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tv   Britains City of Culture  BBC News  November 12, 2017 12:30am-1:01am GMT

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in last year's us presidential elections. he also said he believes the russian leader. mr trump said the allegation was costing lives in syria because it was getting in the way of his relationship with mr putin. iraqi government forces have started to move on the last iraqi town still held by so—called islamic state. the offensive is to recapture rawa, near the border with syria. members of lewis hamilton's formula i team have been robbed at gunpoint in sao paulo, where the brazilian grand prix is taking place. armistice day commemorations have been taking place across the world remembering those who died in two world wars and other conflicts. now on bbc news, britain's city of culture. hello and welcome to hull, the uk's city of culture for 2017.
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if this isn't your thing we still have the biggest uk spoken word and poetry festival, attracting a hollywood star and some of the hottest fresh new talent. also coming up: some of the world's finest ballet dancers come back to hull where they tipped their first dance steps. i don't understand how we've had so many amazing dancers come from hull, it's quite incredible. we go behind the scenes as our‘s most controversial competition, the turner prize, goes to hull and we see what the public thinks of the shortlisted artists. it should be piled high, set alight.
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hello and welcome to the show. this isa hello and welcome to the show. this is a hole for hull, huge art installation being installed here in front of hull minster. one of the many venues taking part in the festival. have you got room in there for a little one? who's the little one? she's one of the headline acts here at britain's biggest spoken word festival. it's called contains strom language, four days, 60 acts, if you thought poetry was just stanzas and
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sonnets, think again. it's much more than rap, you've got the stars of poetry, simon armitage, to hollywood stars like journey irons, something for everyone. -- journey irons. ——jeromy —— jeromy irons. sheet of swerving to solitude of skies and scarecrows. -- swerving to. i've been known to write a few. it's a rich tradition in lancashire, turning up at weddings with a little ditty but i wouldn't put myself in the same class as some of the writers i'll be reading this week in any shape or form. what is exciting is to see the whole
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accent, the whole language just taking its place on this global stage. so much there but you can't have a poetry festival without the legend thatis poetry festival without the legend that is the punk poetjohn cooper clarke, can you ? that is the punk poetjohn cooper clarke, can you? neewatt an absolute gem, he even took time out to share his top three tips on how to a performance poet. a doorbell used to say dingdong but now it bursts out into song, if i'm following it won't be long, could i be wrong or have i falle n be long, could i be wrong or have i fallen in love with my wife? you are
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the boss of all bosses. of poetry. that's right. i'm here to ask you a favour, can you give me a bit of advice, i'm going to be on this open mike stage performing one of my poems. i'm glad you asked me that, kofi, only to help. number one, dress carefully. ijust dress carefully. i just nearly dress carefully. ijust nearly died of a broken heart, i haven't seen my wife for four days. and my dressed right? you're obviously in your casuals, you're not coming at them. you've got to feel confidence but you also got to feel confidence but you also got to feel confidence but you also got to maintain an aura of authority. david sharp, something to look at, maybe a shirt? a silhouette. you've got to cut some kind of silhouette. and also, so we're getting up to point number two now, isn't it? find a comfortable
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vocal pitch. let me be your vacuum cleaner breathing in your dust, let me be your morris marina and i will never rust, if you like your coffee hot let me be your coffee pot, i wa nt to hot let me be your coffee pot, i want to be yours. you're going to be talking to them in between poems, you're going to be discussing what's coming up and thanking them for their applause. but when you're talking to them it's kind of conversational, you got the mike, it's nice and conversational. when you're snapping through a poem, that's a number, so you're not using the same pitch. what's number three? don't be too... merchandise available in the lobby. 0h, don't be too... merchandise available in the lobby. oh, yeah, there it is, in the lobby. you could pay less for a t—shirt, i'll be honest with you. not too much back and fourth, you know what i'm saying? because the whole show involves speech, you become all too
