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tv   Inside Out  BBC News  November 11, 2017 12:30am-1:00am GMT

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in a televised broadcast, hasan nasrallah said the saudi government had detained lebanon's former prime minister in the country. the american comedian louis ck has admitted that claims of sexual misconduct from five women are all true. he apologised to the cast and crew of several projects he'd been working on. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says the uk has two weeks to clarify its position of the payment of its so—called divorce bill. michel barnier said that would allow trade talks to begin when eu leaders next meet. grazia magazine has apologised to the hollywood star lupita nyong'o, after it airbrushed out some of her hair on the cover of its november issue. now on bbc news it's time for inside out. hello and welcome to inside out. tonight, could the emergency
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services have acted any faster on the night of the manchester arena bomb? i said we need paramedics, we need paramedics now. how life after top—level sport can be traumatic. when you are part of the team it is brilliant, and going away from that had a massive impact on me. and why liverpool is the start of a new hollywood movie. i just liverpool is the start of a new hollywood movie. ijust want liverpool is the start of a new hollywood movie. i just want to liverpool is the start of a new hollywood movie. ijust want to go back to liverpool. say it again. liverpool. wow. in may, a suicide bomber killed 22 people at manchester arena. hundreds more were injured. inside out has learned that some of the most seriously wounded victims had to wait over an hour before receiving expert medical treatment. one of the
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first reporters on the scene that might also explores why are firefighters were held back the nearly two hours. —— for nearly two hours. on the 22nd of may, salman abedi made his way to the manchester arena, waiting for the ariana grande concert to finish. as fans streamed out he detonated a suicide device. there was rubble and smoke everywhere, and there was just screaming. it was too much for two or three paramedics to deal with. that night the emergency services treated hundreds of people, many with life changing injuries. but what we have learnt is that some of the most seriously wounded had to wait for more than an hour before receiving any expert medical treatment. 12 months before the bomb, a training exercise was staged
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at the trafford centre on the outskirts of manchester. authorities we re outskirts of manchester. authorities were pleased with how it had gone. we are delighted, i mean the aim of the exercise was to really stress test all of the organisations that would respond to a terror attack. but what happened on may 22, when a real terror attack took place? salman abedi triggered his bomb at 10:31 p.m.. on the night i was here right in the centre of manchester, and in the aftermath i was interviewing people on radio 5 live trying to piece together what had happened. everybody started running as much as we could. the whole building shook, and there were bodies everywhere. how long were you lying there for? probably an hour. so on the night, people were telling me that some of the injured were waiting an hour to treatment. shortly after 11pm, added half an
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hour after the bomb went off, those who had been in the foyer, injured but able to walk, were evacuated to hear, and this is victoria station, approach. ambulance crews from across england treated the injured who had been able to escape the scene. but for those in the foyer, expert help was still very limited. before the police court was made secure, only one north—west ambulance service paramedic made it the foyer. over the next hour, he wasjoined by the foyer. over the next hour, he was joined by two the foyer. over the next hour, he wasjoined by two more paramedics. eyewitnesses we have spoken to say more medical help was desperately needed. kim and phil dick from bradford were in the foyer to collect their daughter and granddaughter. keep going, keep going. second after the explosion, a victim with serious injuries collapsed in front of kim. she could hardly walk, she was stumbling, bleeding from her arm and her mouth
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and her leg and how was burned, and i grabbed her because i thought she was going to fall. how long was this? just over an hour, i kept saying, be brave, but it is kept coming. as time passed, concern grew about the lack paramedics in the foyer. there were police, there were armed police, ijust kept shouting, we need paramedics, we need paramedics now. and they were making sure there was no more bombs. an hour after the explosion, the wounded in the foyer were only receiving basic first aid rather than expert paramedic help. the longer it went on the more silent it became, and it was absolutely, it was really eerie, and people who i had seen a little earlier who are severely injured, when our dead. they made a decision at some point, about an hour in ten minutes after the explosion that... the medical
