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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 11, 2017 7:00am-8:00am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. millions of people prepare to fall silent on armistice day. events will be held across the uk to mark the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. good morning, it's saturday 11th november. a british woman held in egypt for smuggling drugs, appears in court, laura plummer, is accused of importing illegal painkillers — a charge which could result in the death penalty. a lynx which escaped from a zoo near aberystwyth has been killed by the authorities. they say they acted for the safety of the public. in sport, an inexperienced england side hold their own against world champions germany. and on his international debut, goalkeeperjordan pickford is outstanding as he keeps a clean sheet at wembley. and susan powell has the weekend's weather. rather murky weather around to begin
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the weekend across the southern half of the uk. clear and bright conditions spreading from the north. good morning. first our main story. millions of people will fall silent today, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. it's the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. alexandra mackenzie is outside westminster abbey. alexandra, what's happening today? well, it is a rather soggy start to arms sisters —— armistice day. i am outside westminster abbey, outside the field of remembrance, where many people have brought wooden crosses and poppies, and have laid them there just outside westminster abbey. a temporary garden, where people have been able to come to remember and honour those who have died. just about a quarter of a mile
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from here we have be cenotaph, which will be a real focus of the commemorations today and tomorrow. we also saw other commemorations yesterday, a commemoration of the battle of passing bell. —— passchendaele. yesterday was the 100th anniversary, and guns were fired which were used in the first world war. back here at westminster, as you said, many people across the country will fall silent. we have not heard the chimes of big ben for several months, but today we will hear them, just after that two—minute silence until 11 o'clock. and again, on remembrance sunday, tomorrow, to remember and honour those who died. alexander, thank you. —— alexandra. you can watch live coverage of the armistice day commemorations from 10:45 this morning on bbc one.
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a british woman accused of drug smuggling in egypt is due to appear in court this morning. laura plummer, who's 33 and from hull, was arrested in cairo last month with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. she says the tablets were for her egyptian boyfriend, who has a bad back, and claims she had no idea they are banned in the country. but local police say that ignorance of the law is no excuse, as 0rla guerin reports. it looks like paradise. each of‘s red sea coast is a tourist trap. now one british holidaymaker is trapped ina one british holidaymaker is trapped in a legal nightmare. she is accused of smuggling drugs. 33—year—old laura plummer, a shop assistant, has been coming here for years. her family say she lives for her holidays in the sun. for the past month, she has been detained at police station number one, with others accused of drug trafficking.
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the offence can carry the death penalty here. well, we have managed to speak to laura plummer by phone. she told us she is being held in a cell about the size of her bedroom back home, but with 25 other women, so back home, but with 25 other women, so it is hard to breathe. she said her fellow inmates are trying to look after her, but nobody speaks a language. she told us her spirits are at rock bottom. here is the drug battle laura plummer was carrying, tramadol. it is legal in britain, with a prescription, but and in each of, where many are addicted to the opiates. —— banned in egypt. police said she had about 300 tablets in her case. she says a colleague gave them to herfor her her case. she says a colleague gave them to her for her egyptian boyfriend, 0mar, who has a back rub. i have no idea how illegal they are here, she said. i can't tell you how should that i feel. egyptian police
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say that ignorance of the law is no defence. relatives hope thejudge will realise she made an innocent mistake. the bbc understands that the labour mp kerry mccarthy is to submit letters to the party which she says show she received "unwanted attention" from a fellow mp. the mp for bristol east claims she was sent "upsetting" correspondence by kelvin hopkins over the last 20 years. mr hopkins is currently suspended from the party, following accusations of inappropriate behaviour, which he denies and said the complaint had caused him "unbearable" stress. 0ur political correspondent emma vardyjoins us from our london newsroom. take us through what we know about this story? this is really the latest development in what is now a string of investigations into sexual misconduct surrounding certain political figures at westminster. labourmp political figures at westminster. labour mp kelvin hopkins was suspended ten days ago after a young woman, a labour party activist, came forward and spoke publicly about the inappropriate jaegar and some of the text messages she claims to have received from kelvin hopkins. ——
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inappropriate behaviour. now we have seen inappropriate behaviour. now we have seen a inappropriate behaviour. now we have seen a fellow labour mp, kerry mccarthy, speaking out as well. she says she's done this because she was to support the younger woman. she will not be submitting her own formal complaint, but what she will do is submit her testimony to that in —— ongoing investigation into kelvin hopkins. simply put, she says she is doing this because having seen she is doing this because having seen what has played out in the media, she felt it was the right thing to do. she says she first received unwanted attention from kelvin can is back in 1994. more recently, she says she received a letter from recently, she says she received a letterfrom him in which recently, she says she received a letter from him in which she described her as an attractive woman and confided he had a dream about her. it is important to say at this stage that he denies the allegations made by both women. he says he is disappointed with kerry mccarthy for coming to the press rather than speaking to him, and has described her as a long—term friend. i think what this shows is that there are
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some difficult questions they need to get to the bottom of, part of the spotlight placed on the behaviour of the culture around individuals in westminster. american goalkeeper hope solo has accused former fifa presidents cup latter of sexual harassment. she says that latter groped her moments before they went on stage at the bar long door event in 2016. —— ballon dor. a spokesman for sepp blatter has described the allegations as ridiculous. one of the latest hollywood figures to be accused of sexual harassment has admitted that all the allegations against him are true. five women have made claims against the american comedian louis ck. he's expressed remorse for his actions, as our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. another hollywood figure accused of sexual misconduct. but to louis ck admits he did it. the new york times first reported the claims of five women who said he subjected them to various acts of indecency, and two of his accusers say it happened in his hotel room in a comedy festival in 2002.