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accessible. you don't want to get involved. people feel it incumbent upon them to comment upon what you're doing. it's not a conversation? it's not. you're there to tell a story, to say something. that's right, you got to nip that in the bud with something like i could chew the fat all—night, mate, but... i've got to get on. so we have dress carefully, find a comfortable vocal pitch, don't get too chummy. they are the three golden rolls i can pa rt are the three golden rolls i can part with today. yes. thank you very much. hopefully you might be around to see me in action. i'll be looking to see me in action. i'll be looking to see me in action. i'll be looking to see how you dress. -- golden rules. with advice like that, i'm going to be a professional performance poet in no time. why not, hull has a great reputation for
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poetry and another thing it's fantastic at producing is ballet dancers. some of the country's finest had their first lessons here in hull. they returned home along with the royal ballet for the gala opening of the whole new theatre —— hull new theatre. they've danced with some of the world's best—known ballet companies, joseph kelly, is on the parish, elizabeth harrod and in september they made a triumphant homecoming performing in a special i—off gala in the city where they took their very first ballet steps. so this is where you took your first ballet lesson ? so this is where you took your first ballet lesson? yes, where i started when i was eight years old. is armed parish now lives in russia after becoming the first bridge to ever dance the marion ski ballet company. 0na rare dance the marion ski ballet company. on a rare trip home we took him back to his childhood ballet school,
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which he left more than 20 years ago. —— first—ever brick. shall we go and see your first ever dance teacher? let's go. lovely to have you back, it's been a long time. —— first—ever brick. it doesn't change but i get older and the students remain the same —— first—ever brit. i was here with my little legs shaking like that. they've got a lot stronger since then. i know, you've come a long way since. vanessa hooper and her mother vera skelton taught a string of children whose made careers in ballet. there's alexander parish and at english national ballet, his classmate joseph caley and josh were maturely grey is also there. andrew mcnicol isa grey is also there. andrew mcnicol is a choreographer and at the birmingham ballet of hair is a ballet master and at the royal ballet com pa ny ballet master and at the royal ballet company there's elizabeth harrod and alexander's sister, demelza, and the man in charge,
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director kevin 0'hare. demelza, and the man in charge, director kevin o'hare. each generation has had their whole city dancers, which is incredible. va nessa dancers, which is incredible. vanessa and her mum before it really knew how to engage with the young dancers and give them a sense of purpose maybe, taking it seriously and professionally, because there's hundreds of these schools around the country but i don't think many of them have this track record. and to celebrate that, kevin 0'hare has brought some of those former stu d e nts brought some of those former students together to rehearse for the hull gala show. demelza parish will be dancing a new peers, peace choreographed by andrew mcnicol. will be dancing a new peers, peace choreographed by andrew mcnicoli never thought i'd be performing back in hull because at the role ballet we don't really do regional tours so it's not somewhere i ever thought i would be going back to perform. —— royal ballet. it's a once—in—a—lifetime event really —— royal ballet. its gala night and inside alexander
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parish is among the dancers getting ready to perform. the hull theatre has a special place for me because it's where i did my first performance in the pickwick papers asa performance in the pickwick papers as a street urchin. with harry secombe? that's correct, i was a young kid, iwas secombe? that's correct, i was a young kid, i was eight or nine, eight i think, and that's what got me hooked on performing. whenever i say i'm from hull i always get quite a similar reaction, there's so many people from hull that are dancers and they start reading of all the names. i don't understand how we've had so many ageing dancers come from hull, it's quite incredible. with theatre in... after the show the dancers boarded a bus and got ready to surprise them, appearing in person for their curtain call. the theatre looked amazing, the dancers were all incredible, and then to see so many
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people out here, it's really thrilling. so many dancers who took their first ballet steps in thrilling. so many dancers who took theirfirst ballet steps in hull have made huge leaps towards the top of their profession. the gala show brought some of them back to where their journey began. later we'll hear from 0scar later we'll hear from oscar winner jeremy irons, who's come to the city to celebrate hull through poetry. and will be finding out how you move the world's most talked about arts show from london to the city of culture. but first take a look at everything we've been up to in the past couple of months. —— and we'll be finding out. hull's 10th annual freedom be finding out. hull's10th annual freedom festival celebrated antislavery campaign ear william wilberforce with over 200 free events, as well as live performances and public surprises, there was a lecture from kofi annan, the former un secretary general. -- campaigner.
