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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 12, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and chris mason. the uk prepares to mark remembrance sunday. thousands of services will be held at war memorials and churches across the uk to remember those who died in two world wars and other conflicts. i live on horse guards were veterans are preparing to arrive to take part in the 10,000 strong march past the cenotaph on whitehall. good morning, it's sunday 12th november. also this morning... a former head of the metropolitan police confirms he knew that pornographic material had allegedly been found on a computer used by first secretary of state damian green ten years ago. a claim that seriously—ill children in england are being denied access to out—of—hours palliative care — a charity describes services as patchy and inconsistent. in sport, england's women
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are closing in on the draw they need to keep their hopes of regaining the ashes alive. they're just two wickets down on the final day of the test at the north sydney 0val. and we meet the woman behind these amazing images and hear how she made the transition from top athlete to professional photographer. and susan has the weather. the sunshine more widespread across the uk today for remembrance sunday and there is a price to pay, it will feel particularly chilly. thank you, susan. good morning. first, our main story. thousands of services will be held across the uk to remember those who died in two world wars and other conflicts. in london, veterans and military personnel willjoin members of the royal family for the national service of remembrance at the cenotaph. for the first time, the queen will watch proceedings from a nearby balcony. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell has more. the queen and the duke of edinburgh attending last night's festival of remembrance. this weekend is one of the most
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significant in the royal calendar, one the duke, despite now being retired, did not want to miss. but this year there will be one significant difference. her majesty is handed the wreath, which she places first at the foot of the cenotaph... the service of remembrance has changed very little over the years and one of the key moments has been when the queen lays her wreath on the cenotaph on behalf of britain and the commonwealth. it's a role she has performed all but six times throughout her 65—year reign. 0nly pregnancy or absence due to foreign royal tours have prevented herfrom doing so. this year, instead ofjoining the line—up here on whitehall, the queen and the duke of edinburgh will instead watch proceedings from the balcony of the foreign and commonwealth office.
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the prince of wales will lay the queen's wreath on her behalf. music: last post. the decision to watch, rather than physically take part in one of the key royal engagements, will not have been taken lightly. it is a recognition that the queen is now 91 years old, and the ceremony requires standing in often cold temperatures for around half—an—hour and then walking backwards, navigating a step along the way. but the change is now perhaps the most visible signal yet of the gradual transition of responsibilities from the queen to her son and heir. one day, it will be prince charles‘ role as king to lead the nation in remembrance. we can speak to our royal correspondent, sarah campbell, now.
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she's in whitehall for us this morning. without the queen being there later on today, it will have a different feel to it? indeed, it is a small but significant change, the fact that the queen is not physically laying a wreath. she has not done so six times, four times she was on foreign royal tours, twice she was pregnant, but this is the first time she will physically be there but not physically be there but not physically laid a wreath. but other than that the ceremony is continuing as it has for all those years, the two minutes‘ silence of course at 11am and then the prayers, by the priest of the high commissioner of the commonwealth reminding us of not only soldiers but people who have fought for the commonwealth across the world, and then the march past. here on horse guard is where
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vetera ns a re here on horse guard is where veterans are starting to arrive and will continue to arrive, it is a 10,000 strong march past and not just vetera ns 10,000 strong march past and not just veterans but serving personnel, schoolchildren will be marching past as well, is very important part of the service of remembrance, and it is not just here the service of remembrance, and it is notjust here in london that this is notjust here in london that this is happening but across the uk and beyond, there are service personnel who are stationed abroad, there are service personnel helping the relief fund in the caribbean, service personnel in afghanistan, and all sorts of other countries, and all of them will be observing the two minutes‘ silence, remembering all of those either killed or injured in conflicts past and present. sarah, thank you very much indeed. david dimbleby and sophie raworth present coverage of the service on whitehall from 10.20am this morning on bbc one. 0ut—of—hours palliative care for seriously—ill children in england is "patchy and inconsistent" according to a new report seen by the bbc‘s 5live investigates programme.
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the research carried out by the together for short lives charity also suggests many families are forced to go to a&e overnight and at the weekends. the department of health says it will look at the report's recommendations closely. the husband of a british womanjailed in iran will discuss his wife's case with the foreign secretary today. it comes after he called for a meeting on bbc brea kfast yesterday. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is accused of spying. her family have said they fear her sentence could be extended after borisjohnson gave the false impression she'd been teaching in iran. a new watchdog to protect the environment after britain leaves the european union is being planned by the government. the environment secretary michael gove's promise of an organisation with "real bite" comes as the commons prepares for another vote on the eu withdrawal bill. 0ur political correspondent tom barton is in london. the b word politics, brexit, is
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back. absolutely, this is all about showing the government is in control ahead had a really key week in parliament for the brexit process. the eu withdrawal bill, which tra nsfers the eu withdrawal bill, which transfers eu law into british law, is facing its first detailed parliamentary scrutiny by mps on tuesday and wednesday. the government is facing hundreds of amendments as well as opposition to parts of the bill from across the political spectrum, including from some conservative mps. 0ne political spectrum, including from some conservative mps. one of the areas where there has been criticism and concerned is around environmental protection, and so michael gove, today, the environment secretary, is announcing this new environmental watchdog designed to embed protection for the environment into law, but also to hold the powerful to account. this is happening for two main reasons.