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in a statement, the comedian said the stories were true and he was now aware of the extent of the impact of his actions. he said the power i had over these women is that they admired me, and i wielded that power irresponsibly. he adds: the statement doesn't include an apology to the women. hi, everybody. nice to see you all. what's up? louis ck is best known as a stand—up comedian. he is also a successful writer, producer and actor. hollywood's response to the allegations against him has been swift. his latest film, due to be released next week, has been scrapped. he has been dropped by several tv networks and netflix has
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cancelled plans to a stand—up special. the streaming service cited the comedian's "unprofessional and unacceptable behaviour with female colleagues". a lynx which escaped from a small zoo near aberystwyth has been killed. the animal disappeared at the end of last month, prompting a huge search. the local council says that despite "exhaustive efforts" to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public, as bernard wilson reports. the eurasian lynx, named lilith, is thought to have lept over an electric fence at borth wild animal kingdom. zoo staff began a hunt for her along with police and officials from ceredigion council. there were a number of sightings at one point it was thought she was hiding in bushes near the zoo, but she evaded capture. last night the council released a statement, saying the lynx had strayed into a populated area and it had been necessary to act decisively. it added the animal had been destroyed humanely and the safety
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of the public was paramount. the zoo has been closed since the animal's escape. the local council said that despite "exhaustive efforts" to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public, and had to be "humanely destroyed". britain is the most obese country in western europe. that's the claim from the organisation for economic co—operation and development. its annual report says 27% of the british population is officially obese, and that levels are rising faster than in any other developed nation. health organisations say the findings are sobering. almost 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residentialfires in england in the past year, according to new figures. the local government association also found that 21% of mains—powered alarms didn't work properly. it's warning people to check their smoke alarms in the run—up to winter, when the number of serious fires usually goes up. in a world of coffee lovers and pet owners it was only a matter of time before this latest trend came about. in just ten minutes this coffee shop owner in taiwan will create the perfect latte, topped off
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with your pet's face. all she needs is a photograph, some frothy milk and a lot of patience! 0ne cup can cost up to £18, depending on the degree of difficulty, and many of her customers willingly let their drink get cold just to take a few more pictures. so they paint the froth of the cappuccino. 0bviously so they paint the froth of the cappuccino. obviously there is a lot of patience. you can get multiple little kitties. we are confused by that last image. lots of cartoon kitties on different lumps of froth. cold copy max, £18, why not. —— coffee. the minicab hailing app uber says it will appeal the latest in a series of court rulings, which says its drivers should be entitled to certain rights, like the minimum wage, sick pay and paid leave. the company claims most of its drivers would be prefer to be classed as self—employed, and says it's prepared to go all the way to the supreme court. james farrar and yaseen aslam are the two drivers who brought
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the original tribunal case last year. and susannah kintish is an employment lawyer. she's in our london newsroom. you assessment of where we are in oui’ you assessment of where we are in our case now, with uber? the most recent decision of the employee appeal tribunal, which we heard yesterday, just things to the scene viewed music which we have been hearing from the employment tribunal decision and this similar cases in this issue. —— sings to the same mood music. so, this was clearly a victory for you yesterday. can you just explain to us what your thoughts are, given what we now know, regardless of yesterday's decision, uber intends to fight on? looking at what we achieved
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yesterday, the judge reconfirmed with workers, which we won last year, as workers, all we are guaranteed as the basic right to make sure that we are in the minimum wage, and also holiday pay. that is all it is. we are still flexible, there is no need to trade that flexibility. we are still our own bosses, self—employed, technically. but we have basic rights. that is all it means. sorry, what rights did you want? thisjust makes sure that we have protection in place? holiday pay, sick pay? to make sure we are not exploited. we have laws in this country, like the national minimum wage, making sure for every driver going forward that the law is e nforced going forward that the law is enforced in terms of what we earn, that minimum wage, offer every hour that minimum wage, offer every hour that we work. this is about interpretation, isn't it? whether you interpret what you do as being self—employed or being employed by uber. uber says that the joy of their employment, employing drivers, is that they can be flexible? uber
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tries to create this forced choice between fairness and flexible as he. we say that there is no choice. in the united kingdom there are three main categories of employment. there are the truly self—employed, where you are is this of your own, you can set the price, you can charge what you want, you can manage customers. there is employed, paye, gold watch, pension. then there is this middle category that hasjust pension. then there is this middle category that has just called worker. you are self—employed, but you are under the control of another business. that is a vulnerable place to be, if you are a low income worker. we are allowed these rights minimum wage and holiday pay, and thatis minimum wage and holiday pay, and that is about it. uber is fighting this, and why? because they don't wa nt this, and why? because they don't want to pay the minimum wage. it is very important that we have that protection. one of the points uber has made consistently throughout this is that they say that many of your colleagues are also uber drivers, and are not on your side.
