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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  November 10, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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today at five, the clock‘s ticking in the brexit talks as the eu says britain has two weeks to clarify how it will settle its "divorce bill". after talks in brussels, the brexit secretary said it was time for both sides "to work to find solutions", while the eu's chief negotiator said some progress has been made. we are making some progress, although we need to work further on a number of points. this is a serious business. to find a way forward will require flexibility and pragmatism from both sides. meanwhile, theresa may says she wants to enshrine the time and date of brexit into law and warns she won't tolerate attempts to block the process. we'll have the latest from westminster and brussels, and we'll be talking to the irish mep and vice—president of the european parliament mairead mcguinness. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. tensions mount in the middle east
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as hezbollah accuses saudi arabia of declaring war on lebanon. the online taxi—hailing service uber loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. it says it will carry on its fight with another appeal. as the latest christmas adverts are launched we'll be asking if the battle of the seasonal ads is more about your heart strings or your purse strings. the nation's favourite marmalade—sandwich eating bear ends up behind bars in paddington two. we'll get mark kermode‘s thoughts on this and the other cinema releases in the film review. it's five o'clock. our main story: the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has confirmed the uk
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has two weeks to clarify how it will settle the so—called "divorce bill" — if trade talks are to begin next month. at a news conference in brussels after the latest round of talks — the brexit secretary david davis insisted good progress was being made across the board. meanwhile theresa may has outlined plans to enshrine into law the time and date at which britain leaves the eu. our political correspondent emma vardy is at westminster. right now the sticking point is all about cash. the eu is trying to put pressure on the uk over the next two weeks to say it will stump up more money, band theresa may had previously said she was prepared to do so. why is the race suddenly on? the next eu leaders summit is coming up the next eu leaders summit is coming up quickly in december. that is the
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point at which level be about to decide whether we can move onto the next crucial stage of brexit talks to discuss trade. meanwhile here at westminster, mps are poised to scrutinise that each piece of legislation which will transpose eu now into uk law. all that after what has been a pretty turbulent fortnight. it's a one—way journey, says theresa may, as brexit talks enter a critical phase. next week, the eu withdrawal bill comes back to parliament. today, the prime minister sent a strong signal that the referendum decision cannot be reversed. theresa may wants to enshrine in law the exact date and time that britain will leave the european union. writing in the telegraph, she said, "let no one doubt our determination or question our resolve. brexit is happening." we will not tolerate attempts from any quarter to use the process of amendments to this bill as a mechanism to try to block the democratic wishes of the british people. but we can still change our minds, says the man who wrote the key
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eu withdrawal clause. crossbench peer lord kerr has for some time argued that, despite triggering article 50, the uk could still legally reverse the process. i am keen that the public should know that sending the letter is not an irrevocable act. that the opportunity to change our mind is always there, if we want to take it. and it is clear to me that if we were to take that opportunity and we were to change our mind, we would be very welcome in brussels, that we had never left. the decision taken in 1975 by this country to join the common market has been reversed... from the moment the bbc declared the result of the referendum on the 23rd ofjune last year, today, at 1:49 precisely, we will be right at the halfway point. so now you can set your watch to brexit.
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and that ticking clock can't be ignored, because eu sources have told the uk it has just two weeks left to make progress on key withdrawal issues or risk further delays to any talk about future trade. the eu is united. the uk has to cough up more cash and they need to do that soon. the rights of eu citizens and the northern irish border are also yet to be resolved. but brexit secretary david davis said this can't be rushed. there's been a change in pace, i think. but, ultimately, this is about delivering results and will now depend on the content, not just the speed, of the negotiation. the eu's chief negotiator spoke today of working intensely. translation: in order to achieve our common objective, that is to organise an orderly withdrawal on the basis of an agreement, we will also work as intensely as is necessary in the weeks to come, in the run—up to the next european council meeting.
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if all goes as currently planned, we really will leave the eu at the 11th hour — "pm, march the 29th, 2019. theresa may's message is that there is no going back now. so that data, that time is now going to be printed on the front of the eu withdrawal bell. why does that matter? we always knew what the planned timetable was that this is symbolic, this is theresa may showing that the government is determined to see brexit through. as for the comments from lord car and others, similarly like him, tony blairand others, similarly like him, tony blair and gordon brown who have weighed in with their interventions on this, what does number ten thing? it is pretty scornful. they say, politically, the government is not changing course thank you very much.
