gave its drivers employment rights. the company says it will mount a further legal challenge. steven seagal is the latest hollywood actor to be accused of sexual harassment. manchester city council officials criticise the government for extra costs after the arena bombing. sport now on afternoon live with lizzie greenwood—hughes.
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lots of football going on. a big game for england and germany? yes it has been called a friendly, but these matches are never particularly friendly and always an indication of how the teams are performing. england have several top players missing and gareth southgate has gone for an inexperienced team and wales are playing france, and are still seething after missing world cup qualification. their manager said there is no such things as friendlies. it should be a good game. a lot of tension in sydney, england's women cricketers are making a good game of this? yes and they need to. because this is crucial. if england don't win this ashes test, they're trailing in that
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series on points and must win this match, but they have a strong second day, australia closed on 175. andy swiss has been following the action. with two days remaining, the match is poised. england had begun on 235-7, is poised. england had begun on 235—7, looking to push on to something like 300, but they were all out for 280. australia batted beautifully before a clatter of wickets. marsh removed bolton. the star for england was 18—year—old sophie ecclestone who, took two wickets on her test debut. at that point australia were struggling. but a half century from ellise perry
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swung the game back towards australia before a crucial late wicket, the captain out. the match balanced going into the last two days and if australia win this test, they will retain the ashes. there will be a number of firsts at wembley when an inexperienced england side face germany in a friendly tonight. with eric dier as captain and both sets of players wearing poppies — the germans for the first time in their history — after fifa relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. it's also the first time video assistant referee technology's been used in an official match in the uk. already i've learned a lot from the week and when you've got the non—qualification games, that is what you need from it. you want the learn things. i said that when we
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went to swraermy and the game —— germany and the game with france in the summer. we will take more from these games in terms of what we really learn about players and the system and everything else. wales play their first game since failing to make the world cup play—offs last month. and it's a tough one, against france in paris. manager chris coleman hasn't decided whether he will stay in charge beyond the end of his current contract. but, he's not going to let that affect how he and his team prepare. i wouldn't dare take my foot off the gas, because they deserve everything they have got and because they have a lwa ys they have got and because they have always given me everything they have got. it is business as usual for me. i don't see it as an end of anything. even so, the players we have got, the group of players, they will boys will go on, with me, without out me, they will go and i believe they will a achieve. some breaking news, uefa have suspended
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patrice evra for kicking a fan. we will have more for you in our bulletin at 5.30. but that is it from me. thank you. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. are still waiting for £17m from the government after the manchester arena bombing. what is the delay? they don't know what the delay is. they say 17 million is the cost of all the additional expense that they have had to incur. by bringing in police from other forces, had to incur. by bringing in police from otherforces, during the had to incur. by bringing in police from other forces, during the week after the bombing. countless different forces offered support. but of course that had pob paid for. i—— had but of course that had pob paid for. i —— had to be paid for. i spoke to
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officers from gloucestershire and wales. and so too the costs of counselling, of health care for the people who were injured. and they reckon that could add up to 17 million. 9 million for policing and eight million for the nhs and counselling. they thought the government were going to give some support and help them out, in doing that. but as yet, manchester city council said it has not had any money. it said it would be grateful for more support and is concerned about the delay. but they're continuing to talk to the government. the government say they will continue to look at all situations. hopefully there has not been a misunderstanding. manchester council need it, because to pay these costs they're raiding the aduu these costs they're raiding the adult social care budget and even knows that adult social care is one of the things that is under a lot of pressure in many councils across the country. the christmas market opening in manchester, security will be an issue there? yes and they have