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staff were coming up to the foyer, but they were going to evacuate the casualties. the girl they looked after did survive. security fears may explain why only three paramedics could enter the so—called hot zone, where the bomb had gone off. but it's hard to understand the delay in the arrival of fire and rescue staff, commanders on the night held fire and rescue staff back at their stations until 12:18 a.m., fully one hour and 47 minutes after the blast. the fire service made a decision to go to the fire service made a decision to gotoa the fire service made a decision to go to a rendezvous point which is normal practice for the ambulance service, the ambulance service was called forward and at this stage i am unsure as to why the fire service was delayed for so long. greater manchester fire and rescue service has a technical response unit, these are people trained specifically to deal with terrorist situations. that unit took part in the trafford
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centre exercise last year, it is still uncertain who on the night made the decision not to deploy that units. save the uk firefighting service is the major online platform for firefighters service is the major online platform forfirefighters in service is the major online platform for firefighters in the service is the major online platform forfirefighters in the uk. but on the night of the manchester bomb those who were on duty use this page as the event was unfolding to vent their frustrations they were not being sent to the arena.|j their frustrations they were not being sent to the arena. i have been a firefighter in manchester for nearly ten years and i had never felt so much guilt in my life. we we re felt so much guilt in my life. we were only half a mile away from helping, half a were only half a mile away from helping, halfa mile were only half a mile away from helping, half a mile from potentially saving lives and that will always stick with me forever. paramedic when he came to us, —— lady came to us, pleading with us to help, because they needed. one firefighter who was on duty that night has come forward to tell us how it felt. we sat there waiting, waiting for the get go. you are kicking yourself what you could have
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done, it might have changed anything, but we could have been at anything, but we could have been at a help. —— might not have changed anything. but we could have been there to help. they were homeless people helping, members of the public helping, i am a paid public service and i wanted to help, ijust wasn't allowed to help. those who we re wasn't allowed to help. those who were trapped in the foyer that night remain grateful that so many put their lives at risk to help save others. but almost six months on, some remain concerned that emergency medical help was so slow to arrive. they wanted to minimise the risks to as many people as a possible, i understand that. but they employed tens if not hundreds of —— police officers into the arena, and if some officers into the arena, and if some of those had been medically trained they could have... you can't say for certain, at some peoples injuries could have been dealt with quicker and perhaps, just perhaps, some lives could have been saved. but one man who collected his son from the arena leaves the authorities did the
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absolute best they could. you would like everybody to get help straightaway, you would like every single medic, every doctor who was in manchester should have been out. and you would have liked them to have been there and everyone would have been there and everyone would have been there and everyone would have been in their helping, nobody would have died, and that would be it. it would have died, and that would be set up an greater manchester has now set up an independent review to learn lessons from the event in may. it is due to report next year. there was a feeling out the time that the wrong call was made in those moments. it seems to me there is some substance to that, and it was one of the reasons why the independent review was set up. but it's not about feelings is it, that's the point, it is about what is the evidence and that evidence is being looked at by the review. those in charge of the emergency services that night had a
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truly terrible decision to make. should they deploy as quickly as possible, trying to save lives, while there was still the threat of a second explosion? or should they wait until the area happened —— had been declared safe, there for delaying treatment to victims of the bomb asa delaying treatment to victims of the bomb as a result. we contacted all the emergency services, the north—west ambulance service told us they were proud of their response to they were proud of their response to the manchester arena attack. rated manchester fire and rescue said they have conducted their own internal debriefing to the organisation's response to the manchester arena attack, and are fully cooperating with the review. greater manchester police told us that they contacted the north—west ambulance service within three minutes of the incident being declared, and they followed their major incident plan. none of these organisations wanted to appear in this film while the review is ongoing. the life of a professional sportsman
