Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 11, 2017 11:30pm-11:46pm GMT

11:30 pm
we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment, first the headlines: the husband of a british womanjailed in iran has told the bbc he is due to speak to the foreign secretary borisjohnson tomorrow. president trump says his russian counterpart, vladimir putin, was very insulted by allegations that moscow interfered in last year's us election. a british woman held in egypt on drug smuggling charges has been referred to a criminal court for trial. formula 1 driver lewis hamilton calls for improved security after some of his team—mates were robbed at gunpoint outside a circuit in brazil. donation‘s favourite marmalade sandwich eating their returns to the big screen. gashed the nation's. we'll get mark kermode‘s thoughts on paddington ii in the film review ——
11:31 pm
the nation's —— sandwich eating bear. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are kevin schofield, editor of politicshome and benedicte paviot, uk correspondent at the french broadcaster, france 24. tomorrow's front pages, starting with. .. the observer leads on jeremy corbyn‘s calls for boris johnson to quit after comments he made about a british mother imprisoned in iran. the sunday times says a0 tory mps have agreed to sign a letter of no—confidence in theresa may. the telegraph leads on plans by the environment secretary, michael gove, for stronger environmental policy following brexit. meanwhile, the mail on sunday says mr gove and borisjohnson are holding theresa may to ransom in order to secure a hard—brexit. the sunday express says the economy is in for a £3 billion windfall after brexit. we don't really have favourites on
11:32 pm
this, kevin. so let's begin. next time, put it right. we will start with the mail on sunday, boris and go of plot to hijack number 10, and go of plot to hijack number 10, a secret memo has emerged written after the party conference in the autumn. when they felt theresa may was at her weakest and they are michael gove and boris johnson, was at her weakest and they are michael gove and borisjohnson, the environment secretary and the foreign secretary, so the mail on sunday quite rightly calls this a bombshell leaked letter so the secret letter is a secret no more. it seems the bromance is absolutely back on. these two men have known each other for a long time, since university, they had their major
11:33 pm
falling out when there was the leadership election when david cameron needed to be replaced and it seems they've come up with a list of instructions for a woman, the prime minister, theresa may, who, according to the mail on sunday, has been the victim of a soft coup and is almost being held hostage effectively in 10 downing street. amongst the duo's demands, according to this leaked letter, our post—brexit transition must end on june 30, 2021. post—brexit transition must end on june 30,2021. philip hammond, the chancellor, about to deliver his budget on november the 22nd, another big test for the conservative party to get that right for the chancellor and the government as well amid the brexit negotiations, mr hammond will be told he will be held over a barrel because he must not criticise all be seen to criticise either privately or publicly a hard brexit. the line that will go down really
11:34 pm
well with the civil servants is this line the whitehall machine and its ossified ways of working, be left to its own devices, new high—powered staff are needed to apply grid to the oyster. explosive stuff. theresa may might be gagging over her cornfla kes may might be gagging over her cornflakes or whatever she may might be gagging over her cornfla kes or whatever she likes may might be gagging over her cornflakes or whatever she likes to eat. this plotting, i am cornflakes or whatever she likes to eat. this plotting, lam reminded of, if we had sound effects, i would go tick, tock, tick, tock for the government, for certain ministers, for this prime minister, tick, tock, tick, tock for the brexit negotiations and plot, plot, plot because the plotting seems to be continuing. borisjohnson, we will come onto that, doesn't have the support he would have liked to have because... and we will also come onto that, because of what has
11:35 pm
happened in the last few days on iran, that's all i'll say at the moment. indeed. is itjust the hard brexit they are angling for, getting themselves into position for when they no longer think theresa may is required? i think that is definitely on the cards. we know borisjohnson is hugely ambitious, desperate to be prime minister. michael gove likewise looked like he shot himself in the foot when he stood instead of borisjohnson last year, in the foot when he stood instead of boris johnson last year, didn't go terribly well but he seems to have reinvented himself almost and he's been mentioned in dispatches in the la st been mentioned in dispatches in the last few days as a potential leader so last few days as a potential leader so there's all sorts of manoeuvring is going on within the cabinet and everything that happens within the conservative party at the moment has two bc in within the prison of the fa ct two bc in within the prison of the fact everyone knows the prime minister is living on borrowed time and it's all about succession and jockeying opposition —— has to be seen. last year we could have
11:36 pm
thought michael gove and boris johnson was a dream ticket when theresa may goes. 40 mps saying theresa may goes. 40 mps saying theresa may goes. 40 mps saying theresa may must go according to the sunday times and those on the remain side of the referendum debate saying we don't want this ultra hard brexit and they are manoeuvring into position? essentially it is the tory party being two parties in one now. you still have the remain backing mps who want a soft brexit, and the ha rd mps who want a soft brexit, and the hard brexiteers who essentially want britain to walk away and not give the eu terribly much. things seem to be coming to a head. a couple of weeks ago i spoke to a former minister who said they sense a change in the mood where previously there been a belief theresa may would stay in place until brexit, 2019, and probably depart later that year maybe at tory conference 2019 and they would elect a new leader
11:37 pm
and they would elect a new leader and prime minister —— there'd been. it looks like, not just and prime minister —— there'd been. it looks like, notjust because brexit, but you've got michael fallon and priti patel leaving the cabinet. you've got the sex harassment stuff. it looks as though events are being done to the prime minister, to the government, rather than the government shaping events and all of this, the backdrop is she called a snap election injune, it blew up in her face, we now have a hung parliament and she's being pulled in all sorts of directions and she doesn't seem to be... we've got a minority government. she doesn't seem to be in control of her cabinet, her government, her future. the whole thing... events. indeed, things seem to be coming to a head. and the eu withdrawal bill coming up on tuesday. this is all being watched very carefully in continental europe, notjust in france and germany, by president macron or angela merkel, but
11:38 pm