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ramped up the security at the markets, one of the biggest in the country. officials from manchester, you can see the concrete blocks, the scanners, people from manchester have gone to berlin, where there was a terror attack last year, to look at the security precautions they have put in place. so that manchester can step up its own very visible security ahead of this yea r‘s visible security ahead of this year's festivities. i think people wa nt year's festivities. i think people want to see it. i've spoken to my friends and family and they say, i expect to see it. because of that and the horrendous incident that happened here in may, we have put these extra measures in place. i wa nt these extra measures in place. i want to be clear, we don't have any information or intelligence to suggest that this market or any other market nationally is a target. so these are just purely preventative measures. the message from the police and the council is come and enjoy the market, just as
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councils across the country will say it isa councils across the country will say it is a fantastic social occasion for people to go, particularly after work. please come and enjoy it, but while not be scared, just be vigilant. thank you, roger. now let's go to peter levy. there is a new housing development and once you move in, your costs are a pound a day. they say less than that. 18 homes, with no electricity and no gas and they are the examples of best echo homes —— eco—homes in the country. they have storage panels, no electricity and no gas. each room has an intra red panel and you have no bills, no gas, no electricity. everything looks after itself. very low carbon emission. if you think about the prices, you would be
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interested with london, between £325 for a three—bedroomed. 389 for a four bedroom. also overlooking a la ke four bedroom. also overlooking a lake and with two parking spaces for £389,000. it is not bad. is it? around the country, housing costs, the figures are different, but it looks expensive. it is a lot more than the average house price which is just below than the average house price which isjust below 200,000w than the average house price which is just below 200,000w the electricity and gas prices going up, you have no bills. a pound a day. today we have been in the house, well, it is cold here in the north, but 21 degrees on a november day with no heating on. that is not bad. and finally the water system is eco—friendly and the pipes drain the water used in your shower to help heat fresh water. not that i would
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wa nt heat fresh water. not that i would want to, a cup of coffee that has been near your bath water. ter, a lwa ys been near your bath water. ter, always a sting! . if you'd like to catch up with more of those news nationwide stories, go to the bbc iplayer. the head of hezbollah has accused saudi arabia of declaring war on lebanon. the french president,
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emmanuel macron, is on an unscheduled visit to saudi arabia to discuss the escalating crisis between the kingdom and lebanon. richard galpin reports. this latest middle east crisis was sparked by the sudden resignation last week of lebanese prime minister saad hariri, wearing the dark suit. it was announced during a visit to saudi arabia, where he's still staying. mr hariri claimed his life was in danger in lebanon. but it seems to be part of a much bigger game between rival regional powers following the defeat of so—called islamic state in most of iraq and syria. iran now wields significant influence in both these countries, as well as in lebanon, where the shia organisation hezbollah, which is close to iran, is part of the coalition government. translation: the americans, the saudis and israelis are all trying to prevent hezbollah from maximising its gains from the wars in syria and iraq.
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hezbollah, and its allies, have achieved enormous success, but they're now facing huge pressure because of this. with tensions rising between shi'ite iran and saudi arabia, which is predominantly sunni, emmanuel macron flew out to the region yesterday to mediate, holding talks with saudi leaders. we've never been so close to the precipice. in many ways, the threat of regional war has never been this real, if you like, where it's a conflict that would involve a variety of different countries. the focal point seems to be lebanon. already, saudi arabia, bahrain and kuwait have told their citizens living here to leave. this seems to be an attempt to pressurise the these government to exclude the shi'ite organisation hezbollah from its
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ranks, and therefore reduce iran's influence in the country. richard galpin, bbc news. just to bring you some breaking news from the south—west of france, we are hearing a driver has ploughed into a are hearing a driver has ploughed intoa group are hearing a driver has ploughed into a group of people in the city of toulouse. three people have been injured. it happened outside a college. police say the incident was deliberate, but the driver was not ona deliberate, but the driver was not on a security watch list. we will bring you more on the that if there is more to come out of the south of france. joe will tell us what has been happening in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: as theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law, a warning from the eu that we've got
