Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 11, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

8:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning, it's saturday the 11th of november. millions of people prepare to fall silent on armistice day. events will be held across the uk to mark the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. eight links which escaped from a zoo near aberystwyth has been killed by the authorities. they say they acted for the safety of the public. in
8:01 am
sport, and young england side hold their own against world champions germany. goalkeeperjordan bickford is outstanding on his international debut, as he keeps a clean sheet. a lucky escape at nearly 90 miles an hourfor lucky escape at nearly 90 miles an hour for the british bobsleigh lucky escape at nearly 90 miles an hourfor the british bobsleigh team as the crash out of the world cup eventin as the crash out of the world cup event in the us. and susan powell has the weather. brighter conditions spreading from the north, but each really feel. a british woman accused of drug smuggling in egypt's is due to appear in court this morning. laura plummer, who's 33 and from hull, was arrested in cairo last month with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. she says the tablets were for her egyptian boyfriend, who has a bad back, and claims she had "no idea" they are banned in the country. but local police say that ignorance of the law is no excuse, as 0rla guerin reports.
8:02 am
it looks like paradise. egypt's red sea coast is a tourist trap. now one british holiday—maker is trapped in a legal nightmare. she is accused of smuggling drugs. 33—year—old laura plummer, a shop assistant, has been coming here for years. her family say she lives for her holidays in the sun. for the past month, she has been detained at police station number one, with others accused of drug trafficking. the offence can carry the death penalty here. well, we have managed to speak to laura plummer by phone. she told us she is being held in a cell about the size of her bedroom back home, but with 25 other women, so it's hard to breathe. she said her fellow inmates are trying to look after her, but nobody speaks her language. she told us her spirits are at rock bottom. here is the drug that laura plummer was carrying, tramadol. it is legal in britain, with a prescription, but banned in egypt, where many are addicted to the opiate.
8:03 am
police said she had about 300 tablets in her case. she says a colleague gave them to her for her egyptian boyfriend, 0mar, who has a back problem. i had no idea they were illegal here, she said. i can't tell you how stupid ifeel. egyptian police say that ignorance of the law is no defence. relatives hope the judge will realise she made an innocent mistake. millions of people will fall silent today, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. it's the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. alexandra mackenzie is outside westminster abbey. alexandra, what's happening today? well, here in the shadow of
8:04 am
westminster abbey is the field of remembrance, and as you can see, already many people have been bringing small wooden crosses and poppies as a way of remembering those who fell in all conflict. and also about a quarter of a mile from here is the cenotaph, and that will bea here is the cenotaph, and that will be a centre for commemoration today and tomorrow for remembrance sunday. there will be other events and people observing the two—minute silence here and across the country. already, yesterday in northern france, people have been remembering the battle of passchendaele. yesterday marked the 100th anniversary of the end of the battle of passchendaele. guns were fired that were originally fired during world war i. and back here in westminster, we have been hearing the familiar chimes of big ben. they
8:05 am
have been silent for three months but they will be had today for armistice day and tomorrow for remembrance sunday. you can watch live coverage of the armistice day commemorations from 10.45am this morning on bbc one. the bbc understands that the labour mp kerry mccarthy is to submit letters to the party which she says demonstrate "unwa nted attention" from a fellow mp, kelvin hopkins. mr hopkins is currently suspended from the party, following accusations of inappropriate behaviour, which he denies. 0ur political correspondent emma vardy joins us from our london newsroom. ata time at a time when the spotlight is really on westminster in the uk? yes, it has been, we have seen allegation after allegation developing, and this isjust the latest add to what is now a string of investigations which are open into the conduct of certain individuals at westminster. kelvin
8:06 am
hopkins, the labour mp, was suspended ten days ago when a young women, a labour activist, spoke publicly about the inappropriate behaviour, the text messages she claims to have received from kelvin hopkins. now, kerry mccarthy has also spoken out. she said she has spoken out because she wants to support the investigation surrounding her circumstances and because she feels it is the right thing to do. kerry mccarthy is not submitting a new formal complaint, instead she is adding her testimony to the investigation already taking place into kelvin hopkins. she says that she began to receive unwanted attention from mr hopkins in that she began to receive unwanted attention from mr hopkins “119911. more attention from mr hopkins in 1994. more recently she said she received a letter from more recently she said she received a letterfrom him in which he described her as a very attractive women. she said he confided he had a dream about her. it is important to
8:07 am
say that kelvin hopkins denies the allegations regarding the young labour activist. and he has said he is disappointed kerry mccarthy did not come to him, and went to the press. thank you very much. an american women's football star has accused the former fifa president, sepp blatter, of sexual harassment. hope solo, the team's world cup winning goalkeeper, told a portuguese newspaper that the 81—year—old groped her during an awards ceremony in 2013. a spokesman for mr blatter has described the accusation as "ridiculous". one of the latest hollywood figures to be accused of sexual harassment has admitted that all the allegations against him are true. five women have made claims against the american comedian louis ck. he said he could hardly wrap his
8:08 am
head around the scope of hurt he had caused. almost 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residentialfires in england in the past year, according to new figures. the local government association is warning people to check their smoke alarms in the run—up to winter, when the number of serious fires usually goes up. dan johnson reports. the images can be hard—hitting, and the message is familiar. but it appears it's still not getting through. figures show that in house fires last year, 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms go off. —— smoke alarms did not go off. for mains—powered fire alarms, the rate was more than 20%. there is a claim that more than one in five households never test their smoke alarms. one in ten households do not even have one fitted. check your fire alarms and smoke alarms at home. check the batteries are working.
