Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2017 10:00am-10:30am GMT

10:00 am
this is bbc news. the headlines at 103m. millions of people will fall silent today, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. big ben will chime at 11 o'clock. a british woman is due to appear in court tomorrow in egypt — charged with drug smuggling. she's accused of entering the country with 300 painkillers. a lynx which escaped from a small zoo near aberystwyth last month, has been caught and destroyed. new figures reveal nearly 40% of battery powered smoke alarms failed to activate in residential fires in the past year. and in half an hour here on bbc news — the travel show goes to china to meet the daredevil spider men and women of gway—joe. good morning and
10:01 am
welcome to bbc news. millions of people will fall silent this morning, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. events will take place across the country, including the cenotaph in london and the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. today is the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. we can now speak to our correspondent adina campbell — who's at the cenotaph. good morning to you. good morning. just under one hour to go until the two—minute silence was observed here in whitehall and in many parts of the country. hundreds of people are starting to arrive in central london to mark the location. you will be
10:02 am
able to see the cenotaph war memorial. a stark reminder of those who lost their lives in past conflict over the last 100 years or so. conflict over the last 100 years or so. today's events have been organised by the western front association,. britain and its empire lost nearly 1 million association,. britain and its empire lost nearly1 million men during the first world war on the western front, and i am pleased to say we're joined by colin mike staff, who is the chairman of the association. thank you forjoining us. a poignant and moving day for many people. absolutely. we commemorate all those who died in the great war, but although —— also those involved them ina combat although —— also those involved them in a combat since in the war and the home front. why have you decided to come here today on armistice day, rather than remembrance day?m 1995, we started the original
10:03 am
tradition again, which is to commemorate on the 11th hour of the 11th day. it died out after the war when it became remembrance sunday, but we revive the original tradition. our focus is on the great war. this is a huge event. how long does it take to organise an event of this scale? we are already beginning to organise the future event, so it is one year of planning. then six months before, there are more —— there is more detail, and three months before is pretty manic. your job is to educate particularly the younger generations about what has gone on in the past. absolutely. education is one of the main purposes, for young people particularly. the evidences they all have some connection to the family or community with the great war, and they carry on that legacy. and you very much forjoining us, colin wagstaff. the queen will lead the
10:04 am
commemorations tomorrow, but today the focus is on armistice day. in less tha n the focus is on armistice day. in less than one hour, we will be observing the two—minute silence. in the next hour, schoolchildren, cadets, veterans, they will all be expected to arrive to take part in the parade. there will be poms and careers, and people will lay flowers. —— there will be poems. there are many other events going on in other parts of the country, in glasgow, staffordshire and brighton, and the queen will later be taking pa rt and the queen will later be taking part in the annual festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall later. today, very much many people to remember those who died, those who fought, and what they fought for. thank you very much. we will speak to your little later in the morning. if you are unable to attend
10:05 am
an armistice event, stay with us, because we will be marking the silence that just because we will be marking the silence thatjust before 11am. a custody hearing for a british woman detained in egypt on drugs charges has now been postponed until tomorrow. laura plummer, who's 33 and from hull, was arrested in cairo last month with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. she says the tablets were for her egyptian boyfriend, who has a bad back. her lawyer has told the bbc that he's come forward with documents which should help her case. these include medical records. 0rla guerin reports. it looks like paradise. egypt's red sea coast is a tourist trap. now one british holiday—maker is trapped in a legal nightmare. she is accused of smuggling drugs to the resort of hurghada. 33—year—old laura plummer, a shop assistant, has been coming here for years. her family say she lives
10:06 am
for her holidays in the sun. for the past month, she has been detained at police station number one, with others accused of drug trafficking. the offence can carry the death penalty here. well, we have managed to speak to laura plummer by phone. she told us she is being held in a cell about the size of her bedroom back home, but with 25 other women, so it's hard to breathe. she said her fellow inmates are trying to look after her, but nobody speaks her language. she told us her spirits are at rock bottom. here is the drug that laura plummer was carrying, tramadol. it is legal in britain, with a prescription, but banned in egypt, where many are addicted to the opiate. police said she had about 300 tablets in her case. she says a colleague gave them to her for her egyptian boyfriend, 0mar, who has a back problem.