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or woman can be incredibly glamorous. the fame, the financial rewards, the adulation. but what happens to those things when they stop competing? ara porter —— our reporter is the former olympic athlete, known as diane edwards. diane edwards in lane three. those we re diane edwards in lane three. those were the days. i have always thought that a sporting career is like running a long—distance rates. that a sporting career is like running a long-distance rates. they can now, is it fast enough... occasionally there will be barriers along the way, and maybe falls, but they will also be fantastic highs. the australians are coming out, they are into the wind... so what actually happens when you reach the
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finishing line? sometimes, i think that can be the hardest part of all. danny sculthorpe was a successful proper would with wigan and england. for him, rugby league was everything, especially when it was a big game. there has back of your neck are on end, the adrenaline is going through your body that is absolutely unbelievable, i can't explain how good it was, it was brilliant, absolutely brilliant. but towards the end of his career, danny had serious injury problems, and when his final club radford bulls tore up his contract in 2010, he was devastated. a shack radford. he was just 31. —— bradford. devastated. a shack radford. he was just 31. -- bradford. i lost my job, lost my career, i get choked up about it, i had two kids and a wife that i couldn't support, and that's when the depression started. for a
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long time i did what most men do when they have mental health issues, i kept it to myself i didn't deal with it, i am supposed to be this 6—foot four prop forward, i can't have mental health issues, ifound myself in a cart with a bottle of pills and i was going to take my own life but i am just lucky that i decided not to do it on that occasion, i'd render coming home and a day after that is when my mum and dad and my wife sat me down and called me out on it, and saved my life. danny's experience is actually not that unusual in the world of professional sport, as neurologist and professional footballer told me. if they have not developed options and opportunities to transition into another career than their brain can often go into a threat state, and their thought process can be more negative, and that can lead to many
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issues such as clinical depression. we are unaware of certain athletes who have taken their life because of that loss of identity that retirement brings. as an amateur boxer, natasha jonas won a stack of titles, including european championship gold and world championship bronze. she made history at london 20 when she became the first british woman to box in the first british woman to box in the olympics. boxing isjust a skill. but you learn so much more and you learn a lot of life skills. there are a lot of milestones. obviously the olympics was by far my greatest boxing achievement. but then a foot injury led to defeat in then a foot injury led to defeat in the commonwealth games and failure to qualify for the real olympics. natasha made the decision to retire.
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i couldn't do it for another four yea rs. i couldn't do it for another four years. my time was done. i don't think that i could have been that athlete again. so i thought, now is the time. natasha started to prepare for life outside the ring. she found work with outside associations and broadcasters. and there was another compelling reason for her to reappraise her plans. she was pregnant with her daughter. reappraise her plans. she was pregnant with her daughterlj reappraise her plans. she was pregnant with her daughter. i had a whole new world and i can itself busy with a baby, with new companies. for the first year or so of her life you are trying to get her into a routine, so i was off doing what i needed to do —— i wasn't off doing what i need to do, because i was focusing on her. despite this, the pull of boxing proved too powerful. working with others was what i missed. i had left
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boxing on a bit of a low. i got beaten in the commonwealth games, where should have won a medal. i had unfinished business. once i got over the physical stuff, i thought, unfinished business. once i got over the physical stuff, ithought, i've still got it. and so earlier this year she turned professional, working with manchester trainer joe gallagher. she has already won her first three fights. i want your six digit numberto be first three fights. i want your six digit number to be as close as possible to that. ben burgess is known to the students as their favourite teacher. but to thousands of football fa ns favourite teacher. but to thousands of football fans he is remembered as a striker at nearby bloomfield road. his 14 a striker at nearby bloomfield road. his 1a year career took him to no fewer than ten clubs, including blackburn, old ham fewer than ten clubs, including