8:09 am
check they are in a suitable position where it's actually going to help you. make sure you have at least one on each floor of your house. that is the key message. we have seen too many smoke alarms and too many fire alarms which haven't done theirjob because people haven't either placed them in the correct position, or checked their batteries. with more boilers and heaters being turned on in colder weather, this is a reminder that smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are tried and tested and proven to work. britain is the most obese country in western europe. that's the claim from the organisation for economic co—operation and development. its annual report says 27% of the british population is officially obese — and that levels are rising faster than in any other developed nation. health organisations say the findings are sobering. a wild cat which escaped from a zoo near aberyswyth has been killed. the eurasian lynx,
8:10 am
escaped after jumping over an electric fence last month, prompting a huge search. the local council said that despite "exhaustive efforts" to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public, she'd become a risk to the public. the eurasian lynx... there were a number of sightings, at one point it was thought she was hiding in bushes near the zoo, but she evaded ca ptu re. near the zoo, but she evaded capture. last night the council released a statement saying it had strayed into a populated area and it had been necessary to act decisively. it added that the animal had been destroyed humanely, and the safety of the public was paramount. the zoo has been closed since the animal's escape. we will have the weather coming up later, and mike
8:11 am
will have the sport as well. the husband of a british woman jailed while visiting iran is calling on the foreign secretary to visit the country as soon as possible to help secure her release. nazanin zaghari ratcliffe could have her prison sentence doubled, after borisjohnson told a committee of mps that she'd been training journalists in the country. he later accepted he could have been clearer with his comments. in a moment we'll be speaking to nazanin‘s husband, richard, but first here's a reminder of their story. 0ne family, half british, half iranian. the case of nazanin zaghari ratcliffe is an international story that has separated women, her husband and their young daughter. she was detained in april 2016, accused of plotting to overthrow the regime. 18 months into a five—year sentence she faces the prospect of up sentence she faces the prospect of up to 16 years in an iranianjail. her case has been seemingly undermined by these remarks from the foreign secretary. when you look at what nazanin zaghari ratcliffe was
8:12 am
doing, she was simply teaching people journalism, as i doing, she was simply teaching peoplejournalism, as i understand it. her family insists that she was taking her daughter to see her grandparents, but now broadcast on state television has said that mr johnson's remark said she was acting asa johnson's remark said she was acting as a spy. the complicated make—up of as a spy. the complicated make—up of a union politics between hardliners and moderates says the future of this family torn apart is far from straightforward. nazanin‘s husband, richard ratcliffejoins us now. you must be desperately missing your wife. how was your wife and daughter? yes, missing them a lot, it has been huge turmoil, this week particularly. nazanin was very shocked at being dragged into court on tuesday, by tuesday it was a bit
8:13 am
more calm because there was all this press attention and it was a bit more easy to deal with what the foreign secretary had said. i do not know where she is now, we will speak later on her parents watched the tv programme and they were horrified at their own state tv was saying she was a spy. boris johnson, i think his phrase was he tried to clarify his phrase was he tried to clarify his comments, which initially caused some problems. do you think what he said subsequently has changed anything, or as the iranians —— as the iranian authorities said, they are taking that as a significant pa rt are taking that as a significant part of the testimony? he said in parliament that she had been training journalists, which she hadn't, and the iranian authorities seized on that. you then clarified in parliament and insisted dashingly
8:14 am
insisted it be clarified, which he did, but the iranian authorities have not acknowledge that. you cannot control how people manipulate your words, but you can make it much clearer. i think what is important 110w clearer. i think what is important now is that he tries to meet with us as soon as possible so it is clear from a political point of view that the uk government is standing alongside her. have you spoken to borisjohnson since he made those comments? his office-mate contact and there were suggesting some dates. wade so, and meeting is scheduled? it dates. wade so, and meeting is scheduled ? it is dates. wade so, and meeting is scheduled? it is not yet scheduled, i would like it next week. this is the front page of the times. it will touch many people hearts. nazanin‘s treatment injail and touch many people hearts. nazanin‘s treatment in jail and her interrogation and her mental well—being, this must be something you're very concerned about. what she has been through isjust awful,
8:15 am
and the process of cruelty and isolation and manipulation and threatening her and threatening her about her daughter. at point she was so traumatised she could not walk. the physical consequences are awful, but the psychological consequences. something she is ok on the phone, sometimes she's really don't. it is ha rd to sometimes she's really don't. it is hard to put into words because i don't really know, i do not understand, it is only when she comes out she can tell us. but one of her fellow cell—mates says it has been full. are you familiar with some of the things we were talking about, that she was hooded during some interrogations? were you aware of this? this story has been going on and there have been some very dark revelations for us, which we have shared with the foreign office, yes, it has been tough. how often do
8:16 am
you get to speak to her? you spoke to her on tuesday. she gets one hour per week. so, every to her on tuesday. she gets one hour perweek. so, every sunday to her on tuesday. she gets one hour per week. so, every sunday i get a slot with her, and sometimes another. the iranian authorities have not backed down on what they believe she has done and what she was doing. what is her realistic hope of what happens next? she doesn't do realistic at this point, shejust doesn't do realistic at this point, she just wants to be warm. and from me, she looks every reassuring is, i have said that christmas is possible and early release should happen. the past week has set us back significantly because in some ways it has brought so much more attention to her case, more focus for the foreign secretary to try to solve it, hopefully that will help.