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firstly, in order to show that the government is willing and able to listen to some of the criticism, to adjust in the face of some of the amendments which are coming forward, but also this is about putting the government back on the front foot after a very difficult couple of weeks, which has seen theresa may lose two cabinet ministers, both forced to resign, and has been facing increasing criticism over the pace of brexit negotiations. thank you, tom, tom barton there, oui’ thank you, tom, tom barton there, our political correspondent. a former metropolitan police commissioner has confirmed that he knew pornographic material had allegedly been found on a computer used by the first secretary of state, damian green, in 2008. sir paul stephenson said he was briefed about the claims but regarded them as a "side issue" to a criminal investigation into leaks from the home office. the allegations were first made public last week by former met assistant commissioner bob quick. he has strenuously denied
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the claims, which he's described as political smears. jon donnison reports. damian green, effectively the prime minister's deputy, is one of theresa may's closest colleagues. already under investigation over allegations of inappropriate behaviour towards a female activist, accusations he denies, the first secretary of state is facing more questions about pornography allegedly found on his computer. the claim dates back to 2008, when police raided mr green's office as part of an investigation into leaks from the home office. when the allegations were first made last week by a former senior officer in the metropolitan police, damian green offered a strong denial. he called the story completely untrue and a disreputable political smear, saying police have never suggested improper material was
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found on his parliamentary computer. now, though, the former metropolitan police commissioner sir paul stephenson, seen here with theresa may in 2010, has confirmed he was aware that pornographic material had allegedly been found. he's told the bbc he was briefed about the allegation, but said it was a side issue and not relevant to the criminal investigation into the home office leaks. this morning damian green responded to sir paul's claim, but he did not deny the material was on his computer, only that the police had ever asked him about it. he said he reiterated that no allegations about the presence of improper material on his parliamentary computers had ever been put to him or to the parliamentary authorities by the police, and said that he assumed the allegations were being made nine yea rs later allegations were being made nine years later for old here allegations were being made nine years laterfor old here motives. theresa may has already lost two cabinet ministers this month. this story will only add to the growing feeling her
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government is under siege. the australian actor rebel wilson has become the latest hollywood star to claim she has been a victim of sexual harassment. in a series of tweets, the pitch perfect actor alleged an unnamed "male star in a position of power" had repeatedly asked her to perform a sexual act. she also claimed she had a separate "hotel room encounter" with a "top director", but said she managed to escape before anything physical happened. the open university and the institute of directors have written to the chancellor, calling for tax breaks for companies and employees willing to re—train to meet skills shortages. they want next week's budget to help bring about what they call a "cultural change in attitudes to life—long learning". the government has said its proposed industrial strategy white paper would address british workers getting the right skills for the 21st—century workplace. that brings you up—to—date with this
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morning's news. services will be held across the country this morning to remember those who died in the first and second world wars, as well as other conflicts. the main focus of the nation's commemorations will be at the cenotaph in london. thousands of veterans will take part in the march past down whitehall and major rob shenton will be among them. he served for 21 years with the royal electrical and mechanical engineers and we can speak to him now. many thanks for your time this morning. how do you approach a day like this? really it is a chance for me to remember those who have fallen but also reflect on those which are still with us, and the wounded, injured and sick, and carry on suffering with their wounds and whatever today. i mentioned this earlier because i think with these commemoration services we have moved a long way now from simply marking past war glories, if you like, and there is an acute awareness of the
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long—term impact of being involved in active conflict and what that can have on individuals. you yourself, i know, have been through a pretty difficult time with ptsd as a result of your experience in active service? yes, i was medically discharged september last year as a result of mental health issues and post—traumatic stress disorder, and actually that is where the forces charities, such as help for heroes, stepped in and look after the physical and mental well—being of those which have served, and, to be honest, without the services of people like that i would be truly struggling much more. very easy to see a physical wound, less easy to see a physical wound, less easy to see a physical wound, less easy to see a wound of the mind. how have you been over the last 12 months or so, and what kind of tools have you been able to use, what support have you been given to help you through this? again, through help for heroes and elements of that like hidden wounds, they have taught me things