interesting, in the sunday times, this line, which will infuriate brexiteers, eu negotiators say their uk counterparts have signalled willingness to resolve the key outstanding, the divorce bill, the so—called payment cheque, to agree a 60 million euros exit bill which is a condition for starting trade talks. but these eu negotiators are concerned that what is happening is because there's this loss control, this huge division in the british government, that they are no longer convinced that actually because of what they call the internal psychodrama of the conservative party, they are no longer sure if theresa may will be in place throughout the process and that is of great concern so they are making contingency plans. staying with the sunday times, one of those conservative mps who has been in the
11:39 pm
news of late, damian green, and the met police chief who was in charge at the time of an investigation into computer leaks in 2008 apparently knew that pornography had allegedly been found on damian green's computer. we also have to stress damian green completely denies this, la st damian green completely denies this, last week put out a strong statement saying it was completely untrue, it was smears, seemed to be fitted up bya was smears, seemed to be fitted up by a disgruntled former anti—terror officer, bob quick. this is another headache that the prime minister could well do without. he's notjust any tory mp or cabinet minister, he'sa any tory mp or cabinet minister, he's a first secretary of, effectively theresa may's deputy. our closest —— her effectively theresa may's deputy. our closest — — her closest effectively theresa may's deputy. our closest —— her closest ally in government, long—standing friend going back to university days. if you lost damian green ben... all bets are off. she would be in a lot
11:40 pm
of trouble —— then. she relies on him an awful lot to put it mildly. there's an investigation going on into whether he broke the ministerial code, notjust into whether he broke the ministerial code, not just the into whether he broke the ministerial code, notjust the porn allegations but also allegations he also denies about sexual inappropriateness with a female journalist. it never rains but it pours. it's a sunday times story we should point out. they broke the story. what's unfortunate in a sense is this is, as you pointed out, the boss of bob quick, at the time, but the fact damian green, it was the computers, plural, that is crucial, thatis computers, plural, that is crucial, that is the alleged accusation. the problem is mr green said it was com pletely problem is mr green said it was completely untrue and these were disreputable comments. now to have sir paul stephenson coming out saying i knew about them... knew
11:41 pm
about them at the time but he said it wasn't relevant to the enquiry, which was about the computer leaks. let's look at the observer, sack boris for shaming our nation, corbyn tells the prime minister, over the comments boris johnson made regarding nazaneen sa careea radcliffe, who is in prison in iran —— nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. radcliffe, who is in prison in iran -- nazanin zaghari-ratcliffe. he said that she had been in iran training journalists, said that she had been in iran trainingjournalists, he said that she had been in iran training journalists, he told a commons select committee, obviously she wouldn't but ears pricked up in iran at that point and it would appear they are using that as an excuse to increase her sentence. borisjohnson this excuse to increase her sentence. boris johnson this week has tried to...i boris johnson this week has tried to... iwas boris johnson this week has tried to... i was going to say apologised but he hasn't apologised, he's apologised if people misunderstood what he said but if you look at what
11:42 pm
he said, it is pretty clear. he misspoke. he was taken out of context. made maybe he misremembered what he was briefed or maybe he was badly briefed —— maybe. he landed her in it. if it turns out she has her in it. if it turns out she has her centres increased then his position i think becomes untenable —— hersentence. position i think becomes untenable -- her sentence. we should point out, everything you said i com pletely out, everything you said i completely agree with, but we should point out that the treatment of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is appalling by iran. to separate her from her little girl, who barely speaks english any more now, who is with her maternal grandparents, and the fact that she was hooded at some point. of course she would be very depressed, she already 18 months into this. what would be very serious is if her sentence is indeed lengthened as a result of this miss speaking, i do hate that word, but what happened and what borisjohnson
11:43 pm
said to the parliamentary committee. as you say, tehran hasjumped on it and there are divisions in iran, the hardline is pushing for anotherfive yea rs on hardline is pushing for anotherfive years on top of the five years she's already in four. let's look at the observer, we shall not forget them, some schoolgirls observing the two minute's silence at the cemaat after day —— already in for. —— the cenotaph. i am wearing a british p°ppy cenotaph. i am wearing a british poppy but i am wearing the french equivalent and we had a ceremony at victoria station with the french ambassador today with a very impressive british soldiers there, as brexit happens, that bilateral relationship will be all the more important and prominent. what has a lwa ys important and prominent. what has always moved me greatly and
11:44 pm
impressed me as a child and increasingly as an adult is in france in most villages and in towns, you have monuments to the dead. for people who have never come across them, that might seem a very morbid thing but it's very humbling to look at these and to take a few minutes to look as a mark of respect, not just one minutes to look as a mark of respect, notjust one day a year, but to see it as part of a living, thriving community and you can go up and have a look and you see names and have a look and you see names and the first names are different most of the time, but the surnames, you see entire families of men wiped out. that tradition, these young children, girls, as it happens, on the front of the observer, that oral tradition we going to lose in ten yea rs, tradition we going to lose in ten years, the generation who were children in britain, france and germany and elsewhere, this oral tradition of helping people understand, this is literally deadly serious, it is so important to pass
11:45 pm
that on. i want to tonight pay tribute to robert hall, i've met him andi tribute to robert hall, i've met him and i want to pay tribute to him, the work he does for the bbc and the way he approaches his reports is absolutely commendable because it's absolutely commendable because it's a legacy that is very important. that is it for the papers for tonight. thank you benedict and kevin. good to see you both. coming up kevin. good to see you both. coming up next it is the film review and i'll be back tomorrow. goodbye. welcome to the film review on bbc news. and taking us through this week's releases

18 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on