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two weeks to clarify what we'll pay if the uk wants to talk trade. president trump has defended his "america first" approach at an asia—pacific economic summit. the online taxi—hailing service uber loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the uk's industrial output grew at its fastest pace so far this year in september. that's according to official figures from the office for national statistics. separate data showed the uk's trade deficit in goods and services narrowed by more than expected in september. broadband and landline customers will now get money back from their providers when things go wrong, without having to claim it. this follows an 0fcom review which says customers are set for £142 million in payouts — around nine times the current level — benefiting millions
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who suffer poor service. the gap in pay between men and women will take 100 years to close. according to the fawcett society, today marks the point in the year when a woman on an average wage stops being paid relative to their male counterparts. figures from m&s and sainsbury‘s. how would you describe the numbers? we always use the same picture for this. that looks tempting. it did a couple of weeks ago. it may have hardened a bit. retailers are in intense competition with each other, so intense competition with each other, so if their costs go up and their producers charge more, they cannot necessarily pass that on to their customers, because of the intense competition. so the pound being
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wea ker competition. so the pound being weaker means the input costs are higher, but that can't be passed on and we saw that from sainsbury and marks and spencers, they said, our profits are down, but our sales are 0k. profits are down, but our sales are ok. many companies will have an eye on the budget in a week, they're looking for pointers. yes, the housing sector is one thing to watch. there will be a huge benefit if the chancellor decides to make it easier to build homes. it is the construction companies will benefit, also there is estate agents and lawyers and furniture companies and people will be able to get their feet on the housing ladder. younger people especially. that is very tough in the south—east of england. a lot of people are hoping for something. i have interviewed an mep who talked about unknown knowns and known unknowns. rumsfeld would be proud of that. it underlines the issue of uncertainty and we keep
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hearing that is bad for business. yes it is not great for business, they can deal with crisis, but they don't like uncertainty. companies do need some clarity in the coming weeks on these negotiations, because if they don't know what the post—brexit arrangements will be, they don't know how or whether to invest in uk for the next put the yea rs. joining me now is shaniel ramjee, a senior investment manager, at pictet asset management. what did you make of the retail sector in the uk over the last week orso? sector in the uk over the last week or so? marks sector in the uk over the last week orso? marks and sector in the uk over the last week or so? marks and spencers and sainsbury‘s being the obvious ones. we can see there is definite retail weakness and the consumer companies such as marks and spencers and
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sainsburies are feeing pressure and food inflation with any items that are imported facing higher prices for consumers. so when wage growth isn't growing high and we have had an interest rate rise, consumers are feeling the pinch. we talked of housing, is there other sector that should get attention from the chancellor? it is going to be a difficult budget for the chancellor. was because he has to find a way to stimulate the economy, while keeping the tax revenue higher. it will be interesting to see what he does with tax loop holes. we have seen the paradise papers issue and he may shore up tax revenues and allow the property market more leeway in terms of the budget. a final question, you
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manage a lot of money for your investor, a re manage a lot of money for your investor, are they holding off until they know the colours of post brexit deal. they are looking at the equity market and thinking revenues and production will be weak until we know what the climate will be. across the world, equity markets have done well and the uk has been a big lagarde. that has to do with the uncertainty about prefbgt and brexit and what a new government could look like and what would a new government set out. investors are worried about that too. thank you. now some markets. yes, you can see the ftse is down. it had some decent numbers from barrett push it up. but marks a
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spencers were down. they are down 1.85%. this is on concerns about retail sector. sign on mccoy. all right, don't push it. it's a hint. i know! thank you. you're watching afternoon live. more than half of schools in england fail to offer computer science at gcse, according to a new report by the uk's leading science academy. the royal society is calling for a ten—fold increase in funding for computing education, which it says is patchy and fragile. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. what effect does a binary shift left, and a binary shift right have? in a classroom in st albans, some budding young computer scientists are deep in their gcse course. but this school is in a minority. today's report says computing education is fragile and patchy, with too few pupils given the chance to enter the exam.