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mairead mcguinness is vice—president of the european parliament and mep for the ruling fine gael party in ireland. we can talk to her now. thank you for being with us. let's talk first of all about that key question of the irish border and the need which both sides agree, to avoid a hard order. it seemed like at the moment, thatis order. it seemed like at the moment, that is still sticking point to you? —— does it seem like? that is still sticking point to you? -- does it seem like? it is certainly not resolved, therefore it is still a sticking point. i come from just south of the border some i know this area well. i was speaking to young people at a concert riek machar conference today and their concerns are many around the difficulties with the border, free movement, access, we know everybody is committed to no return to borders of the past but i'm afraid that at this remove, to know what the eu will do to avoid those borders of the past and to make sure the good friday agreement, in all its parts,
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is fully respected. but the commitment is there, the actions required to deliver on those words are still in place. leo varadkar has said the only way to avoid a hard order in ireland is to apply the rules, to continue to apply the rules, to continue to apply the rules, eu single market and the customs union. that is something the british government have said they do not want to do. i'm very well aware of what the uk is saying and has said repeatedly, buti of what the uk is saying and has said repeatedly, but i had a meeting in brussels on evening with james brokenshire, secretary of state for northern ireland, a good meeting but idid northern ireland, a good meeting but i did say, the way to avoid problems around a border is to make sure the uk stays in the customs union and single market. i think we have to keep saying that so there is an understanding of what the consequences are, and invitations for the uk living the customs union and single market. national politicians like myself have to keep saying it. we said it about this conference, knowing that the uk
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ta kes a conference, knowing that the uk takes a different view, so that's why there is quite a gap in understanding of this situation. but there is a verbal commitment from all sides that we will not have a border on the island of ireland. it would be a very backwards step, it would be a very backwards step, it would damage relationships that are still fragile but communities that are trying to work together in peace and harmony. to me that's the core of this issue. trade and other things are important, economic prosperity helps to keep all those things together, but nobody on the uk side has come up with another solution that will work better than the one we have today, which is to stay in the customs union. let's talk more generally about brexit talks. view as vp of the european parliament, it seems we are coming to crunch time on this divorce bill, the financial settlement, how much do you think the uk has to pay?|j think do you think the uk has to pay?” think rather than talk about figures, talk about what needs to be done. we are very clear we need to
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see more commitments from the uk side on the commitments that have been made on the financing of the european union after 2020. there is an attempt by the uk, and i can understand why, to say we will talk money if you talk trade. so once —— show us what will we would have in terms of trade and we can deal with money. i don't think i will work. i do think what we need is a clear understanding from the uk, but as a member of the european union today and with the agreement and financial commitments that they are prepared to pay those commitments. there is a wide gap in this area. again, i am hoping both sides have said some progress is being made a number of issues and i hope some progress is being on this issue, it was one of the points raised when i had meetings with members of parliament it came to brussels this week. we need to understand each other very clearly on this. the worry for me is
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that every time we talk about money, there is an angry reaction in the uk, that we are demanding something that the uk should not and is not entitled to paid. howl that the uk should not and is not entitled to paid. how i see it is that the uk made commitments and is an honourable country, and therefore will meet those commitments when and until it ceases to be a member of the eu. it may continue to pay if there is a desire to stay within some policies, like other parts of the uk is keen to be part of. thank you for your time. news just newsjust coming into news just coming into us with two stu d e nts news just coming into us with two students have been seriously hurt after being deliberately run over by after being deliberately run over by a car near toulouse in southern france. we are hearing another student was also injured in the attack. police arrested the driver immediately afterwards. he has reportedly said that he rammed the car intentionally into the students outside a technical college. french police say the driver was not on a list of known extremists and the incident is not currently
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being treated as terrorist—related. wales's first minister carwynjones has asked for an independent inquiry into how he handled allegations about carl sargea nt. the labour welsh assembly member was found dead on tuesday, and is understood to have taken his own life. a spokesman for carwyn jones, who defended his actions yesterday, said he agrees an independent inquiry is necessary and called for a seniorjudge to lead it. the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actress portia de rossi, who is married to the american talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her "how important it was to have chemistry off—screen".