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to paraphrase william wilberforce, we may choose to look the other way but we can never say again that we did not know. there's been more brilliant theatre premiers, including kings of hull byjohn god perth and an adaptation of the novel a short history of tractors in ukrainian. turn and face the strange was a celebration of mick ronson and his journey from was a celebration of mick ronson and hisjourney from a was a celebration of mick ronson and his journey from a whole housing estate to rock ‘n' roll stardom as david bowie's guitarist. —— hull housing estate. 0ne one day may be turned an old office block into a 1980s south korean police station. i got to be honest, it's one of the best but creepiest things i've done all year. if i don't make it out, tell my mum, dad, sisters, brother, you can't touch my stuff! 0n the first of october,
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hundreds of hull's iconic phone boxes rang simultaneously and the people who answered spoke to a character from the year 2097. hull's feature is the subject of five sci—fi films that sit alongside a live experience and an interactive app. we're now well into tell the world, the fourth season of hull 2017 that runs from october to december. highlights include these photographs by 0livia after and martin capturing the essence of what makes hull unique. a new by maxine peake will tell the story of lylian blogger who campaigned for safer conditions for trawler men, and as the year draws to a close, there's more large—scale art installations in store, including a light show in the robotic arms. so much good stuff so far but one of the highlights of the eu is still to come. in this december, that stage will have disappeared and this will be the
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venue for giving out the turner prize. how do you get the most prestigious art show out of london and into hull? i've been finding out —— of the year. some love it, some hate it, but pretty much everyone has an opinion on the annual turner prize. 0ver pretty much everyone has an opinion on the annual turner prize. over the yea rs, on the annual turner prize. over the years, the competition's become notorious. works like damien hirst‘s pickled cows, tracy min's unmade bed and martin creed's lights going on and martin creed's lights going on and off, making some ask, is it really a rt? and off, making some ask, is it really art? but this year the turner prize has grown up a bit. for a start a change in the rules means two of the artists are over 50. the techniques are more traditional, printmaking, photography, painting and the subject matter is more political. one thing that started to ta ke political. one thing that started to take me down this road was this idea
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that it take me down this road was this idea thatitis take me down this road was this idea that it is someone forgetting where they were. the history of people from the caribbean or from the rest of the world in britain is they couldn't forget where they were, they had to be constantly aware. painter hervey and anderson is one of four shortlisted artists vying for the £25,000 prize. next german printmaker and multimedia artist andrea examining issues like shame and baking. there's hardly any art historical research done on the iconography of the beggar and its important to me coming from my interest in shame, it made me interested in the discourse of it in art —— baking. interested in the discourse of it in art -- baking. she looks at black identity. sometimes the pattern is on the newspaper to give the black person some kind of talisman to balance up what the text, which is often juxtaposed from quite another
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story, is doing to undermine that black person. finally, rosalind is showing two films, viv‘s garden and electrical gaza. everything i shoot is on 16mm up until now. it's not that i'm thinking it's nostalgic all looks a certain way, it's that it ca ptu res a looks a certain way, it's that it captures a certain liveliness in the image. when there is a permanent state of crisis and war, there are things that are not seen. the actual human beings that are lost. every other year the turner prize travels out of london and this year it's come to the city of culture. but how do you move this hugely popular show from tate britain to a small regional gallery? i went behind this is at hulse behrens as an army of curators, technicians and builders
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got to work. you might think getting ready for the show just got to work. you might think getting ready for the showjust involve taking down the old art and giving the walls a lick of paint but take a look at this, getting ready for the turner prize is a full on construction projects. the turn's kogi rater george vaizey showed me round as they built two proper cinemas to show rosalind's films. we wa nt cinemas to show rosalind's films. we want people to feel comfortable and spend time watching the whole film. —— the turn's curator. sometimes it's uncomfortable and the sound is blaring but we wanted to immerse people in the film. there was a lot of thinking to do. before the real paintings came —— the turner's curator. we laughed the other day that most places you come here won't know that the walls are different shades of white. there's thousands of different shades of white. how many of different shades of white. how ma ny tester of different shades of white. how many tester pots have you gone through? there's hundreds, boxes of