8:17 am
i know you're very measured in the way you are reacting to what has unfolded. you were talking about borisjohnson a moment ago, and the suggestion there may be a meeting. clearly for you there is only one intention, to get your wife and daughter home. in amongst this, there was criticism that there had not been contact previously, they have still not had a face—to—face meeting. there must be part of you thinking, why has there been this delay, and why no apologies? there must be some of you that is thinking along those lines? and why has it taken this long to get to meet the foreign secretary, yes, i have complained many times before, and i think it will happen now in a way that two weeks ago i was not so sure. it is really important he gets ona sure. it is really important he gets on a plane to go and see nazanin. i would really like to go with them. after a ll would really like to go with them. after all these months of not being able to go there, at least i could see her. so what you're asking for
8:18 am
110w see her. so what you're asking for now is what from the foreign secretary? to meet with him this week and then whenever he goes to run, which is hopefully over the next few weeks, to be weapon, so i can visit nazanin with him. have you had any indication that is possible? the said it is a situation they are looking at. thank you for speaking with us. keep us up—to—date with what is happening. good luck. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. a big difference in the way britain is looking today. here is the sunrise, a beautiful day, with a lot of clear skies in the background. here is twickenham. if we pull out and takea here is twickenham. if we pull out and take a look at the way the uk
8:19 am
looks in the big picture, you will see why we have that contrast. to the south—west we have thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain. further north we have clear skies and sunshine. through the south—west and england, we will keep the rain around through this afternoon. also in south wales. cloud in the midlands hopefully breaking up this afternoon. further north, sunshine from the get go. hopefully it is going to help and improve the way that you feel when you out and about. we have a keen northerly wind, so, for their rugby at murrayfield, it will be sunny but it will be actually feel. in cardiff it will be actually feel. in cardiff it will be rain that stays with us. through the afternoon and into the evening, the clear skies are across the british isles, but not before we have seen heavy and intense rain across wales and southern england. by across wales and southern england. by the end of the night, the worst of the rain to the south, with
8:20 am
showers chasing behind. but essentially we are moving into some clearer and colder airfor remembrance sunday. it will be coming straight down from the arctic into southern britain, and sunday we will feel that. there should be some sunshine at the cenotaph, but the wind will make the 7 degrees feel particularly chilly. that is the story across the board. sunshine for wales and the south—west of england will be peppered with showers, and the second part of the day could see some showers moving in from the coast of the north sea into east anglia. top temperatures on sunday afternoon, somewhere between six and 10 celsius, but you have to factor in the wind, which makes things feel colder. to kneecap, there will be rain in the south, brighter skies elsewhere, but the sunshine will be
8:21 am
more widespread tomorrow along with the cold. thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. anand menon is director of the uk in a changing europe, which publishes independent research about britain's relationship with the eu. let us start with the times. we were just hearing from nazanin‘s husband who is on the front page of the times today. her husband has been speaking to us, richard, this is nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, who has been jailed nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, who has beenjailed in nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, who has been jailed in iran nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, who has beenjailed in iran for allegedly plotting to topple the iranian regime. we have also heard boris johnson in previous days making comments about watching was there to do. richard says he is trying to
8:22 am
push the foreign office to make a visit to iran, to help secure her release. the front page of the telegraph, the main story looks at charities circumventing their band on sending begging letters. we're 110w on sending begging letters. we're now and on most, to the homeowner. boris johnson's now and on most, to the homeowner. borisjohnson‘s bid now and on most, to the homeowner. boris johnson's bid to now and on most, to the homeowner. borisjohnson‘s bid to boost relations, which faltered when he defended pulsating. the daily mail says the christmas sales are on already. we shall we start, brexit? it is an unusual day because the brexit is not on the first —— front pages. the financial times says that discussions have stalled. britain is desperate to get a agreement in
8:23 am
principle. yesterday we had two sides responding in a press conference, and both were saying that there are deadlines set. the eu has set a two—week deadline, and some people say it is positive, which means they will force the issue and have to come up with something. there has been a lot of general at its in the debate. —— general at its in the debate. —— general comments. the eu has to decide how much money we're going to pay them, which a sticking point. things have floated around about northern ireland, where the commission has suggested northern ireland could have a different status to the rest of the united kingdom to overcome the border question. we're following donald trump, his asian tour, 1011 days, he is in vietnam the moment. we focus a