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like mindfulness, even yoga, in order to understand what my triggers are and be able to prevent them in the future, so i get warning signs when there are issues going on and it is working very well. that is lovely to hear. how difficult was it to be able to address this in the first place, to be able to talk about it amongst your military friends and colleagues? well, my attitude is the military is all about teamwork and if i'm part of the team and i am not functioning correctly, i need to make sure i make the team aware, so i was quite open early on that i was having a few issues with my mental health, and actually the military were tremendous, trying to help me identify that and work through those problems as well. we can see better and in the background behind you, a reminder that people were involved in conflicts fighting for their country many, many years ago, but you will have worked alongside people in active service very, very recently, and for some, i guess, it
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makes today very poignant because the memories are very close, very recent? yes, they are, i served in bosnia, kosovo, northern ireland and afghanistan twice, and it was when i got to afghanistan, when i was facing the difficulties that every soldier faces facing the difficulties that every soldierfaces on facing the difficulties that every soldier faces on operations in places like that, and various people that i met and new on operations which are no longer with us today, this is a great chance for me to reflect on things like that. thank you very much indeed for your time, major rob shenton who is there and will be taking part in that service on whitehall today. david dimbleby and sophie raworth present coverage of the service on whitehall from 10.20am this morning. let's check the weather, susan is there for us. we could see some sunshine there at whitehall, there will be sunshine across the british isles today but it is accompanied by
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very cold air that has plunged down from the arctic and we will have a strengthening wind today which will make it all the more bitter, something to bear in mind if you are heading out to any of the parades. some showers to contend with across wales and the midlands, perhaps a few in southern england. further north, a lot of sunshine, isolated showers i think by 11am across northern ireland, heavy other northern and eastern scotland. pretty hefty showers in the forecast for the next few hours for wales, for the next few hours for wales, for the next few hours for wales, for the cenotaph a temperature of around 8 degrees at 11am, but add on the effect of the wind and it will be considerably cold so don't be fooled by the figures on the map behind bean. northern ireland, scattered showers towards the coast, shallot across the highlands and grampians, the wind picks up along the north sea coast this afternoon which will feel particularly raw, it does ease off in the west and the showers will clear from wales and the south—west of england where big
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showers will be onshore in east anglia and lincolnshire. we must, though, about a day factor in the effect of the wind, for some temperatures hovered just above freezing for much of the day in terms of how they feel, rather than the reading on the thermometer. in terms of real temperatures overnight, high—pressure moves in to kill of the wind, perfect setup for a widespread frost, and we could see loads of —6 in parts of rural scotla nd loads of —6 in parts of rural scotland to get monday under way. the chilly but bright start, make the most of the early sunshine, cloud will pile in across england and wales which will make the day feel as chilly as today, despite the wind not being so strong, the grey sky will make things feel chilly and further north there is rain in northern ireland and scotland, and with cold air it could mean stoped it even lower levels across scotland for a time. back to you. —— it could mean snow across even lower levels. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. let's have a look at the newspapers.
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technology expert dan sodergren is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we will speak to dan now about this story in the mail today. this term snowfla ke story in the mail today. this term snowflake has come to prominence over the last year or two, you might have to explain that and then explain the story as well. yes, the snowflake, a derogatory term for younger people, i am lucky that i work at mediacity around there, they are calling the 1a to 18—year—olds the snowflake generation that have been treated so uniquely and specially by their pa rents uniquely and specially by their parents that it is a detriment to their education. and not terribly robust, lacking resilient and independence? is it true, did you meet those students? in some respects it might be more true, the resilience is not necessarily there
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but it is really bad to use that term snowflake. hasn't every student ever struggled with essay deadlines? maybe i am just dobbing myself in! not me! maybe this generation has other pressures we did not have. if i had social media when i was younger i imagine it would have taken up a lot of my time as well, whether it should or not is a different point. but technology does make life a whole lot easier as well, i know that students can, for example, if they don't make it to a lecture, they don't make it to a lecture, they can get the lecture online, so you barely need to get out of bed if you barely need to get out of bed if you absolutely don't want to to com plete you absolutely don't want to to complete a university degree! as someone who works in education i would say you definitely do need to get out of bed! technology is good but you need to get out of bed as well! let's look at some other stories, in the observer, police to use face recognition cameras at the cenotaph service? it is quite a clever idea, always talking about
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technology, but they are using ai and algorithms to notice people in crowds, it is not perhaps as big as they are making out, 50 people they have highlighted, and it is something we have done for a long time with cctv to help the police service pick constant defenders, so to speak. the interesting thing about doing it at that particular time is, lest we forget these guys gave their lives so we can live in freedom, but bizarrely enough by using technology we might be losing that freedom because if we are continually monitored, i am not saying it is necessarily a bad thing, but if we monitored, especially with facial recognition, because the algorithm systems are not good at picking out differences in blackface is because of the way they are coded, no whether they lie, they are coded, no whether they lie, the code comes from a non—diverse community and also does not pick up women and black faces very well. community and also does not pick up women and black faces very wellm that all ethnic minorities in