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them, i wasjoking through? there's hundreds, boxes of them, i was joking with anderson that its 50 shades of artistic ray or something. each asked artist worked with a curator to install their exhibition and for this man, showing outside london has proved no list stressful than being in the capital —— 50 shades of artistic grey —— each artist. capital —— 50 shades of artistic grey -- each artist. if it is outside the capital the pressure is real people —— no less stressful. people you've actually seen in the shopping area are going to be in here looking at this workjust by taking six steps in, that's a huge pressure, whereas in london it's sort of some other intangible thing. and then there's the pressure of the judging. in december, we'll find out which of these four artists will ta ke which of these four artists will take away the turner prize. since the exhibition came to hull people have been lining up to see it, but
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what do the locals think?” have been lining up to see it, but what do the locals think? i think it's good, i think it's got a good contrast between modern art and oldish art. it's lovely to see paint used so well. there are very painterly and the colours are amazing. i like the colours of them and how, though, like, different colours of green and stuff. it's not what i would have expected for the turner prize, i've looked about me here and i think this is going to make tracey emin's bed look like a masterpiece. no merit whatsoever. it should be piled high and set alight and let the roaring flames go up to the sky. that would be art. amateur art critics from all over have had their say on the exhibition, including the stars of an online video series featuring puppets voiced by hull teenagers. video series featuring puppets voiced by hull teenagerslj video series featuring puppets voiced by hull teenagers. i don't understand how people get famous off
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this, i don't understand. this one here. they've put their bum cheeks on that but what for? proof of identity. but what do you think about the art? you might be speechless, like a puppet. you might be speechless, like a puppet, you might love it, you might hate it, but as the tagline says, whatever you think about the turner prize, you're right. we're back at contains strong language and kate tempest is onstage. as a rising star she has done so much, she's the winner of the ted poetry prize. 0ne one of the other highlights of the
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festival has been this, poetry written in or about hull and read by actorsjulie written in or about hull and read by actors julie hausmann haupt written in or about hull and read by actorsjulie hausmann haupt and hollywood starjeremy irons. down by the indian ganges' side should rubies find, by the tide of humber would complain. he's one of the few actors to excel on the stage and the small and big screen, winning a tony, an emmy and an oscar. he is still making hollywood blockbusters, but he's always got time for a bit of poetry. i love being introduced into new poets, which i have been in this programme. philip larkin i knew but i don't know some of the poems i'm reading of his in this. steven smith of course, the famous hull poets. did you write anything yourself? i used to, when i was 14 or 15, short shirt it was called,
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i'm worried about my shirt, very worried, very worried indeed, think it's too short for my trousers, a safety pin's the thing i need. my shirt is too low and my trousers... i'm sure they would be happy together, they must lead a terrible life, i have a suspicion they might make a good man and a wife. don't call me matchmaker i'm just trying to help, it would be so simple to fix them together for companionship's save. a safety pin's just what i need. well remembered as well! surprised myself actually. you mentioned you mentioned before about philip larkin and andrew marvell, reading both of them today, who is whole's best? i never compare, never compare levels, i never compare poets, i never compare music, it's just different. i'm glad we don't have 0scars just different. i'm glad we don't have oscars for poets —— who is
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hull's best? it's ridiculous for actors but for poets it would be stupid because it's about communication. whenever i read a poem i get a different to you and that's the glory of it. whenever i get a bad review i always think, someone might have liked it. these days poetry is having a bit of a renaissance, younger people are getting involved, what do you think about that? i think it's fantastic, idida about that? i think it's fantastic, i did a lot of reading withjocelyn hart, who is sadly dead now, trying to get it in schools but i think rap has a lot to do with it. so much of the time kids spend time in this ridiculous short and language on facebook and twitter and all of that but now they're beginning to have fun with language. research has found that you have the perfect male voice. can you give us some tips on how to deliver a poem perfectly?” recently did a lot of ts eliot. for