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mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc the actor had no comment. jon donnison's report contains some flash photography. steven seagal is used to playing the tough guy. now, he's the latest hollywood big name to be facing tough questions. portia de rossi, seen here on the right, with her wife ellen degeneres, accused the actor and director of sexual harassment. the arrested development star tweeted that at a final audition for a part in a steven seagalfilm, he talked about the importance of off—screen chemistry before unzipping his leather pants. ellen degeneres added her support for coming forward. mr seagal has been accused of inappropriate behaviour by several other women. his manager has told the bbc he has no comment to make. and there are more allegations,
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this time about one of america's best—known comedians, louis ck. the new york times is reporting five women have accused him of serious sexual misconduct. the bbc has contacted his managerfor comment. each day, it seems, hollywood is waking up to more revelations. it's just a very unsettling time. it's a good time in the fact that women now feel comfortable, or more comfortable, speaking out about what happened to them, and what was their experience. the list of stars accused is growing, and the more people who come forward with allegations, the more likely it is others will have the confidence to do so. this hollywood story could have some way to run. jon donnison, bbc news. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: the eu's chief brexit negotiator
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michel barnier says the uk has two weeks to clarify how it will settle the so—called "divorce bill" — if trade talks are to begin next month. tensions mount in the middle east as hezbollah accuses saudi arabia of declaring war on lebanon. the online taxi—hailing service uber, loses an appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. it says it will carry on its fight with another appeal. sport, patrice evra has been sacked by marseille and banned from all european club matches by uefa until the end of the season, after the former man united captain aimed a kick at the head of one of his club's supporters. gareth southgate faces his biggest test since taking over as england manager, fielding an inexperienced side against germany ina inexperienced side against germany in a friendly tonight. lewis hamilton is currently quickest in second practice ahead of sunday's brazilian grand prix. the new world champion is just ahead
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brazilian grand prix. the new world champion isjust ahead of his mercedes team—mate, valterri bottas. more sportjust after half past. the head of the lebanese militant group hezbollah has said that saudi arabia has declared war on his country, following the surprise resignation of lebanon's prime minister. but hezbollah‘s leader, hassan nasrallah, says the now—former prime minister is being held under house arrest by saudi authorities. saad hariri announced he was quitting while on a trip to the saudi capital riyadh, saying he feared for his life. richard galpin reports on the escalating crisis. this latest middle east crisis was sparked by the sudden resignation last week of lebanese prime minister saad hariri, wearing the dark suit. he travelled to saudi arabia, and in a shock announcement said he was resigning. he claimed his life was in danger in lebanon, presumably a hint he felt threatened by the powerful shia military and political organisation hezbollah, which is
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backed by iran. today, the hezbollah leader responded. he accused saudi arabia of deliberately detaining the lebanese prime minister, and forcing him to resign. this, he said, amounted to a declaration of war on lebanon. it is the recent defeat of so—called islamic state in syria and iraq which is behind this crisis. iran and hezbollah played a key role in these battles. now they wield significant influence in all these areas, much to the frustration of saudi arabia. supporters of hezbollah in lebanon feel they are very much the target of saudi arabia's anger. translation: the
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americans, saudis and israelis are all trying to present hezbollah for maximising its gains from wars in syria and iraq. hezbollah and its allies have achieved enormous success , allies have achieved enormous success, but they now face huge pressure because of this. with tensions rising between saudi arabia, which is predominantly sunni muslim, and iran, which is shi'ite, the french president emmanuel macron akin to the region yesterday to try to mediate. to prevent what is currently a diplomatic crisis is owning over into conflict. we have never been so close to the precipice, in many ways. the threat of regional war has never been this real, if you like, where it is a conflict that would involve a variety of different countries. there has also been an appeal for calm from the ewen. this is a matter of great concern to us. and what we wa nt of great concern to us. and what we want is for peace to be preserved in
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avalon. it is essential that no new conflict erupts in the region, it could have devastating consequences. but there is no sign of saudi arabia backing off. it has already told all citizens living here in lebanon on to leave. people from kuwait and bahrain have also been told to return home. the online taxi—hailing firm uber has lost an appeal against a ruling that gave its drivers employment rights. an earlier ruling had ordered uber to treat its drivers as workers rather than self employed independent contractors, after two drivers argued that they were entitled to the minimum wage, sick pay and paid leave. uber challenged that ruling, and says it will pursue a further appeal. 0ur correspondent simon gompertz has been following this story for us. we were so often in the headlines.