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blackburn, oldham and stockport. but after yea rs of blackburn, oldham and stockport. but after years of wear and tear and 21 operations on his knees, then realised in 2012 that he wouldn't be able to fulfil a new contract he had just signed. when your body can't do what your mind wants to do it the most frustrating thing in the world. we wrote the two years of the contract we wrote the two years of the co ntra ct off we wrote the two years of the contract off and that was it. we just sort of parted. i was really emotional at the time and it was a lot to take in. driving home from liverpool, i had to stop the car and gather my thoughts. the key factor which helped with his transition into the real world was that unlike most athletes, he had planned ahead. i always had on the back of my mind that i needed something. i managed to get a journalism degree. i was doing little bits of freelance while i was still playing. as i knew my career was coming to an end, it was like, what can i do with my
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qualifications? someone mentioned that if you have a degree you can become a qualified school teacher. you could say his transition from footballer to school teacher is a lesson for all. while they are competing it is important for them to have interest outside of that sport, which can then lead into their transition when they come to their transition when they come to the end of their career. danny sculthorpe is in a good place now. his failed suicide attempt proved to bea his failed suicide attempt proved to be a turning point. my family is absolutely everything. i could have done something stupid that they and i could have ruined their lives. to see them growing up healthy, you know, just means the world to me. big smiles for dad. he is now working with state of mind, a mental health charity. we've spoken to
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27,000 people over the last six yea rs 27,000 people over the last six years and 28 people have told us that because of one of our sessions they've changed the minds of taking their life, which is unbelievable. family life is at the centre of natasha jones's life as well and she isa natasha jones's life as well and she is a winner once again, but she knows the day will come when retirement will come. it is scary. i can't walk away from boxing. i don't think i will 100% of the leaf boxing. i'll always have something to do with it. children are at the heart of ben burgess's daily life too. football life in the past, he is working on developing the citizens of the future. i don't want their children to see that you are their children to see that you are the clever or you're not or talented or not, it's about how hard you work. it's clear that some athletes handled the move into retirement much better than others. but for me there's a duty care for everybody in
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sport to ensure that our sports men and women make that transition as easily as possible. there's a bit of an oscar buzz about a new movie called film stars don't die in liverpool. it tells the remarkable true story of a man whose life is turned upside down when he met and fell in love with a hollywood superstar back in the 19705. hollywood superstar back in the 1970s. i've been to meet him. ifi make you a drink will you come to my room? i make you a drink will you come to my room ? i need make you a drink will you come to my room? i need a partnerfor my make you a drink will you come to my room? i need a partner for my dance class. i mean, if you fix me a drink, i'll come in... a classic young man meets older woman love story, except in this case he was just a young actor from liverpool and she was a former hollywood screen goddess. a bit far—fetched? maybe, but this is very much a true story. it begins in the late 1970s.
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she came to do a play in london and came to rent this groundfloor apartment in this house and i was at the top of the house. were you aware of who she was immediately? no. gloria graham —— grahame? i hadn't seen any of the films. what he didn't realise was 20 years ago gloria grahame was at the top of her tree, starring in various films and playing femme fatale to lead by co mfrey playing femme fatale to lead by comfrey bogart, kirk douglas and lee marvin. —— humphrey bogart. around the time she met peter gloria was interviewed on the bbc. i'm just a girl who can't say no. i'm an
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interminable fix. they asked if i could sing and i said no. they said, of course you sing, using in the shower? i said, of course you sing, using in the shower? isaid, no, icouldn't of course you sing, using in the shower? isaid, no, i couldn't carry it in shower? isaid, no, i couldn't carry itina shower? isaid, no, i couldn't carry it in a bucket. we just connected and there was a big age gap and at that time it was quite controversial. she used to travel around on the buses or the tube and waiting queues and all things like that. for two - couple lived la, new york and london, it up in la, new york and london, before splitting up in 1980. but within a year the final dramatic scenes would be played out in liverpool. gloria would spend her last days here, at peter's family home. it all followed a phone call from the duke's theatre in lancaster. what did that phone call ctu? it was very
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lancaster. what did that phone call ct u? it was very brief. gloria is here, she's very ill. what? how ill? they said, well, she is very, very ill and would you come immediately? she came to liverpool when the chips we re she came to liverpool when the chips were down, a place where she felt safe. she wanted to get better. it was futile. i think she knew she was going to die. she knew she had left it late. eventually peter wrote a moving account of the difficult days that followed and the fabulous years which preceded them. the book was published in 1986 and now has been turned into a film starring annette denning and jamie bell as peter. not that gloria grahame, in our kitchen,