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what's more, the subject is being largely avoided by girls. so what's made these students take it up? our future is very much based around computers, and technology is becoming a big part of society. it would be useful to have, and i could get a job out of it easily. maybe in other schools, it might be viewed as slightly nerdy to do computer science. but i think it's quite respected in this school. the royal society's report says too many young people are missing out on vital digital skills. 54% of english schools do not offer computer science as a gcse. schools need 3,500 more computing teachers. only one in five computer science entrants are female. both teachers in this class have degrees in computer science, which makes them unusual. the royal society wants a big increase in spending on training new teachers. the computer industry says
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digital skills are vital for the uk's future. if we want to remain a developed nation, if we want to remain a nation that is innovative, that provides the products and services that are going to us forward in the 21st—century, then we need people with advanced digital skills. and that's true in all industries and in all sectors. the department for education says it wants to ensure that the future workforce has the skills the uk needs. but this report says, without more computing teachers, that just won't happen. rory cellan—jones, bbc new, st albans. just to update with you with the news from toulouse in france a driver has ploughed into a group of stu d e nts driver has ploughed into a group of students in a suburb of toulouse. three people have been injured and two are in a serious condition. all
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are of chinese origin. this is the first sight of the location of what police describe as an attack. the french media say the police say the incident was deliberate, but the driver was not on a security watch list. so too early to speculate on motive. but it is reported that the driver ploughed into three chinese students, leaving two of them with severe injuries and they are being treated in hospital. as dusk falls as you see in toulouse, a heavy police presence at the scene. we will keep you updated on that in the 5 o'clock hour. british universities are being warned not to use misleading language as they try to attract students. the advertising standards authority is expected to issue guidelines next week about the wording used in marketing material.
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they will scrutinise claims made by some universities such as being in the "top 1%" or "having a gold standard in teaching". here's a flat with a difference... it's taken nearly 40 years of painting, but diana keys has turned her council flat in hemel hempstead into her very own masterpiece. inspired by michelangelo's frescoes in the sistine chapel, she's decided to open her home and reveal what she's been working on. she paints using her fingers and you're wondering why, here is the answer. i've never seen the sistine chapel, but i wanted it to be a bit like that. if i haven't done anything in my life, which i haven't, because i have been in care and homes and everything, i like to think i've left behind a piece of love and the reason why i want it to be shown now is because i like to think some of it will live on even when i'm not here.
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i want to bring you some news from wales. the welsh first minister, ca rwyn wales. the welsh first minister, carwyn jones has wales. the welsh first minister, carwynjones has asked for an independent inquiry into his actions into the death of carl sergeant. two mps had called for an inquiry into the circumstances of death of the former minister carl sergeant. the first minister said he would be open to scrutiny over how he sacked mr sergeant, who was under investigation for allegations of touching or dproeping. —— groping. but the first minister has asked for an independent inquiry. more on those stories in the five. that is
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it from the afternoon live team. now the weather. this weekend we should see some bright but cold weather. it will take a while for things to perk up will take a while for things to perk up in some spots, because this area of rain swinging in from the west is going to set in across england and wales tonight. northern ireland clearing up by the end of the night and in scotland with clear skies and wintry showers, it will turn cold and frosty. tomorrow, we will see this cloud and rain only very slowly sinking south wards across england and wales. things will brighten up across the midlands and east anglia. something brighterfor across the midlands and east anglia. something brighter for northern england, northern ireland and scotland. a breezy day. cold in the north, six in aberdeen. 13 in plymouth with the rain. that mild air being swept away from the north on remembrance sunday. cold weather across the country. a lot of sunshine. showers in the north—east and highs of six to 10 degrees.
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today at five, the clocks ticking in the brexit talks as the eu says britain has two weeks to clarify how it will settle its "divorce bill". after talks in brussels, the brexit secretary said it was time for both sides "to work to find solutions", while the eu's chief negotiator said some progress has been made. we are making some progress, although we need to work further on a number of points. this is a serious business. to find a way forward will require flexibility and pragmatism from both sides. meanwhile, theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law and warns she won't tolerate attempts to block the process. we'll have the latest from westminster and brussels, and we'll be talking to the irish mep and vice—president
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