8:24 am
lot on this, it seemed friendly and china, but now this language seems to be, the generosity of language seems to be abating. this is a big asian conference, and his language was very forceful, different to the language used in china. in china he saidi language used in china. in china he said i do not blame the chinese for what they are doing economically. here, he was saying people in asia are putting us —— ripping us off and we're not going to put up with it any more. it also left space for the president to sound conciliatory, so his rhetoric opened... a lot of people discussing the issue of town and see that real politics is kicking and internationally, where you have to say certain things in
8:25 am
certain places, that is the truth, and he is no different from any presidents before him. but he was different because of the town he used in vietnam. in china he roared back deliberately on what he was saying, but a couple of days later he goes to vietnam and his tone was acerbic, picked someone heckling him in the cloud, and was very donald trump. we're in for a few rainy days. yes, a school in ipswich brought in a new policy where the kids have to stay outside even if it is raining —— play outside even if it was raining, and their kids have been coming home soaked.“ it was raining, and their kids have been coming home soaked. if they are playing at lunchtime, they do not dry up in the afternoon? this day was so bad apparently parents had to put their shoes and radiators. was so bad apparently parents had to
8:26 am
put their shoes and radiatorsm was so bad apparently parents had to put their shoes and radiators. it is one of those stories will inevitably you start saying, back in my day... i was about to say that. i remember getting soaked at school, they forced us to go outside. if you think sensibly, you do not want wet children in the classroom. equally, if it is a bit of drizzle... i always thought wet play was the best, there are puddles and chaos. but not if you have to go back into the classroom. cold and wet clothes. that is common sense has to play into this. is there a link between the stories, there probably is, about obesity. we are declared as the most obese nation in any developing country. yes, the oecd study. slightly below—average when it comes to children, but with adult 63% of british adults are overweight. why are we the fat man
8:27 am
of europe? one of the things they spoke about was the high levels of adolescent drinking in this country compared to others. i would say the link being that if you get kids out in the playground and wet weather but they won't be drinking! the other thing is about politics, or schools with no playing fields, not enough space to indulge in physical activity. absolutely. it brings together so many different stories about public health, education policy, whether the government should interfere with what people do in their lives and what people do in their lives and what they eat. are you nervous flyer? you might be after reading this. i'm not particularly, but it is an amazing photo. this is a flight is an amazing photo. this is a flight where the front wheel did not come then. they took off from belfast, had to circle around the airport for a couple of hours to expend a fuel, before landing on its
8:28 am
nose. but apparently only one passenger was hacked. probably one of these stories weave it is not fun to be on board, but everyone was ok, so it is ok. 0nly so it is ok. only a so it is ok. 0nlya minor so it is ok. only a minor hand injury. fabulous. thank you. coming up in the next half hour, we have two blue peter presenters on the sofa. as radzi prepares to freefall with the raf falcons — we'll unite him with janet ellis — who famously jumped hello, this is breakfast with
8:29 am
charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before 9, we'll have your full weekend weather forecast. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. a british woman is due in court in egypt this morning, accused of drug smuggling after being caught with with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. laura plummer, who's 33 and from hull, says she didn't know the painkiller was banned in the country, where many people are addicted to the opiate. she says the tablets were for her egyptian boyfriend, who has a bad back. local police say that ignorance of the law is no excuse. millions of people will fall silent this morning, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. events to mark the end of the first world war exactly 99 years ago will take place across the country, including the cenotaph in london and the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. this evening the queen will attend a festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall. the bbc understands that the labour mp kerry mccarthy is to submit
8:30 am
letters to the party which she claims show "unwanted attention" from a fellow mp. the mp for bristol east claims she was sent "upsetting" correspondence by kelvin hopkins over the last 20 years. mr hopkins is currently suspended from the party, following accusations of inappropriate behaviour, which he denies. he says the complaint has caused him "unbearable" stress. an american women's football star has accused the former fifa president, sepp blatter, of sexual harassment. hope solo, the team's world cup winning goalkeeper, told a portugese newspaper that the 81—year—old groped her during an awards ceremony in 2013. a spokesman for mr blatter has described the accusation as "ridiculous". the american comedia louis ck has admitted that sexual misconduct allegations made against him by five women are true. the emmy award—winning star said he had "wielded power irresponsibly" and could hardly wrap his head around the "scope of hurt" he had caused.