10:07 am
i have no idea they were illegal here, she said. i can't tell you how stupid that i feel. egyptian police say that ignorance of the law is no defence. relatives hope the judge will realise she made an innocent mistake. we can now speak to her mp. how confident are optimistic at the family in the conversations you have had with them that these new records, this new evidence could help her case? the family are anxious as laura is clearly worried about what is happening to her. she's a woman with no previous convictions, and clearly would be very shocked to find herself incarcerated in an egyptian prison, but this is really welcome news. she has always maintained her innocence
10:08 am
and that she did not know the drugs we re and that she did not know the drugs were legal. her father says she would not know tramadol from panadol, she was simply taking painkillers over to help her partner who suffers with severe back pain. he has now come forward to confirm thatis he has now come forward to confirm that is correct, with medical evidence, so we are very optimistic that this will go somewhere to persuade the egyptian judiciary of her innocence. do you think it was realised quickly that this was a genuine case because a lot of these cases, involving tourists, and they do not always have an innocent explanation? i'm quite sure the foreign office are aware of the situation with her, and believe her story. they have been working very hard, along with the british embassy, to ensure her welfare in
10:09 am
this egyptian prison. what about the general situation in terms of people travelling, because i suppose it is a salutary reminderfor travelling, because i suppose it is a salutary reminder for most of us not to make assumptions about the things we might regard as routine medicines over here, there are lots of medicines you can buy in countries like the united states that are not available here except on prescription. and the egyptian authorities have... she was taking other things, perfume, deodorant, things that are difficult to obtain in egypt, and along with it painkillers to treat a partner's bad back. but i think it is a very valid point. i did not know a lot about tramadol in egypt, until this, and i have researched it, and it is clearly banned in egypt, and it is
10:10 am
used recreationally and is banned, but laura would not have know any of that, and neither would i. are you optimistic that tomorrow's custody hearing could see her get bail? that is one of the options her lawyer is considering. we would be very hopeful that she was bailed at the very least, but the family are desperate to have the daughter back and that is what we're working towards. but must respect and appreciate the customs and laws of egypt. we cannot be critical, they are doing what you would expect them to do. karl turner, labour mp, thank you for being with us. we're hearing from jonathan head who
10:11 am
is at the summit little later. let us is at the summit little later. let us look at another case in iran, involving a british citizen being held on criminal charges. state media says recent comments by the foreign secretary borisjohnson has confirmed the british iranian women jailed in teheran was spying for the uk at the time of her arrest. —— tehran. last week mrjohnson suggested that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists when she was detained last year , before correcting himself. her family have insisted she was merely on holiday. ms nazanin's husband, richard ratcliffe, has told the bbc
10:12 am
he wants to meet with the foreign secretary this week and accompany the foreign secretary to iran to see his wife. speaking on bbc breakfast, mr ratcliffe said he has been told by a minister that the government is seriously considering this. it's important he gets on a plane to go and see doesn't mean. that is the request i have put to the foreign 0ffice, request i have put to the foreign office, and at least i could get to see her. so what are you requesting from the foreign secretary? to meet with him this week, and to be on the plane with so i can go and see nazanin. have you had any information that this possible? minister said yesterday this is a serious possibility. —— minister burt. it is a busy day at the summit. is this a rebuke to president trump, do not talk about america first, we are thinking of the world? you could look at it that
10:13 am
way. we have two completely diverging views of what it is worth doing in the region. remember the free trade forum was championed and driven by american presidents back to the 1980s, how they spread the message of free trade in the region. it is how it has thrived so much. president trump has turned it on its head, saying that we did not get a good deal with this. he has said we're not taking it any more, and the countries here as saying they are going to go ahead with davies deals, they are difficult and complex, these are difficult and complex, these are difficult and complex, these are difficult and complex, these abercorn —— there are going to go ahead with these deals. their difficult than pong —— complex. we have seen american leadership in the asia—pacific region since the second world war, it has guaranteed the security of japan and been the economic philosophy here. president trump has
10:14 am
more 01’ philosophy here. president trump has more or less said he is pulling out, and people have decided that without the americans we have to try to make it work anyway. so you could look at it work anyway. so you could look at it very much as a rebuke, people saying that the americans have the biggest economy, that we do better with them inside, but if they do not wa nt to with them inside, but if they do not want to be part of all the deals they do here, they can go on their own. we are seeing one deal, the transpacific partnership with president trump pulled out of after he came out of office. 11 remaining countries are saying it will go ahead. does it have potential impact on the other things that president trump is trying to do? prudently he needs the goodwill of countries like china andjapan needs the goodwill of countries like china and japan and others, in order to have the leverage if he wants a united front against north korea, for example. this is complicated, president trump wants what he describes transactional deals, you give me something, i give you something. and i think they get back. on issues like north korea, i
10:15 am