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they are content with the arrangements as they are. that is because uber offer, they confuse the issue. they say that all the drivers wa nt issue. they say that all the drivers want to be self—employed. they want to be their own boss. we are not challenging that at all. so do we. we agree with that. that is not the choice. so our colleagues can continue to work exactly the same way, except now they have a guarantee that no matter what, they will in the minimum wage and they will in the minimum wage and they will get holiday pay. what isn't to like? you say the judge found in your favour yesterday and that is caused the celebration. it remains an outstanding legal issue, as of today, doesn't it? your status has not changed. because we've been campaigning since 2014. it's dragging out longer. it's not nice to people like me who have to carry on with this struggle. going back to your point about
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hoover. the majority of drivers are happy. but as part of the iwgb union, there are drivers for example from uber that we represent. that is talk about the legal ramifications. the reason we talk about this case, there is the insinuation that this could set a precedent and change the form of employment. james is right in his characterisation. there is genuine employees. there are self—employed and this intermediate category of workers. i don't think it can be properly characterised, there is a subcategory of self—employment. employment law in this country has been built up on a foundation of protecting those who are exploited and the most
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vulnerable. and there is no suggestion that it ought to change. and people who are unequal in a relationship that they have. with the entity to whom they are providing services. 0r the entity to whom they are providing services. or to have proper protection. 0bviously, providing services. or to have proper protection. obviously, the flipside to business is, where there is genuine 2—way flexibility, if the signals continuing the way they are going, and we will get definitive guidance. if it continues to go the way it's going, even where you do have genuine 2— way flexibility between individual an organisation, if they are found to be workers, then that comes at a cost. you mentioned holiday pay, national minimum wage, sick pay. there are lots of additional costs that come with that. that has to be born somewhere, either by the business or
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passing it on to the individual was contracting with them via a different arrangement or passed onto the consumer. we are slightly short of time. on the last thought, away from the technicalities, there must be times where you wondered, not easy putting yourself on the front line. it isn't. you must be crazy to ta ke line. it isn't. you must be crazy to take a $70 billion corporation. but the law has been on our side. the iwgb union has become the de facto union for the gig economy. got their support. they have been behind us 100%. we appreciate your time this morning. thank you very much real—time. it is time to look at the weather.