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general? yes, because of the way it is coded. so very good at white males but not others. so if you approve of that technology that seems a fairly fundamental flaw. you have referenced your poppy, this is a home—made poppy made by your daughter. yes, she is only seven and she made this. the education system does work, we are remembering things! social media has been a bit ofa things! social media has been a bit of a theme for the morning but i liked this story about a 21 year bold, increasingly amongst the so—called snowflake generation, we are seeing people switching social media, saying they have had enough. iam media, saying they have had enough. i am obsessed with democratic so i would say this is more the millennials, that kind of thing... what is a millennial? those turning 18 to 21 around the millennium time. not you, we can be clear on that!” not you, we can be clear on that!|j teach not you, we can be clear on that!” teach millennials but it is definitely not me! the millennials and others are turning up social
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media, realising that it could be a bit too... it could be used for control but it is also addictive and they are turning. maybe we just did to change the way we are using it, so turn off your notifications, because that is the bit that is addictive, it is made to be addictive. it is like in a pub where your friend continually shouts oi! so maybe turner is often said of abandoning the social media. 0ur people completely turning it borders building in times where they don't... building in times where they don't. .. i think building in times where they don't... i think this building in times where they don't. .. i think this article is saying that people are actually leaving but i think the reality is people are becoming more digitally minded, having some downtime. we could be doing it too much, there is a lovely thing which said millennials, in their lifetime, will ta ke millennials, in their lifetime, will take 25,000 selfies. that is too much, isn't it, we can all safely
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say! a bit of a difference from waiting for the holiday photos to come back and finding out your phone was over the length! sunday night has become a treat in the last few weeks because of the return of blue planet and inside the sunday mirror this morning is a preview of what we will see this evening. it is one of the shots that took five days, and what is beautiful about it, not only a beautifully made programme, but it showcases again how technology, if we keep using it for good, we could not have got the shot a few years ago but now we can, lots of use of submarines and new technology to show these shots. the really nice thing about it, not only is it a great piece and a great story, but it brings across an environmental message, and this is important because there is another piece, i don't go if we have time for it, this is in china now, it is a great export, 80 million people in china
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have now seen the first two episodes of blue planet, 80 million. a0 million in this country, 80 million over there, so the environmental message is getting through, which is unbelievably important for our planet. we are getting through to parts of china which are perhaps traditionally not that interested in it, so from doing that we could actually be changing world using technology, so it is an important thing for me, i have a daughter.” can't help pointing out that you are it digitally savvy chap, but come in to sit on the breakfast so far armed with a notepad and pen! sometimes you have do go old—fashioned!m with a notepad and pen! sometimes you have do go old-fashioned! it is quite 20th—century, even 19th—century! quite 20th—century, even 19th-century! i will be bringing a printing press next! it is old —fashioned printing press next! it is old—fashioned technology we are returning to now. it's a tradition that's long been the soundtrack to all sorts of occasions — some joyful, some sombre. but there are concerns bell—ringing
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is at risk of dying out. a new uk—wide campaign is hoping to ring in the changes though, and attract a new generation to the art form. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been to find out more. treble's going... she's gone. weddings. remembrance. treble to two! national celebrations. three to two, two lead. 0rjust another sunday morning — church bells convey many messages. five to four. ringing them brings many benefits. it's good for the brain, it's good physical exercise as well. it's both physically and mentally a challenge because you've got to concentrate really hard. the sound comes a long time after the action, and so listening is key. but this hobby is failing to chime with many. like a lot of churches, edington priory in wiltshire is struggling to recruit the next—generation. youngsters don't see it as being a particularly cool thing.
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we've got 20 ringable bells in this big parish of four churches, but we've only got 11 ringers that are able to ring those bells. it's thought there are around 30,000 active bellringers in the uk. now, that might sound like quite a few, but there are concerns as to how many there will be in ten or 20 years' time. so the aim of ringing remembers is to recruit 1,a00 new ringers by armistice day of next year. that number's been chosen to honour the 1,a00 bellringers killed during world war i. this is the memorial book of church bellringers who fell in the great war. alan regin has been researching their lives and the impacts of their deaths. we can see one of the bellringers from this very church? indeed, leonard drewett, he was one of the six ringers from eddington that died. there were six bells in those days, six ringers died, so their band was gone.