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radio 4? for radio 4. as an actor you try to be the connection between the writer and the listener and not get in the way. that's what i try to do with poetry, not perform that actually work as a communicator of the writer's ideas. i say to people when they're listening to ts eliot, which is very very long, if you nod off, that's fine. he says for insta nce off, that's fine. he says for instance it's often when you're in that half green state between waking and sleeping, that you're really open to influences. you read larkin's poetry today, do you think that hull has improved since he wrote his verse? —— dream state. that hull has improved since he wrote his verse? -- dream state. i'm going to be so ashamed of what i'm about to say. i've been in hull for the first time in my life for about three hours. so you've mainly seen here? here, the walk from the
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station and the train ride into hull. i'm not one tojudge hull but i'm sort of intrigued by the affection people have for it, almost exactly 24 hours. you have to change that, you'll have to extend your state. in that case, thank you for spending 24 hours in hull. it's been a real pleasure and i'll have to come back i think. —— extend your stay. that's all from us tonight. but we will be back with one very special episode looking back at the whole two whole of hull's year as uk city of culture. if you want to get your cultural fix, head to this website, —— the whole of whole's year. goodbye. particularly in wales and south—west
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england the cloud was a nuisance on saturday and it lingered for much of the day even bringing persistent rain by the end of the day, you can see the rain gathering across our. that rain still lingers first thing, not as cold here, it will be a chilly start in scotland with some snow showers with any height. that cold air continues to push across the whole of england and wales for today —— across tower. if you're up early you might start with rain. a cluster of showers pushing down through the cheshire gap to the midlands and maybe one or two arriving towards the london area, which means there's the slim chance ofan which means there's the slim chance of an isolated shower for the cenotaph at 8am, hopefully the showers will ease away and it will bea dry, showers will ease away and it will be a dry, sunny but crisp morning. at 11am if you're heading to other
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remembrance sunday services, a few showers in south—west england and wales in particular, hopefully those showers will have eased across the south—east corner, a good slice of sunshine generally spreading up through central and northern england. a scattering of showers across the east coast of northern ireland and one or two filtering into the far north of scotland and with any height there could be wintry. as we go through the day, most showers will die back to the coast of wales, south—west england and some running of the north sea, elsewhere decent, dry and sunny as an afternoon, it will be quite beautiful but it will be cool with the northerly wind —— running of. top temperatures around six to ten. —— running of. winds will fall like and the area of high pressure nudges and the area of high pressure nudges a bit further east. —— will fall like. that will allow winds to fall lightly. a hard frost on monday morning and temperatures in sheltered glens of scotland as low as five. that's important because
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there's more cloud and rain into the north—west —— will fall might. we could see some snow —— will fall light. may be more straightforward in england and wales. not particularly warm, a bit more cloud, top temperatures of five to 10 degrees. that front will continue to spill south on monday night into tuesday, weakening all the time and by then introducing milder air, cloudy conditions and some rain at times. hour week ahead starts cold and frosty but then turning milder with some rain around —— hour week ahead. take care. —— hourweek ahead. welcome to bbc news. i'm duncan golestani.
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our top stories: face to face — president trump says he believes vladimir putin when he says russia didn't meddle in the us elections. the husband of a british—iranian womanjailed in tehran is to meet the british foreign secretary on sunday. hello. president trump has said that he trusts his russian counterpart, vladimir putin, who has again denied interfering in last year's elections for the white house. the two leaders met in vietnam, where they were attending a summit. mr trump claimed the allegation that russia had meddled in the campaign was costing lives in syria,

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