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making a bacon sam wyche!m that gloria grahame, in our kitchen, making a bacon sam wyche! it is the relationship that has most affected him. i would spend many hours of him just sitting down and asking what we re just sitting down and asking what were to him the nine questions but to me meant everything. has anyone told you how you look when you smoke? yeah, humphrey bogart and i didn't like it then either. this is the backstage. fantastic. at the time, gloria was seriously ill in the family home and peter was appearing ina the family home and peter was appearing in a play at the liverpool playhouse. the theatre is the location of one of the most moving scenes in the film and peter has a small cameo. it was so strange, surreal, to be on stage with jamie... surreal, to be on stage with jamie. .. being surreal, to be on stage with jamie... being you. playing that pa rt jamie... being you. playing that
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part and with annette bening being gloria grahame. it was like a time capsule... where am i? what's going on? life is full of surprises. 31 yea rs on? life is full of surprises. 31 years after writing his book and 36 yea rs years after writing his book and 36 years after writing his book and 36 years after he had last seen gloria, peter turner finally got to see the film. he watched it in a private screening with the producer. at the end of the screening i said, you wa nt to end of the screening i said, you want to sit by any? barbara came and gave me a big hug. it's such a significant part of your life. gave me a big hug. it's such a significant part of your lifem gave me a big hug. it's such a significant part of your life. it is big. the whole period, the whole relationship, you know, kind of has given me so much and too fine to
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weigh an too, logic stands. the film isa weigh an too, logic stands. the film is a heartfelt tribute to peter turner's love affair with a remarkable woman. a relationship which took a young man on a journey which took a young man on a journey which changed his life. and the film is released on the 17th of november. inside out is back in the new year. see you then. hello. contrasting fortunes across the
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british isles for the weekend. first of all the west we have imported the re m na nts of of all the west we have imported the remnants of tropical storm rina as moist air, but that means a lot of cloud and some rain across much of england and wales and parts of northern ireland. further north the air has come from the north, hence these numbers. 2—4 degrees. there is some sunshine but it is doing nothing for the feel of the day and for the temperatures. this is how we shape up in the middle part of the afternoon. there will be some showers across northern and western parts of scotland. that's been the way of it for a few days. dry and bright weather in the central belt and towards eastern part of scotland and towards eastern part of scotland and across the board into the north of england. eventually and slowly we have brighter conditions getting past the wash towards east anglia. anywhere back towards the south and west, go too far and it is just anywhere back towards the south and west, go too far and it isjust rain all the way for the greater part of
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the day. scotland versus samoa, right. towards wales later, it doesn't matter what time of day, wales versus samoa will be wet. the rain peps up as a wave when a weather front comes through into the small hours of remembrance sunday. further north skies will be clearer and temperatures as a consequence will fall away. a touch of frost. plenty of showers from the word go on remembrance sunday around the shoulders of the british isles. largely affecting the coast. we are all exposed by sunday to the cold blast, as the weather front pulls away. on sunday, bright, crisp and sunny. a scattering of showers as well. it colder. well. it will feel markedly colder. the top temperature on the day, 9— 10 degrees. in the next week we
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start on that theme of cold and frosty and it then turns milder in the middle part of the week and there will be some rain in the forecast. a bright, crisp, frosty start for many into monday and then we have the first signs of that change getting to the north—west of the british isles, with milder weather on the way. hello, and welcome to bbc news. i'm gavin grey. the head of the lebanese shia movement, hezbollah, has claimed saad hariri who resigned as lebanon's prime minister last week is being held under house arrest in saudi arabia. in a televised address, hassan nasrallah said mr hariri had been forced to stand down by the saudis, an act which amounted to a declaration of war. there is growing international concern that the political crisis is being fuelled by a proxy war between saudi arabia and iran. our correspondent in beirut, martin patience, reports. for a region in turmoil, beirut served as a sanctuary
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