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it's a national recruitment campaign funded by the department for communities and local government. but in eddington, they're about to try a direct approach. hi, guys, sorry to bother you. i don't suppose you'd like to try your hand at bellringing? have you guys ever tried bellringing before? i haven't, no. today, most bellringers are getting on, and if new people join now they can be trained by these experienced, wonderful bellringers and that will pass it on. that's it, don't look up, just keep looking straight ahead. it's a bit complicated, you've got to keep looking, you've got to keep your eyes straight, i keep wanting to look more up. on occasion, we need to go faster, or i can go slow by letting it slither through my fingers. i thought it would be a lot harder and it's not, really, it's sort ofjust a fluid movement. two new ringers shown the ropes, many more wanted. tim muffet, bbc news
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in eddington in wiltshire. fabulous effort there. coming up in the next half—hour, she may have broken javelin records on the field, but tesni ward is now out in it as she pursues her passion for wildlife photography. she'll be here to tell us more. and we'll be back with a summary of the morning's main news injust a moment. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and chris mason. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. services will be held across the country at eleven o'clock this morning — to remember those who died in two world wars and other conflicts. thousands of veterans and military personnel will join members of the royal family for the national service of remembrance at the cenotaph in london. in a break with tradition, the queen's wreath will be laid by prince charles — while her majesty watches
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the ceremony from a nearby balcony. a former metropolitan police commissioner has confirmed to the bbc that he was aware pornographic material was allegedly found on a computer used by the first secretary of state, damian green, in 2008. sir paul stephenson said he was briefed about the claims but regarded them as a "side issue" to a criminal investigation into leaks from the home office. the allegations were made public last week by a former senior officer at scotland yard. mr green has denied the claims, which he has described as a "political smear" and says no allegations have been put to him by the police. a new watchdog to protect the environment after britain leaves the european union is being planned by the government. the environment secretary michael gove has promised an organisation with "real bite" amid concerns that existing rules could be watered down when brexit takes place. the announcment comes as the commons prepares for another vote on the eu withdrawal bill this week. out of hours palliative care for seriously ill children in england is "patchy
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and inconsistent" — according to a new report seen by the bbc‘s 5 live investigates programme. the research carried out by the together for short lives charity also suggests many families are forced to go to a&e overnight and at the weekends. the department of health says it will look at the report's recommendations closely. the husband of a british woman jailed in iran will discuss her case today. she is accused of spying in iran and is a family fear her sentence could be extended after borisjohnson sentence could be extended after boris johnson gave sentence could be extended after borisjohnson gave the sentence could be extended after boris johnson gave the false impression she was teaching journalism in iran. two more teenagers are facing murder charges after a 17—year—old boy was stabbed to death at a park in south east london. michaeljonas was fatally wounded in penge, earlier this month.
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a man has died after being beaten by a gang armed with baseball bats in east london. the attack took place on high road in ilford shortly before three o'clock this morning. the metropolitan police has launched a murder inquiry. the australian actor, rebel wilson, has become the latest hollywood star to claim she has been a victim of sexual harassment. in a series of tweets, the pitch perfect actor alleged an unnamed "male star in a position of power" had repeatedly asked her to perform a sexual act. she also claimed she had a separate "hotel room encounter" with a "top director", but said she managed to escape before anything physical happened. the open university and the institute of directors have written to the chancellor — calling for tax breaks for companies and employees willing to re—train to meet skills shortages. they want next week's budget to help bring about what they call a "cultural change in attitudes to life—long learning". the government has said its proposed industrial strategy white paper would address british workers getting the right skills for the 21st—century workplace. there are surely many positives to living in florida, not least the climate, but here's something that might put you off moving to the sunshine state. imagine going into your garage, only to find an eight foot long
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alligator has set up a temporary home there. but it's all in a day's work for florida fish and wildlife who were called in to remove the creature. using wire lassos, the team were able to keep their distance and pull the gator out of the garage. they were then able to tie its mouth shut so they could safely take it away. i don't fancy a job like that! i wonder where they suit it. far, far away. they are beautiful creatures though. you really have got to have respect, dealing with a creature like that.