8:31 am
his upcoming film — in which he starred withjohn malkovich — will no longer be released in cinemas. almost 40 per cent of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residential fires in england in the past year, according to new figures. the local government association also found that 21 percent of mains—powered alarms didn't work properly. it's warning people to check their smoke alarms in the run—up to winter, when the number of serious fires usually goes up. a wild cat which escaped from a zoo near aberyswyth has been killed. lilleth, the eurasian lynx, escaped after jumping over an electric fence last month, prompting a huge search. the local council said that despite "exhaustive efforts" to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public, and had to be "humanely destroyed". the latest type of milk to try is
8:32 am
camel ‘s milk. we've tasted it, it's certainly different to cows milk and we got some of you to try it, here is your reactions. why are you milking camels? yes, very rich. we've got some camel ‘s milk year, which we've tried. just try it, mike. it's not bad. take a big goal. actually, is better than goats milk, no offence to goats, but i've got a thing about goats cheese.
8:33 am
any goats that are watching, we don't want to offend you. yes, it's mild, it's inoffensive. it's fine. we did try earlier on and matt from saturday kitchen, matt, can you see? have you tried it? it has a curious aftertaste. have you ever tried it? yes, i have. use a distinctive, i couldn't bear it. i thought it was horrible start. that is a bit harsh. maybe, but it's the truth. i couldn't get on with it. it's really expensive as well. have you ever had camel ‘s meat? no, i haven't. have you? no. i'm not sure why you would want to milk the camel. for fun! those things are dangerous, right? assuming there is
8:34 am
no camel presents on your programme today. ok, are special guest today is rochelle humes. you are here to talk about children in need. you are co—presenting. yes, me and my husband are hosting together.m co—presenting. yes, me and my husband are hosting together. it is a big nights next friday. yes, it's a big nights next friday. yes, it's a great watch. also your food, a big nights next friday. yes, it's a great watch. also yourfood, have an hotel. what's your idea of food heaven? i'm a fan of this, so sea bassis heaven? i'm a fan of this, so sea bass is my favourite. and another unusual one. cockles. you don't strike me as a clock call eater. i'm from essex, so my family loves cockles. it reminds me of the seaside, being a kid. and what about hell? anchovies. reminds you of the seaside? just reminds me of hell. why do people stick them into salad
8:35 am
dressings and salads and pizzas. we also have two great chefs. what's on the menu? i'll be making chinese pot sticker dumplings, some chilli oil. you guys at home are in charge of what rochelle eats at the end of the show. go to the website for details. see you at 9.15, nice and early today. mike, have you recovered? the aftertaste, there's definitely an aftertaste. no offence to camels. every time you mention an animal, you don't need to apologise. i'm sensitive their feelings. their
8:36 am
rubbish polo players. you really offended the camel population now. now the football. england manager gareth southgate described the performance of his young side as "really encouraging" after they drew 0—0 in their friendly against world champions germany at wembley. disappointment though for the welsh in paris, they lost 2—0 to france. nick parrott rounds up the action, starting at wembley. last post plays. united in tribute to the fallen, both sides wearing poppies, germany for the first time in their history after fifa relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. hampered by injuries, england fielded their most inexperienced side since 1980. jordan pickford was one of three debutantes to begin, with another two coming on as substitute. he kept england in contention,
8:37 am
saving them twice in the first half. another new boy, ruben loftus—cheek, was man of the match. the 21—year—old, who plays for crystal palace, shone in midfield, staking a claim for next summer's world cup squad. a very exciting player, we have known that a long time. we've been waiting for a night like tonight, i guess. but we felt it was important to give him that opportunity. i wanted to do it last month. he had an injury. so i think he's one the public may not have been aware, but i think they will be after tonight. wales started with an experienced side in paris but there was no stopping the attacking force that france opened with. antoine griezmann and arsenal striker 0livier giroud struck in either half for a comfortable 2—0 win. it doesn't matter who they play against, they score lots of goals and have lots of possession.