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quite a chilly bin to this weekend. we start off today with some rain in the south. the overall riding story as we get to the north of the british pilot —— british isles is the way she dashed is the way it sticks around for much of the day. further north, the sunshine and the colder air. some of that sunshine getting further south this afternoon. for wales in the south—west, heavy rain for wales in the south—west of england. a bit dry, albeit remaining cloudy to the south—east. for the midlands, and east anglia, a lot of sunshine from the get go. hopefully seeing some of that in northern ireland. the thing to bear in mind is how chilly it is likely to feel thanks to the northerly wind. some sunshine but it
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will feel quite cold standing out. even with temperatures in double figures in cardiff, with the rain around 11 degrees, farfrom warm. more rain to the southern half of wales. windy, with some heavy rain for a time. you will notice that area of rain is trying to head away to the continent. what's really happening is the colder areas try to push its way down from the arctic. look at isobars behind me. almost like stripes. basically dragging that you straight down from the arctic. the wind will feel cold. a cold day at the cenotaph. basically a cold day right across the british charles. shun —— some showers through the morning. those will die off through the afternoon. some of the showers further east around the
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north sea coast. essentially, we are dominated by sunshine but it is the cold. always bear in mind, the back of the mind, with the wind chill. it will feel colder than this. around seven degrees, a typical temperature. you keep the cold air to start. monday, definitely frosty. as the week goes on, more cloud returning. grey skies and some outbreaks of rain. closer to average for the time the year. quite a lot of changes coming through. the story for this weekend, that colder air digging down from the north. especially for us tomorrow. while the money raised from selling
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poppies goes towards servicemen. we have been to the poppy factory in london to meet some of the team. i serve the royal engineers. i served with staffordshire. they are the faces behind the poppy production line, the disabled vetera ns to production line, the disabled veterans to prepare all weekend this weekend's remembrance day. how long does it take to make wannabes? you wa nt to does it take to make wannabes? you want to see how it takes? it's not as easy as it looks. it makes you forget about all the bad stuff.|j used to run for the army. i injured myself. i had to reinvent myself. i left the army and ended up homeless for a little while. and has this
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helped you? for a little while. and has this helped you ? i for a little while. and has this helped you? i am beating you here. it isa helped you? i am beating you here. it is a wonderful way of providing ability and structure. this is quite the production line. they make a whopping 7.5 million poppies. they also make 950,000 symbols like these crosses as well is 136,000 reefs. it can be challenging going back into civilian life. you have to work on time and find your way. it can be challenging. about two or three yea rs challenging. about two or three years ago i was paralysed on the left—hand side. everything just kind of, your skills and everything just fades. my life is upside down. a
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year on from that, to be here, it's great. the field of remembrance is the culmination of a year of hard work at the factory. 17,000 crosses made by soldiers for soldiers and find every cross, a life lost in the first world war. it's amazing. never should we forget the guys who went before us. these guys that fought before us. these guys that fought before we joined up, if it wasn't then... the poppy factory says at least 17,000 disabled veterans are without —— are out of work today. people are having to get them back to health and back to work. let us look at some of the paper. a
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£1 million boost. 0n the front page in the sun. across bbc newsletter on this morning. that is take a look at the guardian. decades of progress in communities at risk. the senior national co—ordinator of the counterterrorism policing is talking to the guardian. the picture on the front page is the artist. some of the leading children's illustrators drawing in response to brexit. 0n the front page of the daily mail, the reporting on christmas. stores are launching a lot of adverts this week. i have already bought to christmas gifts, which is ridiculously organised. very organised, i am slightly concerned.
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the front page of the times. this is about a british mother who has been jailed in iran. she has been accused of spying, toppling the regime. we will talk to richard bradley, her husband. she has been separated from her daughter. some rather distressing stories from people who spend time with her in jail. distressing stories from people who spend time with her injail. a distressing stories from people who spend time with her in jail. a full review of the papers coming up. it's been a tough few years for dairy — with trendy alternatives like soya, almond and coconut milk all vying for a place in our coffee and on our cornflakes. but now there's a far more exotic product entering the market — camel's milk. yes, milk — from a camel. lactose—free and with half the fat of cow's milk, could this be the next superfood
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or superfad to hit the uk? we'll try some in a minute, but first let see what some of you made of it. with question, what sort of animal do think that came from? is it lamb's milk? would you be surprised ifi lamb's milk? would you be surprised if i said it was camel's milk? oh! yes, very rich. too rich for me. is it genuinely from a camel? it is
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from a calf. why are you milking camels? it's absolutely vile. really? it's like a medicinal milk. we were watching very closely because he was going first? i will go first. i don't think a lot of milk. maybe i will not be so averse to it. it smells... it's fine. it's fine. its milk. it doesn't taste like our‘s milk but its milk. fine. its milk. it doesn't taste like our's milk but its milk. here we go. you know, it's got a slightly different flavour to it. there is an aftertaste. almost like a nutty