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today we are focusing on the woman's ashes. england need to avoid defeat to keep the series alive. let's go live to get the latest where england need a draw to keep the series alive. 0ur correspondence is in sydney. what's the latest? the match seems to be heading for a draw, they have just begun the final session with england 152 for two, trailing by 16 runs. they had to battle most of the day to avoid defeat, they began steadily but lost two wickets
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in quick succession was a beaumont the first to go from some magic from jayna wellington, followed by a second england wicket with winfield and at that stage but still you must have really fancied their chances but since then england have rallied after a good run from knight and elwiss, just two hours of play remaining. if england can secure a draw they would still need to win all three of the remaining matches to regain the ashes, a pretty tall order but at least the hope would still be alive. thank you very much indeed. republic of ireland managed a goaless draw in the first leg of their world cup play—off against denmark in copenhagen. the best chances on the night fell to the home side — darren randolph parried
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christian erriksen's shot and pione sisto fired wide with the rebound. randolph was called into action again late on tipping over yussuf poulsen's header in stoppage time. so the match is evenly poised ahead of tuesday's return match in dublin. it is what it is. we came out here and we know that we needed to do a job, which we've done. we've got 90 minutes now to try and get to the world cup. we're close, but it's going to be a real tough game. it was difficult tonight and we will expect more of that on tuesday. northern ireland play their world cup play—off second leg against switzerland this afternoon. michael 0'neill‘s men are 1—0 down from a controversial penalty. they're aiming to qualify for a first world cup since 1986, and only the fourth in their history. we didn't press the ball as well as we could have done. as i say, we watched the game last night. the players certainly saw that and agreed with that and we know we can play better. sometimes we have to give credit to switzerland. i thought they played very well on the night.
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but we know we can play a lot better than that and the fact that the scoreline is 1—0 and we've still a lot to play for. in rugby union there were mixed fortunes for the home nations in the autumn internationals. england, ireland and scotland all won, but wales' torrid run against australia continues. alex gulrajani rounds up all the action. the autumn sets north against south. a chance to suss out enemies from further afield and, for warren gatland, time to get settled back into the welsh hot seat. a nice and easy welcome back. 12 games with australia, 12 defeats for wales. an early home try spread hope around cardiff. it didn't last long. a lapse in defence pounced upon and punished. gap found there and more from kurtley beale. the full—back taking full advantage of a welsh defence slow to react, as he pinched in and raced away. a late rally closed the gap for wales as they take positives going forward. hopefully people can see what we're trying to do.
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i think we probably hurt ourselves in the first half. credit to australia, put pressure on. hopefully people can see the positive way we are trying to play. there was more evidence of attacking rugby in ireland. they were rampant against south africa. they clashed, but the only team scoring was the irish. 38—3 was the margin of victory. a record win for the hosts over their visitors. samoa arrived on these isles amid financial woes and fears for their future, but all those problems were left off the field. a frantic match with scotland saw stuart hogg return to action with an early try. but scotland couldn't get away from their wily opponents. 11 tries in total, a late samoan rally held off by gregor townsend's men. not as much excitement down at twickenham, though, as england just about emerged victorious over argentina. nathan hughes's early try gave them the foundation but they never really took off.
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eddie jones far from content. an off day from the argentine kickers helped, as did a final try. but england's know they need to improve. we need to be a lot better. this is the start of the international season, so we'll take that result, but we need to step up the intensity and application to beat australia next week. and that's just what eddie jones is hoping for. there was more british success at the track cycling world cup in manchester last night. great britain's men's pursuit team made sure of a gold medal on day two of the event. the team ridden by steven burke, kian emadi, ed clancy and ollie wood beat denmark in the final. the success didn't end there, britain's kate archibald and elinor barker secured gold in the women's maddison. they scored 32 points overall and pipped world champions belgium to the top prize byjust two points. lewis hamilton will start from the back of the grid and declared ‘we're all human' after crashing in yesterday's qualifying session
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for the brazilian grand prix. he lost control of his mercedes at 160 miles an hour on turn six of the interlagos circuit, before hitting the barrier. hamilton has already won his fourth formula one title but starts on the back row as he didn't register a time. his team mate valtteri bottas will start in pole postion. i feel good. still a bit shaky, you know? it's a good feeling. it was just a nice lap. it was so close between sebastian, in qualifying. getting a good lap in the end and obviously lewis was out in the beginning, which was a shame for us. in the cricket, and with our 162 fors, so with time running out a draw is looking very likely —— 162
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for two. after this we going to see the 20—20s, so there will be two points difference if this does an as a draw. so england well into the game in their attempt to regain the ashes. thank you so much, richard. out of hours palliative care for children with life—limiting conditions in england is "patchy and inconsistent", according to a new report seen by the bbc‘s 5 live investigates programme. it suggests some families are forced to go to a&e during the night and at weekends, because of a lack of out—of—hours services. we're joined by hayley smallman whose daughter holly requires 2a hour care and also with us is 5live