think they can deal with. his predecessor, president 0bama, understood that inevitably american influences declining relative to china, and he hoped the deal could help with the non—chinese members of the region and perform a powerful trade —based alliance, but that has been torn up. you can tell that the chinese leader, president xi, got a standing ovation, treated like royalty, and president trump was treated as a second—rate compared to him. one of the opportunities in these events is one—on—one meetings in the margins —— margins. we hear that president trump met vladimir putin to talk about syria. yes, this was much anticipated. it was a difficult meeting. we have been talking about it for days, nothing
10:16 am
was finalised in terms of a formal meeting. the leaders all get together, they have a dinner where they 0ld we're funny shirts, this sort of uniform, they have met for a gi’oup sort of uniform, they have met for a group photograph and they have had a meeting. it does not tell as anything new, and we have not had a statement from the american —— the american side yet. thank you very much for being with us. we're going to cross to paris, we're president macron is observing the commemorations for the armistice at the tomb of the unknown soldier. president macron france marking armistice day in paris at the tomb of the unknown soldier, observing the tributes to the fallen the great
10:17 am
war. of course it was france and belgium in particular who suffered so belgium in particular who suffered so much on their territory in the war, with many casualties, among the millions of people who died. we will be observing the two—minute silence here atam. be observing the two—minute silence here at am. the other main stories today. millions of people will fall silent today, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. a british woman is due to appear in court in egypt tomorrow — charged with drug smuggling. she's accused of entering the country with 300 painkillers. almost a0 % of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residentialfires in england in the past year, according to new figures. it is saturday, it is 10:25am, and
10:18 am
mickey bushell has the sport. i love your build—up, it is appreciated. i can offer you football and cricket first. it has been a struggle for england's women on day three of the four—day ashes test in sydney. are still your resumed on 177—5 but quickly added to the total with ellyse perry hitting her first century. to the total with ellyse perry hitting herfirst century. it to the total with ellyse perry hitting her first century. it has been a dominant performance from her, she went on to make a double century and ended the day on 230 not out. england struggle to wrap up the australian innings. chile declared on 448—9, a lead of 168 runs. england are 32 without loss. england's youngest football team for 37 years much the world champions
10:19 am
germany at wembley last night, and will be full of confidence to face brazil on tuesday. everton'sjordan pickford made his debut in goal, and kept a clean sheet. at the other end, tammy abraham started up front, he came close, like germany, but england didn't make a breakthrough in the game finished 0—0. england didn't make a breakthrough in the game finished 0-0. really encouraging performance, really encouraging performance, really encouraging individual performances. we played a top team, had a few problems early in the game, but managed, jordan made some super saves, but then we showed good composure with the ball. system cost them a few problems, and the system caused us a few problems. wales were well beaten by impressive france in a friendly in paris...
10:20 am
antoine griezmann's neat volley gave the dominant hosts the lead. although the match offered wales hope, with the emergence of a new generation of young players, arsenal's 0livier giroud, made it 2—0 with his deflected effort. wales of course won't feature at next year's world cup, they missed out on a place in the qualifying play offs, when they were beaten by the republic of ireland. the first leg of their qualifying play—off against denmark is tonight in copenhagen. meanwhile sweden beat italy 1—0 in the first match of their play—off in stockholm. substitute jacob johansson scored just after the 30 minute mark. italy will need a great performance in the return leg in milan on monday if they are to avoid missing out on their first world cup since 1958. the autumn international by since 1958. the autumn international rugby season gets underway today with the home nations. first up,
10:21 am
scotla nd with the home nations. first up, scotland against samoa. we have to be good an attack, if we kick purely to them we will be —— they will be very dangerous against unstructured defences. a quick look at the day's other games. wales hostessjulia at 5:15pm. england take on argentina at twickenham. at the rugby league world cup this morning, tonga pulled offa world cup this morning, tonga pulled off a shock win over new zealand beating them 28—22. the pacific islanders came from behind to pull off this incredible victory. the winger scored a hat—trick of tries. they will face lebanon in the quarterfinals. scotland have drawn level against samoa, 14—14. that means scotland cannot qualify for the quarterfinals. this is what happened earlier. they almost save their tournament, they were leading 14-10, their tournament, they were leading 14—10, which would have been enough to ta ke 14—10, which would have been enough
10:22 am
to take them through, but in the end samoa scored a try with 15 minutes left. scotland are out on points difference. britain's two—man bobsleigh team are bruised but 0k after a lucky escape after going at nearly nine badge 90 miles an hour on concrete like ice. 0ne nearly nine badge 90 miles an hour on concrete like ice. one of them flipped out when it flipped over. amazingly brad polk is still inside, he tucked himself in to protect —— protect himself. they had been 15 after the first run but crashed early in the second event in lake placid. thankfully both athletes walked away. that is all for now. the bbc understands that the labour mp, kerry mccarthy, will submit letters to party officials on monday which she says show she received "unwa nted attention" from her fellow labour mp, kelvin hopkins. mr hopkins is currently suspended from the party, following accusations of inappropriate behaviour, which he denies. here's our political correspondent, iain watson.