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aftertaste. almost like a nutty aftertaste. i won't be seeking it out. you wouldn't notice it in your coffee. 0ne put some in your coffee? it's absolutely fine. i understand why people say it tastes a bit off because it has funny aftertaste. it's on sale in the supermarkets. very cloying. the headlines are coming up. some water, please! hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. millions of people will fall silent this morning, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. events will take place across the country, including the cenotaph in london and the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. today is the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. a british woman is due in court in egypt this morning, accused of drug smuggling
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after being caught with with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. laura plummer, who's 33 and from hull, says she didn't know the painkiller was banned in the country, where many people are addicted to the opiate. she says the tablets were for her egyptian boyfriend, who has a bad back. her relatives say they're concerned for her physical and mental wellbeing. the first time i saw her, i couldn't believe it. she was breaking down, she was begging me to take her home. it's heart breaking because your daughter is there and you can't bring her home. she's very set in her ways. she likes her home comforts. so to be somewhere completely out of her comfort zone, she will be struggling, it will be traumatic for her. the bbc understands that the labour mp kerry mccarthy is to submit letters to the party
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which she claims show "unwanted attention" from a fellow mp. the mp for bristol east claims she was sent "upsetting" correspondence by kelvin hopkins over the last 20 years. mr hopkins is currently suspended from the party, following accusations of inappropriate behaviour, which he denies. he says the complaint has caused him "unbearable" stress. the american goalkeeper, hope solo, has accused former, fifa president sepp blatter, of sexual harrassment. the world cup winner said mr blatter groped her moments before they went on stage at the ballon d'0r event in 2013. a spokesman for mr blatter has described the accusation as "ridiculous". the american comedia louis ck has admitted that sexual misconduct allegations made against him by five women are true. the emmy award—winning star said he had "wielded power irresponsibly" and could hardly wrap his head around the "scope of hurt" he had caused. his upcoming film, in which he starred withjohn malkovich, will no longer be released in cinemas. a wild cat which escaped from a zoo near aberyswyth has been killed. lilleth, the eurasian lynx, escaped after jumping over an electric fence last month, prompting a huge search. the local council said that despite "exhaustive efforts"
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to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public, and had to be "humanely destroyed". britain is the most obese country in western europe. that's the claim from the organisation for economic co—operation and development. its annual report says 27% of the british population is officially obese, and that levels are rising faster than in any other developed nation. health organisations say the findings are sobering. almost 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residentialfires in england in the past year, according to new figures. the local government association also found that 21% of mains—powered alarms didn't work properly. it's warning people to check their smoke alarms in the run—up to winter, when the number of serious fires usually goes up. those are the main stories this morning. the time is 733 a.m. . let's find out
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happening in sport. the england team looks very smart. well, yes. a different sort of kit. they idea and up—and—coming. five players making theirdebut, up—and—coming. five players making their debut, the youngest and most inexperienced england sides as 1980. they have a point to prove. looking smart was part of it. this is what is being encouraged, to get younger players through? yes, well the under 17 's one world cup, the under 19 's won the world cup. they do not often get a chance in the premier league, do they? this was rather enforced on the web manager. he had 16 players withdraw in due to injury. —— the england manager. so gareth southgate said the performance of his young side was really written courage in —— really encouraging. even after they drew 0—0 in a friendly against germany. nick parrott rounds up the action, starting at wembley. last post plays. united in tribute to the fallen, both sides wearing poppies, germany for the first
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time in their history after fifa relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. hampered by injuries, england fielded their most inexperienced side since 1980. jordan pickford was one of three debutantes to begin, with another two coming on as substitute. he kept england in contention, saving them twice in the first half. another new boy, ruben loftus—cheek, was man of the match. the 21—year—old, who plays for crystal palace, shone in midfield, staking a claim for next summer's world cup squad. a very exciting player, we have known that a long time. we've been waiting for a night like tonight, i guess. but we felt it was important to give him that opportunity. i wanted to do it last month. he had an injury. so i think he's one the public may not have been aware, but i think they will be after tonight. wales started with an experienced
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side in paris but there was no stopping the attacking force that france opened with. antoine griezmann and arsenal striker 0livier giroud struck in either half for a comfortable 2—0 win. it doesn't matter who they play against, they score lots of goals and have lots of possession. but it was good for us to experience that, great for our young players. probably the best team we have played against. we are trying to gather ourselves. it will be a difficult period. with the talents of david brooks, making his debut, and teenage striker ben woodburn, combining well, it could also be an exciting period to come. wales of course won't feature at next year's world cup, they missed out on a place in the qualifying play offs, when they were beaten by the republic of ireland. the first leg, of their qualifying play—off against denmark is tonight in copenhagen. meanwhile sweden beat italy 1—nil in the first match of their play—off in stockholm. substitute jacob joha nsson scored just after the hour mark from a long deflected drive.