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tell us what this is about. —— uber so tell us what this is about. —— uber so often. first of all, in this country they do not get workers' rights of the sort of holiday pay, sick pay, minimum wage. many say it means they do not have to pay employers national insurance for those people, which is a lot of money. so it saves uber money. last year, money. so it saves uber money. last yea r, two of money. so it saves uber money. last year, two of its drivers won an employment tribunal against them, they appealed, they have won against that appeal as well, the drivers, at the employment appeal tribunal. i spoke to one of the two drivers who had fought the case, james farrar, as he came out. they were jubilant. huge relief, i hope it will stick this time and they will obey the law in this country and do the right thing. i would like them to now sit
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down and work with us, with our trade union, the independent workers union of great britain, sit down and work out how we can as quickly as possible make sure that every driver thatis possible make sure that every driver that is working but uber gets the worker rights that they are entitled to, which includes the minimum wage, holiday pay, and so on, and the right to not be discriminative against. what difference will this decision make to them? at the moment, drivers make about £5 an hour. they had to cover about £400 a week in fixed costs. it's about £5 an hour while huber makes for pound 50 per every hour we work, no matter what we make. uber will always make for pound 50, we only make £5 an hour. now if they want to make national wage, we would have two 125 hours a weekjust to make that. it's important we paid the correct amount, that we have a sustainable business model that works for
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londoners, businesses, and uberas well. one of the drivers who brought the case. uber says they will appeal. what next? while they are pursuing this case, they can carry on operating in the way they operate, incidentally uber says most of its drivers like the flexibility of its drivers like the flexibility of being self—employed, and they earn more than the minimum wage. but if the appeal, it is likely to go to the supreme court. that will be next year, so the whole thing will rumble on that period. this case today is an eye—openerfor other on that period. this case today is an eye—opener for other so—called geek economy employees who have bicycle delivery people, quarries and other drivers. that they may have to change the way they operate. it is an important, ongoing case and all eyes will be on the supreme court next year to see what is decided. it's a sure sign that christmas is just around the corner.
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the first sighting of the christmas adverts on tv. they've become big budget productions and a third of people say they're just as excited about a premiere of a christmas advert as they are for any film release. not sure mark kermode would agree with that... let's take a look back at some the memorable offerings from past years and then at this years big releases. # i've been lost, i've been found... they can share ours... my name is jim. my name is otto. # give a little bit... give a little bit of your love to me. it was love
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at first sight. #to # to get back home, sleep, pretty darling... giddy-up. just a flavour of some of those adverts. joining me now isjim thornton who is the deputy executive creative director at vccp — the advertising agency behind the meerkats for compare the market. thanks for being with us. we were just looking at a selection there, the production budgets for these seem to get bigger and bigger, they become more sophisticated each year. iama become more sophisticated each year. i am a huge fan, i become more sophisticated each year. iam a huge fan, i have become more sophisticated each year. i am a huge fan, i have to say. i got goose bumps just watching and
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listening to your little montage. this iqbal christmas, they always have done. it's like the official starting signal that says you can get excited now. —— they signal christmas. for my kids it was the coca—cola ad, holidays are coming. for this generation it will bejohn lewis, i'm sure. obviously they cost millions of pounds to make, the question is are they worth it? do they earn the money back?” question is are they worth it? do they earn the money back? i would say they are undoubtedly worth it, otherwise they would not keep making them. all retailers know how much they rest on christmas. i suspect we are worth every penny. especially because they become an event, and they and appointment of view. as this was always about that, whether it was morecambe and wise, the two ronnies, showing my age! these have become another part of that, christmas telly. we know these are
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tough times for the retail industry. some of the figures out recently have been pretty ropey, i suppose, in terms of sales. 0ggies adverts more important than ever?” in terms of sales. 0ggies adverts more important than ever? i think we asked that question every year. there are possibly more important this year, only because there is also the uncertainty surrounding next year. and the economy. in light of the recent figures, yes, i think they probably are. the big ones are usuallyjohn lewis, mns, so on. is it possible to say who has the best stories that unfair? i think it's fair. christmas is all about suspending your critical faculties, i think people have accused them of becoming formulaic. but that's what christmas is all about. it's all about repeats, craziness, ritual, family ritual. —— cosiness.