10:23 am
kerry mccarthy says she is speaking out to support the young labour activist ava etemadzadeh, who alleged hopkins had acted inappropriately towards her after a meeting at essex university four years ago. kelvin hopkins is currently suspended by the labour party while those allegations, which he denies, are investigated. kerry mccarthy is not making any formal complaint. instead, she is submitting information to the inquirer which she believes could be helpful for the ava etemadzadeh. she says she first suffered unwanted attention from mr hopkins “119911, and more recently, she received a letter in which he described as a very attractive woman and confided he had a dream about her. she is submitting this letter to the labour enquiry on monday. in a statement, kelvin hopkins describes kerry mccarthy as a long—term friend and says he is disappointed she appears to have gone to the press rather than telling him that she was unhappy. let's talk to our political correspondent emma va rdy.
10:24 am
this is pretty grim from the labour pa rty‘s this is pretty grim from the labour party's point of view and from the individuals involved, more importantly. these are two people who worked together a long time before kerry mccarthy even became an mp. yes, kerry mccarthy speaking out about another labour mp, albeit the suspended one, kelvin hopkins. she came forward in support of our young labourer member, ava etemadzadeh, and she
10:25 am
spoke out to support her. we do not know that these alleged incidents took place. kelvin hopkins said he is baffled, and regarded them as friends. in terms of relations in luton it is difficult, but in westminster that is difficult, they will bump into each other at westminster. absolutely, and there will be a number of these kind of awkward relationships going on at the moment, because kelvin hopkins is just the moment, because kelvin hopkins isjust one of the moment, because kelvin hopkins is just one of a number of political figures who are currently under investigation, but westminster life must go on, but there is a sense that this is a step change, that behaviour that was perhaps tolerated 01’ behaviour that was perhaps tolerated or ignored in the past is no longer going to be ignored in future. we have had a bit of a flavour of what
10:26 am
the kind of behaviour that kerry mccarthy was talking about in the letters, the recent one she received, she says mr hopkins described her as a very attractive woman, confided in her that he had a dream about her, but she said the u nwa nted dream about her, but she said the unwanted attention she received goes back to 1994, which it is really important to point out that kelvin hopkins has denied the allegations from ava etemadzadeh, and is confused that kerry mccarthy did not come to him first, she went to the press. so the investigations have difficult questions to get to the bottom of. thank you very much. a lynx which escaped from a small zoo near aberystwyth has been killed. the animal disappeared at the end of last month, prompting a huge search. the local council says that despite "exhaustive efforts" to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public,
10:27 am
as bernard wilson reports. the eurasian lynx, named lilith, is thought to have leapt over an electric fence at borth wild animal kingdom. zoo staff began a hunt for her along with police and officials from ceredigion council. there were a number of sightings at one point it was thought she was hiding in bushes near the zoo, but she evaded capture. last night the council released a statement, saying the lynx had strayed into a populated area and it had been necessary to act decisively. it added the animal had been destroyed humanely and the safety of the public was paramount. the zoo has been closed since the animal's escape. almost 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residentialfires in england in the past year, according to new figures. the local government association is warning people to check their smoke alarms in the run—up to winter, when the number of serious fires usually goes up. dan johnson reports. the images can be hard—hitting, and the message is familiar. but it appears it's still not getting through. figures show that in house fires last year, 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms go off. for mains—powered fire alarms, the rate was more than 20%.
10:28 am
there is a claim that more than one in five households never test their smoke alarms. one in ten households do not even have one fitted. check your fire alarms and smoke alarms at home. check the batteries are working. check they are in a suitable position where it's actually going to help you. make sure you have at least one on each floor of your house. that is the key message. we have seen too many smoke alarms and too many fire alarms which haven't done theirjob because people haven't either placed them in the correct position, or checked their batteries. with more boilers and heaters being turned on in colder weather, this is a reminder that smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are tried and tested and proven to work. —— detectors are no use unless tried and tested and proven to work. lead to speak to our correspondent
10:29 am
who is in staffordshire for the armistice day service. this is the other place that has become the focus of national attention. yes, and it has only been here for ten yea rs and it has only been here for ten years since it was first dedicated, and it is an important part of armistice day and also remembrance sunday is well. they are getting ready for this enemy, which begins shortly. guests arriving, and we're expecting the royal party shortly. probably the star of today's events is this veteran who i'm going to talk to. he was born before the end of the first world war and served in the second world war. your 99 today. what happened to you? you were fighting in north africa in your tank came under fire. yes, into an jay—z. yes, into anjay—z. about yes, into an jay—z. about a week before the campaign finished, we
10:30 am
we re before the campaign finished, we were going up to the mountains. we got through the gap and we got about 12 times through the gap and

26 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on