8:38 am
but it was good for us to experience that, great for our young players. probably the best team we have played against. we are trying to gather ourselves. it will be a difficult period. with the talents of david brooks, making his debut, and teenage striker ben woodburn, combining well, it could also be an exciting period to come. wales of course won't feature at next year's world cup, they missed out on a place in the qualifying play offs, when they were beaten by the republic of ireland. the first leg, of their qualifying play—off against denmark is tonight in copenhagen. meanwhile, sweden beat italy 1—nil in the first match of their play—off in stockholm. substitute jacob joha nsson scored just after the hour mark from a long deflected drive. italy will need a great performance in the return leg in milan on monday, if they're to avoid missing out on their first world cup since 1958. there's a swedish link
8:39 am
to football focus today, so god morgan to dan walker.. so god morgan to dan walker. it's one of those heart—warming stories. there's a guy called graham potter, who always had ambitions to bea potter, who always had ambitions to be a manager. he ended up taking a job at a fourth division team in northern sweden, very cold part of the country, 350 miles north of the capital. he taken to great things. i've explain where he took them in a moment. i did this traditional coaching, didn't feel it was the right way for me to go. ended up
8:40 am
with a job at the university, after that point, i thought, with a job at the university, after that point, ithought, i need with a job at the university, after that point, i thought, i need to test myself in the real world, and the opportunities in england, ijust couldn't get anything, really. his coaching football team at hull university. it is an incredibly successful england manager in a different country, who doesn't get a chance to be a manager here. did you asking what the swedish for put the ball on the back of the net was? that's what i want to know. i think there's a website where you can your swedish name. shall i tell you what else is on the programme? we'll also be looking into what happened at west ham. the west ham
8:41 am
manager has been replaced by david moyes. trevor sinclair was also on the programme, you mention the republic, hopefully there will be speaking to some of matt scotland will also looking back at northern ireland. also back in today, it's not power hour. but have you got camels now? is this the offending article here? it's not offending. dan, you drink milk alternatives, like me. it's not offending. dan, you drink milk alternatives, like melj it's not offending. dan, you drink milk alternatives, like me. i like a bit of almond milk. what's the benefit of this? it's lowering cholesterol. the main thing is we get to look at feeds are drinking it. it has five times more vitamins c
8:42 am
and ten times more iron than cows milk and fewer allergens. his nose is twitching. it tastes a bit hairy. do you know what i mean? the good news is, it takes about an hour and the good news is, it takes about an hourand a the good news is, it takes about an hour and a half further flavour to go. it's ok. you can take it with you to the football focus studio. the guest is in retreat. while darren gets over that, but stop cricket. it's advantage australia, on day 3 of the women's four day test against england in sydney. the hosts resumed on 177 for 5 but quickly added to their total with ellyse perry hitting herfirst test century. in fact she's gone past 150 as well and is at the crease on 155. england have taken just one wicket so far, laura marsh the bowler and anya shrubsole with the catch. australia are 358 for 6, that's a lead of 78 runs. and england's men have won their latest ashes warm up match, against a cricket australia eleven,
8:43 am
by 192 runs. the autumn international rugby season, gets underway today with the home nations, facing the best of the southern hemsiphere, over the next month. first up — it's scotland against samoa. it'll be the first murrayfield test for scotland coach gregor townsend. we will have to be very good defensively, but also very good on attack, so if we give a team like sam alla attack, so if we give a team like sam all a turnover ball we kicked too early to them, they will be very dangerous against unstructured defences. a quick look at the day's other games involving the home nations — the pick of which sees wales host australia at 5.15. england take on argentina at twickenham. ireland host south africa. at the rugby league world cup this morning, tonga pulled off a shock win over new zealand beating them by 28 points to 22.
8:44 am
the pacific islanders came from behind to pull off an incredible victory, winger david, fu—sit—ua, scoring a hat trick of tries. they'll now face lebanon in the quarterfinals. meanwhile scotland are out. . .their sorry tournament was almost retrieved in their match against samoa. they were leading 14 points to 10 but samoa scored a try with 15 minutes left, it finished 14 points all. scotland out on points difference. there was a dramatic start to the season, for britain's two man bobsleigh team. talk about lucky escapes...going at nearly 90 miles an hour, on concrete like ice...brake man toby 0lubi, came out of their sled, as it flipped...amazingly brad paul is still in there....inside the sled...tucked himself right in to protect himselff... had been 15th after the first run but crashed early in their second, world cup event in lake placid.. thankfully though both athletes walked away from the accident. is it any safety mechanism to stop
8:45 am
them once they're going? no, it's gravity and eyes. there are no barriers? no, the only thing he could do was talk himself inside. next to a sport not quite as dangerous. next to a sport, not quite as dangerous but still requiring a high level of skill — tumbling. the british women's quartet of lucie colebeck, rachel davies, yasmin taite, and ashleigh long won silver at the world championships in sofia. that result matches, their achievement in 2015. britain's women also took bronze in the team final at the world trampoline championships. if you've ever received a parking ticket from a private company, you may well have paid it, even though you planned to appeal. that's because many operators offer a discount for prompt payment. but paul lewis, from radio 4's money box programme, says that's a mistake. he's in our london studio. explain this one for us, because on
8:46 am
the face of it, if you won your appeal, surely they don't get to keep the money? i'm afraid they do. it's really odd, because what they do is they offer you a discount if you do is they offer you a discount if y°u pay do is they offer you a discount if you pay early, so the fine might be £100 if you have overstayed, technically, it's not a fine, is a charge. if you paid within 1421 charge. if you paid within1421 days, it will only be £60. if you appeal, that will take you longer than the 21 day period, so if you appeal, you are bound to pay the higher amount if you lose. so what happens is, you pay the lower amount, you win the appeal and you don't get your money back. but that's ridiculous. it's how the rules are. and although the private parking companies have a code of practice, which they have to follow, this is not included in it. this kuchar attention through a listener who had gone exactly through this.