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christmas ads or any section of their own way you do want to stray too far from the successful and familiar path. what is the formula? they are cosy, lovely, is it slushy music, what is it? i think it's a bit of everything. the most successful ones tend to take a children's story aspect. they recognise the magic of christmas is for kids. it tends to be about friendship. you see examples of that both from kids into adult word. the rest of it, it's always going to be about the emotional heart of the story, it has to make you feel good, about christmas and therefore about the brand. that is at the heart of it. it needs to make you feel something and make you feel christmassy. we are feeling christmassy. we are feeling christmassy now. thank you, good to talk to you. time for a look at the weather. not much snow yet...
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a little bit, actually, if you live in scotland, particularly over high ground. what will generally be a cold weekend, the cold, crisp autumn conditions reaching all parts of the country. the further south, you will have to be patient because through this evening we have outbreaks of rain through northern ireland and setting in across england and wales, quite heavy bursts of rain across scotland, that is, where we could see some snow. particularly in high ground. pretty chilly, miles down south. southern areas will have a miserable start to saturday, armistice day, lots of cloud and rain. staggering slowly southwards. it will stay pretty damn all day long. further north some sunshine, still showers into northern scotland, which we over high ground, 5 degrees in aberdeen. —— winter we over high ground. the some sweet
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south over all parts, some showers, heavy up towards the north—east. wintry showers, even fairly low levels in scotland at this stage, temperatures of just 210 levels in scotland at this stage, temperatures ofjust 210 degrees. —— six to 10 degrees. this is bbc news — the headlines: following brexit talks in brussels the eu's chief negotiator has given the uk has two weeks to clarify its position. david davis said the time was right for both sides "to work to find solutions". theresa may has decided push ahead with her resolve to "make happen to brexit"— as she unveils plans to enshrine the time and date of transition into law. taxi—hailing app uber has lost its appeal against a ruling on employment rights for its drivers. the company says it will continue fight with another appeal. president trump has called time on "chronic trade abuses" in his speech on the future of global trade at summit in vietnam.
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in contrast, the chinese president xi said globalisation was irreversible. heads below has accused saudi arabia of declaring war on lebanon. —— hezbollah has accused saudi arabia of declaring war on lebanon. we can bring you more on the news that the first minister carwyn jones bring you more on the news that the first minister carwynjones has asked for an independent enquiry into how he handled the death of carl sargeant. it is deeply concerning for the first minister,
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that all the answers the family seek and are entitled to know should be dealt with at a coroner ‘s inquest. the first minister is himself an experienced barrister and he will know that the coroner ‘s inquest will answer four questions only, the identity of the deceased, the time of death, the place of death and how the death was caused. the family believe they have the right to a nswe i’s believe they have the right to a nswers to believe they have the right to answers to those questions. what the inquest cannot determine is a civil or criminal liability to apportion guilt or attributable aim or to be seen guilt or attributable aim or to be seen to apportion guilt or attribute blame. the first minister will also know that to announce and commence a full independent in view and enquiry does not hinder the inquest and would run alongside the coroner ‘s inquest in any event. we can get the latest from our wales political correspondent. so news of this
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independent enquiry, was this innovative? was the pressure on the first minister such that there was no choice in this? yes, it seems that this is the case. 0vernight we have heard from a number of members of parliament from the labour party saying there needs to be this independent enquiry which even as early as wednesday, the family of carl sa rg ea nt early as wednesday, the family of carl sargea nt thought there early as wednesday, the family of carl sargeant thought there should be an independent enquiry. carwyn jones gave a statement setting out his thoughts about what happened and he did leave the door open that point, that there might be an independent enquiry. he said the family of carl sergent deserved a nswe i’s family of carl sergent deserved answers and if that was not coming from the coroner ‘s inquest then maybe there should be another enquiry and should that be independent. he seemed to be agreeing with that. but not going any further than that. in the last half an hour or any further than that. in the last halfan hourorso, any further than that. in the last half an hour or so, carwynjones the first minister said yes there should be an independent enquiry, and also outlining some of his thoughts on that, but it should be separate from