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italy will need a great performance in the return leg in milan on monday, if they're to avoid missing out on their first world cup since 1958. what next for patrice evra? he's been banned from all european club matches by uefa, until the end of the season and has left his club marseille by "mutual consent". it follows evra, kicking one of his own supporters, before marseille's europa league match last week. the former manchester united player is banned untiljune 2018 and has been fined almost 9 thousand pounds. england's battle for the women's ashes hangs in the balance this morning. the tourists have to avoid defeat if they're to retain any chance of getting something from the multi format series. play got underway in sydney at 0330 our time. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss is watching the action in sydney and joins us now. it seems the match and the series is
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slipping away from england? yes, i'm afraid england's hopes of victory would seem to be fading. australia is currently 356 — six in their first innings. that is a lead of 76. england were bowled out for 280 in their first england were bowled out for 280 in theirfirst innings. the england were bowled out for 280 in their first innings. the day began with the match finely poised. australia's batters dominated the first session, especially ellyse perry, who began the day 70 not out. she reached her first perry, who began the day 70 not out. she reached herfirst test perry, who began the day 70 not out. she reached her first test century in some style. she proves just why she is australia's star player. a great performance from elyse perry. england eventually got a breakthrough. alyssa healy out for 45. a great catch by anglers from seoul. that has been england's and the wicket of the day so far. elyse perry just reached the the wicket of the day so far. elyse perryjust reached the 150 mark. england with plenty of work to do. as you said, if england's —— if
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england win this match, they retain the ashes, and they are in a strong position. and the men have been in action. despite the injury problems they had a morale boosting win, as their own ashes series edges closer? that's right. england wrapped up he three wickets they needed to beat a cricketer ‘s failure 11 in adelaide. they were bowled out forjust cricketer ‘s failure 11 in adelaide. they were bowled out for just 75, england winning that match by 192 runs, three wickets for craig 0verton, three wickets forjames anderson. a decent run out for the england players. they now had out to townsville in queensland for their final warmup match ahead of the first test in brisbane, which starts in ten days. andy, thank you. it looks very golden behind you this morning. we enjoy the toddlers running past year. i guess we are getting into the sporting spirit, all of us. exactly. they are on uk national tv. the autumn international rugby season gets underway today
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with the home nations, facing the best of the southern hemsiphere, over the next month. first up — its scotland against samoa. it'll be the first murrayfield test for scotland coach gregor townsend. we will have to be good defensively and could in attack. if we give a tea m and could in attack. if we give a team like samoa turnover ball, or kicked poorly to them, they will be very dangerous against unstructured defence. a quick look at the day's other games involving the home nations — the pick of which sees wales host australia at 5.15. england take on argentina at twickenham. ireland host south africa. britain's katie archibald missed out on gold, in the omnium, at the world track cycling championships in manchester, after being overtaken in the final moments of the endurance event. the scot took silver but could have gone one better. she won the elimination race but couldn't not hold off american jennifer valente in the final points race. valente outsprinted her to take the title. there was a dramatic start to the season, for britain's two man bobsleigh team. competing at the opening world cup event in lake placid in the usa, brad paul and toby 0lubi,
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had been 15th after the first run but crashed early in their second, flipping the bob upside down as brake man 0lubi fell out of the back. thankfully though both athletes walked away from the accident. he was tucked right inside, to protect himself and protect his head. that crash really cost them. this is at the world cup event in late acid. —— lake placid. this is at the world cup event in late acid. -- lake placid. it is the most extraordinary sport, isn't it? you see them go down and you think it is wonderful, but when it goes wrong it goes spectacularly wrong. absolutely. and you think about the slide is in the skeleton, they have even less protection. but they don't have the sled which could flip over on the top of them. 170 kilograms. that could have been so much worse, couldn't it? absolutely, thankfully they are ok. but lewis hamilton isn't taking his foot off the gas. he dominated practise
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ahead of tomorrow's brazilian grand prix. the briton topped the timesheets in both sessions at interlagos. his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas is just four hundredths of a second behind. qualifying takes place this afternoon. now back to the football action and we are about to see the roughest of tackles anywhere this weekend. showing a good turn of pace, on a pitch in argentina, a playful dog, who was so dogged in its pursuit of the ball, he took down one of the players. in a lower league match, but the efforts were in vain as it was substituted. cani can i make myjoke again? harry kane—ine? can i make myjoke again? harry kane-ine? i am glad the player did not land on top of him. it was a lower league match, so perhaps somebody brought the dog in. maybe they were allowed. we were talking about the laws yesterday. the dog went for the laws. i think he was going for the ball, not his legs. luke! he is trying to get the ball,
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but the legs get in the way.|j luke! he is trying to get the ball, but the legs get in the way. i think he was trained to con the referee by trying to go for the ball, making it look like that, but going for the player. i just look like that, but going for the player. ijust think look like that, but going for the player. i just think he was look like that, but going for the player. ijust think he was having a lot of fun. absolutely. lots of players could learn from that example. mike, thank you. it is 7:43 a.m.. let's bring you up—to—date with the main stories this morning. millions of people will fall silent today, to remember those who lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. a british woman will appear in court in each of this morning accused of smuggling in 300 legal painkillers, a charge which could result in the lc. -- in a charge which could result in the lc. —— in egypt. as commemorating those who fell during