8:47 am
he didn't overstay and he paid the lower amount, he appealed, he didn't overstay and he paid the loweramount, he appealed, he he didn't overstay and he paid the lower amount, he appealed, he won his appeal and didn't get his money. they said he paid, so that's an admission of guilt. this is a fairly common view among the private parking companies and even some of the public ones, so the rule is, don't pay. the difference is that public parking provisions, if you runa public parking provisions, if you run a road and that is a council or the police in scotland but i knew, then they will stop the clock. so you stop the clock, so you don't get that extra penalty charge for the delay. so that it is, don't pay back more charge, take the risk of paying a higher amount. then if your appeal works, you're not out of pocket. that's absolutely right, but about half of appeals on private land to succeed. you get away with it, if
8:48 am
you like, you don't have to pay the money, so about half succeed. very few people likely to appeal. but if the machine didn't work, if your car broke down, if the signs were clear, because the signage has to be really clear, all those are good grounds for appeal. it is fascinating. thank you very much. money box is on bbc radio 4 at midday. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. it's not looking too pretty, quite a lot of cloud and intense rain across the southern parts of the united kingdom. it is clearer and brighter further to the north and west, but it's also considerably colder. we do also have been further north across wales, through the midlands and south—eastern england at the moment.
8:49 am
quite hopeful but but but tend to ease, though the cloud will linger. much brighter, as promised, further north, but definitely with the chilly fields. he was the south west this afternoon, not much change. the rain really setting in. the southeast dreier, but not much brighter. east anglia and the midlands hopefully seeing some sunshine before the jays through. northern england and scotland are staying in sunshine but feeling chilly. northern ireland, similar temperatures and brighter skies this afternoon. rugby at murrayfield, hopefully there will be pleasant sunshine there. much greyer prospects further south at twickenham and cardiff. hopefully, a drier story through this afternoon. the rain will return to the
8:50 am
southeast and england, still raining into tonight. windy as well, but eventually common cereal grain. to clear the southeast to make way for some clearer and colder air. those isobars lining up. it will be cold story for those attending remembrance day ceremonies. it will feel chilly, thanks to the northerly wind. lots of sunshine tomorrow, but that northerly wind pretty penetrating. showers towards the west in the morning, clearing in the afternoon. showers further east. temperatures down on today, our ice of six or seven, eight or nine, but
8:51 am
chilly enough for if you wintry showers across the north of scotland. sunshine more widespread for tomorrow. in 19 northerly wind and the theme this weekend chilly. thanks very much, will see later. it's one of the most famous blue peter challenges ever set — a free—fall sky—dive with the raf falcons. the stunt has been completed by five generations of presenters since 1973, whenjohn noakes first took the plunge. now it's the turn of the new guard, and presenter radzi has some big shoes to fill. he was just a baby whenjanet ellis set a european record for her efforts. we'll chat to them both in a moment, but first, let's see a little of radzi preparing himself for the big jump. of all the incredible challenges blue peter has ever taken on, there is one i have
8:52 am
always dreamt of. wow! a challenge that was first attempted more than 50 years ago. this is john noakes, the first blue peter presenter to ever do it. green forgo! suddenly, all my training made sense. i found i was enjoying flashing through the air at 120 mph. i'm sure janet broke her pelvis when she was training. i'd become the first woman in britain to freefall from over 16,000 feet. for this year's children in need, i'm taking on skydiving. radzi and janet ellis join us now. janet, you were looking back atjohn noa kes janet, you were looking back atjohn noakes and janet, you were looking back atjohn noa kes and you janet, you were looking back atjohn noakes and you were saying you did all those challenges. radzi, you
8:53 am
we re all those challenges. radzi, you were a baby when she was doing that. this must be a dream come true. yes, people stop me in the street and they say i remember whenjohn did that and went janet they say i remember whenjohn did that and wentjanet did it and broken pelvis. so getting to do it with the balkans is just a privilege. janet, how did you break your pelvis? that was on jump 23, so i'd already done quite a lot of stuff. we were training for a display and i wasn't being filmed. i think biddy baxter was disappointed i wasn't being filmed. they found there was probably a rock under the ground and it was probably a stress and back. iwas ground and it was probably a stress and back. i was out of action for a while, but then biddy baxter said to me, if you've got any more courage in the bottle, tippett upside down and give it a bash. the lastjump i did was 35 or something like that, so did was 35 or something like that, soi did was 35 or something like that, so i did did was 35 or something like that, soldida did was 35 or something like that,
8:54 am