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investigates presenter, adrian goldberg. adrian, what have these figures are highly the country? they have come from the charity who put in a freedom of information request to every clinical commissioning group in england, these are the groups who hold the purse strings. although you talk about children with incredible conditions, they may live for months and even years but often have quite complex medical needs and require out of hours assistance. the research found two thirds of these clinical commissioning groups could not say they provide out of hours nursing care out of hours and four weekends for these children which may mean if they do have a particular issue means they would be forced to go to a&e, which in many cases would not be appropriate for
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these children. tell us about holly. tell us about her condition and her needs and the challenges you face. she has a very complex health needs, she has a number of conditions, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, chronic lung disease, should requires oxygen support, so her carers are 24 hours, seven days a week and very structured and rigid routine which cannot be compromised because it is detrimental to her. it also fluctuates, she is fragile and her condition fluctuates. she can have up condition fluctuates. she can have up to 30 epileptic seizures which the monitoring. her condition, it does not really know what time of day it is, it does not care if it is christmas day or a bank holiday so
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these are the time when families like mine feel alone and isolated. we feel like we have such good support monday to friday, 9—5, but we have really good support for palliative care, end of life, but when you have a child with complex needs, a palliative journey can be anything from eight few weeks to months, two years. —— are few weeks. responding to critical end of life ca re we are responding to critical end of life care we are very good at what it is the bit before we need to work on. and palliative care can have so many different meanings and understanding these children is a real key to success these children is a real key to success in providing appropriate service for them. you were talking about her conditions do not respect the time of the what day it is, how big a difference is there between
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what you can access on, say, lunchtime on wednesday compared to 9am ona lunchtime on wednesday compared to 9am on a sunday morning. 0na 9am on a sunday morning. on a wednesday, if her condition deteriorates it will generally be a spirit of the issue, which is quite common in children was holly's condition —— respiratory issue. we have two on—call professionals who will come to our home and assess holly and work with the hospital tea m holly and work with the hospital team to liaise and make the best decision for holly and to try and keep her at home, which is everybody‘s goal. it is unsettling for holly and for us as a family when we go into hospital, i have other children as well so it can be very constructive to us. this is one
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of those funding decisions whereby investing little bit more and palliative care can save the health service money long—term because you do not have those unexpected and perhaps more dramatic and intensive visits to a&e. and the clinical commissioners who represent the clinical commissioning groups the commission services and knowledge there is more work to be done, the guidelines are not always being met in every case but they say every day that google decisions are having to be made because ccg ‘s only have limited resources —— critical decisions. you only need someone you can consult and referred to. yes, and we find and our local area we probably do have people like that so it is honing in on the skills we have an art local areas and
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examining the impact of the services we are commissioning and looking to see and asking, is this server is having a positive impact and meeting the needs of the families and the child? 0ur children's hospice is second to none and without their support we would be completely lost. and they do work together with our local ccg to provide really good emergency care but it is the out of our support that we need. thank you for coming and. —— thank you for coming in. you can hear more on this story on 5live investigates today at 11am. we say goodbye to chris now. but before i vanish let's have a last look at the weather and say hello to susan. the cold be in prospect. and the raw
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northerly wind. mixed out there at the moment. this is the picture in shropshire at the moment. in the east coast near hartlepool beautiful blue skies and sunshine. we expect some showers moving onshore on the east coast this afternoon, helped along by this wind. the showers in the midlands should ease in the next few hours but still some heavier ones for wales. this is the way things are looking at 11am. a fine story at the cenotaph. some showers starting to move into the east coast, still some showers for northern ireland and the highlands and grampians. temperatures slightly
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deceptive, that is the thermometer reading but not taking into account this chilly wind. here come the showers into the east coast and east anglia later in the day. knock down those temperatures. some easter sport will feel closer to freezing if you are heading out and about. —— easter in spots. tonight high pressure will knock the wind on the head and the widespread frost on monday morning, so rural sports as low as minus five celsius. some beautiful sunshine first thing on monday, but much more cloud in the afternoon and feeling pretty chilly because of that. rain turning to snow across scotland across the higher ground for a time. pretty chilly across the board on monday again. as a former soldier who fought in the second world war and survived
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more than two years in auschwitz, 100—year—old ron jones, from newport, has done more than his fair share of service for his country. but the veteran — who has also been selling poppies for over 35 years — says he will never retire from carrying out charity work in memory of his fallen comrades. 0ur reporter, tomos morgan went to meet him. every year you'll find him selling poppies as he has done for over 35 years. and even at 100 years old... in the box, love. ..ronjones is still doing his part in making sure we remember those that gave their lives. thank you very much. why do you still do it at 100 years old? well, i'm able. as long as i can get a lift, taking me back and forth. so you will be there next year, 101? well next year, i don't know.