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his office. he has asked the permanent secretary of the welsh government, the most senior minister wales to discuss how that should operate. he said he did not think the enquiry should get underway until the coroner ‘s inquest has had time to reach conclusions, although he said he was willing to take further advice on that matter. there has been an awful lot of pressure coming on carwyn jones has been an awful lot of pressure coming on carwynjones to go for the independent enquiry, but it is something he has left the door open himself, being willing to entertain that thought. thank you. we can catch up on the latest sports news now. lizzie greenwood hughes is at the bbc sports centre this evening. good evening. patrice evra has been sacked by marseille and has been banned from all european club matches until the end of the season. u efa matches until the end of the season. uefa have said the former france and
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manchester united captain cannot play untiljuly 2018 and they have also fined him 10,000 euros. it came after he aimed a kick at the head of one of his supporters in portugal last week. marseille have terminated his contract. it is another international break this weekend. england who have already qualified for the world cup are plenty and in a friendly this evening. there are quite a few missing top players for england, so a few new caps being handed out by gareth southgate, and it is quite a game to make your first start for england? it is. it is a friendly only in name when it comes to england against germany. no love lost between them. it is a great opportunity because there will be some new faces in this england squad. that is because there have been seven withdrawals through injury, the likes of harry kane
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pulling out and an eighth darry drinkwater declined the opportunity to be called up because he did not feel he was fit enough —— danny drinkwater. jordan pickford comes into gold. he is 23 years old. ruben loftus—cheek is 21 years old and tammy abraham, 20 years old, the chelsea striker on loan at swansea this season, to start up front. it is not the situation that gareth southgate the manager would have wished for, one of only two friendlies this year before england play two more friendlies in march and then the world cup squad is named, but the england fans will get a chance to see some new faces. as well as seeing the new faces, there is new technology on show tonight. many people are reflecting on northern ireland's disappointment with the debatable refereeing decision in their world cup play—off
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last night but there will not be any of those problems hopefully tonight? that northern ireland decision would have been amended with video assisted referee system which will be used here. the first time it has been used in an official match in the uk. it is to correct major errors in match changing moments such as goals, red cards or penalty situations. it will be really interesting to see how that plays out tonight. it is a controversial system. also, england will be wearing poppies, germany as well on an armband. they did it lasted and they were punished for doing so, but are the rules mean it will be allowed and remembrance will be paid. thank you. wales will play their first game since failing to make the world cup play—offs and it is a tough one against france. chris coleman has said he has not decided if he will stay in charge but it is not
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affecting on how his team are preparing for the game. england's hopes of retaining the ashes are hanging in the balance. they had a strong second day, restricting australia to 177—5, 103 ru ns restricting australia to 177—5, 103 runs behind england. finally f1, he has already won his world title but lewis hamilton is not taking his that of the gas, dominating practice for the brazilian grand prix. his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas is just four hundredths of a second behind. that is all the sport for now. you can find out more on this story is on the bbc sport website. we will have more in sportsday for you at 6:30pm. thank you. let's get more now on eu's chief brexit negotiator saying britain has two weeks to resolve key issues,
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if discussion about a future trading relationship is to begin next month. speaking after the latest round of talks in brussels, michel barnier said the government had provided "useful clarifications" after brexit — but he warned it was "absolutely vital" to make more progress on the financial price paid by britain for leaving. i'm joined now by the labour mp frank field who campaigned for britain to leave the eu. where'd you think we are on these talks? week seemed to be approaching crunch time and how much do you think we should pay?” crunch time and how much do you think we should pay? i don't know, i am not in the steering seat for the negotiations. but how you summarised that was crucially important. as we get towards the leaving date, the european union are faced with a mega mega financial crisis, which is our contribution into the common fund. therefore, the power relationship which we have seen appallingly on one side, their side, will begin to
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change. so although the next year will be a very difficult year, we need to plan to make that a success, knowing that they will need a settle m e nt knowing that they will need a settlement with a very generous contribution from us. that is on their side. some people would say we face the possibility of falling off the cliff edge? no, i think anybody with any sense will be doing two things. one will be planning in case we are forced off the edge but they turn very spiteful towards their old colleagues. it also shows how serious that we stare them in the eye that we have planned for that. but on tuesday, when we begin the big trench warfare on the government's bill to implement a referendum decision, i have four clauses, amendments on the order paper. the first one the government has already accepted, announced