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the war. gillbee commemorations at the war. gillbee commemorations at the cenotaph as well. susan has the weather. quite mixed across the british isles this weekend. today, cloudy and wet in the south. elsewhere, brighter skies. tomorrow, sunshine but feeling much, much colder. here is how it is looking outside. this is the radar picture from seven a.m.. lots of cloud in the rain, pretty intense. as we look further north and east, cloud around as well. 0utbreaks and rain across mid wales in the south—east of england. that will peter out a little bit during the day. the cloud. around. we will be left with some drizzly rain. not the greatest of conditions. further north, are better looking day. a lot of
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sunshine to come to scotland and northern england. it will fill considerably colder. it doesn't look much different to now unfortunately. perhaps a little drive through the london area to the second part of the day. hopefully a bit byte of the birmingham northwards. more sunshine to company northern england and scotland. increasing amounts of sunshine to northern ireland. a few showers possible to the north of the british isles. the northern and western coasts and across the hills. a little bit wintry at times. some by a little bit wintry at times. some rugby at morayfield but in cardiff, rain. we also have the lord mayor ‘s show in london today. maybe a bit byte this afternoon that always the legacy of the cloud. thanks to this weather front lurking to the south—west. some heavier rain eastwards. gusty winds as well.
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there are prospects following on behind. 0ff there are prospects following on behind. off to the continent for remembrance sunday. straight from the arctic, cold air. a much different day to day in terms of how it will look sunny. that applies to the whole of the british isles. showers for wales in the south—west of england. further east, some showers for the coast through the morning. perhaps getting further inland. top temperatures on the face of it. not looking to chile. we had on the effect of the wind, a warm day tomorrow. we'll be back with the headlines at 8, but first it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed.
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a huge leak of financial documents dominated bbc news at the start of this week. did they deserve all that attention, or was this journalistic self—indulgence? and did the bbc unfairly suggest wrongdoing on the part of politicians, royalty and celebrities when they had broken no laws? another week, another departure from theresa may's cabinet. pressure had been building on priti patel since the emergence last friday of her undisclosed meetings while on holiday in israel. but was some of that pressure imposed in an unwarranted way by the media, particularly the bbc, which broke the story? yes, according to andy ramsbottom, who asked: and keith brown thought: the long predicted end came for priti patel after her hastily
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arranged journey home from africa, monitored at one point by 22,000 people on a flight tracking website, as shown on the bbc news channel. that prompted ian miller to tweet: while a user called kubrick's lens cap thought: when the soon—to—be ex—international development secretary reached heathrow airport, the coverage switched from flight tracker to helicopter camera, and the complaints continued. here's roy ramm: it was a huge
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information dump, the leak of over 13 million documents, worked on for a year by almost 100 different media organisations. a lot of work clearly went into the so—called paradise papers, and despite it being a busy news week as well, the bbc gave the story a lot of airtime. tonight on panorama... it started at 6pm on sunday with a panorama special, and more than half of the news at ten was dedicated to the subject, pushing a report of the texas shooting and new allegations against damian green down the running order. on monday, there was another hour—long panorama special, watched by neil spellings: immediately following panorama was the bbc news at ten o'clock.
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this dedicated the first half of the show, so 15 minutes, covering exactly the same topics that had just been shown immediately previous to the news by panorama. i thought it was a strange editorial decision to repeat so much content immediately adjacent to programmes, especially when the news were using the same clips of richard bilton doorstepping celebrities outside the studios, and with the same infographics and pretty much everything. it was like a panorama—lite for 15 minutes. the paradise papers also led bbc one bulletins for a third night on tuesday, ahead of the death of welsh politician carl sargea nt and the ongoing travails of borisjohnson and priti patel. so was the big investigation worth the prominence given to it? not according to scores of viewers, including paul titley,
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0thers targeted in the investigation, or hounded as several viewers saw it, were actors from mrs brown's boys, conservative party donor lord ashcroft, us commerce secretary wilbur ross and formula 1 driver lewis hamilton. the latter case prompted sandra lipscomb to record this video. i was really incensed the other morning, listening about lewis hamilton and his avoidance of vat. all of us, no matter who we are, it's human nature. if we can save a few pennies, we will. why aren't they going, or you going after the likes
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of these financial experts, who are being paid lots of money by celebrities to help save them money? and also, hmrc. they need some whizzkids to sort out these loopholes. with me now to explore coverage of the paradise papers story is james stephenson, news editor for bbc news. welcome to newswatch. we kept hearing the phrase "none of this is illegal", so who exactly were you targeting in this investigation? well, it's perhaps worth saying that, as you and many of your listeners will know, this was an enormous project over a long timespan and only began with the leak of the documents. after that, there was a great deal of journalistic work to sift through and identify stories that we should be doing, and notjust do stories because names were found in papers. we applied a very rigorous public
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interest test above and beyond "is it interesting?" to the stories we decided to take on. which was? it varied from case to case, and that was part of the complexity that the panorama team and the wider news operation had to work through. each case was somewhat different, but where people were simply, to use that phrase, avoiding tax, we didn't think that that was in itself a reason to include them in our coverage. if it was aggressive tax avoidance or if it was tax evasion, or if there were some other big public interest element, we felt that was the reason why we would do a story rather than leave it to one side. of course, tax evasion is illegal whereas tax avoidance, even at the blurry line, is legal. why didn't you focus just on the firms and advisers, instead of tarnishing the reputation of, say, the queen? i think we did do that. we obviously thought carefully about what was a story and how we should present the story and whether it was newsworthy.