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i'm getting a bit shaky on my legs. as an ex—serviceman, remembrance sunday and the poppy is personalfor ron. in world war two he endured horrors that scarred him for years, after his squad was captured and they spent two years as prisoners of war near auschwitz. by far the worst experience they endured was the death march. they marched us through the carpathian mountains, czechoslovakia, bohemia, saxony, bavaria and down into austria. i was on a march for about 17 weeks. we lost...around about 100 died. and when you finally came home, just describe the state and the toll that... i was in a shocking state when i came home. for instance, my wife put me in the bath that first night and she started to cry cos
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i looked like somebody from belsen. i said, "oh, don't cry, love "i left men there who's never gonna come home". ron suffered with post—traumatic stress, flashbacks and nightmares that haunted him for years, but he overcame it all thanks in no small part to the woman he will never forget. i think my wife saved my life. i think my wife was marvellous. super woman. today, britain remembers all of those who have fought for our country over the years. ronjones will be doing the same for the friends he lost more than 70 years ago. that was ron jones talking to tomas morgan. there is coverage of today's
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remembrance day service at the cenotaph from 10:20am on bbc one. as a team gb and wales athlete, tesni ward's idea of a winning photograph was one which showed the distance her javelin had just travelled. but when her sporting career was ended by injury, she turned to wildlife photography to fill the void. before we speak to tesni, let's take a look at some of her work. tesni ward joins us now. some of those are absolutely beautiful. tell us your story, how do you get from throwing a javelin to wildlife photography? as an athlete i had no time to myself so i had a slight interest in photography but no time. so when i was injured and had to end my career i had all
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this free time so i started doing my photography. idid it photography. i did it initially as a very basic hobby, on the occasion i might get a free day i might go to the peak district for the day or take photos on holiday but not seriously. so you a lwa ys on holiday but not seriously. so you always in being out in the countryside? absolutely. do you have a knowledge of wildlife, you must have some kind of expertise in that area? i do not have any official expertise but the time you spent out in nature with the world life you develop quite a good understanding of their behaviour and habitats, which is quite important when it comes to capturing them. what makes a stunning wildlife photograph, how do you construct it? it is important to connect with the people who view your images are also
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happy story. the wildlife photographer of the year award, the winning picture was a picture of the rhinoceros that had just been poached and when you first saw it it really hits you hard, and that kind of story highlights the difficulties that wildlife are facing. you did not win but you still made it into the book, which is a fantastic achievement. this is my favourite. i think it is absolutely beautiful. what kind of hare is this? it isa this? it is a mountain hare, they turn white during winter, it is designed to make them blend into their habitat but as we get less and less snow each winter they tend to stand out. he looks very grumpy. he is called hamish and he is one of the regular ha res i hamish and he is one of the regular hares i visit. where does he live? in the peak
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district. there is quite a decent population of hares in the peak district. how patient do you have two b when observing creatures like that? how long did that shot take you? i have been working with mountain ha res i have been working with mountain hares for the last two years and every time i go there is always some obstacles that get in the way, such as last year i injured my back. something you can spend hours sitting with hares and they can do nothing but sleep so you need to spend a lot of time waiting for them. let's look at this badger picture that also made it into the boot. where is this? that is also in the peak district. so you know all these creatures? the timei so you know all these creatures? the time i spend with badgers, i spent
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pretty much every evening from the previous june and july sitting with them and developing understandings, studying their behaviour and their habits. what kind of date would that be to see that kind of activity?” what kind of date would that be to see that kind of activity? i am quite fortunate the badgers i see come out quite early, so i can work with them from anything from 5pm in the evening, most badgers come out from around sunset. let's look at some of the pictures from the other winner is involved in this. as a committee you recognised the skill involved. this is the winner here. i think it is a really good photo. it is the wagtail. what kind of owl is that? short eared owl. and that another badger, a lovely one!
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is this something you can make a living out of or is it purely hobby? currently i work full—time as a photographer, i have been full—time forjust over 1.5 years. it is not easy but it's what i love doing. you are clearly very talented. thank you for introducing us to some beautiful animals. that work can be seen at the british wildlife photography awards, along with other entries to the competition. that's all from us this morning. dan and louise will be here from six tomorrow. until then, enjoy the rest of your weekend. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 9am. remembering britain's war dead — services are being held this morning for people across the uk to pay their respects to the fallen from two world wars and other
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conflicts. iam i am live on horse guards, where vetera ns a re i am live on horse guards, where veterans are arriving in preparation to ta ke veterans are arriving in preparation to take part in the 10,000 strong march past the cenotaph on whitehall. a former head of scotland yard confirms he knew that pornographic material had allegedly been found on a computer used by the cabinet minister damian green in 2008. president trump and north korean leader kim jong—un resume their war
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