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yesterday evening, that they will give us a leaving date. we had not had that before. why was that so important in your view to have that enshrined in law? i wasjust amazed, or would you be, that we did not haveitin or would you be, that we did not have it in law, that on this day we would leave? when we came in the other end we had on this day we joined. it was very important to have on the legislation that on this day really. the second clause is one that we take over all their laws and regulations. the third clause is that parliament will consider how we review those. the fourth clauses that we have a safe haven in which we continue our negotiations, when as every day goes by, they will more and more need our money. i don't think we want any other clauses the government is putting forward. if they persist with the rest of the bill, instead of adopting this very short exit bill, the house of lords
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will kill the whole process, by making many, many amendments to the 60 pages of legislation the government is proposing. my bill does not even take a side. frank field, thank you for being with us. lucy thomas is the former deputy director of the britain stronger in europe campaign. what is your view of these talks. they do seem to be reaching a crunch on the financial settlement, do you have a figure in mind that we should prepare to pay? i think broadly speaking we should pay what we owe. how much is that? that is about our liability is and what we said we would pay into the budget. theresa may has been very clear that she does not want any eu members to pay in more than they otherwise would have done orfor in more than they otherwise would have done or for anybody to lose out until 2020, but they're all sorts of
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other things. pensions until 2020, but they're all sorts of otherthings. pensions for eu civil servants, all sorts of things going back 40 years, and i think it is about the principle. from the eu side we want them to say yes, we will sign up to this and this. unfortunately, for the uk, we need them to say we are ready for phase two. but there will be lots of leave voters saying we should not pay a penny. but we have legal obligations. what sort of country would we be if we walked away from the things we signed up to? gordon brown, the former prime minister, was saying that britons could be persuaded to turn away from brexit if there was a game changer shift in policy from brussels. do you agree with that? do you think there should bea with that? do you think there should be a second referendum on all of this? no, i am not one of those former remainers who thinks that. the majority of people voted to
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leave and i do think we have to push on for the best possible deal. i think what lord coe was saying today, the gentleman who wrote the article 50 clause about the divorce talks was interesting from the perspective of it is legally technically possible to revoke that process —— lord kerr. in theory it is possible but in my opinion it is a democratic opinion. if you look at public opinion, it has not changed that much. there is not a big clamourfor people has not changed that much. there is not a big clamour for people to go backin not a big clamour for people to go back in at all. public opinion is broadly where it was. michel barnier and david davies keeps saying there is progress but actually there does not seem to be huge mantle progress. do you think there can be a settle m e nt do you think there can be a settlement and then we will have trade talks? i think the whole process is so complicated. i don't think anybody really prepared for...
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are we running out of time?” think anybody really prepared for... are we running out of time? i think ideally at the october meeting last month we would have moved further forward on the bill on northern ireland and citizens rights, and from uk perspective, if the eu do not say that in december, we are in real trouble, because what we absolutely need is a transitional agreement, the terms of that by march, and if we don't have phase two starting after december, we are in real trouble. lucy two starting after december, we are in realtrouble. lucy thomas, thank you. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier says the uk has two weeks to clarify how it all settle the so—called divorce bill if trade talks are to begin next month. tensions mount in the middle east as a hezbollah accuses saudi arabia of declaring war on lebanon. the online taxi hailing service uber
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loses a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. it says it will carry on its fight with another appeal. an update on the market numbers for you. now on bbc news a look ahead to sportsday at 6.30pm tonight. coming up on sportsday at 6:30pm, we will be live from wembley as we count down to england's friendly match against their old rivals, germany. also, can england regain the ashes? we will have the latest from sydney. plus a round—up of the autumn internationals and the extraordinary story of british cyclist vicky barnes on the comeback trail after

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