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as you saw, we concluded that it was. the most newsworthy thing was that these tax havens around the world had had all their documents from this company, appleby, but also from the company registers in these places revealed. and we felt that that was in itself a big story worthy of reporting. we then moved on to reporting individual cases where we felt there were controversial issues to be raised or issues of public interest to be considered. one of the other issues which came up is that it has been a very busy news week. the biggest complaint we got was how much airtime this got, sometimes half of a bulletin when there were important stories such as the foreign secretary's comments about a british citizen in an iranianjail. we feel we have done justice to those other stories as well. it's part of the nature of news and part of the nature of bbc news that we often have to do several very big stories at one time. it is worth saying that
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the priti patel story was broken byjames landale, our diplomatic correspondent. so it wasn't that we focused all our energies on one story and not on others. but we did feel that this long investigation with these high—profile companies and individuals was worthy of the time we gave it. we also gave some additional airtime to two things. one was to put into broader context what tax havens are, how they have grown up over the century, so people will have seen, on sunday night, our economics editor kamal ahmed stepping through that. and we also had reaction. we had an interview with wilbur ross after the revelation. so it wasn't just the original journalism. we were also doing the context and the follow—up. we can tell that it was a huge, coordinated news operation with international partners. it even had its own hashtag, paradise papers.
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again, viewers feel that in the end, this wasn't the big scoop that you are claiming and the amount of coverage was self—indulgent. people will have to judge that for themselves. i think different viewers will have different views on that. if you take one example, apple, apple is the biggest company in the world, and we've revealed where it places its funding, effectively its wealth, offshore. where did the papers come from? we actually don't know. in one sense, we do. they came from appleby originally, which is this law firm which has offices in these various tax havens. it came into the possession of suddeutsche zeitung, a german newspaper. they then collaborated with the icij, the international consortium of investigativejournalists, and bbc panorama is one of the partners among 100
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partners in that consortium. but we don't know how the leak happened. are you comfortable with that? some viewers feel it is unethical for the bbc to publish them. we have taken the decision that there is a public interest, but it takes us back to the point i'm making, which is that we haven't simply published what is in those documents, we have gone through a lengthyjournalistic, editorial and legal process including right to reply by the people concerned, to establish that we think there is a public interest above and beyond simply the fact that people appear in these papers. is there a risk to the bbc‘s values if it partners in this way in future, do you think? i don't. we didn't subcontract our editorial judgments to the icij. they have done an outstanding job in corralling this group of investigative journalists, something that a few years ago would have seemed a very improbable thing for investigative journalism. but we have made our own editorial decisions about which stories we thought we should do, which we thought were justified. if we didn't think they met the standards of what we wanted to broadcast, we didn't put them out
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on any of our platforms. james stephenson, thank you. finally, a very unusual picture appeared on the bbc news website on monday. this anonymous caller describes what she saw and what she thought of it. hello, i've been increasingly frustrated by the dumbing down of the bbc news web pages. i finally reached the limit when i looked and saw an item which was "my dog looks like donald trump's face". i think you're just trying to appeal to masses and dumbing down. if people want to read that stuff, they can read it elsewhere. that is not what bbc news is for and i hope you get that message loud and clear from other people too. thank you for your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs within appear on the programme, you call us or e—mail us. you can find us on twitter, and do have a look at our website for previous discussions. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week.
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goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning, it's saturday the 11th of november. millions of people prepare to fall silent on armistice day. events will be held across the uk to mark the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war.
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