so i did a few more up after that. when you would auditioning for blue peter, this was on your wish list of things to do. it was in my all-time top ten. i had seen simon do it and i thought, i want to do exactly what he did and i wanted to feel that sense of being present in the moment and would i have the courage to jump out of a plane. that there is just me with my coach tony, and we had so many issues, because there wasn't much time on the weather was against us, and we finally got to do it and i finally us, and we finally got to do it and ifinally got to us, and we finally got to do it and i finally got to jump out of the plane. all i will say is, if you saw all skydive, it is the single most overwhelming experience i have ever had. it lives with me. virtually every d rea m had. it lives with me. virtually every dream i have. i will never forget it. when you leave the plane, 28 years of my existence has said, do notjump 28 years of my existence has said, do not jump out 28 years of my existence has said, do notjump out of a plane, and 28 years of my existence has said, do notjump out ofa plane, and i 28 years of my existence has said, do notjump out of a plane, and i do it there, right there. what is
8:55 am
happening, is it so low? because you with someone as you leave the plane. absolutely, i'm not attached to anyone. that was my third jump, and they let go. this is the very first jump, so they hold on to make sure go jump, so they hold on to make sure 9° my jump, so they hold on to make sure go my procedures and then successfully, i pull the toggle myself. then i jump successfully, i pull the toggle myself. then ijump out of my own, they're not holding onto me and i completed. then we have a look at janet now? yes, because it has to be said, i never wanted janet now? yes, because it has to be said, i neverwanted to janet now? yes, because it has to be said, i never wanted to do it. when i was asked to do it, i thought i had never done anything like that before. i was always the one with an excuse to get off games, i'd describe myself as brave, i don't like heights very much, so i was kind of doing it by that person, for those people like me. i didn't want
8:56 am
to do it and yet i did, so i'm really pleased it happen for me, despite the fact that i was injured along the way. i can't take that away from me. it was extraordinary. i love the fact that it's been recreated now. i grew up watching john noakes. i grew up at a time when health and safety had no bearing, you just did anything. something tells me that there must bea something tells me that there must be a lot of form filling in your work now, but alicia doing it anyway. it probably has changed since your time. it probably has. when i was training with the balkans, the jumps were over three years. it was spread out because i was doing other stuff, but one of them said to me, we really hope nothing happens to you. it was so sweet. he said, because the forms would be unbelievable. i'm sure there was something going on behind—the—scenes, but i think there's an element of, you have to
8:57 am
do those things that you have to be given the freedom to do them, because if you restrict too much, he stop people doing it. one of the great things about blue peter is it's showing people things that they think they wouldn't be able to do. your reward people for their achievements and people who go that bit further and challenge themselves. it's also about learning something because i fully admit, i wouldn't be able to do something straightaway. the learning process is hard. like something with pa rachuting, is hard. like something with parachuting, you have to concentrate on the experts, you have to listen ha rd on the experts, you have to listen hard and accept you don't know stuff and they do. radzi has a little surprise for you this morning. absolutely, janet, because i speak on behalf of generations of presenters, seeing you overcoming your nerves and despite your injury,
8:58 am
your nerves and despite your injury, you left a legacy for blue peter. as you're aware, there is one badge thatis you're aware, there is one badge that is the highest accolade we give to anyone we think is very special, who has inspired people, the gold badge. with the footage we saw there and visio for years on blue peter, we think you are only two deserving. 0n we think you are only two deserving. on behalf of myself, blue peter many, on behalf of myself, blue peter any on behalf of myself, blue peter many, many viewers. oh, my goodness! that's unbelievable. what does it mean to you? apart from anything else, my instructor nigel injured himself about 70 years ago. he was parachuting into a football stadium and it went badly wrong. he said it was a bad day in the office. he is now an amputee and last year, he roared the atlantic with other amputees. his attitude always was,
8:59 am
go for it. he and the other falklands got me through, because i wasn't brave. it wasn't my natural thing and! wasn't brave. it wasn't my natural thing and i never got to the stage of getting to jump thing and i never got to the stage of getting tojump on thing and i never got to the stage of getting to jump on thinking, thing and i never got to the stage of getting tojump on thinking, this is all i ever wanted to do. but there was something so exhilarating about it, because they gave me was and used as a expertise. you now have that barrage. we will always give you a bbc breakfast tissue. thank you both so much for coming on. of course, radzi, we can see the third... the fourth bird children in need specials at half past five. congratulations, janet. what a lovely moment. we will be back with the headlines.
9:00 am

9 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on